Lisbon sentence example

lisbon
  • It is decidedly less at Perpignan and Lisbon than at Potsdam, Kew and Greenwich, but nowhere is the seasonal difference more conspicuous than at Tokyo, which is south of Lisbon.
    2
    1
  • This three-peaked curve is not wholly pecuiiar to Paris, being seen, for instance, at Lisbon in summer.
    2
    1
  • He was educated at Geneva, but, preferring an army career to a clerical one, went to Lisbon and enlisted.
    1
    0
  • She left England finally with a train of one hundred persons in March 1692, travelling through France and arriving at Lisbon on the 20th of January 1693.
    0
    0
  • She took up her residence at the palace of Bemposta, built by herself, near Lisbon.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • From 1825 to 1827 he acted as assistant viceconsul at Lisbon, where his uncle, Barthelemy de Lesseps, was the French charge d'affaires.
    0
    0
  • The name is taken from Nicotiana, the tobacco plant, so called after Jean Nicot (1530-1600), French ambassador at Lisbon, who introduced tobacco into France in 1560.
    0
    0
  • In 1820 a band of flagellants appeared during a procession at Lisbon; and in the Latin countries, at the season of great festivals, one may still see brotherhoods of penitents flagellating themselves before the assembled faithful.
    0
    0
  • Rodrigues set out at once for Lisbon to confer with the king, who ultimately decided to retain him in Portugal.
    0
    0
  • Xavier complied, merely waiting long enough to obtain the pope's benediction, and set out for Lisbon, where he was presented to the king, and soon won his entire confidence, attested notably by procuring for him from the pope four briefs, one of them appointing him papal nuncio in the Indies.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • On April 7th, 1541, he sailed from Lisbon with Martim Alfonso de Sousa, governor designate of India, and lived amongst the common sailors, ministering to their religious and temporal needs, especially during an outbreak of scurvy.
    0
    0
  • He died after a few days' illness on the 25th of September 1617 at Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • During the minority of Otho he was named privy councillor and minister at Madrid and Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Portugal, on the other hand, having abolished the Inquisition in 1821, has since 1826 allowed Jews freedom of religion, and there are synagogues in Lisbon and Faro.
    0
    0
  • The Jackson formation south-west of the Lisbon beds, is made up chiefly of grey calcareous clay marls, bluish lignitic clays, green-sand and grey siliceous sands.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Through Spain he then threatened Portugal with extinction unless she too paid a heavy subsidy, a demand with which the court of Lisbon was fain to comply.
    0
    0
  • The occupation of Lisbon, which led on to Napoleon's intervention in Spanish affairs, resulted naturally from the treaty of Tilsit.
    0
    0
  • Napoleon was then in the midst of operations against Sir John Moore, whose masterly march on Sahagun (near Valladolid) had thwarted the emperor's plans for a general "drive" on to Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • An uncle having promised him a place in a counting-house at Lisbon, he also learned French, German and Italian to fit himself for the post.
    0
    0
  • The crusaders of northern Germany never went to the Holy Land at all; they were allowed the crusaders' privileges for attacking the Wends to the east of the Elbe - a fact which at once attests the cleavage between northern and southern Germany (intensified of late years by the war of investitures), and anticipates the age of the Teutonic knights and their long Crusade on the Baltic. The crusaders of the Low Countries and of England took the sea route, and attacked and captured Lisbon on their way, thus helping to found the kingdom of Portugal, and achieving the one real success which was gained by the Second Crusade.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Portugal remonstrated against Napoleon's demands, and a French corps (30,000) under General Junot was instantly despatched to Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Wellesley began to land his troops, unopposed, near Figueira da Foz at the mouth of the Mondego; and the Spanish victory of Baylen having relieved Cadiz from danger, Spencer now joined him, and, without waiting for Moore the army, under 15,000 in all (which included some Portuguese)"with 18 guns, advanced towards Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • On the 21st of August the Allies were attacked by Junot at Vimiera, who, leaving a force at Lisbon, had come up to reinforce Delaborde.
    0
    0
  • Junot, believing the allied August21, left to be weakly held, attacked it without reconnoitring, but Wellesley's regiments, marched thither behind the heights, sprang up in line; and under their volleys and bayonet charge, supported by artillery fire, Junot's deep columns were driven off the direct road to Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • On the 26th of October 1808, when Moore's troops had left Lisbon to join Baird, the French still held a defensive position behind the Ebro; Bessieres being in the basin of Vitoria, Marshal Ney north-west of Logrono, and Moncey covering Pampeluna, and near Sanguessa.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • 2 It was not, however, signed at Cintra, but at Lisbon, and was mainly negotiated near Torres Vedras.
    0
    0
  • On the 22ndof April 1809 Sir Arthur Wellesley reached Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Wellington's policy was thus cautious and defensive, and he had already commenced the since famous lines of Torres Vedras round Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • The fall of Bahia for once roused the Spaniards and Portuguese to joint action, and a great expedition speedily sailed from Cadiz and Lisbon for Bahia.
    0
    0
  • The Cortes at Lisbon chose Bahia as a centre for resisting the independence, and large forces were sent thither.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • His remains lie in a majestic tomb in the Jeronymos at Belem, near Lisbon, which was raised by public subscription to the greatest modern historian of Portugal and of the Peninsula.
    0
    0
  • At the expiration of his tenure of the provincialship, he retired to the Dominican convent at Lisbon, where he lived till his death on the last day of 1588.
    0
    0
  • Her husband, having then acquired a fixed domicile in Lisbon, settled down to advocacy with success, and he was able to send Antonio to the university of Coimbra, where he matriculated in the faculty of law.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile Antonio had gone back to Coimbra, and finishing his course in 1728-1729 he returned to Lisbon and became associated with his father as an advocate.
