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literature

literature

literature Sentence Examples

  • Waller edited the Cambridge History of English Literature (1907, &c.).

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  • In a state of deep depression, she stopped by the social services office on the way home and picked up some literature and a form.

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  • In literature Argentina is still under the spell of Bohemianism and dilettanteism.

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  • There is in this town, with a very few exceptions, no taste for the best or for very good books even in English literature, whose words all can read and spell.

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  • What if an equal ado were made about the ornaments of style in literature, and the architects of our bibles spent as much time about their cornices as the architects of our churches do?

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  • His place in literature rests really on the essays in his Plato.

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  • Here he became an instructor in German at Harvard in 1825, and in 1830 obtained an appointment as professor of German language and literature there; but his anti-slavery agitation having given umbrage to the authorities, he forfeited his post in 1835, and was ordained Unitarian minister of a chapel at Lexington in Massachusetts in 1836.

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  • In a word, literature is my Utopia.

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  • At the university he made rapid progress, especially in jurisprudence, though preferring the study of history, literature, juridical science and philosophy.

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  • The significance of seven throughout Babylonian literature is very marked, and most of the material has been collected by J.

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  • My studies for the first year were English history, English literature, German, Latin, arithmetic, Latin composition and occasional themes.

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  • In the morning I bathe my intellect in the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy of the Bhagvat-Geeta, since whose composition years of the gods have elapsed, and in comparison with which our modern world and its literature seem puny and trivial; and I doubt if that philosophy is not to be referred to a previous state of existence, so remote is its sublimity from our conceptions.

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  • This thought pervades all German literature and is mystically expressed in Goethe's "Faust":

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  • Then, too, there is in German literature a fine reserve which I like; but its chief glory is the recognition I find in it of the redeeming potency of woman's self-sacrificing love.

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  • This generation inclines a little to congratulate itself on being the last of an illustrious line; and in Boston and London and Paris and Rome, thinking of its long descent, it speaks of its progress in art and science and literature with satisfaction.

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  • Many scholars forget, it seems to me, that our enjoyment of the great works of literature depends more upon the depth of our sympathy than upon our understanding.

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  • Like Heine, Auerbach and Steinthal, he rose superior to the narrower ideals of the German Jews, and took a leading place in German literature and thought.

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  • Science and Literature.-Though the university of Cordoba is the oldest but one in South America, it has made no conspicuous contribution to Argentine literature beyond the historical works of its famous rector, Gregorio Funes (1749-1830).

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  • The literature of the last two centuries consists mainly of translations and religious works written by ecclesiastics, some of whom were natives of the Albanian colonies in Italy.

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  • French literature passed through the same phase, from which indeed it was later in emerging; and the ultimate consequence was the enrichment of both languages.

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  • In one sense tt may be said to stand to theological literature in Scotland in something of the same position as that occupied by the Canon Mirificus with respect to the scientific literature, for it is the first published original work relating to theological interpretation, and is quite without a predecessor in its own field.

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  • GEORGE SAND (1804-1876), the pseudonym of Madame Amandine Lucile Aurore Dudevant, née Dupin, the most prolific authoress in the history of literature, and unapproached among the women novelists of France.

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  • After studying Middle English literature Emma loved using the word gast instead of scare.

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  • Some of them would be found written in our literature and dear to the hearts of many, while others would be wholly unknown to most of my readers.

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  • He contributed extensively to the periodical literature of astronomy, and was twice, in 1823 and 1830, the recipient of the Royal Astronomical Society's gold medal.

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  • In France Cartesianism won society and literature before it penetrated into the universities.

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  • In France Cartesianism won society and literature before it penetrated into the universities.

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  • Some notion of the personal appearance of Alexander may be got from the literature and the surviving monuments.

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  • His high conception of God's transcendence, it may be supposed, led him to ignore intermediary agencies, which are common in the popular literature, and later, under the influence of this same conception of transcendence, are freely employed.

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  • See further the literature on Gen.

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  • In 1866 he was appointed professor of history and English literature in Owens College, Manchester, and was principal from 1890 to 1897, when he retired.

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  • His most important work is his standard History of English Dramatic Literature to the Age of Queen Anne (1875), re-edited after a thorough revision in three volumes in 1899.

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  • of Irish Periodical Literature from the End of the 17th to the Middle of the Igth Century (2 vols., London, 1867); Francis Hardy, Memoirs of the Earl of Charlemont (2 vols., London, 1812); W.

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  • It is true, the more sensitive and imaginative the mind is that receives the thought-pictures and images of literature, the more nicely the finest lines are reproduced.

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  • He knew something of six languages, and could discuss art, music, literature or theology.

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  • In literature Megara figures as the reputed home of the comedian Susarion, and in the 4th century gave its name to a school of philosophy founded by Euclid.

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  • For further references to the literature on Alexander, see Kaerst's article in Pauly-Wissowa's Realencyclopadie (1894).

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  • The Cartesianism of Holland was a child of the universities, and its literature is mainly composed of commentaries upon.

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  • Pascal and other members of Port Royal openly expressed their doubts about the place allowed to God in the system; the adherents of Gassendi met it by resuscitating atoms; and the Aristotelians maintained their substantial forms as of old; the Jesuits argued against the arguments for the being of God, and against the theory of innate ideas; whilst Pierre Daniel Huet (1630-1721), bishop of Avranches, once a Cartesian himself, made a vigorous onslaught on the contempt in which his former comrades held literature and history, and enlarged on the vanity of all human aspirations after rational truth.

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  • Plutarch (Pericles) gives many interesting details as to Pericles' personal bearing, home life, and patronage of art, literature and philosophy, derived in part from the old comic poets, Aristophanes, Cratinus, Eupolis, Hermippus, Plato and Teleclides; in part from the contemporary memoirs of Stesimbrotus and Ion of Chios.

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  • The name is often in popular literature written Cambalu, and is by Longfellow accented in verse Cambeilic. But this spelling originates in an accidental error in Ramusio's Italian version, which was the chief channel through which Marco Polo's book was popularly known.

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  • The renewal of interest in classical literature was shown in the prohibition of the study of sophistry by any scholar under the age of eighteen, unless he had been pronounced proficient in grammaticals.

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  • Her .own predilections led her to literature; and in her society Propertius found the intellectual sympathy and encouragement which were essential for the development of his powers.

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  • Boissonade chiefly devoted his attention to later Greek literature: Philostratus, Heroica (1806) and Epistolae (1842); Marinus, Vita procli (1814); Tiberius Rhetor, De Figuris (1815); Nicetas Eugenianus, Drosilla et Charicles (1819); Herodian, Partitiones (1819); Aristaenetus, Epistolae (1822); Eunapius, Vitae Sophisiarum (1822); Babrius, Fables (1844); Tzetzes, Allegoriae Iliados (1851); and a Collection of Greek Poets in 24 vols.

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  • Paul's epistle to the Colossians is one of my favorite pieces of Biblical literature.

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  • In sacred literature: Antimuratorius sive confutatio disputationis Muratorianae de rebus liturgicis (1755-1758); Neue theologische Bibliothek, vols.

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  • Martha bounced around, thrilled to be back in the routine, and joined Fred in passing out more campaign literature.

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  • LITERATURE.

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  • Jen, the valedictorian of her class, was to attend Ryder College in New Jersey and major in English Literature.

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  • Belonging to a noble family, he was educated under the best masters, and particularly excelled in poetry and polite literature.

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  • It was only as a last resource that she tried literature.

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  • That Douglas undertook this work and that he makes a plea for more accurate scholarship in the translation have been the basis of a prevalent notion that he is a Humanist in spirit and the first exponent of Renaissance doctrine in Scottish literature.

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  • By his translation (from the English) of the Sakuntala of Kalidasa (1791), he first awakened German interest in Indian literature.

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  • After thirty-seven years of war he set himself to emulate Asoka and became a patron of art and literature.

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  • The Port Royalists, Pierre Nicole (1625-1695) and Antoine Arnauld (1612-1694), had applied it to grammar and logic; Jean Domat or Daumat (1625-1696) and Henri Francois Daugesseau (1668-1751) to jurisprudence; Fontenelle, Charles Perrault (1628-1703) and Jean Terrasson (1670-1750) to literary criticism, and a worthier estimate of modern literature.

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  • Lydgate had a consuming passion for literature, and it was probably that he might indulge this taste more fully that in 1 434 he retired from the priorate of Hatfield Broadoak (or Hatfield Regis), to which he had been appointed in June 1423.

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  • The pity of it is that he should have squandered his powers in a futile attempt to create an entirely new category of literature.

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  • The exact meaning of these features is not clear, but if it be remembered (a) that the Levites of post-exilic literature represent only the result of a long and intricate development, (b) that the name "Levite," in the later stages at least, was extended to include all priestly servants, and (c) that the priesthoods, in tending to become hereditary, included priests who were Levites by adoption and not by descent, it will be recognized that the examination of the evidence for the earlier stages cannot confine itself to those narratives where the specific term alone occurs.

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  • A berglauben (Giitersloh, 1903: an interesting list of unlucky days from an old Egyptian calendar on p. 57 seq.); and for post-Biblical literature, F.

