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linen

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linen

linen Sentence Examples

  • There were linen napkins, two china plates and champagne flutes on top.

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  • Gabe's step slowed as he neared the man dressed in a white shirt held closed by two buttons and cream linen pants rolled to his knees, as if he'd been walking in the ocean.

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  • "A Frenchman or a Russian prince incognito," said the officer, looking at Pierre's fine though dirty linen and at the ring on his finger.

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  • An active trade is carried on with Austria, especially through the Isakovets and Gusyatin custom-houses, corn, cattle, horses, skins, wool, linseed and hemp seed being exported, in exchange for wooden wares, linen, woollen stuffs, cotton, glass and agricultural implements.

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  • He offered an Irish linen handkerchief from his pocket and waited.

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  • Meanwhile Agrippa gave the Levites the right to wear the linen robe of the priests and sanctioned the use of the temple treasure to provide work - the paving of the city with white stones - for the workmen who had finished the Temple (64) and now stood idle.

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  • There are numerous tanneries, and the manufacture of boots and shoes and linen goods is carried on.

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  • The industry is not well developed, but the weaving of linen and lace is pursued as a household industry.

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  • Trautenau is the centre of the Bohemian linen industry and has factories for the manufacture of paper and for the utilization of the waste products of the other mills.

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  • The unaccustomed coarse food, the vodka he drank during those days, the absence of wine and cigars, his dirty unchanged linen, two almost sleepless nights passed on a short sofa without bedding--all this kept him in a state of excitement bordering on insanity.

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  • The tunica was originally of white wool, but in the 3rd century it began to be made of linen, and from the 4th century was always of linen.

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  • However, the feeling which was aroused among the priests when some centuries later the singers obtained from Agrippa the privilege of wearing the priestly linen dress (Josephus, Ant.

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  • The industries consist of manufactures of cotton, linen, woollens and worsteds, and leather.

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  • Taran looked down at his own richly spun wool and linen clothing, pitying the men on the beach.

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  • You would think the women had spread out their linen, said one of the men, gazing with admiration at the Milky Way.

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  • Tables were covered with white linen table cloths and adorned with violet colored napkins inside light gray napkin holders.

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  • There are factories of linen and cotton goods, and of felt hats, paper mills, and a celebrated bell foundry at Annecy le Vieux.

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  • The Frenchman looked at the linen, considered for a moment, then looked inquiringly at Pierre and, as if Pierre's look had told him something, suddenly blushed and shouted in a squeaky voice:

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  • There was a lion in the linen closet and no one wanted to reach for the towel.

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  • Besides manufactures of brandy, flour, oil, soap, linen and cloth, it has an active trade in wheat, wine and fruit, especially melons.

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  • Its once famous tanneries have lost their importance, but the manufacture of linen has increased; it has also steam flour-mills, distilleries, manufactories of soap and of iron implements.

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  • "It's good, quite good, thank you," said the Frenchman, in French, "but there must be some linen left over."

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  • A large variety of materials have been used in their manufacture by different peoples at different times - painted linen and shavings of stained horn by the Egyptians, gold and silver by the Romans, rice-paper by the Chinese, silkworm cocoons in Italy, the plumage of highly coloured birds in South America, wax, small tinted shells, &c. At the beginning of the 8th century the French, who originally learnt the art from the Italians, made great advances in the accuracy of their reproductions, and towards the end of that century the Paris manufacturers enjoyed a world-wide reputation.

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  • The leading industry of Udine is silk-spinning, but it also possesses manufactures of linen, cotton, hats and paper, tanneries and sugar refineries, and has a considerable trade in flax, hemp, &c. Branch railways lead to Cividale del Friuli and S.

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  • The principal manufactures are woollen, linen, cotton, cast-iron goods, beet-sugar, leather and brandy.

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  • The dining room table was set with a linen tablecloth under a handmade lace cover, fine china, Waterford crystal and brass chargers.