    0
    0
  • On the 18th of October he was beheaded and his body burnt in an auto-dale; that same day one of his popular operettas was given at a Lisbon theatre.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The earthquake at Lisbon, which appalled other people, gave Voltaire an excellent opportunity for ridiculing the beliefs of the orthodox, first in verse (1756) and later in the (from a literary point of view) unsurpassable tale of Candide (1759).
    0
    0
  • He became minister plenipotentiary at Madrid and at Lisbon, but the revolution of 1848 caused him to withdraw into private life, from which he did not emerge until in 1871 he was elected deputy to the National Assembly by the Gironde.
    0
    0
  • The city is characteristically Portuguese in the construction and style of its buildings - low, heavy walls of broken stone and mortar, plastered and coloured outside, with an occasional facing of glazed Lisbon tiles, and covered with red tiles.
    0
    0
  • In 1341 the two girls left Penafiel; Costanca's marriage was celebrated in the same year, and the young infanta and her cousin went to reside at Lisbon, or at Coimbra, where Dom Pedro conceived that luckless and furious passion for Inez which has immortalized them.
    0
    0
  • It was sent from India to Emmanuel, king of Portugal, in 1513; and from a sketch taken in Lisbon, Albert Diirer composed his celebrated but fanciful engraving, which was reproduced in so many old books on natural history.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Portugal Portugal could long boast of only one review, the Jornal enciclopedico (1779-1806), which had many interruptions; then came the Jornal de Coimbra (1812-1820); the Panorama (1836-1857), founded by Herculano; the Revista universal lisbonense (1841-1853), established by Castilho; the Instituto (1853) of Coimbra; the Archivo pittoresco (1857) of Lisbon; and the Jornal do sociedade dos amigos das letteras.
    0
    0
  • In 1868 a review called Vox femenina, and conducted by women, was established at Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • (el Justicieiro), was born at Lisbon on the 22nd of April 1357, and in 1364 was created grand-master of Aviz.
    0
    0
  • When the boy was about eleven years old he paid a short visit to Lisbon where his uncle David had settled as a wine merchant.
    0
    0
  • Soon afterwards, his uncle, the wine merchant at Lisbon, having left David a sum of £t000, he and his brother entered into partnership as wine merchants in London and Lichfield, David taking up the London business.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Both branches terminate in a broad tidal lake immediately above Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • With it'hie sailed from Palos in Andalusia on the 3rd of August 1492, reached Guanahani on the 12th of October, touched on the coast of Cuba and Hispaniola, established a small post on the latter, and returned to Lisbon on the 4th of March 1493, and thence to Spain.
    0
    0
  • In 1857 he went to reside at Lisbon, where he died on the 21st of December 1862.
    0
    0
  • France and Spain were then about to partition Portugal, and the Spanish forces were beginning to invade that land, when the court of Lisbon succeeded, owing (it is said) to the free use of bribes, in inducing Godoy, the Spanish minister, and Lucien Bonaparte to sign the preliminaries of peace on the 6th of June 1801 at Badajoz.
    0
    0
  • The First Consul, finding his plans of seizing Lisbon frustrated, remonstrated with his brother, who thereupon resigned his post, and returned to Paris, there taking part in the opposition which the Tribunate offered to some of Napoleon's schemes.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The state supports a hospital for the insane at Jamestown, an institution for the feeble-minded at Grafton, a home for old soldiers at Lisbon, a blind asylum at Bathgate, a reform school (opened 1902) at Mandan and a penitentiary at Bismarck.
    0
    0
  • Galvao (Lisbon, 1563 and 1731), of which a translation entitled Discoveries of the World was made for Richard Hakluyt and reprinted by the Hakluyt Society (London, 1862).
    0
    0
  • (1512-1580), king of Portugal, third son of Emanuel the Fortunate, was born in Lisbon, on the 31st of January 1512.
    0
    0
  • In 1542 he received the cardinal's hat, and in 1578 when he was called to succeed his grandnephew Sebastian on the throne, he held the archbishoprics of Lisbon and Coimbra as well as that of Braga, in addition to the wealthy abbacy of Alcobazar.
    0
    0
  • In 1800 he was appointed professor of geology at Coimbra, and soon after inspector-general of the Portuguese mines; and in 1812 he was made perpetual secretary of the Academy of Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Brazil in 1819, he urged Dom Pedro to resist the recall of the Lisbon court, and was appointed one of his ministers in 1821.
    0
    0
  • In 1825 he became rear-admiral, and in December 1826 escorted the expeditionary force to Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • The Latin grammar in use was that of the Jesuit rector of the school at Lisbon, Alvarez (1572).
    0
    0
  • The mean annual temperature is 57.3° F., corresponding to that of Washington in the United States, and to Lisbon and Messina in Europe.
    0
    0
  • Taking advantage of this last clause, Laynez applied the new law to two houses only, namely, Rome and Lisbon, the other houses contenting themselves with singing vespers on feast days; and as soon as Paul IV.
    0
    0
  • There are some to this day in Lisbon under the name of "Fathers of the Faith."
    0
    0
  • It is a curious fact that on the day of the earthquake at Lisbon (1st November 1775) the main spring at Teplitz ceased to flow for some minutes.
    0
    0
  • Finding that the junta of Corunna wished for no foreign soldiery, he followed his alternative instructions to act against Junot at Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • This treaty was replaced by one signed at Lisbon in June 1893.