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  • The rest of the southern coast west as far as 124° E., with the exception of the southern projection of Eyre Peninsula, which receives from 10 to 20 in., belongs to the 1 The literature of the geology of Australia is enumerated, to 1884, in the bibliography by Etheridge and Jack.

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  • From August 1851 until his death, in Princeton, New Jersey, on the 10th of February 1900, he was professor of Biblical and Oriental Literature in Princeton Theological Seminary.

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  • Ujjain, known as Avanti in the Buddhist period and as Ozene to the Greeks, is one of the seven sacred cities of the Hindus and the traditional capital of King Vikramaditya, at whose court the "nine gems" of Sanskirt literature are said to have flourished.

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  • The older literature is cited exhaustively in W.

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  • In 1869-1879 he was professor of Hebrew in the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (first in Greenville, South Carolina, and after 1877 in Louisville, Kentucky), and in 1880 he became professor of Hebrew and Oriental languages in Harvard University, where until 1903 he was also Dexter lecturer onzbiblical literature.

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  • In 1546 he accepted a professorial chair at Lucca, which he exchanged in 1555 for that of Greek and Latin literature at Milan.

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  • He was the real founder of the Romantic school; to him more than to any other member of the school we owe the revolutionizing and germinating ideas which influenced so profoundly the development of German literature at the beginning of the 19th century.

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  • The variety of his pursuits at this time carried him over the whole field of ancient and modern literature.

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  • Of English plays, the interlude called Jack Juggler (between 1547 and 1553) was based on the Amphitruo, and the lost play called the Historie of Error (acted in 1577) was probably based on the Menae-chmi; Nicholas Udall's Ralph Royster Doyster, the first English comedy (acted before 1551, first printed 1566), is founded on the Miles gloriosus; Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors (about 1591) is an adaptation of the Menaechmi; and his Falstaff may be regarded as an idealized reproduction or development of the braggart soldier of Plautus and Terence - a type of character which reappears in other forms not only in English literature (e.g.

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  • Historical inscriptions, royal charters and rescripts, despatches, private letters and the general literature afford welcome supplementary information.

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  • The sources for the life of St Francis and early Franciscan history are very numerous, and an immense literature has grown up around them.

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  • For general information and references to the literature of the subject, see Otto ZOckler, Askese and Monchtum (1897), ii.

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  • Thenceforward he withdrew from active life and devoted himself to literature.

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  • of Roman Literature (Eng.

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  • The senate consists of princes of the blood who have attained their majority, and of an unlimited number of senators above forty years of age, who are qualified under any one of twenty-one specified categoriesby having either held high office, or attained celebrity in science, literature, &c. In 1908 there were 318 senators exclusive of five members of the royal family.

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  • of literature, a founder of universities, he anticipated the spirit of the Renaissance.

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  • They conferred the signory upon him for life; and, had he not mismanaged matters, he might have held the city in his grasp. Italy was settling cown and turning her attention to home comforts, arts and literature.

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  • Young Italy spread to all centres of Italian exiles, and by means of literature carried on an active propaganda in Italy itself, where the party came to be called Ghibellini, as though reviving the traditions of medieval anti-Papalism.

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  • All the while a vast amount of revolutionary literature was being printed in Switzerland, France and England, and smuggled into Italy; the poet Giusti satirized the Italian princes, the dramatist G.

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  • The promise of a constitution for the empire, ~,~after made in 1849, was never carried out; the government of Lombardo-Venetia was vested in Field-Marshal Radetzky; and although only very few of the revolutionists were excluded from the amnesty, the carrying of arms or the distribution or possession of revolutionary literature was punished with death.

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  • "Annales"; the histories of Roman Literature by M.

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  • Literature.

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  • Mackintosh's Selections from the Literature of Theism (useful texts with useful notes: nothing from Hegel).

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  • have been a vast and varied literature.

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  • We are thus beginning to know something of the history of this literature.

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  • Dr Forchhammer in his Jardine Prize Essay, and Dr Mabel Bode in the introduction to her edition of the Sasana-vamsa, have collected many details as to the Pali literature in Burma.

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  • The Pali books written in Ceylon, Burma and Siam will be our best and oldest, and in many respects our only, authorities for the sociology and politics, the literature and the religion, of their respective countries.

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  • - In addition to the literature already mentioned, see the articles of Sanday on "Colossians" and Robertson on "Ephesians" in Smith's Bible Dictionary (2nd ed., 1893), and the article of A.

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  • 639; several references in Aulus Gellius; Teuffel, Hist.of Roman Literature, 170; M.

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  • 156-158, are the chief references in ancient literature.

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  • In English medieval literature it appears in three somewhat different versions: Sir Orpheo, a " lay of Brittany " printed from the Harleian MS. in J.

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  • The new work largely centred round a discussion of the nature and origin of vessels, conspicuous features in young plant tissues which thus acquired an importance in the contemporary literature out of proportion to their real significance in the construction of the vascular plant.

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  • 269, and literature.

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  • 549, with literature.

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  • Mackinder in British Association Report (Ipswich), 18 95, p. 73 8, for a summary of German opinion, which has been expressed by many writers in a somewhat voluminous literature.

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  • (1904), where full references to the literature of the subject will be found.

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  • He received a careful education, and was a devoted student of literature and art.

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  • - Only a mere fraction of the enormous literature dealing with the skeleton of birds can here be mentioned.

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  • In the same year he published Ober die Freiheit der Wissenschaft, in which he maintained the independence of science, whose goal was truth, against authority, and reproached the excessive respect for the latter in the Roman Church with the insignificant part played by the German Catholics in literature and philosophy.

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  • 9); in the rabbinic literature "the fathers" are the more eminent of the earlier rabbis whose sayings were handed down for the guidance of posterity.

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  • By the "fathers," then, we understand the whole of extant Christian literature from the time of the apostles to the rise of scholasticism or the beginning of the middle ages.

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  • However we may interpret the lower limit of this period, the literature which it embraces is immense.

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  • 325) is the watershed which actually separates two great tracts of Christian literature.

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  • Yet the post-Nicene literature, considered as literature, reaches a far higher level.

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  • The ante-Nicene period of patristic literature opens with the "apostolic fathers," 5 i.e.

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  • Next come the great Alexandrians, Clement, Origen, Dionysius; the Carthaginians, Tertullian and Cyprian; the Romans, Minucius Felix and Novatian; the last four laid the foundations of a Latin Christian literature.

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  • The Latin West was scarcely less productive; it is enough to mention Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose of Milan, Augustine of Hippo, Leo of Rome, Jerome, Rufinus, and a father lately restored to his place in patristic literature, Niceta of Remesiana.'

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  • The reader to whom the study is new will gain some idea of the bulk of the extant patristic literature, if we add that in Migne's collection ninety-six large volumes are occupied with the Greek fathers from Clement of Rome to John of Damascus, and seventysix with the Latin fathers from Tertullian to Gregory the Great.2 For a discussion of the more important fathers the student is referred to the articles which deal with them separately.

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  • Their works comprise the whole literature of our faith during the decisive centuries which followed the apostolic age.

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  • Sophocles, and the Lexicon Graecum suppletorium et dialecticum of Van Herwerden; whilst the new great Latin Lexicon, published by the Berlin Academy, is calculated to meet the needs of students of Latin patristic literature.

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  • HEBREW LITERATURE.

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  • Properly speaking, "Hebrew Literature" denotes all works written in the Hebrew language.

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  • In catalogues and bibliographies, however, the expression is now generally used, conveniently if incorrectly, as synonymous with Jewish literature, including all works written by Jews in Hebrew characters, whether the language be Aramaic, Arabic or even some vernacular not related to Hebrew.

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  • The literature begins with, as it is almost entirely based upon, the Old Testament.

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  • The traditional view that Moses was the author of the Pentateuch in its present form, would make this the earliest monument of Hebrew literature.

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  • The Jews have always been, however, an intensely literary people, and the books ultimately accepted as canonical were only a selection from the literature in existence at the beginning of the Christian era.

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  • Very important for the study of Midrashic literature are the Yalgut (gleaning) Shim`oni, on the whole Bible, the Yalqut Mekhiri, on the Prophets, Psalms, Proverbs and Job, and the Midrash ha-gadhol, 2 all of which are of uncertain but late date and preserve earlier material.

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  • With the Talmud, the anonymous period of Hebrew literature may be considered to end.

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  • Individual Geonim produced valuable works (of which later), but what is perhaps most important from the point of view of the development of Judaism is the literature of their Responsa or answers to questions, chiefly on halakhic matters, addressed to them from various countries.

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  • 1038), a man of wide learning, wrote 1 For the history of the very extensive literature of this class, Zunz, Literaturgeschichte der synagogalen Poesie (Berlin, 1865), is indispensable.

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  • Their literature, with which alone we are here concerned, is largely polemical and to a great extent deals with grammar and exegesis.

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  • From the 12th century onward the sect gradually declined, being ultimately restricted mainly to the Crimea and Lithuania, learning disappeared and their literature became merely popular and of little interest.