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  • They have a kind of short kilt, stiff, made of black wool, with a band from back to front between the legs; under this they wear short linen trousers, which come a little below the knee, and black woollen leggings with boots.

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  • Yully trotted up to her wing and pulled a spare blanket out of the main linen closet.

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  • The main dining area consists of two rows of tables covered with crisp white linen.

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  • From the cave we have advanced to roofs of palm leaves, of bark and boughs, of linen woven and stretched, of grass and straw, of boards and shingles, of stones and tiles.

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  • Lana drew a deep breath and placed the clothing in the round dryer in the linen closet before returning to the living room.

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  • Here, by the very corner of my field, still nearer to town, Zilpha, a colored woman, had her little house, where she spun linen for the townsfolk, making the Walden Woods ring with her shrill singing, for she had a loud and notable voice.

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  • She knelt and pushed clothes and trunks out of the way to reveal a dagger wrapped in linen, several bladders, and a barrel the height of her knee.

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  • Its material may be linen, wool, cotton or silk; but silk only is the rule for deacons.

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  • In the neighbourhood are extensive coal-mines and brick-works, and the industries embrace the manufacture of linen, beer, spirits and tobacco.

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  • The restaurant's ambiance is considered romantic and exotic, accented by dark woods and white linen.

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  • It gave its name to cadurcum, a kind of light linen, and the bankers of Cahors were famous.

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  • In the medieval inventories are sometimes found albae, described as red, blue or black; which has led to the belief that albs were sometimes not only made of stuffs other than linen, but were coloured.

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  • Its industrial establishments comprise tobacco, yarn, thread, linen and woollen cloth manufactories, bleaching and dyeing works, breweries and oil and flour mills.

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  • Liqueurs, chicory, chocolate, candles, hats, boots and shoes, and woollen and linen goods are also made, and tanning is practised.

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  • It is the centre of considerable lace, linen and cotton industries.

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  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.

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  • There is a large agricultural trade, and linen and leather manufactures and the quarries also employ a considerable number of persons.

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  • Segesvar has a good woollen and linen trade, as well as exports of wine and fruit.

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  • The fashionable material was linen, and although, according to Herodotus (ii.

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  • Linen, paper (to varieties of which Herrnhut gives its name), tobacco and various minor articles are manufactured.

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  • Woollen and linen goods are manufactured, and there are ribbon looms and tanneries in the town, and large iron works in the neighbourhood.

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  • Mixed with gum arabic it forms a marking ink for linen.

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  • It carries on a considerable trade in cotton and linen and embroidered muslin.

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  • The linen industry is concentrated at Schonberg, Mistek, Wiesenberg and Heidenpiltsch; while the cotton industry has its principal seat at Sternberg.

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  • The industries of Breda comprise the 'manufacture of linen and woollen goods, carpets, hats, beer and musical instruments.

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  • The principal industries include manufactures of linen and sailcloth, bleaching, rope-making, brewing, distilling, paper-making, in addition to nurseries and freestone quarries.

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  • In the Old Testament we are told that Pharaoh arrayed Joseph " in vestures of fine linen " (Gen.

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  • The costume of the Tosks differs from that of the Ghegs; its distinctive feature is the white plaited linen fustanella or petticoat, which has been adopted by the Greeks; the Ghegs wear trews of white or crimson native cloth adorned with black braid, and a short, close-fitting jacket, which in the case of wealthy persons is embellished with gold lace.

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  • It consists of a white felt cap, a long white tunic bound with a red girdle, white linen trousers and opinki, or sandals.

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  • He was described by Sir Philip Warwick on this occasion: - "I came into the House one morning well clad and perceived a gentleman speaking whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled; for it was a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor; his linen was plain and not very clean;.

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  • The chief industries include distilleries, breweries, glass works, cigar factories and the ancient linen and cutlery manufactures.

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  • "Jacob, bring a bottle!" shouted the host, a tall, handsome fellow who stood in the midst of the group, without a coat, and with his fine linen shirt unfastened in front.