    0
    0
  • In 1751 his health, which had never been good, broke down, and he sailed for Lisbon on the 30th of September of that year; but the change was unavailing, and he died there on the 26th of October.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile pressure was being put upon France to admit the German claim to a voice in the affairs of North Africa, a claim fortified by the mission of Count von Tattenbach, German minister at Lisbon, to Fez for the purpose of securing from the sherifian government special privileges for Germany.
    0
    0
  • It is the starting point of the railway to St Louis, and is within five days steam of Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • On Elizabeth's accession they migrated to the Low Countries, and thence, after many vicissitudes, to Rouen, and finally in 1594 to Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • So does a magnificent drawing of a head of a nonagenarian with a flowing beard who sat to him at Antwerp, together with a picture from the same head in the character of St Jerome; the drawing is now at Vienna, the picture at Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Maciot thereupon sold his office to her envoy, Pedro Barba de Campos; sailed to Lisbon and resold it to Prince Henry the Navigator; and a few years afterwards resold it once more to Enrique de Guzman, count of Niebla.
    0
    0
  • The expedition under Vasco da Gama started from Lisbon five years later, and, doubling the Cape of Good Hope, cast anchor off the city of Calicut on the 10th of May 1498, after a prolonged voyage of nearly eleven months.
    0
    0
  • The arrival of da Gama at Lisbon was celebrated with national rejoicings scarcely less enthusiastic than had greeted the return of Columbus.
    0
    0
  • There is a regular steamship communication between Portugal, England and Germany, and Loanda., which port is within sixteen days' steam of Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • There is also a regular service between Cape Town, Lobito and Lisbon and Southampton.
    0
    0
  • The administration of the province is carried on under a governor-general, resident at Loanda, who acts under the direction of the ministry of the colonies at Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • (Documentos) (Lisbon, 1877); A Report of the Kingdom of Congo (London, 1881), an English translation, with notes by Margarite Hutchinson, of Filippo Pigafetta's Relatione del Reame di Congo (Rome, 1591), a book founded on the statements and writings of Duarte Lopez; Rev. Thos.
    0
    0
  • Barboza du Bocage (Lisbon, 1881); "Geologie des Colonies portugaises en Afrique," by P. Choffat, in Corn.
    0
    0
  • Alphonso continued to distinguish himself by his exploits against the Moors, from whom he wrested Santarem in 1146 and Lisbon in 1147.
    0
    0
  • - There are three or more cellular prisons at Lisbon, Coimbra and Santarem, and the system of strict separation when first adopted in 1884 was expected both to amend and deter.
    0
    0
  • Du Cane, Punishment and Prevention of Crime (1885); Braco, Estudos penitenciarios e criminaes (Lisbon, 1888); Garofalo, Studio sul delitto, sulle sui cause e sui mezzi di repressione (1890); Adolphe Guillot, Les Prisons de Paris (1890); Tallack, Preventive and Penological Principles (1896); Salillas, Vida penal en Espana (Madrid).
    0
    0
  • Intent upon accomplishing this cherished project, he embarked for Portugal, and after he had been shipwrecked on the coast of Natal, and captured by pirates, arrived at Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Lobo wrote an account of his travels in Portuguese, which appears never to have been printed, but is deposited in the monastery of St Ro q ue, Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • During the eight years following he was' T heard at all the principal centres - including London, Leipzig, Berlin, Copenhagen, St Petersburg, Moscow, Warsaw, Constantinople, Lisbon and Madrid.
    0
    0
  • The lesser patriarchates are those of Babylon (Chaldaic), Cilicia (Armenian), the East Indies (Latin), Lisbon (Latin), Venice (Latin) and the West Indies (Latin).
    0
    0
  • The main wine-growing district outside that of Oporto is in the neighbourhood of Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • There was a story that in the 8th century a bishop of Lisbon, to escape from the Arabs, had fled to islands in the West, where he and his followers had founded seven cities; and when the Indians in Mexico related to the Spanish explorers a bit of their folk-lore, to the effect that they had issued from seven caves, the imaginative white men soon identified these caves with the famous Seven Cities.
    0
    0
  • On the death of Scarron, in 1660, Anne of Austria continued his pension to his widow, and even increased it to 2000 livres a year, which enabled her to entertain and frequent the literary society her husband had made her acquainted with; but on the queen-mother's death in 1666 the king refused to continue her pension, and she prepared to leave Paris for Lisbon as lady attendant to the queen of Portugal.
    0
    0
  • The second narrative is the famous history of Florida by the Inca, Garcilasso de la Vega, who obtained his information from a Spanish cavalier engaged in the enterprise; it was completed in 1591, first appeared at Lisbon in 1605 under the title of La Florida del Ynca, and has since passed through many editions in various languages.
    0
    0
  • The lagoon of Aveiro, the estuary of the Sado and the broad inland lake formed by the Tagus above Lisbon, recall the waterways of Holland.
    0
    0
  • The harbours of Lisbon and Oporto are hardly inferior in beauty to those of Naples and Constantinople.
    0
    0
  • The Mesozoic beds form an irregular triangle extending from Lisbon and Torres Novas on the south to Oporto on the north.
    0
    0
  • Supposed Triassic beds are found, but they are confined chiefly to the eastern margin of the Mesozoic area north of Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Lisbon, Coimbra, Evora and Oporto have mean temperatures between 60° and 61.5° F., and the daily variation nowhere exceeds 23°.
    0
    0
  • Even in Lisbon the yearly variation is not less than 50°.
    0
    0
  • Portugal is very rarely visited by thunderstorms; but shocks of earthquake are frequently felt, and recall the great earthquake of Lisbon (q.v.) in 1755.