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  • Mention need only be made further of Isaac of Troki, whose anti-Christian polemic (1593) was translated into English by Moses Mocatta under the title of Faith Strengthened (1851); Solomon of Troki, whose Appiryon, an account of Karaism, was written at the request of Pufendorf (about 1700); and Abraham Firkovich, who, in spite of his impostures, did much for the literature of his people about the middle of the 19th century.

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  • In the 12th and 13th centuries literature maintained a high level in Spain.

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  • With the 13th century Hebrew literature may be said to have reached the limit of its development.

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  • The result, while linguistically more uniform and pleasing, often lacks the spontaneity of medieval literature.

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  • Introductory: Abrahams, Short History of Jewish Literature (London, 1906); Steinschneider, Jewish Literature (London, 18 57); Winter and Wi nsche, Die jitdische Literatur (Leip;ig, 1893-1895) (containing selections translated into German).

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  • The Ahoms had a considerable literature, much of which is still in existence.

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  • He went to Rome after the termination of the civil wars, and spent twenty-two years in studying the Latin language and literature and preparing materials for his history.

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  • Literature also flourished.

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  • In 1827, with Stephen Elliott (1771-1830), the naturalist, he founded the Southern Review, of which he was the sole editor after Elliott's death until 1834, when it was discontinued, and to which he contributed articles on law, travel, and modern and classical literature.

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  • They adopted the French tongue, and were presently among the first to practise and spread abroad its literature.

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  • He was educated for the law, but gave up his profession on the death of his father, and devoted four years to the study of literature, philosophy and science.

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  • His name, in which the Greek Avbpovucos is combined with the gentile name of one of the great Roman houses, while indicative of his own position as a manumitted slave, is also significant of the influences by which Roman literature was fostered, viz.

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  • He determined the course which Roman literature followed for more than a century after his time.

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  • Such knowledge became essential to men in a high position as a means of intercourse with Greeks, while Greek literature stimulated the minds of leading Romans.

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  • In 240, the year after the end of the first Punic War, he produced at the ludi Romani a translation of a Greek play (it is uncertain whether a comedy or tragedy or both), and this representation marks the beginning of Roman literature (Livy vii.

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  • He was educated at the lycee Louis le Grand, and afterwards studied medicine, a profession which he abandoned in 1894 for that of literature.

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  • In his early years he was seized with a passionate enthusiasm for Greek literature, and this continued through life.

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  • It was the basis of the earliest specimen of Provençal literature.

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  • Sometimes defendants' speeches passed into literature, e.g.

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  • C. Baur and his school - important as the first scientific attempt to conceive New Testament conditions and literature as a whole - has been abandoned.

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  • LITERATuRE.

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  • While they had no written language, a considerable oral literature of songs, legends and traditions existed.

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  • The sacred literature of the Balinese is written in the ancient Javanese or Kawi language, which appears to be better understood here than it is in Java.

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  • C. Miall's Aquatic Insects (London, 1895), the special literature of the Coleoptera is enormous.

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  • It remains to mention his alleged services to literature.

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  • (3) It was under his auspices that Athens began to take the lead in literature.

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  • A taste for French literature spread rapidly, and the poets and dramatists of Paris found clever imitators in St Petersburg.

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  • Soloviev's history, from the earliest times to 1774, is based throughout on original investigation of sources, and therefore, though inferior to Karamzin's work as literature, is incomparably superior to it in authority.

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  • For reference to later geological literature, and discussion of the Basin Ranges, see J.

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  • and li., and in Greek literature the striking words which Porphyry quotes from an earlier writer, "We ought, then, having been united and made like to God, to offer our own conduct as a holy sacrifice to Him, the same being also a hymn and our salvation in passionless excellence of soul" (Euseb.

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  • The ideas are also found both in the New Testament and in early Christian literature: "Let us offer up a sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of lips which make confession to His name" (Heb.

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  • Lastly it should be recollected that the entire body of the fragments of tradition and literature belonging to northern Israel has come down to us through the channel of Judaean recensions.

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  • in the Trito-Isaiah during the post-exilian period, and in such psalm literature as Pss.

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  • But it cannot be said that we possess in later literature any fresh contribution to the conception of God or any presentation of a higher ideal of human life or national destiny than that which meets us in chap. xl.

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  • The second path is that which is traced out by the priest-prophet Ezekiel, and is that of legalism, which was destined to secure a permanent place in the life and literature of the Jewish people.

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  • In later Jewish literature we meet with further examples of similar hypostases in the form of Memra, Metatron, Shechinah, Holy Spirit and Bath kol.

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  • Alexander disliked business of state, preferring literature and philosophy; a collection of his Latin poems appeared at Paris in 1656 under the title Philomathi Labores Juveniles.

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  • He next turned to French literature, and to the early English drama and ballad literature.

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  • In pursuance of his method of successive studies he began in 1823 the study of Italian literature, passing over German as demanding more labour than he could afford.

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  • In the following year he made his first acquaintance with the literature of Spain under the influence of his friend and biographer, Ticknor; and, while its attractiveness proved greater than he had at the outset anticipated, the comparative novelty of the subject as a field for research served as an additional stimulus.

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  • On the 6th of October 1829 he began the actual work of composition, which was continued without more serious interruptions than those occasioned by the essays on Asylums for the Blind (1830), Poetry and Romance of the Italians (1831), and English Literature of the 19th Century (1832), until the 25th of June 1836, when the concluding note was written.

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  • He had been fortunate in obtaining the aid of Don Pascual de Gayangos, then professor of Arabic literature at Madrid, by whose offices he was enabled to obtain material not only from the public archives of Spain but from the muniment rooms of the great Spanish families.

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  • From the numerous incidental references in his works, and from his knowledge of European literature, it may be inferred that he spent some time abroad.

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  • It was the starting-point of a new satirical literature.

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  • Of an enthusiastic temperament, accomplished in classical literature, he seems while a pagan to have courted discussion with the converts to Christianity.

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  • He also read largely, though somewhat indiscriminately, in French literature, and appears to have been particularly struck with Pascal's Provincial Letters, which he tells us he reperused almost every year of his subsequent life with new pleasure, and which he particularly mentions as having been, along with Bleterie's Life of Julian and Giannone's History of Naples, a book which probably contributed in a special sense to form the historian of the Roman empire.

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  • He renewed former acquaintance, however, with the " poet " Mallet, and through him gained access to Lady Hervey's circle, where a congenial admiration, not to say affectation, of French manners and literature made him a welcome guest.

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  • The subject of this youthful effort was suggested, its author says, by a refinement of vanity - " the desire of justifying and praising the object of a favourite pursuit," namely, the study of ancient literature.

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  • In addition to public applause, he was gratified by the more select praises of the highest living authorities in that branch of literature: " the candour of Dr Robertson embraced his disciple "; Hume's letter of congratulation " overpaid the labour of ten years."

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  • His boyhood was spent with a grandmother in Middletown, Connecticut; and prior to his entering college he had read widely in English literature and history, had surpassed most boys in the extent of his Greek and Latin work, and had studied several modern languages.

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  • From his early youth he applied himself to historical studies and literature in general.

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  • He made no attempt at a critical examination of historical traditions, and wrote in a flowery and often bombastic style, but in spite of this drawback, Mirkhond's Rauzat remains one of the most marvellous achievements in literature.

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  • MALARIA, an Italian colloquial word (from mala, bad, and aria, air), introduced into English medical literature by Macculloch (1827) as a substitute for the more restricted terms "marsh miasm" or "paludal poison."

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  • Nevertheless, or rather for this very reason, its symbols found their way into the rising literature of the vulgar tongues, and helped to quicken the fancy of the artists employed upon church buildings and furniture.

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  • The historical traditions are to be supplemented by the great body of prophetic, legal and poetic literature which reveal contemporary conditions in various internal literary, theological or sociological features.

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  • - The Old Testament preserves the remains of an extensive literature, representing different standpoints, which passed through several hands before it reached its present form.

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  • Gray, " Law Literature," ib.

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  • The disaster became the great epoch-making event for Jewish history and literature.

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  • This interest and the popular tone of the history may be combined with the fact that the literature does not take us into the midst of that world of activity in which the events unfolded themselves.

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  • It is a gratuitous assumption that the history of (north) Israel ceased with the fall of Samaria or that Judah then took over Israelite literature and inherited the old Israelite spirit: the question of the preservation of earlier writings is of historical importance.

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  • It is another question whether such literature can be identified (for Cheyne's views, see Ency.

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  • " Prophetic Literature," " Psalms," and his recent studies).

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  • Thus, in any estimate of the influence of Babylonia upon the Old Testament, it is obviously necessary to ask whether certain features (a) are of true Babylonian origin, or (b) merely find parallels or analogies in its stores of literature; whether the indebtedness goes back to very early times or to the age of the Assyrian domination or to the exiles who now returned.

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  • To this age we may ascribe the literature of the Priestly writers (symbolized by P), which differs markedly from the other sources.

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  • It has been easy to confuse the study of the Old Testament in its relation to modern religious needs with the technical scientific study of the much edited remains of the literature of a small part of the ancient East.

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  • The early myths, legends and traditions which can be traced differ profoundly from the canonical history, and the gap is wider than that between the latter and the subsequent apocalyptical and pseudepigraphical literature.