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  • Flax, Hemp, Jute, &c.The preparation and spinning of these materials and the manufacture of nets and rope, together with the weaving of linen and other fabrics, give occupation to 112,000 persons chiefly in the departments of Nord (Lille, Armentires, Dunkirk), Somme (Amiens) and Maine-et-Loire (Angers, Cholet).

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  • In the 18th and early part of the 19th century Penrith manufactured checks, linen cloth and ginghams, but the introduction of machinery put an end to this industry, only the making of rag carpets surviving.

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  • It is a sack-like tunic of white linen, with narrow sleeves and a hole for the head to pass through, and when gathered up round the waist by the girdle (cingulum) just clears the ground.

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  • The decree of the Congregation of Rites (May 18,1819) says nothing about apparels, but only lays down that the alb must be of white linen or hemp cloth.

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  • In the middle ages it was the seat of a large trade in linen.

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  • There are considerable manufactures; chiefly of cotton and linen.

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  • Next in importance are the machine, linen, cotton and paper manufactures, the milling, brewing and distilling industries and shipbuilding.

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  • Paper, cotton, silk, linen and hemp are manufactured.

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  • The industries of Dessau include the production of sugar, which is the chief manufacture, woollen, linen and cotton goods, carpets, hats, leather, tobacco and musical instruments.

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  • Like Tilburg and Helmond it has developed in modern times into a flourishing industrial centre, having linen,, woollen, cotton, tobacco and cigar, matches, &c., factories and several breweries.

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  • Pamplona has a flourishing agricultural trade, besides manufactures of cloth, linen stuffs, flour, soap, leather, cards, paper, earthenware, iron and nails.

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  • Bank of Scotland, the Royal Bank of Scotland, and the British Linen Company's Bank are in St Andrew Square, the Bank of Scotland is at the head of the Mound.

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  • The principal imports are: cotton goods, woollen manufactures; apparel, haberdashery and linen; silk manufactures; leather and leather goods.

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  • Linen weaving is carried on extensively in the Suf.

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  • It has important commerce in linen, flax, hemp, wool and seeds, and a considerable transit trade.

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  • In the West the principle already laid down by St Gregory the Great in his letter to Constantia, namely that of not disturbing the bodies of the saints, was for a long time the rule in all cases, and the portions distributed to the churches were simply brandea, that is to say, linen which had lain upon the tomb of the saint, or, in other words, representative relics.

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  • The loinor waist-cloth prevailed under a very great variety of minor differentiated forms. In Egypt it was the plain short linen cloth wrapped around the loins and tied in front.

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  • In Egyptian tombs have been found linen bands no less than 30 ft.

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  • 81), a woollen mantle was worn over the fringed linen skirt, wool was forbidden to the priests in the temple.

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  • That the Pharaoh's skirt, sometimes decorated with a pleated golden material, should become an honorific garment, the right of wearing which was proudly recorded among the bearer's titles, is quite intelligible, but many difficulties arise when one attempts to identify the individuals represented, or to trace the evolution of ideas.2 The well-known conservatism of religious practice manifests itself in ceremonial festivals (where there is a tendency for the original religious meaning to be obscured) and among cere= the priests, and it is interesting to observe that despite the great changes in Egyptian costume in the New Kingdom the priests still kept to the simple linen skirt of earlier days (Erman, 206).

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  • 17-23) actually used the clothing peculiar to some deity, nor is it quite clear what is meant when a Babylonian ritual text refers to the magical use of the linen garment of Eridu (seat of the cult of Ea).

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  • Why the layman was forbidden a mixture of wool and linen (sha'atnez, Deut.

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  • The chiton, xcrcww, was formed by sewing together at the sides two pieces of linen, or a double piece folded together, leaving spaces at the top for the arms and neck, and fastening the top edges together over the shoulders and upper arm with buttons or brooches; more rarely we find a plain sleeveless chiton.

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  • Aegina), the details of which are to all appearance legendary, in order to account for a change in the fashion of female dress which took place at Athens in the course of the 6th century B.C. Up to that time the " Dorian dress " had been universal, but the Athenians now gave up the use of garments fastened with pins or brooches, and adopted the linen chiton of the Ionians.

