How to use Loam in a sentence

loam
  • The soil generally is a sandy loam or a strong but friable clay, and very fertile.

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  • Any good free loam is suitable, but a calcareous loam is the best.

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  • The north-west and north-east sections contain some glacial drift but the soil in these parts is not suitable for cultivation except in the larger valleys in the north-west where it is drained by glacial gravel or there is some sandy loam mixed with clay.

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  • The shores are sand, clay or loam throughout some 1300 m., with very rare rock ridges or rapids, and the banks rise low above ordinary water.

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  • The soil of the northern portion of the county is a rich brown loam, on a substratum of clay or gravel.

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  • The district is famed for its stock, and the fine quality of its grain; also for the character of the English grasses laid down there, which flourish in a rich black loam on a limestone formation.

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  • The soil varies greatly according to the district, being in some cases a rich loam, in others a chalky marl, and elsewhere showing a coating of peat.

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  • Loam which contains much red matter (iron) should be avoided.

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  • Loam has a balanced texture with a correct amount of water and nutrients.

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  • But there are long stretches of pine loam in the South where branch lines can be, and are, built and equipped for £2400 or less per mile, while the construction of new main line in the prairie region of the West ought not to cost more than £4000 per single-track-mile, under present conditions.

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  • Cilicia Pedias included the rugged spurs of Taurus and a large plain, which consists, in great part, of a rich stoneless loam.

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  • Instead of choosing a shady spot I selected a fully exposed one, and here two plants have been for over a year, one in peat and the other in sandy loam.

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  • The plant thrives in a mixture of peat and loam, in full sun, and is fully hardy.

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  • If grown in pots, the plant should be on broken stones, and the roots in light sandy loam with peat.

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  • The soil for this plant should be a mixture of two parts of rich loam and two parts composed of peat, leaf-mould, and sand.

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  • It should be grown in gritty peat mixed with a small portion of loam.

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  • These shrubs succeed best in a deep light loam, and will thrive on chalky soils much better than many other evergreen shrubs.

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  • Given sandy loam, these plants thrive in borders or in the margins of shrubberies.

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  • They like shelter, even from southerly winds, and peaty soil suits them best, though they grow well in loam.

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  • Not more than 6 inches in height, it is of easy culture, and growing freely in peat and loam.

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  • Where the plant cannot be grown in the border it will bloom in a sunny, airy greenhouse potted in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and treated as one would a Cineraria.

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  • The situation should be open, but not exposed, and the soil a loam mixed with decayed stable manure equal to a third of its bulk.

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  • A well-drained light loam, well enriched with leaf-mould, suits it admirably.

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  • They should have a mixture of fibry peat and loam, which has some broken-up sandstone mixed with it.

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  • F. Gardeni enjoys a light loam, and grows all the better if peat and leaf-soil are mixed with the loam at planting-time.-W.

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  • The most suitable soils are medium grades of loam.

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  • When the subsoil is too compact to be pervious to water, effectual drainage must be resorted to; when it is very loose, so that it drains away the fertile ingredients of the soil as well as those which are artificially supplied, the compactness of the stratum should be increased by the addition of clay, marl or loam.

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  • Somewhat heavy loam y are best for potting pine apples, for melons and strawberries, fruit trees in pots, &c., and may be used with the addition of manures only; but for ornamental plants a loam of a somewhat freer texture is preferable and more pleasant to work.

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  • It should be mixed with six or eight times its weight of loam or ashes, charred peat, charcoal-dust or some earthy matter, before it is applied to the soil, as from its causticity it is otherwise not unlikely to kill or injure the plants to which it is administered.

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  • Brilliant erect-growing caryophyllaceous plants, thriving best in beds of peat earth or of deep sandy loam.

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  • Requires rich, gritty loam of good depth, as it produces tuberous roots I to 2 ft.

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  • Beautiful dwarf bulbous plants, thriving in well-worked sandy loam, or sandy peat.

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  • Warm sunny situations and rich sandy loam and peat are required.

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  • Pretty caryophyllaceous plants, preferring sandy loam, and well adapted for rockwork.

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  • Bedding plants thrive best in a light loam, liberally manured with thoroughly rotten dung from an old hotbed or thoroughly decomposed cow droppings and leaf-mould.