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  • He seems to regard this body of literature as the answer to the charge that the Jews had contributed nothing useful for human life.

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  • Literature and affairs, science and statecraft, poetry and medicine, these various expressions of human nature and activity were so harmoniously balanced that they might be found in the possession of one and the same individual.

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  • In the early 14th century, the age of Dante, the new spirit of the Renaissance made Italian rulers the patrons of art and literature, and the Jews to some extent shared in this gracious change.

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  • 1863) and Lasker in politics, Auerbach in literature, Rubenstein and Joachim in music, Traube in medicine, and Lazarus in psychology.

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  • Many Jews have been members of the Reichsrath, some have risen to the rank of general in the army, and Austrian Jews have contributed their quota to learning, the arts and literature.

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  • Montefiore), in literature (Israel Zangwill and Alfred Sutro), in art (S.

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  • Many Jews have filled professorial chairs at the universities, others have been judges, and in art, literature (there is a notable Jewish publication society), industry and commerce have rendered considerable services to national culture and prosperity.

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  • In The Ever Green, being a Collection of Scots Poems wrote by the Ingenious before 1600, Ramsay had another purpose, to reawaken an interest in the older national literature.

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  • He revived the interest in vernacular literature, and directly inspired the genius of his greater successors.

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  • The praise of the fair sex in the first poem is exceptional in the literature of his age; and its geniality may help us to understand the author's popularity with his contemporaries.

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  • There is a considerable controversial literature concerning the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence; W.

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  • Weeks, Bibliography of Historical Literature of North Carolina (Cambridge, 1895).

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  • Syriac Literature >>

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  • He also posed as an author and patron of literature; his poems, severely criticized by Philoxenus, were hissed at the Olympic games; but having gained a prize for a tragedy on the Ransom of Hector at the Lenaea at Athens, he was so elated that he engaged in a debauch which proved fatal.

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  • Persian literature after that date, and especially Persian poetry, is full of an ardent natural pantheism, in which a mystic apprehension of the unity and divinity of all things heightens the delight in natural and in human beauty.

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  • The social instincts and industrious habits of ants have always made them favourite objects of study, and a vast amount of literature has accumulated on the subject of their structure and their modes of life.

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  • The literature on ants is so vast that it is only possible to refer the reader to a few of the most important works on the family.

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  • As they are now known to us, they have undergone a process of partial civilization, first at the hands of the Brahminical Indians, from whom they borrowed a religion, and to some extent literature and an alphabet, and subsequently from intercourse with the Arabs, which has led to the adoption of Mahommedanism by most of them.

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  • The Buddhist influence is not merely religious, for it is always accompanied by Indian art and literature, and often by an Indian alphabet.

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  • introduction of Sinhalese Buddhism, with its literature and art.

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  • The most conspicuous figure in Chinese literature is Confucius (55 1 -475 B.C.).

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  • On the other hand it is noticeable that the Japanese have little which is original in the way of religion, literature or philosophy.

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  • This epoch is marked by the renaissance of Sanskrit literature and the gradual revival of Hinduism at the expense of Buddhism.

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  • Even the great dynasties have left few traces, and it is with difficulty that the patient historian disinters the minor kingdoms from obscurity, but Indian religion, literature and art have influenced all Asia from Persia to Japan.

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  • The achievements of the Persians in art, literature and religion are by no means contemptible, but somewhat mixed and cosmopolitan.

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  • It is perhaps on account of this intermediate flavour that the literature of Persia - for instance the adaptations of Omar Khayyam - is more appreciated in Europe than that of other Oriental nations.

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  • It is plain from early Moslem literature that Persian, Christian and especially Jewish ideas had penetrated into Arabia.

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  • But in spite of this total political collapse, Arabic religion and literature are still one of the greatest forces working in the western half of Asia, in northern Africa and to some extent in eastern Europe.

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  • Almost all Asiatic countries have a literature, but it is often not indigenous and consists of foreign works, chiefly religious, read either in translations or the original.

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  • Thus with the exception of a little folklore the literature of Indo-China, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea and Manchuria is mainly Indian or Chinese.

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  • The extensive Sanskrit literature, which has reached in translations China, Japan and Java, is chiefly theological and poetical, history being conspicuously absent.

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  • India has also a considerable medieval and modern literature in various languages.

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  • Pali, though only a form of Hindu literature, has a separate history, for it died in India and was preserved in Ceylon, whence it was imported to Burma and Siam as the language of religion.

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  • Persian, after being itself transformed by Arabic, has in its turn largely influenced all west Asiatic Moslem literature from Hindustani to Turkish.

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  • If one excepts the Old Testament, which is a product of the extreme west of Asia, it is remarkable how small has been the influence of Asiatic literature on Europe.

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  • Though Greek and Slavonic almost ceased to be written languages under Turkish rule, Europeans showed no disposition to replace them by Ottoman or Arabic literature.

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  • Mahommedan art is also largely architectural and has affected Literature, art, science.

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  • In both art and literature modern Asia is inferior to the past more conspicuously than Europe.

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  • In spite of the mass of literature which has accumulated on the subject, neither his death in the Temple nor his escape therefrom has been definitely established, though a very strong presumption is established in favour of the latter.

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  • His mother belonged to the brilliant Gregory family (q.v.), which, in the 18th century, gave so many representatives to literature and science in Scotland.

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  • In his later years he dabbled in literature and the drama, and interested himself in arboriculture in his retirement at Henley-on-Thames.

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  • Aberdeen was a distinguished scholar with a retentive memory and a wide knowledge of literature and art.

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  • English readers, who know the story only through the medium of Malory's noble prose and Tennyson's melodious verse, carry away an impression entirely foreign to that produced by a study of the original literature.

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  • He went over every part of the translation with me, observed on every passage in which justice was not done to the thought or the force of the expression lost, and made many useful criticisms. During this occupation we had occasion to see one another often, and became very intimate; and, as he had read much, had seen a great deal of the world, was acquainted with all the most distinguished persons who at that time adorned either the royal court or the republic of letters in France; had a great knowledge of French and Italian literature, and possessed very good taste, his conversation was extremely interesting and not a little instructive.

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  • the Decretum Gelassii, § 20) in spite of his services to Christian literature.

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  • Though they have produced some poetry, the Mahrattas have never done much for literature.

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  • Of his numerous publications the following are of special importance: - Assyrian Grammar for Comparative Purposes (1872); Principles of Comparative Philology (1874); Babylonian Literature (1877); Introduction to the Science of Language (1879); Monuments of the Hittites (1881); Herodotus i.-iii.

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  • Like Jean Hardouin he got to believe that a great deal of what is called classical literature was compiled by anonymous authors at a much later date, and he used frequently to startle his colleagues, the Gustavian academicians, by his audacious paradoxes.

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  • The literature of agriculture, in abeyance since the treatise of Walter of Henley, makes another beginning in the 16th century.

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  • Bevan, House of Seleucus (1902), and the earlier literature of the subject there cited.

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  • American literature began as far back as 1788, when a report on the Hessian fly was issued by Sir Joseph Banks; in 1817 Say began his writings; while in 1856 Asa Fitch started his report on the " Noxious Insects of New York."

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  • Since that date the literature has largely increased.

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  • Among other Americans who have largely increased the literature and knowledge must be mentioned F.

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  • " Anticipations " of method and doctrine can generally be found by the diligent investigator in the economic literature of his own or a foreign country.

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  • The span of life is limited; the work requires an extensive knowledge of the economic literature of several countries and the general features of all the important departments of modern economic activity.

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  • For such a general theory there is ample material in the economic literature of all civilized countries.

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  • Other books dealing with special subjects are likely to take a very high place in economic literature.

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  • Mahmud ibn Sabuktagin, the second of the dynasty (998-1030), continued to make himself still more independent of the caliphate than his predecessors, and, though a warrior and a fanatical Moslem, extended a generous patronage to Persian literature and learning, and even developed it at the expense of the Arabic institutions.

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  • SOURCES AND LITERATURE.

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  • He read much of the pamphlet literature then flooding the country, but he still preferred the, more general studies in history and literature, Plutarch, Caesar, Corneille, Voltaire and Rousseau being his favourite author:.

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  • The folly of the monarchs of the Holy Alliance in Europe gained for the writings of Montholon and Las Cases (that of Gourgaud was not published till 1899) a ready reception, with the result that Napoleon reappeared in the literature of the ensuing decades wielding an influence scarcely less potent than that of the grey-coated figure into whose arms France flung herself on his return from Elba.

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  • 209-C. 222)/n==Authorities== - Persian tradition knows very little about the Arsacids, who by it are called Ashkanians (from Ashak, the modern form of Arsaces.) Of modern works on the history of the Parthians (besides the numismatic literature) the most important are: G.

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  • He endeavoured to please Queen Caroline, who loved literature, and he has the credit, on good grounds, of having paid the expenses of the first handsome edition of Don Quixote to please her.

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  • JOSIAH WILLARD GIBBS (1839-1903), American mathematical physicist, the fourth child and only son of Josiah Willard Gibbs (1790-1861), who was professor of sacred literature in Yale Divinity School from 1824 till his death, was born at New Haven on the 11th of February 1839.