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  • 6) tells us that in his own time the linen chiton of Ionia had again been discarded in favour of the Doric dress, and the monuments show that after the Persian wars a reaction against Orientalism showed itself in a return to simpler fashions.

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  • The long linen chiton, which had been worn by men as well as women, was now only retained by the male sex on religious and festival occasions; a short chiton was, however, worn at work or in active exercise (Greek Art, fig.

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  • A woollen undergarment (subucula) was often worn by men; the women's under-tunic was of linen (indusium).

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  • The chief industries are the manufacture of bed and table linen, towelling and woollen cloth, shipbuilding and flax-spinning.

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  • At the age of eight he was compelled to leave the school and support himself by work in a linen factory.

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  • A and B are pear-shaped glass vessels connected by a long narrow india-rubber tube, which must be sufficiently strong in the body (or strengthened by a linen coating) to stand an outward pressure of 1 to 2 atmospheres.

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  • In the Roman Catholic Church the rochet is a tunic of white, and usually fine linen or muslin (battiste, mull) reaching about to the knee, and distinguished from the surplice by the fact that its arms are narrow and tight-fitting.

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  • In general it has retained the medieval form more closely than the Roman rochet, in so far as it is of plain, very fine linen (lawn), and reaches almost to the feet.

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  • It owes its prosperity to its manufacture of linen, woolen goods and paper, especially cigarette paper.

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  • Woollen and linen cloth, leather, earthenware, paper, and articles in gold and silver are also made in Vicenza, and a considerable trade in these articles, as well as in corn and wine, is carried on.

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  • The linen trade introduced in the middle of the 18th century is extinct, and a like fate has overtaken the kelp and straw-plaiting industries.

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  • The industries (linen, yarn-spinning, distilling, brewing, salt-refining, shipbuilding) are comparatively unimportant.

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  • There is a trade in agricultural produce, a salmon fishery, sea fisheries and a manufacture of linen.

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  • The principal exports are grain, eggs, cattle, linen cloth and flax, and the imports include timber, groceries and coal.

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  • Cotton was first imported to Providence from Spain in 1785; a company to carry on cotton-spinning, formed at Providence in 1786, established there in the following year a factory containing a spinning jenny of 28 spindles (the first machine of the kind to be used in the United States), and also a carding machine and a spinning frame with which was manufactured a kind of jean having a linen warp and a cotton filling.

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  • After receiving a very limited education he was apprenticed to a linen manufacturer, but, finding the employment uncongenial, he resumed school-life at the institution founded by Wesley at Kingswood, near Bristol.

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  • The leading industries are manufactures of linen and cotton goods, especially canvas and tarpaulin, and of soap, paper, chemicals, starch, glass, leather, spirits and flour.

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  • Chocolate or dove-colored grounds with delicate diapers in gold and engobe; brown or black faience with white, yellow and pink designs incised or in relief; pottery curiously and deftly marbled by combinations of various colored clays these and many other kinds are to be found, all, however, presenting one common feature, namely, skilful finger-moulding and a slight roughening of the surface as though it had received the impression of coarse linen or crape before baking.

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  • Agriculture, however, is not far advanced, yet owing to the linen industry the inhabitants are generally in circumstances of comparative comfort.

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  • The principal manufacture, and that which has given a peculiar tone to the character of the population, is that of linen, though it has somewhat declined in modern times.

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  • An electric tramway connects Bessbrook, a town with important linen manufactures and granite quarries, with Newry.

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  • The solution, containing hypochlorites and chlorates, was then applied to the bleaching of linen, paper-pulp or the like, the solution being used over and over again.

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  • His bristly black person, and shagged breast quite open and rarely purified by any ablutions, was wrapped in a foul linen nightgown and his bushy hair dishevelled.

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  • Georgswalde is one of the oldest industrial places of Bohemia, and together with the neighbouring town of Rumburg is the principal centre of the linen industry.