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  • Good turfy loam is also used for some, such as cypripediums and calanthes.

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  • The soil should consist of about 3 parts turfy loam, i part leaf mould, I part coarse silver sand, with enough chemical or other manure added to render the whole moderately rich.

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  • The borders should consist of 3 parts rich turfy loam, the top spit of a pasture, and i part light gritty earth, such as road-grit, with a small portion (one-sixth) of fine brick rubbish.

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  • But in the " Drift " maps many other types of deposit are indicated, such, for instance, as the ordinary modern alluvium of rivers, and the older river terraces (River-drift of various ages), including gravels, brickearth and loam; old raised sea beaches and blown-sand (Aeolian-drift); the " Head " of Cornwall and Devon, an angular detritus consisting of stones with clay or loam; clay-with-flints, rainwash (landwash), scree and talus; the " Warp," a marine and estuarine silt and clay of the Humber; and also beds of peat and diatomite.

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  • The points which require constant attention are - the perfect freedom of all carriers, feeders and drains from every kind of obstruction, however minute; the state and amount of water in the river or stream, whether it be sufficient to irrigate the whole area properly or only a part of it; the length of time the water should be allowed to remain on the meadow at different periods of the season; the regulation of the depth of the water, its quantity and its rate of flow, in accordance with the temperature and the condition of the herbage; the proper times for the commencing and ending of pasturing and of shutting up for hay; the mechanical condition of the surface of the ground; the cutting out of any very large and coarse plants, as docks; and the improvement of the physical and chemical conditions of the soil by additions to it of sand, silt, loam, `` chalk, &c.

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  • The state also makes annual grants directly to owners who are willing to place their plantations under state supervision, for the sale of plants at half price to the poorer peasantry, for making protective or sheltering plantations, and for free transport of marl or loam.

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  • Usually a light loam, it passes here and there into pure clay, or degenerates occasionally into barren sand.

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  • Korean soil consists largely of light sandy loam, disintegrated lava, and rich, stoneless alluvium, from 3 to 1 0 ft.

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  • The San Joaquin is a very crooked stream flowing through a low mud-plain, with tule banks; the Sacramento is much less meandering, and its immediate basin, which is of sandy loam, is higher and more attractive than that of the San Joaquin.

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  • It thrives most in a light loam with a dry subsoil; rich and, in particular, wet soils are unsuitable, conducing to the formation of too much wood.

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  • Enclosed between the Taurus and Amanus ranges and the sea are the fertile plains of Cilicia Pedias, consisting in great part of a rich, stoneless loam, out of which rise rocky crags that are crowned with the ruins of Greco-Roman and Armenian strongholds, and of Pamphylia, partly alluvial soil, partly travertine, deposited by the Taurus rivers.

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  • The prevailing type of soil on the higher lands is a sandy loam, underlaid with clay or clay loam, which stores water and is the typical soil of the basins.

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  • The soil is exceedingly rich and well adapted to all kinds of agricultural purposes, and for the most part is composed of a rich black loam reposing on a grey sandy clay, though occasionally it exhibits a light yellow clayey texture.

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  • The potato thrives best in a rather light friable loam; and in thin sandy soils the produce, if not heavy, is generally of very good quality.

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  • They are described as hungry plants which well repay generous treatment, and will flourish in a rich, not too stiff loam, and for the first year or two should be well mulched.

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  • The soils in the southern part of Arizona are mainly sandy loams, varying from light loam to heavy, close adobe; on the plateaus is what is known as " mesa " soil; and along the rivers are limited overflow plains of fine sediment - especially along the Colorado and the river Verde.

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  • The tree grows rapidly; it flourishes best in a sandy, somewhat moist loam, and attains a height of 50 to 60 or more ft., assuming a pyramidal outline.

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  • North of this southern hardwood forest there were pine forests on the sandier land, mixed hardwoods and conifers on the loam and clay, and tamaracks and cedar in the swamps.

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  • The soil of south-west and south-east Michigan is for the most part a dark clay loam or muck; in the north central part of the lower peninsula it is a light sandy loam, along the Huron shore it is heavy with blue clay, in the mining districts of the north-west the rocks are usually either barren or very thinly covered; and elsewhere in the state the soil is generally rich in a variety of mineral elements, and varies chiefly in the proportions of vegetable loam, sand or gravel, and clay.