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  • In Greek literature his master was Emmanuel Chrysoloras.

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  • Ep. r) of the Englishman as "not ignorant of literature and.

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  • Frisch began the long series of works on the birds of Germany with which the literature of ornithology is enriched, by his Vorstellung der Vogel Teutschlands, which was only completed in 1763, and, its coloured plates proving very attractive, was again issued at Berlin in 1817.

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  • In addition to an enormous body of new information chiefly on the shoulder girdle, the alar muscles and the nerve plexuses of birds, this work contained a critical and descriptive summary of practically the whole pre-existing literature on the structure of birds, and it is hardly necessary for the student of ornithology to refer to earlier literature at first hand.

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  • His taste for literature was early seen, and his father Pierre (1496-1556) cultivated it to the utmost.

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  • In classical literature he was the first who made the world acquainted with the Fables of Phaedrus (1596); he also edited the Pervigilium Veneris (1587), and Juvenal and Persius (1585).

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  • Welcker returned to Giessen in 1808, and resuming his schoolteaching and university lectures was in the following year appointed the first professor of Greek literature and archaeology at that or any German university.

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  • Among his works on Greek literature the chief are Die schyleische Trilogie (1824, 6), Der epische Zyklus oder die Homerischen Gedichte (2 vols.

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  • Brown library of music (9886 vols.), a very full collection on the anthropology and ethnology of Europe, and more than 10o,000 volumes on the history, biography, geography and literature of the United States.

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  • Two Boston periodicals (one no longer so) that still hold an exceptional position in periodical literature, the North American Review (1815) and the Atlantic Monthly (1857), date from this period.

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  • The great English writers of Queen Anne's reign seem to have been but little known in the colony, and the local literature, though changed somewhat in character, showed but scant improvement.

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  • It is not till much later that Palmyra first appears in Western literature.

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  • Plumacher, Der Kampf urns Unbewusste (2nd ed., 1890), with a chronological table of the Hartmann literature from 1868 to 1890; A.

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  • Certainly it is due to this very much more than we commonly think, and the more it is due to this the more do moral therapeutics rise in possibility and importance " (Literature and Dogma, pp. 143-144).

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  • In Irish literature, however, the Druids are frequently mentioned, and their functions in the island seem to correspond fairly well to those of their Gaulish brethren described by classical writers.

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  • The following is the position of the Druid in the pagan literature.

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  • In the religious literature they are almost exclusively represented as magicians and diviners opposing the Christian missionaries, though we find two of them acting as tutors to the daughters of Laegaire, the high-king, at the coming of St Patrick.

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  • An excellent article in Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopcidie (3rd ed.), "Briider des gemeinsamen Lebens," supplies copious information with references to all the literature; see also Max Heimbucher, Orden and Kongregationen (1897), ii.

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  • In 1893 he published a history of early Christian literature down to Eusebius, Geschichte der altchristl.

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  • But the new field of poetic literature afforded by the Crusades is still more striking than this development of science.

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  • - In dealing with the literature of the Crusades, it is perhaps better, though ideally less scientific, to begin with chronicles and narratives rather than with documents.

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  • The Catholic mission has done very good work in what relates to schools, institutes and the diffusion of literature.

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  • THE CID, the favourite hero of Spain, and the most prominent figure in her literature.

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  • The Cid of romance, the Cid of a thousand battles, legends and dramas, the Cid as apotheosized in literature, the Cid invoked by good Spaniards in every national crisis, whose name is a perpetual and ever-present inspiration to Spanish patriotism, is a very different character from the historical Rodrigo Diaz - the freebooter, the rebel, the consorter with the infidels and the enemies of Spain.

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  • In the popular literature of Spain he holds a place such as has no parallel in other countries.

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  • Huber, Muller, and Ferdinand Wolf are among the leading authorities in the history and literature of the Cid.

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  • He was the author of several contributions to the literature of horticulture, including a Practical Treatise on the Culture of the Dahlia (1838), and a Pocket Botanical Dictionary (1st ed., 1840).

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  • Iphigeneia is a favourite subject in Greek literature.

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  • It has fallen to the lot of no other patron of literature to have his name associated with works of such lasting interest as the Georgics of Virgil, the first three books of Horace's Odes, and the first book of his Epistles.

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  • The few fragments that remain show that he was less successful as an author than as a judge and patron of literature.

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  • The literature is vast; see G.

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  • 315; histories of Roman literature by Teuffel-Schwabe and Schanz.

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  • Such is Koheleth's view of life, and it is obvious that such a conception of an aimless cosmos is thoroughly non-Jewish, if we may judge Jewish thought by the great body of the extant literature.

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  • The Solomonic authorship has long since been given up: the historical setting of the work and its atmosphere - the silent assumption of monotheism and monogamy, the nonnational tone, the attitude towards kings and people, the picture of a complicated social life, the strain of philosophic reflection - are wholly at variance with what is known of the 10th century B.C. and with the Hebrew literature down to the 5th or 4th century B.C. The introduction of Solomon, the ideal of wisdom, is a literary device of the later time, and probably deceived nobody.

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  • By about the beginning of our era the Jews had given up Hebrew and wrote in Aramaic; the process of expulsion had been going on, doubtless, for some time; but comparison with the later extant literature (Chronicles, the Hebrew Ecclesiasticus or Ben-Sira, Esther) makes it improbable that such Hebrew as that of Koheleth would have been written earlier than the 2nd century B.C. (for details see Driver's Introduction).

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  • The conception of the world and of human life as controlled by natural law, a naturalistic cosmos, is alien not only to the prophetic and liturgical Hebrew literature but also to Hebrew thought in general.

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  • Malay Language And Literature The Malay language is a member of the Malayan section of the Malayo-Polynesian class of languages, but it is by no means a representative type of the section which has taken its name from it.

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  • The Malays cannot, strictly speaking, be said to possess a literature, for none of their writings can boast any literary beauty or value.

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  • Their most characteristic literature is to be found, not in their writings, but in the folk-tales which are trans mitted orally from generation to generation, and repeated by the wandering minstrels called by the people Peng-lipor Lara, i.

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  • They also contributed to sacred literature themselves in the composition of new psalms. Attendance to the ordinary needs of nature was entirely relegated to the hours of darkness.

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  • By the forms of the letters of the inscriptions, and by the architectural details, the age of the monument has been approximately fixed in the 3rd century B.C. The bas-reliefs give us invaluable evidence of the literature, and also of the clothing, buildings and other details of the social conditions of the peoples of Buddhist India at that period.

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  • After being twice imprisoned during the Terror he retired to Brittany, where he devoted himself to literature till 1814.

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  • of Roman Literature, p. 259.

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  • Thus, in the treatise known as Physica et Mystica and falsely ascribed to Democritus (such false attributions are a constant feature of the literature of alchemy), various receipts are given for colouring and gilding metals, but the conception of transmutation does not occur.

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  • But the Arabs did not acquire their knowledge of this literature at first hand.

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  • Drew continued to work at his trade till 1805, when he entered into an engagement with Dr Thomas Coke, a prominent Wesleyan official, which enabled him to devote himself entirely to literature.

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  • We have above all his Letters (Epistolae), difficult to date, but extremely important from the standpoint of history, dogma, or literature; see Dummler's edition in the Monumenta Germaniae historica, 1892.

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  • Taking up his residence in New York, he was in 1832-1839 president of the National Bank (afterwards the Gallatin Bank) of New York, but his duties were light, and he devoted himself chiefly to the congenial pursuits of science and literature.

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  • In the next place comes the evidence derived from the whole range of ancient literature and specially from descriptions of the city or its different localities.

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  • The literature of succeeding centuries furnishes only isolated references; the more important are found in the scholia on Aristophanes, the lexicons of Hesychius, Photius and others, and the Etymologicum Magnum.

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  • Leake (Topography of Athens and the Demi, 2nd ed., 1841) brought the descriptive literature to an end and inaugurated the period of modern scientific research, in which German archaeologists have played a distinguished part.

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  • The attention of many students has naturally been concentrated on the ancient city, the birthplace of European art and literature, and a great development of investigation and discussion in the special domain of Athenian archaeology has given birth to a voluminous literature.

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  • According to DBrpfeld, this was the " old temple " of Athena Polias, frequently mentioned in literature and inscriptions, in which was housed the most holy image (oavov) of the goddess which fell from heaven; it was burnt, but not completely destroyed, during the Persian War, and some of its external decorations were afterwards built into the north wall of the Acropolis; it was subsequently restored, he thinks, with or without its colonnade - in the former case a portion of the peristyle must have been removed when the Erechtheum was built so as to make room for the porch of the maidens; the building was set on fire in 406 B.C. (Xen.

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  • After this catastrophe the benefactors of Athens were for the most part Romans; the influence of Greek literature and art had begun to affect the conquering race.

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  • Her achievements in literature are hardly less great.

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  • Athenian art and literature in the 4th century declined but slightly from their former standard; philosophy and oratory reached a standard which was never again equalled in antiquity and may still serve as a model.

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  • Periodical Literature.

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  • He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus, the patron of art and literature, and showed the same taste for Greek culture and its representatives.