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  • Other principal public buildings, nearly all to be included in modern schemes of development, are the city hall, occupying the site of the old Linen Hall, in Donegall Square, estimated to cost £300,000; the commercial buildings (1820) in Waring Street, the customhouse and inland revenue office on Donegall Quay, the architect of which, as of the court house, was Sir Charles Lanyon, and some of the numerous banks, especially the Ulster Bank.

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  • The chief exports are linen, whisky, aerated waters, iron ore and cattle.

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  • Belfast is the centre of the Irish linen industry, machinery for which was introduced by T.

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  • Next in importance comes the spinning and weaving of wool, cotton, linen and carpet manufactures, and dyeing.

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  • The industries include paper-mills, flour-mills, distilleries, copper works, and linen factories; and the samovars (tea-urns) and sausages made here are famous.

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  • The town has several linen manufactories and a large cotton spinnery, but is chiefly famed for its many extensive breweries, which mainly produce a black beer, not unlike English porter, which is largely exported.

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  • Jagerndorf has large manufactories of cloth, woollens, linen and machines, and carries on an active trade.

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  • The diadem, which was of eastern origin, was a fillet or band of linen or silk, richly embroidered, and was worn tied round the forehead.

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  • 8) says that the diadem and crown "have been from 'ancient times confounded, yet the diadem strictly was a very different thing from what a crown now is or was, and it was no other then than only a fillet of silk, linen, or some such thing."

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  • The linen or silk diadem was eventually exchanged for a flexible band of gold, which was worn in its place round the forehead.

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  • Almost all industries are represented; chief among them are machine-building, the manufacture of india-rubber, linen, cloth, hardware, chemicals, tobacco, pianos, furniture and groceries.

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  • Exports are all kinds of manufactured goods, such as cotton, linen, woollen, worsted and leather goods, machinery and hardware.

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  • The chief manufactures of the town are linen goods, soap, malt, and agricultural implements, and a brisk trade is carried on in cattle, grain and geese.

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  • The local industries, chiefly developed since 1880, include the manufacture of cotton, linen, wool, ribbons, cloth, chocolate, soap, brandies, leather, cards and nails.

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  • 5, 6; the young man who, when Jesus was arrested, followed, "having a linen cloth cast about him," xiv.

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  • Flax is grown in the Erzgebirge and Lusatian mountains, where the manufacture of linen was at one time a flourishing domestic industry.

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  • Linen is manufactured chiefly in the mountains of Lusatia, where the looms are still to some extent found in the homes of the weavers.

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  • Their clothing was partly of linen and partly of woollen fabrics and the skins of their beasts.

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  • Originally the diaconal stole would seem to have been a narrow strip of folded linen, and it appears in the pictures of the 9th century as a narrow band ornamented with crosses.

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  • It is now best known for its fine linen, which ranks with that of Larne.

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  • Glass and coarse linen and woollen stuffs are manufactured; and there are valuable stone quarries in the neighbourhood.

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  • It possesses manufactures of cloth, table-linen and earthenware, and has an active trade in wine, linen, cattle and grain.

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  • Pliny speaks of the whiteness of its linen, and the productiveness of its vines is mentioned.

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  • Linen goods are manufactured; fairs are held twice yearly, and numerous flour mills are worked by the river.

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  • Although Ypres is unlikely to regain the importance it possessed when its "red-coated" contingent turned the day in the great battle of Courtrai (1302), it has an important linen and lace trade and a great butter market.

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  • The linen manufacture is the most important industry.

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  • Imports consist of cotton, linen and woollen fabrics, hardware, cutlery and machinery, kerosene, glass and earthenware; and the exports of cattle, sugar, tobacco, coffee, coco-nuts and fibre, dividivi and dye-woods, vegetable ivory, rubber, hides and skins, medicinal forest products, gold, silver and platinum.

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  • In industrial enterprise silk and linen goods and iron wares are almost the only products of any note.

