Liszt sentence example

liszt
  • Liszt, in after years when they had drifted apart, wrote of her: " George Sand catches her butterfly and tames it in her cage by feeding it on flowers and nectar - this is the love period.
    0
    0
  • The mention of Liszt has led us to anticipate the end of the story, and we must revert to 1836, when the acquaintance began.
    0
    0
  • In fact, after the flight of the king and the subsequent suppression of the riots, a warrant was issued for his arrest; and he had barely time to escape to Weimar, where Liszt was at that moment engaged in preparing Tannhauser for performance, before the storm burst upon him with alarming violence.
    0
    0
  • In all haste Liszt procured a passport and escorted his guest as far as Eisenach.
    0
    0
  • Two words I wrote to Liszt; his answer was the news that preparations were being made for the performance of the work, on the grandest scale that the limited means of Weimar would permit.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Liszt saw what was wanted at once, and did it.
    0
    0
  • Lohengrin was, in fact, produced at Weimar under Liszt's direction on the 28th of August 1850.
    0
    0
  • It was a severe trial to Wagner not to hear his own work, but he knew that it was in good hands, and he responded to Liszt's appeal for a new creation by studying the Nibelungenlied and gradually shaping it into a gigantic tetralogy.
    0
    0
  • His first wife, from whom he had parted since 1861, died in 1865; and in 1870 he was united to Liszt's daughter Cosima, who had previously been the wife of von Billow.
    0
    0
  • The town has been embellished by several other statues, including those of Charles Augustus (1875); Lucas Cranach (1886); Marie Seibach (1889); the composer Hummel (1895) and Franz Liszt (1904).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Under the patronage of Charles Alexander, also, Weimar became a famous musical centre, principally owing to the presence of Franz Liszt, who from 1848 to 1886 made Weimar his principal place of residence.
    0
    0
  • The artistic life in Budapest is fostered by the academy of music, which once had Franz Liszt as its director, a conservatoire of music, a dramatic school, and a school for painting and for drawing, all maintained by the government.
    0
    0
  • His appeal to musicians was made in a threefold capacity, and we have, therefore, to deal with Liszt the unrivalled pianoforte virtuoso (1830 - r848); Liszt the conductor of the "music of the future " at Weimar, the teacher of Tausig, Billow and a host of lesser pianists, the eloquent writer on music and musicians, the champion of Berlioz and Wagner (1848-1861); and Liszt the prolific composer, who for some five-and-thirty years continued to put forth pianoforte pieces, songs, symphonic orchestral pieces, cantatas, masses, psalms and oratorios (1847-1882).
    0
    0
  • Liszt's father, a clerk to the agent of the Esterhazy estates and an amateur musician of some attainment, was Hungarian by birth and ancestry, his mother an AustrianGerman.
    0
    0
  • After the death of his father in 1828 young Liszt led the life of a teacher of the pianoforte in Paris, got through a good deal of miscellaneous reading, and felt the influence of the religious, literary and political aspirations of the time.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The appearance of the violinist Paganini in Paris, 1831, marks the starting-point of the supreme eminence Liszt ultimately attained as a virtuoso.
    0
    0
  • Liszt transcribed this work, and its influence ultimately led him to the composition of his " Poemes symphoniques " and other examples of orchestral programme-music.
    0
    0
  • Five years (1835-1840) were spent in Switzerland and Italy, in semi-retirement in the company of Madame la comtesse d'Agoult (George Sand's friend and would-be rival, known in literary circles as " Daniel Stern," by whom Liszt had three children, one of them afterwards Frau Cosima Wagner): these years were devoted to further study in playing and composition, and were interrupted only by occasional appearances at Geneva, Milan, Florence and Rome, and by annual visits to Paris, when a famous contest with Thalberg took place in 1837.
    0
    0
  • The enthusiasm aroused by Liszt's playing and his personality - the two are inseparable - reached a climax at Vienna and Budapest in 1839-1840, when he received a patent of nobility from the emperor of Austria, and a sword of honour from the magnates of Hungary in the name of the nation.
    0
    0
  • The subscriptions having come in but sparsely, Liszt took the matter in hand, and the monument was completed at his expense, and unveiled at a musical festival conducted by Spohr and himself in 1845.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Liszt retired to Rome in 1861, and joined the Franciscan order in 1865.'
