Literary-language sentence example

literary-language
  • His efforts to make Servian writers adopt his reformed alphabet, and accept the language of the common people as a literary language, met with fierce opposition, especially on the part of the clergy and friends of the artificial Slaveno-Servian literary language.

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  • Patriotic efforts are made to encourage the use of Hebrew both for writing and speaking, but the continued existence of it as a literary language depends on the direction in which the future history of the Jews will develop.

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  • Its main centres were at Edessa and Nisibis, but it was the literary language of practically all the Christian writers in the region east of Antioch, as well as of the Christian subjects of the Persian empire.

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  • Even as a grammarian he performed an important service to the literary language of Rome, by fixing its prosody and arresting the tendency to decay in its final syllables.

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  • At first an attempt was made to make Maltese a literary language by adapting the Arabic characters to record it in print.

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  • The literary language of Rome was in process of formation during the 2nd century B.C., and it was in the latter part of this century that the series of great Roman orators, with whose spirit Roman tragedy has a strong affinity, begins.

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  • But, notwithstanding the attempt to introduce an alien element into the Roman language, which proved incompatible with its natural genius, and his own failure to attain the idiomatic purity of Naevius, Plautus or Terence, the fragments of his dramas are sufficient to prove the service which he rendered to the formation of the literary language of Rome as well as to the culture and character of his contemporaries.

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  • During the whole of the 12th century it shared with Latin the distinction of being the literary language of England, and it was in use at the court until the 14th century.

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  • Castilian, which is the literary language of Spain, and with certain differences, of Spanish America, is spoken in Old and New Castile, Aragon, Estremadura, and the greater part of Leon; in Andalusia it is subject to various modifications of accent and pronunciation.

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  • The ordinary literary language of the later monuments is modelled on Old Egyptian.

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  • Coptic.This, in the main, represents the popular language of early Christian Egypt from the 3rd to perhaps the 10th century AD., when the growth of Coptic as a literary language must, have ceased.

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  • In Iceland this tongue, with some modifications, has remained in use, and until about 110o it was the literary language of the whole of Scandinavia.

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  • Their literary language is High German, but their spoken language is more of the Low German character.

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  • Modern Greek has also a large number of Turkish words which are rejected in the artificial literary language.

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  • But Pazmany's most unforgetable service to his country was his creation of the Hungarian literary language.

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  • Reval Esthonian, which preserves more carefully the full inflectional forms and pays greater attention to the laws of euphony, is recognized as the literary language.

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  • No doubt Varro contemned the Hellenizing innovations by which the hard and rude Latin of his youth was transformed into the polished literary language of the late republican and the Augustan age.

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  • Karajich and his followers tried to make it the literary language of the Servians.

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  • But, as in the second half of the 19th century the kingdom of Servia, speaking the Ressava or ShumadiyaSyrmian dialect, became the centre of Servian literary activity, the last-mentioned dialect tended to become the literary language.

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  • These differences are so insignificant that it was very natural that the Croats after having tried to convert the chaka y ski dialect into a separate literary language were compelled to abandon that attempt and to adopt the shtokayski.

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  • The appellation " Serbo-Croatian " for the literary language of both nations now finds more favour.

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  • Although the Croats write and print in Latin characters, while the Servians write and print in Cyrillic, and although many a Servian cannot read Croatian books, and vice versa, the literary language of both nations is one and the same.

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  • Servian-Slavonic was the literary language of the Servians from the 12th century to the end of the 15th, i.e.

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  • Russian-Slavonic thus became the literary language of the Orthodox Servians.

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  • The literary language of the two nations is identical, but the Croats use the Latin alphabet,' while the Serbs prefer a modified form of the Cyrillic. The two nations have also been politically separated since the 7th century, if not for a longer period; but this division has produced little difference of character or physical type.

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  • Its history is indissolubly interwoven with that of the Stokavci, which ultimately superseded it, and became the literary language of all the SerboCroats, as it had long been the language of the best national ballads and legends.

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  • One result of this nationalist revival was the unsuccessful attempt made between 1814 and 1830 to raise the Cakavci dialect to the rank of a distinctive literary language for CroatiaSlavonia; but the Illyrist movement of 1840 led to the adoption of the Stokavci, which was already the vernacular of the majority of Serbo-Croats.

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  • Ljudevit Gaj (1809-1872), though he failed to create an artificial literary language by the fusion of the principal dialects spoken by Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, was by his championship of Illyrism instrumental in securing the triumph of the Stokavci.

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  • Afterwards, and especially in these parts of the Catalan domain outside of Catalonia which did not acknowledge that they derived their language from that province, Lesnosi received a more extensive signification, so as to mean the literary language in general, whether of verse or of prose.

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  • The literary language has embodied many of its ingredients from the Old Javanese, as spoken in Java at the time of the fall of Majapahit (15th century), while the vulgar dialect has kept free from such admixture.

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  • The language of Tuscany is remarkable for its purity of idiom, and its adoption by Dante and Petrarch probably led to its becoming the literary language of Italy.

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