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  • In the Arroostook valley, however, is the largest undivided area of good arable land in all New England, the soil being a deep, porous, yellow loam well adapted to the growth of cereals and to market gardening.

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  • The chief crop is wheat, for which the soil in the Vale of Bedford is specially suited; while on the sandy loam of the Ivel valley, in the neighbourhood of Biggleswade, market-gardening is extensively carried on, the produce going principally to London, whither a considerable quantity of butter and other dairy-produce is also sent.

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  • Speaking generally, the Ozark region is characterized by reddish clays, mixed with gravels and stones, and cultivable in inverse proportion to the amount of these elements; northern Missouri by a generally black clay loam over a clay subsoil, with practically no admixture of stones; the southern prairies, above referred to, share the characteristics of those north of the Missouri.

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  • Geological research shows that the land surrounding the lake consists of gneiss, quartz and schistose rocks, covered, in the higher regions, with marl and red clay, and in the valleys with a rich black loam.

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  • The soil of the greater part of the state consists of a drift deposit of loose calcareous loam, which extends to a considerable depth, and which is exceedingly fertile.

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  • The soil of the upland prairies is generally a deep rich clay loam of a dark colour.

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  • The bottom lands near the streams are a black sandy loam; and the intermediate lands, or " second bottoms," show a rich and deep black loam, containing very little sand.

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  • Soils.-The prevailing type of soil is a deep dark-red loam, sometimes (especially in the east central part of the state) made up of a decomposed sandstone, and again (in the north central part) made up of shales and decomposed limestone.

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  • The soil is of various kinds, loam, clay, sand and peat; most of it is sufficiently fertile, though in the lower portions there are barren patches where the scanty vegetation is covered with an ochreous deposit.

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  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.

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  • The extreme eastern corner is occupied by older Tertiary loam, which is used for making bricks, and upon this and the river-banks are the most fertile spots, woods, cultivated land, pastures, towns and villages.

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  • In the Puma valley the soil is everywhere a rich black loam, and nearly the whole of the land is cultivated.

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  • Soft soil In deep loam or soft clay a deep narrow hole can quickly be made using a post hole auger.

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  • The soil type is chalky loam overlying clay, mostly Grade Ill with some Grade Il.

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  • Gewurztraminer likes alluvial clay, while Sylvaner will put up with the loam soil of the valley or Bas Rhin.

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  • Above is [4033] a friable silty loam (2.5yr 2.5/3 very dusky red) containing large pebbles.

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  • Loam overlying flaggy limestone which comes to the surface in places.

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  • Compost It is advisable to use a loam based compost in you containers.

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  • We will replace the topsoil with Rolawn blended loam, giving the turf the best possible growth conditions.

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  • Before planting, skim off grass turfs with a spade and pile upside down in a corner to rot down to form loam.

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  • Only then is the seedling ready to be transferred to a larger container of very sandy, sterilized loam.

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  • Filled with [4195] a friable sandy loam (10yr 4/6 dark yellow brown) with various sized pebbles.

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  • The principle crop on his 450 acres of mainly silty, heavy loam is 320 acres of winter wheat.

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  • Filled with [4171] loose/friable sandy loam (2.5yr 4/6 dark red) with 30% pebbles.

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  • It is a stiff, tenacious loam, mixed with flint stones.

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  • The red clayey loam, mixed up with great yellow flint stones.

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  • High risk of erosion silt loam Predominantly silt with very little sand or clay.

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  • Most people think they have a problem once they discover the soil they have is a clay or clay loam.

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  • Keep the turf to make a turf stack with it, and create your very own garden loam.

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  • The best potting mixture is two parts coarse gritty sand to one part loam.

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  • In a sandy loam soil, most seedlings emerged from the top 20 mm of soil with 89% from the surface 10 mm of soil with 89% from the surface 10 mm.

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  • High risk of erosion silt loam Predominantly silt loam Predominantly silt with very little sand or clay.

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  • The sandstone plateau around the hills gives rise to red, silty, loam soils over silty, loam soils over silty clays.