    0
    0
  • From 1869 onwards Abbe Liszt divided his time between Rome and Weimar, where during the summer months he received pupils - gratis as formerly - and, from 1876 up to his death at Bayreuth on the 31st of July 1886, he also taught for several months every year at the Hungarian Conservatoire of Budapest.
    0
    0
  • About Liszt's pianoforte technique in general it may be said that it derives its efficiency from the teaching of Czerny, who brought up his pupil on Mozart, a little Bach and Beethoven, a good deal of Clementi and Hummel, and a good deal of his (Czerny's) own work.
    0
    0
  • Classicism in the shape of solid, respectable Hummel on the one hand, and Carl Czerny, a trifle flippant, perhaps, and inclined to appeal to the gallery, on the other, these gave the musical parentage of young Liszt.
    0
    0
  • Liszt's strange musical nature was long in maturing its fruits.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In his orchestral pieces Liszt appears - next to Berlioz - as the most conspicuous and most thorough-going representative of programme music, i.e.
    0
    0
  • It was Liszt's aim to bring about a direct alliance or amalgamation of instrumental music with poetry.
    0
    0
  • There is always danger of failure when an attempt is thus made 1 It is understood that, in point of fact, the Princess Wittgenstein was determined to marry Liszt; and as neither he nor her family wished their connexion to take this form, Cardinal Hohenlohe quietly had him ordained.
    0
    0
  • In pieces such as Liszt's " Poemes symphoniques," Ce qu'on entend sur la montagne (1848-1856), after a poem by Victor Hugo, and Die Ideale (1853-1857), after a poem by Schiller, the hearer is bewildered by a series of startling orchestral effects which succeed one another apparently without rhyme or reason.
    0
    0
  • Liszt's masterpiece in orchestral music is the Dante Symphony (1847-1855), the subject of which was particularly well suited to his temperament, and offered good chances for the display of his peculiar powers as a master of instrumental effect.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In these pieces, as in almost every production of his, in lieu of melody Liszt offers fragments of melody - touching and beautiful, it may be, or passionate, or tinged with triviality; in lieu of a rational distribution of centres of harmony in accordance with some definite plan, he presents clever combinations of chords and ingenious modulations from point to point; in lieu of musical logic and consistency of design, he is content with rhapsodical improvisation.
    0
    0
  • In much of Liszt's vocal music, particularly in the songs and choral pieces written to German words, an annoying discrepancy is felt to exist between the true sound of the words and the musical accents.
    0
    0
  • Like other Russian composers he owed much to the influence of Liszt at Weimar.
    0
    0
  • Von Liszt (Das Volkerrecht, p. 331) treats the South African republic as an example of a half sovereign state.
    0
    0
  • " Any state which undertakes to protect another assumes towards the rest of the world responsibility for its good behaviour - the more complete protection the more extensive the responsibility - and this responsibility involves a duty to interfere if need be " (Coolidge, United States as a World Power," p. 167; and to the same effect Liszt, Volkerrecht, p. 31; and Zorn, Volkerrecht, p. 45).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At this time he made Liszt's acquaintance.
    0
    0
  • The princess, an accomplished pianist and pupil of Liszt, was a step-daughter of the Italian statesman Minghetti.
    0
    0
  • Franz Liszt (1811-1886) is buried here, as well as Jean Paul Friedrich Richter, who is commemorated by a monument (1841).
    0
    0
  • Franz Liszt was the greatest piano virtuoso the world has ever known.
    0
    0
  • Other celebrities who figure in the Lettres under a transparent disguise are Liszt and Mme d'Agoult (known to literature as Daniel Stern), whom she met in Switzerland and entertained for some months at Nohant.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The fame of Weimar as a seat of musical education, though it possesses an excellent conservatoire, is based mainly on the tradition of the abb Liszt, who gathered about him here a number of distinguished pupils, some of whom have continued to make it their centre.
    0
    0
  • It was Liszt's habit to recommend novelties to the public by explanatory articles or essays, which were written in French (some for the Journal des debats and the Gazette musicale of Paris) and translated for the journals of Weimar and Leipzig - thus his two masterpieces of sympathetic criticism, the essays Lohengrin et Tannhduser a Weimar and Harold en Italie, found many readers and proved very effective.
    0
    0
  • Having attracted the attention of Franz Liszt, Sherwood spent his last three years in Weimar under the tutelage of the legendary master.
    0
    0