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  • - The Ignatian literature is very large.

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  • The literature connected with the Spiritual Exercises is also large.

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  • His publications include Philosophy of Kant (1878); Critical Philosophy of Kant (1889); Religion and Social Philosophy of Comte (1885); Essays on Literature and Philosophy (1892); Evolution of Religion (Gifford Lectures, 1891-1892); Evolution of Theology in the Greek Philosophers (1904); and he is represented in this encyclopaedia by the article on Cartesianism.

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  • (His merits as a writer are dealt with in the article Spain: Literature).

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  • Prominent among its buildings are the federal building, the auditorium, the public library and the Masonic library, which contains one of the best collections of Masonic literature in the world.

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  • Besides many contributions to periodical literature he wrote,.

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  • Chemical literature was full of the phlogistic modes of expression - oxygen was '" phlogisticated air," nitrogen " dephlogisticated air," &c. - and this tended to retard its promotion.

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  • The growth of chemical literature since the publication of Lavoisier's famous Traite de chimie in 1789, and of Berzelius' Lehrbuch der Chemie in 1808-1818, has been enormous.

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  • The great number and striking character of the compounds of this group of metals have formed the subject of many investigations, and already there is a most voluminous literature.

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  • The literature of this subject is very large.

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  • Again, he began with far greater facility in literature than in music, if only because a play can be copied ten times faster than a full score.

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  • To handle these so successfully that we can discriminate defects from qualities at all, is proof of the technique of a master, even though the faults extend to whole categories of literature.

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  • It is no exaggeration to say that a parallel condition in literature would be produced by a strong public opinion to the effect that any Enelish style was hopelessly out of date unless it consisted exclusively of the most difficult types of phrase to be found in the works of Browning and Meredith.

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  • - The Wagner literature is too enormous to be dealt with here.

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  • Setting aside London and Edinburgh, no locality in the British Isles is so intimately associated with the history of English literature as the Lake District.

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  • German literature tells of several literary schools, or groups of writers animated by the same ideas, and working in the spirit of the same principles and by the same poetic methods.

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  • The most notable instance - indeed it is almost the only instance - of the kind in English literature is the Lake School of Poets.

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  • The following is a selection from the literature of the subject: Harriet Martineau, The English Lakes (Windermere, 1858); Mrs Lynn Linton, The Lake Country (London, 1864); E.

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  • He combined a roving disposition with a natural taste for mechanics and for literature.

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  • For a guide to other literature see W.

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  • Equally certain is a second observation of a general character that the epic originating as the greater portion of the literature in Assur-bani-pal's collection in Babylonia is a composite product, that is to say, it consists of a number of independent stories or myths originating at different times, and united to form a continuous narrative with Gilgamesh as the central figure.

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  • Martyrology was the most popular literature in the early Church.

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    0
  • She figured much in 16th-century literature, notably in the Mirrour for Magistrates, and in Thomas Heywood's Edward IV .

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    0
  • One may notice that the first Ptolemy himself made a contribution of some value to historical literature in his account of Alexander's campaigns; the fourth Ptolemy not only instituted a cult of Homer but himself published tragedies; and even Ptolemy Euergetes II.

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  • Bardenhewer's Patrologie, and other literature cited in F.

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    0
  • He was an indefatigable writer, and the first germ of his future socialism is contained in a letter of the 21st of March 1787, one of a series - mainly on literature - addressed to the secretary of the Academy of Arras.

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    0
  • Charles the Bold maintained the traditions of his house as a patron of literature, and showed special favour to Chastellain, who, after being constituted indiciaire or chronicler of the order of the Golden Fleece, was himself made a knight of the order on the 2nd of May 1473.

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  • This idea that the Messianic kingdom of the future on earth should have a definite duration has - like the whole eschatology of the primitive Church - its roots in the Jewish apocalyptic literature, where it appears at a comparatively late period.

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    0
  • In the Semitic churches of the East (the Syrian, Arabian and Ethiopian), and in that of Armenia, the apocalyptic literature was preserved much longer than in the Greek Church.

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    0
  • She died at Jerusalem about 460, after devoting her last years to literature.

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    0
  • Now, however, a more logical and scholarly aspect was given to their literature by the writings of Barclay, especially his Apology for the True Christian Divinity published in Latin (1676) and in English (1678), and by the works of Penn, amongst which No Cross No Crown and the Maxims or Fruits of Solitude are the best known.

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  • It has abandoned its peculiarities of dress and language, as well as its hostility to music and art, and it has cultivated a wider taste in literature.

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    0
  • West, "Pahlavi Literature" in Grundriss d.

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    0
  • In 1806 he became a medical practitioner in partnership with James Gregory, but, though successful in his profession, preferred literature and philosophy.

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    0
  • Turning his attention from law to divinity, Hare took priest's orders in 1826; and, on the death of his uncle in 1832, he succeeded to the rich family living of Hurstmonceaux in Sussex, where he accumulated a library of some 12,000 volumes, especially rich in German literature.

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  • A man of literary taste and culture, familiar with the classics, a facile writer of Latin verses' as well as of Ciceronian prose, he was as anxious that the Roman clergy should unite human science and literature with their theological studies as that the laity should be educated in the principles of religion; and to this end he established in Rome a kind of voluntary school board, with members both lay and clerical; and the rivalry of the schools thus founded ultimately obliged the state to include religious teaching in its curriculum.

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  • He always showed the greatest interest in science and in literature, and he would have taken a position as a statesman of the first rank had he held office in any secular government.

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    0
  • They appeared also in literature, e.g.

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    0
  • She was well versed in mathematics, which she studied at the university of Moscow, and in general literature her favourite authors were Bayle, Montesquieu, Boileau, Voltaire and Helvetius.

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    0
  • Here the young Marsilio received his elementary education in grammar and Latin literature at the high school or studio pubblico.

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    0
  • Not only literature, but the physical sciences, as then taught, had a charm for him; and he is said to have made considerable progress in medicine under the tuition of his father.

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    0
  • In the year 1459 John Argyropoulos was lecturing on the Greek language and literature at Florence, and Marsilio became his pupil.

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    0
  • The Joachimite literature is extremely vast.

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    0
  • It may be presumed, however, that from the very first it was employed as the vehicle for Roman literature.

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    0
  • Even after the introduction of vellum as the ordinary vehicle for literature papyrus still continued to some extent in use outside Egypt, and was not entirely superseded until a late date.

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    0
  • instinctus, from instinguere, to incite, impel) as employed in general literature and the term "instinct" as used in scientific discourse.

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  • " The mystics accorded the first place to prayer, which was considered as a mystical progress towards God, demanding a state of ecstasy."4 As a result, some of the finest specimens of Jewish devotional literature and some of the best types of Jewish individual character have been Kabbalist.

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  • The Zohar, that farrago of absurdity and spiritual devotion, was the weapon with which these Christians defended Jewish literature against hostile ecclesiastic bodies (Abrahams, Jew.

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    0
  • The study of the whole subject being wrapped up with Gnosticism and Oriental theosophy, the related literature is immense.

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    0
  • Ginsburg, The Kabbalah, its Doctrines, Development and Literature (London, 1865); I.

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    0
  • Waite, Doctrine and Literature of the Kabbalah (London, 1902); Fliigel, Philosophy, Kabbala, eec. (Baltimore, 1902); D.

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    0
  • Warner's World's Best Literature, 8425 sqq.

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    0
  • Liber sapientiae), an apocryphal book of the "Wisdom Literature" (q.v.), the most brilliant production of pre-Christian Hebrew philosophical thought, remarkable both for the elevation of its ideas and for the splendour of its diction.

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  • is, for the first time in literature, identified with the devil ("Diabolos," ii.

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  • The only occurrence in old Jewish literature (except in Ecclus.

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  • Wisdom Literature >>

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  • WISDOM LITERATURE, the name applied to the body of Old Testament and Apocryphal writings that contain the philosophical thought of the later pre-Christian Judaism.

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    0
  • Though the early Hebrews (of the time before the 5th century B.C.) must have reflected on life, there is no trace of such reflection, of a systematic sort, in their extant literature.

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    0
  • There was nothing in their general position to make them in- 'hospitable to ethical conceptions of the future life, as is shown by the fact that so soon as the Egyptian-Greek idea of immortality made itself felt in Jewish circles it was adopted by the author of the Wisdom of Solomon; but prior to the 1st century B.C. it does not appear in the Wisdom literature, and the nationalistic dogma of resurrection is not mentioned in it at all.

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  • Yet, with this adoption of the Greek point of view, the tone and spirit of this literature remain Hebrew.

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    0
  • The literature of Travel is rich.

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    0
  • Consult the literature of history and colonial reform given below.

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    0
  • On the domestic reform problem there is an enormous literature, from which may be selected (see general histories above and works cited under § Administration of this bibliography): M.

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    0
  • A complete classification of mathematical sciences, as they at present exist, is to be found in the International Catalogue of Scientific Literature promoted by the Royal Society.

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    0
  • The school did not produce an extensive literature, but it played an important part in resisting an exaggerated Augustinianism by reasserting the freedom of the will and the continued existence of the divine image in human nature after the fall.