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  • An example of this two way transfer comes from an experiment on a silty clay loam soil (pH 7.0) at Rothamsted.

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  • According to Hellmann, as quoted by Henry (82), the liability to lightning stroke in Germany may be put at chalk I, clay 7, sand 9, loam 22.

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  • Others that are exceedingly productive are the black calcareous loam of the prairies, the calcareous silt of the bluff belt along the eastern border of the Delta, and the brown loam of the tableland in the central part of the state.

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  • Martagon, candidum, chalcedonicum, Szovitzianum (or colchicum), bulbiferum, croceum, Henryi, pomponium - the "Turk's cap lily," and others, will grow in almost any good garden soil, and succeed admirably in loam of a rather heavy character, and dislike too much peat.

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  • The loess is a " salt, fine sandy loam with a large percentage of sand or silt, and considerable calcareous matter, and usually a small amount of clay."

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  • The sandstone plateau around the hills gives rise to red, silty, loam soils over silty clays.

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  • Typically this is a shallow, stony, clay loam to clay textured soil formed over limestone.

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  • The soil consists of clay and loam, with a subsoil of clay.

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  • The soil is generally a black sandy loam, inclining to clay, and having a plentiful substratum of gravel.

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  • Compressed heavy clay loam topsoil horizon (102) 0.45 - 0.5m Subsoil.

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  • They grow freely in borders of well-drained sandy loam, but their home is the rock garden.

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  • Easily raised from seed, and thrive in sandy loam.

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  • They grow well in loam or leaf mould, but are not hardy enough for permanent cultivation in the open air.

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  • It succeeds in almost any soil, preferring a rich, light loam.

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  • It flourishes in sandy loam in the rock garden, and grows capitally on an old wall.

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  • It does not possess the vigour of the other evergreen Iberises, but it is fitted for grouping with dwarf alpine flowers on warm parts of the rock garden in well-drained sandy loam.

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  • It thrives in rock gardens as well as the Cushion Pink, and should be planted in deep sandy loam on a well-drained and exposed spot, moist in summer, facing the south.

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  • This should consist of equal parts of good fibrous loam and well-decomposed manure, half fibrous peat, and half coarse sand.

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  • It likes a half-shaded position in good loam, growing fast and fruiting freely.

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  • It loves best a corner to itself in sandy loam at the foot of a south wall.

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  • The main points in beginning the culture of Narcissi are to get sound and healthy bulbs as early as possible after June, and to plant or pot them at once in good fibrous, sandy, or gravelly loam, or in any virgin soil.

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  • Groups of the bolder kinds associated with Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora, Lilium Henryi, and Azalea mollis are effective for months on end, and all revel in deep rich loam, old manure, and leaf-mould.

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  • They thrive admirably in deep, rich, sandy loam, with the addition of some decayed cow manure.

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  • With such precautions and planted in loam, deep but not too stiff, in a well-drained sunny border, and with an occasional dose of weak liquid manure, they will repay one for all the care given to them."

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  • It grows well in sandy loam, or this with peat added.

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  • It requires an exposed spot of very sandy or gritty loam in the rock garden, where it must be surrounded by a few small stones to guard it from drought, and it must be associated with alpine plants.

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  • It is suitable for the rock garden, for borders, and for naturalisation amongst vegetation not more than 1 foot high, chiefly on banks and slopes in sandy loam, and is increased by division or seed.

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  • If treated as half-hardy annuals, the seed should be sown in heat in spring, but if treated as biennials, the seed should be sown in August, the plants preserved in the greenhouse till May, and then planted out in rich, sandy loam.

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  • Fringe Tree (Chionanthus) - A beautiful, small, hardy tree of the Olive family, well grown in this country in sandy loam; in early summer it bears long clusters of white flowers, with petals long and narrow like a fringe.

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  • The best place for it is the rock garden in a sunny position, drained, with a good depth of soil, so that the plants may root strongly between the stones, the soil a good sandy loam, mixed with broken grit.

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  • Their thick fleshy roots thrive in a rich loam, and like a damp subsoil; impatient of removal, and should not be increased by division.

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  • The plants like a deep sandy loam, as the carrot-like roots when of full size go down to a depth of 2 feet.

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  • The plant does best in rich sandy loam and planted in bold masses, which flower from July to October, according to the time of sowing.