    0
    0
  • The chief towns of Portugal are Lisbon (pop. 1900, 356,009), the capital and principal seaport; Oporto (167,955), the capital of the northern provinces and, after Lisbon, the most important centre of trade; the seaports of Setubal (22,074), Ilhavo (12,617), Povoa de Varzim (12,623), Tavira (12,175), Faro (11,789),(11,789), Ovar (10,462), Olhao (10,009) Vianna do Castello (io,000), Aveiro (9975), Lagos (8291), Leixoes (7690) and Figueira da Foz (6221); and the inland cities or towns of Braga (24,202), Louie (22,478), Coimbra (18,144), Evora (16,020), Covilha (15,469), Elvas (13,981), Portalegre (11,820), Palmella (11,478), Torres Novas (10,746), Silves (9687), Lamego (9471), Guimaraes (9104), Beja (8885), Santarem (8628),(8628), Vizeu (8057), Estremoz (7920), Monchique (7345), Castello Branco (7288), Abrantes (7255), Torres Vedras (6900), Thomar (6888), Villa Real (6716), Chaves (6388), Guarda (6124), Cintra (5914), Braganza (5535), Mafra (4769), Leiria (4459), Batalha (3858), Almeida (2330), Alcobaga (2309), Bussaco (1661).
    0
    0
  • Up to 1851 there was practically no good carriage road in the country except the highway between Lisbon and Cintra.
    0
    0
  • The first railway was opened in 1853 to connect Lisbon with Badajoz.
    0
    0
  • The postal and telegraphic services are adequate; tel° p hone systems are installed in Lisbon, Oporto and other large towns; and the Eastern Telegraph Co.
    0
    0
  • Lisbon is the headquarters of the ship-building trade.
    0
    0
  • Lisbon and Oporto; conspicuous among these are the filigree ornaments which are bought by the peasant women as investments and by foreign visitors as curiosities.
    0
    0
  • Large liners from Liverpool, Southampton, London, Hamburg, Havre and Antwerp call regularly for passengers or cargo at Leixoes or Lisbon, or both ports, on their way to and from South America (especially Brazil).
    0
    0
  • The chief sources of revenue were customs duties, taxes on land and industries, duties on tobacco and breadstuffs, the Lisbon octroi, receipts from national property, registration and stamps, &c. The heaviest expenditure (nearly £ 5,000,000) was incurred for the service of the consolidated debt; payments for the civil list, cortes, pensions, &c., amounted to more than £2,000,000, and the cost of public works to nearly as large a sum.
    0
    0
  • The six ancient provinces were subdivided on the 28th of June 1833 into districts, each named after its chief town, as follows: Entre-Minho-e-Douro into Vianna do Castello, Braga, Oporto; Traz-os-Montes, into Villa Real, Braganza; Beira, into Aveiro, Vizeu, Coimbra, Guarda, Castello Branco; Estremadura, into Leiria, Santarem, Lisbon; Alemtejo, into Portalegre, Evora, Beja; Algarve was renamed Faro.
    0
    0
  • The three courts of appeal (tribunaes de relacao) sat at Lisbon, Oporto and Ponta Delgada (Azores), and there was a Supreme Court in Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • There are three ecclesiastical provinces - Braga, Lisbon and Evora, each under an archbishop. The archbishop of Braga, whose see is the most ancient, has the title of Primate; the archbishop of Lisbon has the honorary title of Patriarch, and is usually elected a cardinal.
    0
    0
  • In 1905 there were state lyceums in each district capital and in Guimardes, Lamego and Amarante; 5 municipal lyceums, at Celorico de Basto, Chaves, Ponte de Lima, Povoa de Varzim and Setubal; military and naval colleges; a secondary school for girls in Lisbon; numerous private secondary schools and ecclesiastical seminaries; industrial, commercial and technical schools; and pilot schools at Lisbon, Oporto, Faro and Ponta Delgada (Azores).
    0
    0
  • Other important educational institutions are described under Lisbon and Oporto.
    0
    0
  • Lisbon, Elvas and Angra in the Azores, were considered first-class fortresses, but only Lisbon had modern defences.
    0
    0
  • Numerous official reports, chiefly statistical, are published periodically in Lisbon; a few are written in French, the majority in Portuguese.
    0
    0
  • But on the 15th of March 1147 Alphonso stormed the fortress of Santarem, and about the same time a band of crusaders on their way to Palestine landed at Oporto and volunteered for the impending siege of Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Aided by these powerful allies, Alphonso captured Lisbon on the 24th of October 1147.
    0
    0
  • Between 1179 and 1184 the Moors retrieved many of their losses in Alemtejo, but were unable to retake Santarem and Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Lisbon had already (1179) received a charter from Alphonso I.
    0
    0
  • (mordomo-mor) and Vicente, dean of Lisbon - resigned their offices.
    0
    0
  • The pope issued a bull of deposition in favour of Alphonso, who reached Lisbon in 1246; and after a civil war lasting two years Sancho II.
    0
    0
  • Lisbon was henceforth recognized as the capital.
    0
    0
  • To avenge this slight, Henry of Castile invaded Portugal and besieged Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • In 1384 a Castilian army invested Lisbon, but encountered a heroic resistance, and after five months an outbreak of plague compelled them to raise the siege.
    0
    0
  • By sea Prince Henry's captains continued their exploration of Africa and the Atlantic. In 1433 Cape Bojador was doubled; in 1 434 the first consignment of slaves was brought to Lisbon; and slave trading soon became one of the most profitable branches of Portuguese commerce.
    0
    0
  • Command of the sea could not be maintained - least of all in the monsoon months - while the Portuguese fleets were based on Lisbon, which could only be reached after a six months' voyage; and experience had proved that almost every Portuguese factory required a fortress for its defence when the fleets were absent.
    0
    0
  • Oriental splendour and Renaissance culture combined to render social life in Lisbon hardly less.