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  • Fairs are periodically held in the town; and the trade in timber, cereals, and linen and woollen goods is generally brisk.

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  • But this does not hold good of some manufactures; especially not of the silk industry, and some parts of the woollen and linen trades.

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  • Esparto leaves contain 56% by weight of fibre, or about ro% more than straw, and hence have come into requisition as a substitute for linen rags in the manufacture of paper.

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  • There is a brisk local trade in farm produce, and in the linen, hempen goods and pottery manufactured in Baza.

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  • z The ordinary interpretation "linen ephod" (i Sam.

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  • 14, where David girt in (or with) a linen ephod dances before the ark at its entry into Jerusalem and incurs the unqualified contempt of his wife Michal, the daughter of Saul.

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  • vi.), all that can safely be said is that 1 It is not stated that the linen ephod was David's sole covering, and it is difficult to account for the text in the parallel passage 1 Chron.

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  • There are manufactures of alcohol, liqueurs, chocolate, starch, sugar, preserves, flour, soap, leather, earthenware, glass, matches, paper, linen, woollen goods and rugs.

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  • (in which contending prophets confront one another in a contest of symbols), of the linen girdle of ch.

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  • The weaving establishments (mainly broadcloth) of Leiden at the close of the 15th century were very important, and after the expulsion of the Spaniards Leiden cloth, Leiden baize and Leiden camlet were familiar terms. These industries afterwards declined, and in the beginning of the 19th century the baize manufacture was altogether given up. Linen and woollen manufactures are now the most important industries, while there is a considerable transit trade in butter and cheese.

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  • The imports largely consist of railway material, industrial machinery, cotton, woollen and linen textiles and yarns for national factories, hardware, furniture, building material, mining supplies, drugs and chemicals, wines and spirits, wheat, Indian corn, paper and military supplies and e9uipment.

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  • Other important manufactories are flour mills, of which there were over 500 in 1904; iron and steel works, of which there are 7 large establishments, including the immense plant at Monterey; 90 smelters for the reduction of precious metals; tanneries, potteries, and factories for the manufacture of hats, paper, linen, hammocks, harness and saddles, matches, explosives, aerated waters, soap, furniture, chocolate and sweetmeats.

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  • The city manufactures silk, leather, tapestry, woollens, linen and cotton, and has an active general trade.

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  • For the smaller sizes, rubber brakes are sometimes used and, for the very smallest, the fingers either bare or protected by linen bands.

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  • British commerce therefore suffered severely, even as far off as the Irish coasts, where it was found necessary to supply convoy to the Belfast linen trade.

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  • About 1715 parliament favoured the manufacture of linen, and the Linen Hall was built.

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  • The linen shared the same fate.

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  • The very important linen industry of Bielefeld, Herford, Minden and Warendorf has flourished in this region since the 14th century.

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  • According to the decisions of the Congregation of Rites chasubles must not be of linen, cotton or woollen stuffs, but of silk; though a mixture of wool (or linen and cotton) and silk is allowed if the silk completely cover the other material on the outer side; spun glass thread, as a substitute for gold or silver thread, is also forbidden, owing to the possible danger to the priest's health through broken fragments falling into the chalice.

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  • The apostle spreads a linen cloth on a bench, lays on it bread of blessing (eNv yia), and says: " Jesus Christ, Son of God, who hast made us worthy to commune in the Eucharist of thy holy body and precious blood, Lo, we venture on the thanksgiving (Eucharistia) and invocation of thy blessed name, come now and communicate with us.

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  • Manresa has important iron-foundries and manufactures of woollen, cotton and linen goods, ribbons, hats, paper, soap, chemicals, spirits and flour.

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  • Markham, in his introduction to the narrative of Clavijo's embassy, states that his body "was embalmed with musk and rose water, wrapped in linen, laid in an ebony coffin and sent to Samarkand, where it was buried."

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  • Much of the wool is sold, like the native cotton, to Indian and Ladino women, who manufacture coarse cloth and linen in their homes.