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  • It grows best in deep moist loam, and where some protection can be given from autumn frosts.

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  • In cultivation, all the Haberleas are happy in cool shaded places between rocks in deep sandy loam, or with peat added.

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  • It grows very freely in strong loam improved by the addition of a little leaf-mould and sand.

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  • It thrives in exposed positions in the rock garden in a moist, free, and sandy loam; dislikes limestone.

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  • Very gritty moist loam in the rock garden is best for it.

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  • Succeeds best perhaps in chalky loam or soil containing much mortar rubble or the like.

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  • It thrives best in sunny positions in loam freely intermingled with pieces of stone, and well watered in dry weather, and is a gem for the rock garden.

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  • It thrives in ordinary loam, and flowers very prettily in spring, like a large Almond.

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  • A suitable soil consists of equal portions of fibrous peat and loam, good sharp sand being added, together with broken oyster-shells or limestone.

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  • It should be planted out in May, in a loose, sandy loam, and in a warm sheltered spot.

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  • It is well suited for the rock garden, is hardy, and prefers a soil mixture of peat and loam.

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  • In cultivation they prefer a generous treatment, rich loam and old manure suiting them.

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  • It requires much the same treatment as Shortia, thriving in well-drained sandy loam and peat, in cool and moist but not wet or shady places.

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  • It is from 15 to 30 feet in height, and thrives in a light, deep, loam soil.

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  • In cultivation they ask for nothing more than a sunny garden or position, while revelling in light sandy or calcareous loam; indeed, in common with all the Flag Iris, they much appreciate a limy soil.

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  • They like a compost of loam, leafmould, and peat, mixed in about equal proportions, with the addition of some sharp sand.

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  • A deep, friable loam, enriched with rotten manure, is a good soil for them, but they will grow well in a hot sandy soil if it be heavily manured and watered.

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  • It grows freely in peat or loam, a mixture of both with a little road-scrapings best fulfilling its requirements.

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  • The roots cannot make way, nor can the plants thrive in a strong adhesive soil of clay or heavy loam, and if the soil be heavy, it must be lightened by a plentiful addition of leaf-mould, sand, or peat.

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  • This Lobelia thrives admirably in equal parts of sandy loam and leaf-mould, with sharp sand to keep it open.

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  • The site should be well prepared by trenching or forking peat and leaf soil freely into common garden soil, or, better still, fresh loam, a space not less than 3 feet by 30 inches being prepared for each tree.

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  • Maidens Wreath (Francoa) - Chilian plants of the Saxifrage family, somewhat tender, and best for dry sheltered positions on warm borders in light loam.

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  • Clay, sands, loam and rocky debris are respectively the chosen homes of certain species, and several choose the blackest and stickiest of clays.

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  • I find the best results follow from the use of about one-half half-rotten spent tan bark with one-half sandy or clay loam.

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  • Happiest in loam, leaf-mould, and peat where moisture is not absent during the growing season.

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  • It should be tried in a sunny, well-drained position in loam and lime rubble.

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  • It is a small evergreen shrub, bearing in summer numerous urn-shaped flowers about 1 1/2 inches long and of a brilliant scarlet, thriving in a mixture of sandy peat and loam, in a moist sheltered spot with perfect drainage.

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  • These plants thrive under the same conditions as the others, but, being much smaller, require more care in planting, viz., in a mixture of peat and good loam with plenty of sharp sand, and associated with minute alpine plants.

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  • It is best increased by seeds, and may be cultivated with success in the moraine, and grows well in sandy loam and peat.

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  • N. selaginoides and N. capensis require to be sown early in heat, and to be transplanted in May in light, rich sandy loam in warm borders.

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  • It is usually considered difficult to grow, but it may be easily kept on dry banks in the rock garden in a firm bed of calcareous soil, or of loam mixed with broken limestone.

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  • The situation for Orchids should be an open one, and the soil a deep, fibry loam in a drained border.

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  • One of the handsomest of British Orchids, finest in rich soil, and if well grown in moist and rather stiff garden loam its beauty will surprise even those who know it well in a wild state.

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  • Experience proves, however, that it revels in cool rich loam and leaf soil, and flowers profusely when with these are associated broken sandstone, over which the rhizomes creep and flower.