    0
    0
  • But the growth of expenditure - chiefly of an unremunerative kind, such as the cost of war and missions - soon rendered these resources inadequate; and after 1515 the empire became ever more dependent on the spoils of hostile states and on subsidies from the royal treasury in Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Seeking for commercial profit, not in the exchange of commodities, but solely in the acquisition of actual gold and silver, and realizing that the home market could not absorb a tithe of the merchandise imported, the Lisbon capitalists sent their ships to discharge in Antwerp (where a Portuguese staple was established in 1503), or in some other port near the central markets of Europe.
    0
    0
  • In 1449 the Lisbon Juderias were stormed and sacked, and between 1450 and 1481 the cortes four times petitioned the Crown to enforce the anti-Jewish provisions of the canon law.
    0
    0
  • In April 1506 most of those who resided in Lisbon were massacred during a riot, but throughout the rest of Emanuel's reign they were immune from violence, and were again permitted to emigrate - an opportunity of which the majority took advantage.
    0
    0
  • The agents of the " New Christians " in Rome long contrived, by lavish bribery and with the support of many enlightened Portuguese, to delay the preliminary negotiations; but in 1536 the Holy Office was established in Lisbon, where the first auto-da fe was held in 1540, and in 1560 its operations were extended to India.
    0
    0
  • The process of decay was hastened by frequent outbreaks of plague, sometimes followed by famine; a contemporary manuscript estimates that no fewer than 500 persons died daily in Lisbon alone during July, August and September 1569, and in some other years the joint effects of plague and famine were little less disastrous.
    0
    0
  • Antonio proclaimed himself king and occupied Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • All these precedents seemed to indicate that Spain and Portugal would ultimately form one state; and despite the strong nationalism which their separate language and Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • Insurrections in Lisbon (1634) and Evora (1637) bore witness to the general discontent, but until 1640 the Spanish ascendancy The was never seriously endangered.
    0
    0
  • Rodrigo da Cunha, archbishop of Lisbon, who was appointed lieutenantgeneral of Portugal.
    0
    0
  • The Spaniards failed to gain any compensating advantage, and on the 13th of February 1668 peace was concluded at Lisbon, Spain at last consenting to recognize the independence of the Portuguese kingdom.
    0
    0
  • The signature of the treaty of Lisbon had been preceded by another palace revolution.
    0
    0
  • Pedro; and after four months of a hated union she left the palace and applied to the chapter of Lisbon cathedral to annul her marriage on the ground of non-consummation.
    0
    0
  • Even more important was the change effected when the Whig ministry of Great Britain sent John Methuen to Lisbon to negotiate a commercial agreement.
    0
    0
  • In the church of Sao Roque in Lisbon, the decoration of a single chapel measuring 17 ft.
    0
    0
  • In Lisbon a chamber of commerce (Junta do commercio) was organized in 1756 to replace an older association of merchants, the ilIeza dos homens de negocio, which had attacked the Path Company; and in the same year the Alto Douro Company was formed to control the port-wine trade and to break the monopoly enjoyed by a syndicate of British wine merchants.
    0
    0
  • The expulsion of the Jesuits involved Portugal in a dispute with Pope Clement XIII.; in June 1760 the papal nuncio was ordered to leave Lisbon, and diplomatic relations with the Vatican were only resumed after the condemnation of the Jesuits by Clement XIV., in July 1773.
    0
    0
  • A school of commerce was founded in 1759; in 1760 the censorship of books was transferred from an ecclesiastical to a lay tribunal; in 1761 the former Jesuit college in Lisbon was converted into a college for the sons of noblemen; in 1768 a royal printing-press was established; in 1772 Pombal provided for a complete system of primary and secondary education, entailing the foundation of 837 schools.
    0
    0
  • Junot, who was everywhere well received by the Portuguese democrats, entered Lisbon at the end of November 1807.
    0
    0
  • He left Lisbon under the control of a regency, headed by the bishop of Oporto, who applied to Great Britain for help, promoted an insurrection against the French, and organized juntas (committees) of government in the larger towns.
    0
    0
  • From Lisbon Moore marched north-eastward with about 3 2,000 men to assist the Spanish armies against Napoleon; his subsequent retreat to join Sir David Baird in Galicia, in January 1809, diverted the pursuing army under Napoleon to the north-west, and temporarily saved Portugal from attack.
    0
    0
  • On the 22nd of April, however, Wellesley, who had been recalled after the convention of Cintra, landed in Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • In 1817 a military revolt (pronunciamento) in Lisbon was crushed by Beresford, and the leader, General Gomes Freire de Andrade, was executed; but on the 16th of August 1820, after Beresford had sailed to Brazil to secure the return of John VI., a second rising took place in Oporto.
    0
    0
  • A new council of regency was established in Lisbon, the British officers were expelled from the army; Beresford, on his return from Brazil, was not permitted to land; a constituent assembly was summoned.
    0
    0
  • Miguel, whose soldiers seized the royal palace in Lisbon on the 30th of April 1824.
    0
    0
  • The charter was brought to Lisbon by Sir Charles Stuart in July 1826.
    0
    0
  • Saldanha, a prominent constitutionalist, threatened to march on Lisbon if the regency did not swear obedience to the charter by the 31st of July.
    0
    0
  • Pedro in Oporto from July 1832 to July 1833, when the duke of Terceira and Captain Charles Napier, who had succeeded Sartorius, effected a daring and successful diversion which resulted in the capture of Lisbon (July 24, 1833).
    0
    0
  • Barros Gomes was then able to yield under protest; but disturbances at once broke out in Lisbon and Oporto, and the ministry resigned.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile a Republican rising was suppressed in Lisbon, and many suspected officers were degraded.