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    0
  • A full account of this language, and its literature, is given under Servia and Croatia-Slavonia.

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    0
  • Amid the cares of state he found time for works of public utility and for the support of literature and art; he is credited with having sent the first embassy to a Christian power, after the Venetian expedition to Gallipoli in 1416, and the Ottoman navy is first heard of in his reign.

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  • (X.) Literature.

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  • In all literary matters the Ottoman Turks have shown themselves a singularly uninventive people, the two great schools, the old and the new, into which we may divide their literature, being closely modelled, the one after the classics of Persia, the other after those of modern Europe, and more especially of France.

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  • Why Persian rather than Arabian or any other literature became the model of Ottoman writers is explained by the early history of the race (see Turks).

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    0
  • Ottoman literature may be said to open with a few mystic lines, the work of Sultan Veled, son of Maulana Jelal-ud-Din, the author of the great Persian poem the Mathnawi.

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  • The writers mentioned above are the most important previous to the capture of Constantinople; but there is little literature of real merit prior to that event.

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    0
  • The poems of this statesman, though possessing little merit of their own, being for the most part translations from Nevayi, form one of the landmarks in the history of Ottoman literature.

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    0
  • This prolific author copied, and so imported into Ottoman literature, a didactic style of ghazel-writing which was then being introduced in Persia by the poet Sa'ib; but so closely did the pupil follow in the footsteps of his master that it is not always easy to know that his lines are intended to be Turkish.

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  • More intimate relations with western Europe and a pretty general study of the French language and literature, together with the steady progress of the reforming tendency fairly started under Mahmud II., resulted in the birth of the new or modern school, whose objects are truth and simplicity.

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  • The whole tone, sentiment and form of Ottoman literature have been revolutionized by the new school: varieties of poetry hitherto unknown have been adopted from Europe; an altogether new branch of literature, the drama, has arisen; while the sciences are now treated and seriously studied after the system of the West.

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  • He wrote with conspicuous success in almost every branch of literature - history, romance, ethics, poetry and the drama; and his influence on the Young Turk party of later days was profound.

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  • In literature, art and science, it divided the supremacy of the world with Cordova; in commerce and wealth it far surpassed that city.

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  • If it was due to Livius that the forms of Latin literature were, from the first, moulded on those of Greek literature, it was due to Naevius that much of its spirit and substance was of native growth.

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  • An important influence in Roman literature and belief, which had its origin in Sicily, first appeared in this poem - the recognition of the mythical connexion of Aeneas and his Trojans with the foundation of Rome.

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  • He was one of those who made the Latin language into a great organ of literature.

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  • In 5802 she published the first of her really noteworthy books, the novel of Delphine, in which the "femme incomprise" was in a manner introduced to French literature, and in which she herself and not a few of her intimates appeared in transparent disguise.

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  • Mme de Stael occupies a singular position in French literature.

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  • But Corinne is still a very remarkable exposition of a certain kind of aestheticism, while De l'Allemagne is still perhaps the most remarkable account of one country, by a native and inhabitant of another, which exists in literature.

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  • He spent his life and devoted himself in Basra chiefly to the study of polite literature.

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    0
  • As to the general literature on Greenland, a number of the more important modern works have been noticed in footnotes.

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  • there is a most valuable list of literature about Greenland up to 1880.

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  • relating to Wales and in Celtic literature generally.

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  • The peach has not, it is true, been found wild in China, but it has been cultivated there from time immemorial; it has entered into the literature and folk-lore of the people; and it is designated by a distinct name, "to" or "tao," a word found in the writings of Confucius five centuries before Christ, and even in other writings dating from the 10th century before the Christian era.

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  • It may, however, well be that both peach and almond are derived from some pre-existing and now extinct form whose descendants have spread over the whole geographic area mentioned; but this is a mere speculation, though indirect evidence in its support might be obtained from the nectarine, of which no mention is made in ancient literature, and which, as we have seen, originates from the peach and reproduces itself by seed, thus offering the characteristics of a species in the act of developing itself.

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  • The charm of the personal character of Stevenson and the romantic vicissitudes of his life are so predominant in the minds of all who knew him, or lived within earshot of his legend, that they made the ultimate position which he will take in the history of English literature somewhat difficult to decide.

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  • He had mastered his manner and, as one may say, learned his trade, in the exercise of criticism and the reflective parts of literature, before he surrendered himself to that powerful creative impulse which had long been tempting him, so that when, in mature life, he essayed the portraiture of invented character he came to it unhampered by any imperfection of language.

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  • But many hold that his letters and essays are finer contributions to pure literature, and that on these exquisite mixtures of wisdom, pathos, melody and humour his fame is likely to be ultimately based.

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  • The Act of 1872 provided for five or more colleges or departments: a college of science, literature and the arts, which offers (for the degree of Bachelor of Arts) a four-years course, is entirely elective (except that a certain number of " long courses " must be selected) after the first year, and in which the only restriction is upon the range of subjects from which the student's choice may be made; a college of agriculture (including military tactics), which is now a " department," including a college and a school of agriculture, a short course for farmers, a dairy school, the Crookston school of agriculture, a main experiment station at St Anthony Park, between Minneapolis and St Paul, and sub-stations 1 m.

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  • They were famous for their skill in music and literature.

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  • It has attracted the attention of many workers, and has formed the subject of a huge literature.

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  • p. 9; Revue biblique (1903), pp. 2 49 sqq.; and on the ark, generally, in addition to the literature already cited, Kautzsch, Hastings' Diet.

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  • Though contributing few names of the highest rank to German literature, the city has been intimately associated with the literary movement.

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    0
  • But all other interests were early subordinated to his love of literature, to which the greater part of his long life was devoted.

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  • He published his first volume of Poems in 1827, and in 1833 appeared his Poems and Prose Writings, republished in 1850 in two volumes, in which were included practically all of his poems and of his prose contributions to periodical literature.

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    0
  • Although the bulk of his published writings was not large, his influence on American literature during the first half of the 19th century was surpassed by that of few of his contemporaries.

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  • Brandes first drew European attention to Nietzsche by his famous essay in 1889; since then an enormous literature has grown up round the subject.

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  • Orthodox in practice and feeling, his critical treatment of the rabbinic literature prepared the way for the scientific investigations of the 19th century.

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  • He expressed himself plainly during the canvass on the questions of slavery and the bank, at the same time voting, perhaps with a touch of bravado, for a bill offered in 1836 to subject abolition literature in the mails to the laws of the several states.

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  • (r) Midrashic. Jellinek published in the six parts of his Beth ha-Midrasch (1853-1878) a large number of smaller Midrashi, ancient and medieval homilies and folk-lore records, which have been of much service in the recent revival of interest in Jewish apocalyptic literature.

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  • His interest was not, however, confined to theological literature; he annotated the margins of his classical texts with numerous scholia (many of which are preserved), and had several MSS.

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  • Ulm is remarkable in the history of German literature as the spot where the Meistersinger lingered longest, preserving without text and without notes the traditional lore of their craft.

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  • four lines, the first, second and fourth of which have the same rhyme, while the third usually (but not always) remains rhymelesswas first successfully introduced into Persian literature as the exclusive vehicle for subtle thoughts on the various topics of Sufic mysticism by the sheikh Ab Said bin Abulkhair,1 but Omar differs in its treatment considerably from Ab Said.

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  • Shirazi (f9o5); but the literature in new translations and imitations has recently multiplied exceedingly.

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  • He also mastered the English language and studied English literature.

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    0
  • References to earlier literature will be found in the following noteworthy studies of recent date: Davidson, "Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah," in Cambridge Bible (1896); Nowack, Die kleinen Propheten (Hdkr.) (1897); Wellhausen, Die kleinen Propheten (1898); G.

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  • Among the earliest examples of pulpit oratory which have been preserved in English literature, the discourses of Wycliffe and his disciples may be passed by, to arrive at the English sermons of John Fisher (1469?-1535), which have a distinct literary value.

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  • But Hugh Latimer (1485?-1555) is the first great English preacher, and the wit and power of his sermons (1549) give them prominence in our literature.

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  • It was the popular movement of the Reformation, which made the sermon a piece of literature, on the lips of Jean Calvin (1509-1564), Pierre Viret (1511-1571) and Theodore de Beze (1519-1605).

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  • These are the great classic preachers whose discourses continue to be read, and to form an inherent pare of the body of French literature.

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  • Since the end of the 18th century, although a great number of volumes of sermons have been and continue to be published, and although the pulpit holds its own in Protestant and Catholic countries alike, for purposes of exhortation and encouragement, it cannot be said that the sermon has in any way extended its influence as a form of pure literature.

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  • In the Assyro-Babylonian literature the name Akkadu appears as part of the royal title in connexion with Sumer; viz.

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    0
  • In Rabbinical literature, Louis Ginzberg, in Monatschrift, xliii.

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    0
  • The tragic story of Niobe was a favourite subject in literature and art.

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    0
  • For further literature on the subject, see A.

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    0
  • In Latin literature it was employed for the first time by the poet Ennius, who wrote in the interval between the First and Second Punic Wars (Ann.

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  • 120-128; Hallam's Literature of Europe, iii.