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  • O. Halleri has charming, compact flowers, of as deep a blue as that of the Gentians, and proves a manageable plant in the rock garden in deep moist loam.

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  • A good moist loam, enriched with cow manure, is the soil best suited to peonies.

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  • Tree Paeonies are not particular as to soil or position, they grow and flower well in chalky soils, or those of good sandy loam.

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  • It thrives in a warm exposed border of sandy loam soil, well drained, the bulbs protected by litter in winter.

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  • A native of sandy places and cool damp woods from Canada to Virginia, and often found in the shade of evergreens, it does best in moist peat, and forms edgings to beds where the soil is of that nature, but it will also grow in loam.

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  • The plant should be grown on warm sheltered borders in sandy peat or sandy loam and leaf-mould.

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  • It likes shelter, and grows best in warm loam, though hardy anywhere.

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  • It is a precious shrub for the cooler parts of the rock garden and succeeds admirably in the more favourable coast gardens, and in moist peat or turfy loam.

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  • It is best in groups, beds, or borders, in a well-drained sandy loam.

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  • About Paris it is grown as a flower garden plant, but with us it does not flower regularly unless in sunny spots and warm, well-drained, and very sandy loam.

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  • A warm sandy loam or other light soil and a sunny warm position should be given.

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  • Where soil is prepared for the choicer varieties, any good loam with a free addition of sand, well-rotted leaf-mould, and decomposed cow manure will form an admirable compost.

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  • Plant them in fibry loam and tough and fibry peat, with a liberal admixture of leaf-mould and well-decayed woody matter, to which add a thin top-dressing of similar material every autumn.

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  • They thrive best in peat, loam, and sharp sand, with some broken lumps of sandstone, and prefer a dry situation in the rock garden, or any situation which is not fully exposed to the sun.

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  • They require a warm loam, and go with the choicest annual flowers.

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  • A large hole, about 6 by 4 feet deep, should be dug out, a good layer of drainage material put at the bottom, and the hole filled with a rich compost of loam and manure.

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  • All are hardy, and prefer warm, sunny situations in sandy loam.

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  • It flourishes in a dry position in a mixture of limestone grit, peat, sand, and loam, and has violet-blue flowers in July.

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  • It is a true rock plant, suitable for a fissure, vertical or sloping to the sun, and does best amongst a mixture of a little loam, peat, sand, or grit, where it can root to the depth of 2 feet.

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  • It is rarely seen in good health in gardens, and is best in limestone fissures, filled with peat, loam, and sand, mixed in about equal proportions.

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  • A soil which is naturally peaty is no doubt the best, but not essential; they may be grown out of doors in loam either light or moderately stiff so long as lime is absent, and with plenty of leaf mould.

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  • The compost should consist mainly of good loam, to which a small proportion of peat may be added, and which should be free from calcareous matter.

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  • Though hardy, it is fragile, and happiest on the rock garden, in sandy fibry loam, in level sunny spots, where it can root freely in moist soil mingled with broken stones.

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  • It thrives in a warm and good loam, and blooms throughout the autumn.

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  • Given moisture, or sandy loam and leaf-mould, with partial shade, Rodgersias are of quite easy culture.

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  • Roscoea - A small though interesting genus of tuberous rooted plants from China and the Himalayas, of easy cultivation if planted 4 to 5 inches deep in sandy loam.

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  • A lime-free soil suits them best, a generous mixture of loam, leaf soil and sand, with consistently cool or moist conditions, meeting all requirements.

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  • S. sinuata thrives in light, rich, sandy loam, and should be treated as a half-hardy annual.

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  • For the soil, a rich light loam mixed with fragments of limestone or grit, small fragments of any rock, and a little river sand will do.

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  • A rich sandy loam, moist yet well-drained, and partial shade during the hottest hours of the day, are the best conditions.

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  • The plants succeed best in a soil composed of two parts of peat, one of loam, and one of sand and leafmould.

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  • A. aculeatum is best in rich loam, with sand and leaf-mould, well-drained, and so does the Male Fern.

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  • The beds are to be spawned when the heat moderates, and the surface is then covered with a sprinkling of warmed loam, which after a few days is made up to a thickness of 2 in., and well beaten down.