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  • At the end of the mass the cleric, clad in chasuble and stole and bearing a linen bag on one arm, comes before the pope or bishop and receives a blessing.

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  • At the moment of communion the acolytes received in linen bags the consecrated Hosts to carry to the assisting priests.

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  • The official dress of the acolyte, according to Ordo V., was a close-fitting linen garment (camisia) girt about him, a napkin hanging from the left side, a white tunic, a stole (orarium) and a chasuble (planeta) which he took off when he sang on the steps of the ambone.

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  • The woollen trade once promised to reach considerable dimensions, but towards the end of the 18th century was superseded by the linen (for which flax came to be largely grown); and when this in turn collapsed before the products of the mills of Dundee, Dunfermline and Glasgow, straw-plaiting was taken up, though only to be killed in due time by the competition of the south.

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  • 86), to be soaked, wrapped in linen bandages, and put in the coffin.

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  • Later, the form was reproduced by elaborate external wrappings of the different parts of the body before the final swathing; later still, in the Ptolemaic age, by coarse padding with plenty of linen and pitch.

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  • The chief industries are linen weaving, cloth making and coal mining.

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  • The imports include wheat, flour, Indian corn, jerked beef (carne secca), lard, bacon, wines and liquors, butter, cheese, conserves of all kinds, coal, cotton, woollen, linen and silk textiles, boots and shoes, earthenand glasswares, railway material, machinery, furniture, building material, including pine lumber, drugs and chemicals, and hardware.

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  • In the 18th century there was an extensive linen industry.

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  • Linen yarn and cloth are largely manufactured, especially in the south about Osnabruck and Hildesheim, and bleaching is engaged in extensively; woollen cloths are made to a considerable extent in the south about Einbeck, Göttingen and Hameln; cotton-spinning and weaving have their principal seats at Hanover and Linden.

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  • After being dried, the hanks are packed in linen bags and boiled for three hours in a weaker soapy solution, then washed out in pure warm water and dried in a centrifugal hydroextractor.

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  • Mansura has several cottonginning, cotton, linen and sail-cloth factories.

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  • Coarse linen and woollen cloths are manufactured to a small extent.

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  • Cloth, linen, paper, flour and brandy are manufactured, and there are iron foundries and saw-mills.

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  • - The chief material for clothing was at first no doubt wool, though linen must also have been used and later became fairly common.

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  • This had developed by the 14th or 15th century into a cerecloth, or waxed cloth, on the table itself; and three linen coverings one above the other, two of about the size of the table and one rather wider than the altar, and long enough to hang down at each end.

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  • The principal articles of manufacture have long been sailcloth, cordage, linen and fishing-nets.

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  • Thereafter they went about their daily tasks, working continuously at whatever trade they knew till the fifth hour, when they assembled, and, girding on a garment of linen, bathed in cold water.

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  • i, or covered with linen upon which the degrees and points are printed, the needles being enclosed in brass.

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  • Cotton linings include silesia, originally a linen cloth made in Silesia and now usually a twilled cotton cloth which is dyed various colours; Italian cloth, a kind of jean or sateen produced originally in Italy.

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  • Among these are sateen, which, dyed or printed, is largely used for dresses, linings, upholstery, &c.; linenette, dyed and finished to imitate coloured linen in the north of Ireland and elsewhere; hollandette, usually unbleached or half-bleached and finished to imitate linen holland; and interlining, a coarse, plain white calico used as padding for linen collars.

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  • Weaving has been practised in Silesia, on a large scale, since the 14th century; and Silesian linen still maintains its reputation, though the conditions of production have greatly changed.

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  • The cloth and woollen industries are concentrated at Bielitz, Jagerndorf and Engelsberg; linen is manufactured at Freiwaldau Freudenthal and Bennisch; cotton goods at Friedek.

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  • These, with the paper, linen and cotton goods manufactured locally in small quantities, are exported from Adra.

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  • - Tunic Of Linen, Vove With Bands Of Purple Wool Embroidered With White Flax.