    0
    0
  • On the 23rd of April 1903 a body of cavalry and artillery mutinied in Lisbon and proclaimed a republic; but they were overpowered and ultimately transported to Mozambique.
    0
    0
  • The failure of the dictatorship and the inability of the monarchists to agree upon any common policy had discredited the existing regime, and at the general election of August 1910 the Republican candidates in Lisbon 1910.
    0
    0
  • On the 3rd of October the murder of a distinguished Republican physician, Dr Miguel Bombarda, precipitated the revolution which had been organized to take place in Lisbon ten days later.
    0
    0
  • Correa da Serra (I i vols., Lisbon, 1790-1804); Quadro elementar das relac es politicas e diplomatical de Portugal, ed.
    0
    0
  • The Colleccdo de tratados, &c. (30 vols., Lisbon, 1856-1879), was ed.
    0
    0
  • Judice Biker; it was continued by the Royal Academy as the Nova colleccdo de tratados (2 vols., Lisbon, 1890-1891).
    0
    0
  • Periodicals containing valuable historical matter are the Archivo historico portuguez (Lisbon, 1903, &c.), the Boletim of the Lisbon Geographical Society (1873, &c.), and Portugalia (Oporto, 1898, &c.).
    0
    0
  • P. Oliveira Martins (2 vols., 4th ed., Lisbon, 1901), is a series of brilliant impressionist studies.
    0
    0
  • Herculano's classic Historia de Portugal (4 vols., Lisbon, 1846-1853) covers the period up to 1279.
    0
    0
  • (2 vols., Lisbon, 1895-1896) is a scientific study of the highest value.
    0
    0
  • All the above may be found in the Portugaliae monumenta historica, scriptores, while the Life of St Elizabeth of Portugal is included in the Monarchia lusitana; Romania has printed the following hagiographical texts belonging to the same century - the Vida de Eufrosina, the Vida de Maria Egypcia and the Vida de Sancto Amaro; the Vida de Santo Eloy has appeared in the Instituto and the Vida dos Santos Barlaao e Josafate has been issued by the Lisbon Academy of Sciences.
    0
    0
  • In Santarem appeared Antonio Prestes, a magistrate who drew from his judicial experience but evinced more knowledge of folk-lore than dramatic talent, while Camoens himself was so far influenced by Gil Vicente, whose plays he had perhaps seen performed in Lisbon, that in spite of his Coimbra training he never exchanged the old forms for those of the classical comedy.
    0
    0
  • After twenty years of investigation at Goa, Fernao Lopes de Castanheda issued his Historia do descobrimento e conquista da India pelos Portuguezes (Lisbon, 15521 554 and 1561), a book that ranks besides those of Barros and Couto.
    0
    0
  • Samuel Usque, a Lisbon Jew, deserves a place to himself for his Consolagam as tribulagoes de Israel, where he exposes the persecutions endured by his countrymen in every age down to his time; the book takes the dialogue form, and its diction is elegant and pure.
    0
    0
  • The Ulyssea of Gabriel Pereira de Castro describes the foundation of Lisbon by Ulysses, but, notwithstanding its plagiarism of The Lusiads and faults of taste, these ten cantos contain some masterly descriptive passages, and the ottava rima shows a harmony and flexibility to which even Camoens rarely attained; but this praise cannot be extended to the tiresome Ulyssipo of Sousa de Macedo.
    0
    0
  • The Jesuit Antonio Vieira, missionary, diplomat and voluminous writer, repeated the triumphs he had gained in Bahia and Lisbon in Rome, which proclaimed him the prince of Catholic orators.
    0
    0
  • Until the Restoration of 1640 the stage remained spellbound by the Spaniards, and when a court once more came to Lisbon it preferred Italian opera, French plays, and zarzuelas to dramatic performances in the vernacular, with the result that both Portuguese authors and actors of repute disappeared.
    0
    0
  • Finally, the bucolic poet Quita produced the tragedies Segunda Castro, Hermione and two others, but these imitations from the French, for all the taste they show, were stillborn, and in the absence of court patronage, which was exclusively bestowed on the Lisbon opera, then the best equipped in Europe, Portugal remained without a drama of its own.
    0
    0
  • Julio Cesar Machado and Fialho de Almeida made their mark by many humorous publications, and, in the domain of pure literary criticism, mention must be made of Antonio Pedro Lopes de Mendonga, Rebello da Silva, Dr Joaquim de Vasconcellos, Mme Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Silva Pinto, the favourite disciple of Castello Branco, and of Luciano Cordeiro, founder of the Lisbon Geographical Society, whose able monograph, Soror Marianna, vindicated the authenticity of the Letters of a Portuguese Nun and showed Marianna Alcoforado to be their authoress.
    0
    0
  • Lopes de Mendonga treats of the literature of the 16th and 17th centuries in articles in the Annaes das sciencias e letras; and the Memorias de litteratura portugueza printed by the Lisbon Academy of Sciences (1792-1814) contain essays on the drama and the Arcadia, but the 19th century has naturally received most attention.
    0
    0
  • Accordingly in June 1654 he set sail for Lisbon to plead the cause of the Indians, and in April 1655 he obtained from the king a series of decrees which placed the missions under the Company of Jesus, with himself as their superior, and prohibited the enslavement of the natives, except in certain specified cases.
    0
    0
  • Principal works: Sermoes (Sermons) (15 vols., Lisbon, 1679-1748); there are many subsequent editions, but none complete; translations exist in Spanish, Italian, German and French, which have gone through several editions.