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  • The most suitable soil is a light, sandy loam enriched with well decomposed manure, in a rather moist situation.

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  • The potting must be done very firmly, using turfy loam with which a little mortar rubble has been mixed.

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  • The trees are to be top-dressed from time to time with well-decayed manure and turfy loam, and considerable space must be left in the pots for this and the watering.

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  • The cultivation of vines in pots is very commonly practised with good results, and pot-vines are very useful to force for the earliest crop. The plants should be raised from eyes, and grown as strong as possible in the way already noted, in rich turfy loam mixed with about one-third of horse dung and a little bone dust.

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  • The plants are slow growers and must have plenty of sun heat; they require sandy loam with a mixture of sand and bricks finely broken and must be kept dry in winter.

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  • On the ragstone the soil is occasionally thin and much mixed with small portions of sand and stone; but in some situations the ragstone has a thick covering of clay loam, which is most suitable for the production of hops and fruits.

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  • For pot culture, the soil should consist of three parts turfy loam to one of leaf-mould and thoroughly rotted manure, adding enough pure grit to keep the compost porous.

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  • On the East Shore to the north is a marly loam overlying a yellowish-red clay sub-soil, to the south is a soil quite stiff with light coloured clay, while here and there, especially in the middle and south, are considerable areas both of light sandy soils and tidal marsh loams. On the West Shore the soils range from a light sandy loam in the lower levels south from Baltimore to rather heavy loarns overlying a yellowish clay on the rolling uplands and on the terraces along the Potomac and Patuxent.

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  • The soils of the Highland Rim Plateau as well as of the lowland west of the Tennessee river vary greatly, but the most common are a clay, containing more or less carbonate of lime, and a sandy loam.

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  • Krabe found that in addition to loam, willows did well on dry ferrugineous, sandy ground with a good top soil of about 6 in.

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  • It receives its name from its soil (weathered from the weak underlying limestone), which is black in colour, almost destitute of sand and loam, and rich in limestone and marl formations, especially adapted to the production of cotton; hence the region is also called the "Cotton Belt."

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  • In the Cumberland Plateau and Great Valley Regions are a red or brown loam, rich in decomposed limestone and calcareous shales, and sandy or gravelly loaTns.

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  • Loam is the staple soil for the gardener; it is not only used extensively in the pure and simple state, but enters into most of the composts prepared specially for his plants.

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  • When employed for making vine borders, loam of a somewhat heavier nature can be used with advantage, on account of the porous materials which should accompany it.

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  • For stone fruits a calcareous loam is best; indeed, for these subjects a rich calcareous loam used in a pure and simple state cannot be surpassed.

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  • They thrive in borders or margins of shrubberies in sandy loam, but are scarcely ornamental.

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  • At Castlewellan it is planted in a shady border near a large Yew hedge, in peat, leaf soil, and loam in equal proportions.

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  • The weeping willow will grow in acid or alkaline soils with any textures from sand to loam to clay.

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  • Loam is not actually one type of texture, but an appropriate balance of all three main kinds.

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  • Basic management consists of making your ground as much like loam as possible and then maintaining it to keep the correct consistency.

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  • Proper composting and mulching, along with appropriate additives, will help create the desirable loam texture.

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  • It prefers a rich, slightly acidic loam.

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  • A well-drained, sandy loam soil with a good mix of organic matter is best.

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  • The climate is widely variable, encompassing both high rainfall and arid dessert, while soils are silty loam.

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  • With this or a mixture of horse-dung, loam, old mushroom-bed dung, and half-decayed leaves, the beds are built up in successive layers of about 3 in.

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  • The oak grows most luxuriantly on deep strong clays, calcareous marl or stiff loam, but will flourish in nearly any deep well-drained soil, excepting peat or loose sand; in marshy or moist places the tree may grow well for a time, but the timber is rarely sound; on hard rocky ground and exposed hillsides.

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  • It thrives best on a dry, deep, sandy loam, on airy sheltered sites at no great elevation above the sea.

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  • Of inferior quality are the yellow loam of the hills in the north-east and the sandy loam in the pine belt of the south.