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    0
  • Though not a profound and systematic philosophical thinker, Thomasius prepared the way for great reforms in philosophy, and, above all, in law, literature, social life and theology.

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    0
  • He thus created an epoch in German literature, philosophy and law, and Spittler opens with him the modern period of ecclesiastical history.

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  • On the collapse of the insurrection he emigrated, and on his return to Poland devoted himself exclusively to literature and the cultiva tion of his estates.

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  • Literature - modern as well as ancient - occupied his attention; one of his works was a translation of four parts of Clarissa; and translations of some of the then current English paraphrases on biblical books manifested his sympathy with a school which, if not very learned, attracted him by its freer air.

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  • For the literature of Trilobites see ('22*).

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    0
  • (For literature see Zittel, 22 *.) Grade b (of the Eu-arachnida).

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    0
  • (Reference to literature (29).) Order 3.

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    0
  • Reference to literature (36).

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    0
  • Reference to literature (37).

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  • Reference to literature (38).

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  • Reference to literature (39).

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    0
  • A species of Acarus is recorded as infesting a store of powdered strychnine and feeding on that drug, so poisonous to larger organisms. Reference to literature (40).

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    0
  • Zittel, American edition of his Palaeontology (the Macmillan Co., New York), where ample references to the literature of Trilobitae and Eurypteridae will be found; also references to literature of fossil Scorpions and Spiders; 23.

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  • APOCRYPHAL LITERATURE.

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  • We shall therefore enter at once on a short account of the origin of this literature in Judaism, of its adoption by early Christianity, of the various meanings which the term " apocryphal " assumed in the course of its history, and having so done we shall proceed to classify and deal with the books that belong to this literature.

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  • Mangey) in Egypt possessed a secret literature.

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  • But such literature was not confined to the members of these communities, but had been current among the Chasids and their successors the Pharisees.'

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    0
  • To this literature belong essentially the apocalypses which were published in fast succession from Daniel onwards.

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  • It is not improbable that with many Jewish enthusiasts this literature was more highly treasured than the canonical scriptures.

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    0
  • Now the current religious literature of Judaism outside the canon was composed of apocryphal books, the bulk of which bore an apocalyptic character, and dealt with the coming of the Messianic kingdom.

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    0
  • While the characteristic features of apocalyptic literature were derived from Judaism, those of Gnosticism sprang partly from Greek philosophy, partly from oriental religions.

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  • We have remarked above that the Jewish apocrypha - especially the apocalyptic section and the host of Christian apocryphsbecame the ordinary religious literature of the early Christians.

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  • OLD Testament Apocryphal Books We shall now proceed to enumerate the apocryphal books: first the Apocrypha Proper, and next the rest of the Old and New Testament apocryphal literature.

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  • The former literature was generally written in Hebrew or Aramaic, and seldom in Greek; the latter naturally in Greek.

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    0
  • Palestinian Jewish Literature: (a) Historical.

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    0
  • under separate article on Apocalyptic Literature.

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    0
  • Hellenistic Jewish Literature: Historical and Legendary.

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    0
  • General Literature: - E.

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    0
  • Other Old Testament Apocryphal Literature: (a) Historical.

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    0
  • Before we discuss these three documents we shall mention other members of this literature, which, though derivable ultimately from Jewish sources, are Christian in their present form.

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    0
  • The book holds the same place in rabbinical literature as the Book of Proverbs in the Bible.

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  • New Testament Apocryphal Literature: (a) Gospels: - Uncanonical sayings of the Lord in Christian and Jewish writings.

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    0
  • (d) Apocalypses: see under Apocalyptic Literature.

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    0
  • See literature generally in Hennecke, NTliche Apok.

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    0
  • (For the literature see Hennecke, NTliche Apok.

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    0
  • For literature see Hennecke, NTliche Apokryphen Handbuch, 132 seq.

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    0
  • For the literature see Hennecke, Neutestamentliche Apokryphen Handbuch, 395 sqq.

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    0
  • 878-881, with the literature there mentioned.) The above correspondence, which appears also in Syriac, is inwoven with the legend of Addai or Thaddaeus.

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  • The literature is overwhelming in its extent.

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    0
  • After the imperial university was founded, he was appointed professor of Greek literature (1809) with Boissonade as his assistant.

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    0
  • - The sources of present knowledge regarding Mithraism consist of the Vedas, the Avesta, the Pahlevi writings, Greek and Latin literature and inscriptions,.

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  • The Brazilian people have the natural taste for art, music and literature so common among the Latin nations of the Old World.

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  • Brazilian literature has been seriously prejudiced by partisan politics and dilettantism.

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  • In historical literature Brazil has produced one writer of high standing - Francisco Adolpho Varnhagen (Visconde de Porto Seguro), whose Historia Geral do Brazil is a standard authority on that subject.

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  • Of these a brief summary, beginning with the department of general literature and passing on to history and science, is subjoined.

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  • In the 17th century we find Ludovico Sergardi (Quinto Settano), a Latinist and satirical writer of much talent and culture; but the most original and brilliant figure in Sienese literature is that of Girolamo Gigli (1660-1722), author of the Gazzettino, La Sorellina di Don Pilone, Il Vocabolario cateriniano and the Diario ecclesiastico.

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  • As humorist, scholar and philologist, Gigli would take a high place in the literature of any land.

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  • Indeed, phrases more or less equivalent occur in the sub-apostolic literature, and even in the New Testament itself, such as those who are " over you in the Lord " (r Thess.

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  • A certain confusion exists in cuneiform literature between Ninib and Nergal, perhaps due to the traces of two different conceptions regarding these two solar deities.

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  • It is also the earliest outstanding work which discloses that habit of Scotticism which took such strong hold of the popular Northern literature during the coming years of conflict with England.

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  • In this respect it is in marked contrast with all the patriotic verse of preceding and contemporary literature.

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  • But now, and until 1728, he created an entirely new class of humorous literature under the pseudonym of Hans Mikkelsen.

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  • Holberg was not only the founder of Danish literature and the greatest of Danish authors, but he was, with the exception of Voltaire, the first writer in Europe during his own generation.

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    0
  • For albeit the other studies assist literature, yet this has the sole privilege of making one lettered.

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    0
  • A critical survey of recent literature on Scholasticism is given by Baeumker in the Archiv far Geschichte der Philosophie, vols.

    0
    0
  • iii.), and Fitzmaurice Kelly, History of Spanish Literature, pp. 200 -202 (London, 1898), may also be consulted.

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  • Mihaly V6rosmartyo, Ferencz KOlcsey, Ferencz Kazinczy and his associates, to mention but a few of many great names, were, consciously or unconsciously, as the representatives of the renascent national literature, accomplishing a political mission, and their pens proved no less efficacious than the swords of their ancestors.

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  • (b) Works: The modern literature of Hungary is very rich in historical monographs, of which a long list will be found in the Subject Index of the London Library.

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  • Literature The Catholic ecclesiastics who settled in Hungary during the 1 1th century, and who found their way into the chief offices of the state, were mainly instrumental in establishing Latin as the predominant language of the court, the higher schools and public worship, and of eventually introducing it into the administration.

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  • Having thus become the tongue of the educated and privileged classes, Latin continued to monopolize the chief fields of literature until the revival of the native language at the close of the 18th century.

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    0
  • The period placed by Hungarian authors between 1 437 and 1530 marks the first development of Magyar literature.

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  • and Leopold I., as also the continual encroachment of Germanizing influences under 17th the Habsburgs, were unfavourable to the development of the national literature during the next literary period, dating from the Peace of Vienna (1606) to that of Szatmar (1711).

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  • In polite literature the heroic poem Zrinyidsz (1651), descriptive of the fall of Sziget, by Nicholas Zrinyi, grandson of the defender of that fortress, marks a new era in Hungarian poetry.

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  • Among the few prose writers of distinction were Andrew Spangar, whose " Hungarian Bookstore," Magyar Konyvtdr (Kassa, 1738), is said to be the earliest work of the kind in the Magyar dialect; George Baranyi, who translated the New Testament (Lauba, 1 754); the historians Michael Cserei and Matthew Bel, which last, however, wrote chiefly in Latin; and Peter Bod, who besides his theological treatises compiled a history of Hungarian literature under the title Magyar Athends (Szeben, 1766).

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  • The first two, marking respectively the progress of the " Regeneration of the Native Literature " (1772-1807) and the " Revival of the Language " (1807-1830), were introductory to and preparatory for the third or " Academy," period, which began about 1830.

    0
    0
  • reaction in favour of the native literature manifested itself at first chiefly in the creation of various schools of poetry.

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    0
  • Journalistic literature in the native language begins with the Magyar Hirmondo (Harbinger) started by Matthias Rath at Pozsony in 1780.

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    0
  • Poetry and belles lettres still o e continued to occupy the chief place in the native literature, la8nguage 1 but under Kazinczy and his immediate followers Berzsenyi, 807- Kolcsey, Fay and others, a correctness of style and ex- 1830).

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  • As a sonnet writer none stands higher than Paul Szemere, known also for his rendering of Korner's drama Zrinyi (1818), and his contributions to the Elet es Literatura (Life and Literature).

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