    0
    0
  • Historia do Futuro (Lisbon, 1718; 2nd ed., ibid., 1755); this and the Quinto Imperio and the Clavis Prophetarum seem to be in essence one and the same book in different redactions.
    0
    0
  • Noticias reconditas do modo de proceder a Inquisiceio de Portugal com os seus presos (Lisbon, 1821).
    0
    0
  • A badly edited edition of the works of Vieira in 27 volumes appeared in Lisbon, 1854-58.
    0
    0
  • In 1809, after his defeat by Sir John Moore, he invadedPortugal and took Oporto, but, busying himself with the political settlement of his conquests in the French interests and, as he hoped, for his own ultimate benefit as a possible candidate for the throne, he neglected to advance upon Lisbon, and was eventually dislodged from Oporto by Sir Arthur Wellesley, making a painful and almost disastrous retreat over the mountains.
    0
    0
  • There is a regular mail service between Antwerp and the ports of the lower Congo, which are also served by steamers from Liverpool, Hamburg, Rotterdam and Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • John Bermudez, a subordinate member of the mission of 1520, who had remained in the country after the departure of the embassy, was, according to his own statement (which is untrustworthy), ordained successor to the abuna (archbishop), and sent to Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • In 1810 Gomez of Lisbon obtained a mixture of alkaloids which he named cinchonino, by treating an alcoholic extract of the bark with water and then adding a solution of caustic potash.
    0
    0
  • In 181 2 he committed the serious mistake of accepting a well-paid ornamental mission to Lisbon, which he was about to visit for the health of his eldest son.
    0
    0
  • The Florentine Paul Toscanelli, in his letters to Columbus and the Portuguese court (1474), takes Antilia as the principal landmark for measuring the distance between Lisbon and the island of Cipango or Zipangu (Japan).
    0
    0
  • Ceuta passed to Spain in 1580 on the subjugation of Portugal by Philip II., and was definitely assigned to the Spanish crown by the treaty of Lisbon in 1688.
    0
    0
  • These successes produced a great effect; the cause of discovery, now connected with boundless hopes of profit, became popular; and many volunteers, especially merchants and seamen from Lisbon and Lagos, came forward.
    0
    0
  • In an endeavour to break with the tradition that the colonies existed only for the benefit of Portugal the Lisbon Government in 1914 granted them a measure of autonomy.
    0
    0
  • See Angola (including Cabinda) (London 1920), a British Foreign Office handbook with bibliography; Hugo Marquardsen, Angola (Berlin 1920), a careful study of the geography and people, by the geographer of the Reichskolonialamt; the Anuario Colonial (Lisbon) and the Boletim of the Lisbon Geog.
    0
    0
  • During the famine which began in the winter of 1739 one-fifth of the population is supposed to have perished; yet it is hardly noticed in literature, and seems not to have touched the conscience of that English public which in 1755 subscribed £roo,000 for the sufferers by the Lisbon earthquake.
    0
    0
  • The Tagus rises in the Montes Universales on the borders of leruel, and flows in a westerly direction until it enters the Atlantic below Lisbon, after a total course of 565 m.
    0
    0
  • Leite do Vasconellos, Dialectos beirei (Oporto, I 884), and Sur le dialecte portugais de Macao (Lisbon, 1892).
    0
    0
  • The cod take had supported in the 18th century an extensive trade with Bilbao, Lisbon and the West Indies, and though changed in nature with the decline of the Bank fisheries after the War of Independence, it continued large through the first quarter of the 19th century.
    0
    0
  • He tried to keep up with the news from the Academy of Sciences of Lisbon and from his fellow academicians and naturalists.
    0
    0
  • Last year's Lisbon summit took place in the context of a relatively benign economic climate.
    0
    0
  • Nicola joined a new chamber orchestra as double bass player in Lisbon after her university courses before returning to the North of England.
    0
    0
  • We will fulfill the commitment set out in the Lisbon Agenda.
    0
    0
  • No Chinese junk, no Arab dhow, no Polynesian war canoe, ever found a mooring in Lisbon or Limehouse.
    0
    0
  • We found it at Azeitao, a cluster of villages that surround a slightly dusty town about 45 minutes from Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • They are the only Scottish team to win the European Cup, beating Inter Milan in 1967 to earn the nickname The Lisbon Lions.
    0
    0
  • Pounds s. d In Lisbon 15 mille reis per pipe is 1,500 mille reis; exchange, at 6s.
    0
    0
  • Melbourne, which stands in latitude 37° 50' S., has a mean temperature of 57'3°, and therefore corresponds with Washington in the United States, Madrid, Lisbon and Messina.
    0
    0
  • Britain, it was true, acting on the initiative of George Canning, had seized the Danish fleet, thus forestalling an action which Napoleon certainly contemplated; but on the other hand Denmark now allied herself with him; and while in Lombardy he heard of the triumphant entry of his troops into Lisbon - an event which seemed to prelude his domination in the Iberian Peninsula and thereafter in the Mediterranean.
    0
    0
  • On the original only equator, ecliptics, tropics, polar circles and one meridian 80° to the west of Lisbon are laid down.
    0
    0
  • In a letter to the cardinal patriarch of Lisbon entitled (1850), he denounced the fanaticism and ignorance of the clergy in plain terms, and this provoked a fierce pamphlet war marked by much personal abuse.
    0
    0
  • The professor of Arabic in Lisbon intervened to sustain the accepted view of the battle, and charged Herculano and his supporter Gayangos with ignorance of the Arab historians and of their language.
    0
    0
  • A letter to Voltaire on his poem about the Lisbon earthquake embittered the dislike between the two, being surreptitiously published.
    0
    0
  • The mean annual temperature is 57.3° F., corresponding to that of Washington in the United States, and to Lisbon and Messina in Europe.