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  • On the Coastal Plain the soil is generally sandy, but in nearly all parts of this region more or less marl abounds; south of the Neuse river the soil is mostly a loose sand, north of it there is more loam on the uplands, and in the lowlands the soil is usually compact with clay, silt or peat; toward the western border of the region the sand becomes coarser and some gravel is mixed with it.

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  • The best soil for cotton is thus a deep, welldrained loam, able to afford a uniform supply of moisture during the growing period.

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  • Farther inland in the level districts and river bottoms it varies from a sandy to a clay loam containing much alluvium.

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  • The soil is a clayey or a sandy loam, and very fertile except in the Usar tracts, where there is a saline efflorescence.

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  • It consists largely of a dark brown or black sandy loam, finely comminuted, the richness of which in organic matter and mineral salts induces rapidity of growth, and the strength and durability of which render it capable of a long succession of crops.

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  • Geographically the wheat-raising area extends across the entire south of the state - the Minnesota Valley and the Red River Valley - the rich glacial loam of which renders it one of the most productive wheat regions in the world.

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  • It is well after the borders are completed to remove the top soil, in which no roots are to be found, every two or three years, and to replace it with a mixture of good loam, rotten manure, lime rubbish and bone meal, to the depth of 6 or 7 in.

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  • The plant grows freely in good garden soil, preferring a deep welldrained loam, and is all the better for a top-dressing of manure as it approaches the flowering stage.

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  • They are increased by cuttings, and grown in a cool greenhouse in rough peaty soil, with a slight addition of loam and sand.

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  • In the valleys of rivers which have overflowed their banks and on level bench lands there is considerable silt and vegetable loam mixed with glacial clay; but on the hills and ridges of western Washington the soil is almost wholly a glacial deposit consisting principally of clay but usually containing some sand and gravel.

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  • On the Columbia plateau the soil is principally volcanic ash and decomposed lava; it is almost wholly volcanic ash in the more arid sections, but elsewhere more decomposed lava or other igneous rocks, and some vegetable loam is mixed with the ash.

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  • The valley of the Medway, especially the district round Maidstone, is the most fertile part of the county, the soil being a deep loam with a subsoil of brick-earth.

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  • The soil should be a light and fairly rich compost, comprising about 2 parts loam, I part decayed manure or horse droppings that have been thoroughly sweetened, I part leaf mould and half a part of sand.

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  • In the mountain region the soil is mostly a sandy loam composed of disintegrated granitic gneiss and organic matter; on the lower and more gentle slopes as well as in the valleys this is generally deep enough for a luxuriant vegetable growth but on the upper and more precipitous slopes it is thin, or the rocks are entirely bare.

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  • Old alluvial deposits are left high above the existing level of many rivers, in the form of "terraces" of gravel and loam, the streams to which these owe their existence having modified their courses and cut deeper channels; such are the alluvial gravels and brick-earths upon which much of "greater London" is built.

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  • The soft limestone underlying this region is covered, in the uplands, with grey, sandy soils, which have a subsoil of loam; in the lowlands the surface soils are loams, the subsoils clays.

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  • Here the prevailing soils are grey and sandy with a subsoil of loam, but they are less fertile than those of the Lime Sink or Cotton Belts.

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  • Certain districts, indeed, in which a layer of heavy loam underlies the porous and friable surface, are able to retain the moisture which elsewhere is absorbed.

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  • A hazel-coloured loam, moderately light in texture, is well adapted for most garden crops, whether of fruits or vegetables, especially a good warm deep loam resting upon chalk; and if such a soil occurs naturally in the selected site, but little will be required in the way of preparation.

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  • For garden purposes loam should be rather unctuous or soapy to the touch when moderately dry, not too clinging nor adhesive, and should readily crumble when a compressed handful is thrown on the ground.

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  • Sound friable loam cut one sod deep from the surface of a pasture, and stacked up for twelve months in a heap or ridge, is invaluable to the gardener.

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  • It should then be thrown together in ridges and frequently turned, so as to be kept in an incipient state of fermentation, a little dryish friable loam being mixed with it to retain the ammonia given off by the dung.

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  • In the flatter parts of the valley occur large beds of loam and rubble, sometimes in terraces parallel with, but several hundred feet above, the river, proving by their disposition and appearance that the valley has been formed by the action of water.

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