    0
    0
  • Lisbon, Coimbra, Evora and Oporto have mean temperatures between 60° and 61.5° F., and the daily variation nowhere exceeds 23°.
    0
    0
  • Even in Lisbon the yearly variation is not less than 50°.
    0
    0
  • The postal and telegraphic services are adequate; tel° p hone systems are installed in Lisbon, Oporto and other large towns; and the Eastern Telegraph Co.
    0
    0
  • The metric system of weights and measures has been officially adopted, but many older standards are used, such as the libra (1.012 lb avoirdupois), alqueire (0.36 imperial bushel), moio (2.78 imp. bushels), almude of Lisbon (3.7 imp. gallons) and almude of Oporto (5.6 imp. gallons).
    0
    0
  • Five years afterwards Portugal was overtaken by the tremendous disaster of the Lisbon earthquake (see Lisbon), which, as Oliveira Martins justly observes, was " more than a cataclysm of nature; it was a moral revolution."
    0
    0
  • Napoleon was dissatisfied with these terms, and although he ultimately ratified the treaty, he sent General Lannes to Lisbon as his ambassador, instructing him to humiliate the Portuguese and if possible to goad them into a renewal of the war.
    0
    0
  • He took no notice of the constituent assembly in Lisbon, which on the 19th of September had ordered him to return to Portugal on pain of forfeiting his right to inherit the Portuguese Crown.
    0
    0
  • Coelho, Theoria da conjugacao em latim e portuguez (Lisbon, 1871), and Questoes da lingua portugueza (Oporto, 1874).
    0
    0
  • A short stakeholder consultation was undertaken over the summer to gage general interest in the Lisbon Strategy.
    0
    0
  • With ports such as Rome, Barcelona, Capri, Sardinia, Gibraltar, Cannes, Florence, Lisbon, and Marseille, the western sailings are typically more popular than similar eastern Mediterranean cruises.
    0
    0
  • Enjoy the culture in Lisbon, Casablanca and Tangier.
    0
    0
  • Eastbound Brazil: Another transatlantic option is to leave in the spring from Sao Paulo, Brazil, and cruise to Rio De Janeiro, Salvador De Bahia, the Canary Islands, and Cadiz before ending in Lisbon, Portugal.
    0
    0
  • White Mountain Shoes was founded in 1978 in Lisbon, New Hampshire.
    0
    0
  • On the original only equator, ecliptics, tropics, polar circles and one meridian 80° to the west of Lisbon are laid down.
    0
    1
  • The chart of the world by Juan de la Cosa, the companion of Columbus, is the earliest extant which depicts the discoveries in the new world (150o), Nicolaus de Canerio, a Genoese, and the map which Alberto Cantino caused to be drawn at Lisbon for Hercules d'Este of Ferrara (1502), illustrating in addition the recent discoveries of the Portuguese in the East.
    0
    1
  • The British troops were directed towards Lisbon and Cadiz, in order to secure these harbours, to prevent the subjugation of Andalusia, and to operate up the basins of the Guadiana, Tagus and Douro into Spain.
    0
    1
  • He then finally decided to attack Soult (intending subsequently to fall back through Galicia) and ordered up transports from Lisbon to Corunna and Vigo; thus changing his base from Portugal to the north-west of Spain; Blake's Spanish army, now rallying under the marquis de la Romana near Leon, was to co-operate, but was able to give little effective aid.
    0
    1
  • Napoleon, directly he realized Moore's proximity, had ordered Soult to Astorga to cut him off from Galicia; recalled his other troops from their march towards Lisbon and Andalusia, and, with 50,000 men and 150 guns, had left Madrid himself (Dec. 22).
    0
    1
  • By this time, French armies, to a great extent controlled by Napoleon from a distance, had advanced - Soult from Galicia to capture Oporto and Lisbon (with General Lapisse from Salamanca moving on his left towards Abrantes) and Marshal Victor, still farther.
    0
    1
  • On the other hand Wellington still held Lisbon with parts of Portugal, Elvas and Badajoz, for Soult had not felt disposed to attempt the capture of the last two fortresses.
    0
    1
  • Cabral despatched a small vessel to Lisbon to announce his discovery, and, without forming any settlement, proceeded to India on the 3rd of May.
    0
    1
  • A ship from Marseilles took it, and left seventy men in it as a garrison; but she was captured on her return, and carried into Lisbon, and immediate measures were taken for reoccupying the place.
    0
    1
  • The Brazilian Company founded by Vieyra, which so materially contributed to preserve its South American possessions to Portugal, had been abolished in 1721 by John V.; but such an instrument being well suited to the bold spirit of Pombal, he established a chartered company again in 1755, to trade exclusively with Maranhao and Para; and in 1759, in spite of the remonstrance of the British Factory at Lisbon, formed another company for Parahyba and Pernambuco.
    0
    1
  • He created a regency in Lisbon, and departed for Brazil on the 29th of November 1807, accompanied by the queen Donna Maria I., the royal family, all the great officers of state, a large part of the nobility and numerous retainers.
    0
    1
  • These causes and the fermentation of liberal principles produced by the French Revolution originated a conspiracy in Lisbon in 1817, which was, however, discovered in time to prevent its success.
    0
    1
  • The idea of free government filled the people with enthusiasm, and the principles of a representative legislature were freely adopted, the first care being for the election of deputies to the Cortes of Lisbon to take part in framing the new constitution.
    0
    1
  • The Brazilian deputies on arriving in Lisbon expressed dissatisfaction with the Cortes for having begun the framing of the constitution before their arrival, for Brazil could not be treated as a secondary part of the monarchy.
    0
    1