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  • Cavan has some linen trade, and a considerable retail business is transacted in the town.

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  • It had grown into a custom to send the books which he had done with in a chest along with his linen to be washed at Gorcum.

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  • It has numerous cotton and linen mills.

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  • He was then conducted by them to his appointed chamber, where a bath was prepared hung within and without with linen and covered with rich cloths, into which after they had undressed him he entered.

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  • It is a tunic of white linen or cotton material, with wide or moderately wide sleeves, reaching - according to the Roman use - barely to the hips and elsewhere in the churches of the Roman communion to the knee.

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  • a widesleeved, very full, plain, white linen tunic, pleated from the yoke, and reaching almost, or quite, to the feet.

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  • But its linen manufactures, begun early in the 18th century, gradually restored prosperity; and when other industries had taken root its fortunes advanced by leaps and bounds, and there is now no more flourishing community in Scotland.

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  • The industries include cotton and flax-spinning, and the manufacture of linen cloth, carpets, furniture, machinery, sugar, tobacco and leather.

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  • According to modern Roman use, laid down by the decree of the Congregation of Rites in 1819, the amice must be of linen or of a hempen material, not wool; and, as directed by the new Roman Missal (1570), a small cross must be sewn or embroidered in the middle of it.

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  • Linen manufacture is also carried on, and brewing, tanning and soap-making give considerable employment.

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  • Linen, flax, jute and wool are also spun and woven.

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  • The park was presented in 1862 by the widow of Joseph Locke, M.P. The manufacture of iron and steel, and the weaving of linen and other cloth, are the two principal industries; but there are also bleachfields, printfields, dyeworks, sawmills, cornmills and malt-houses; and the manufacture of glass, needles and wire is carried on.

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  • Besides these charters and others granting land in Barnsley to the monks of Pontefract there is very little history of the town, since it was not until after the introduction of the linen manufacture in 1744 that it became really important.

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  • Before that time the chief industry had been wire-drawing, but this trade began to decrease about the end of the 18th century, just as the linen trade was becoming important.

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  • Bielefeld is the centre of the Westphalian linen industry.

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  • It joined the Hanseatic league in 1270, and about the same time began to engage in the linen manufacture, which was greatly extended during the 16th and 17th centuries by a number of refugees from the Netherlands.

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  • In the manufacture of woollen and linen goods Tilburg ranks first, followed by Leiden, Utrecht and Eindhoven; that of half-woollens is best developed at Roermond and Helmond.

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  • Where a freezing store for furs is not accessible, furs should be well shaken and afterwards packed in linen and kept in a perfectly cool dry place, and examined in the summer at periods of not less than five weeks.

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  • Before the igth century Darlington was noted for the manufacture of linen, worsted and flax, but it owes its modern importance to the opening of the railway between Darlington and Stockton on the 27th of September 1825.

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  • On the other hand, he approves of a protective tax on German linen in favour of home manufactures, and of a tax on brandy as encouraging the sale of rum and so supporting our southern colonies.

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  • Wimborne carried on considerable manufactures of linen and woollen goods until the time of Charles II., when they declined, their place being taken by the stocking-knitting industry of the 18th century.

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  • Linen is largely made at Gladbach, leather at Malmedy, glass in the Saar district and beetroot sugar near Cologne.

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  • Cotton is the principal product of the mills at Lodz and Lask, both in Piotrkow; though woollen cloth, silk and linen are also produced.

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  • Paisley has been an important manufacturing centre since the beginning of the 18th century, but the earlier linen, lawn and silk-gauze industries have become extinct, and even the famous Paisley shawls (imitation cashmere), the sale of which at one time exceeded i,000,000 yearly in value, have ceased to be woven.

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  • The manufacture of linen thread, introduced about 1720 by Christian Shaw, daughter of the laird of Bargarran, gave way in 1812 to that of cotton thread, which has since grown to be the leading industry of the town.

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  • It is the chief seat of the textile industry in south Germany, and its cloth, cotton goods and linen manufactories employ about 10,000 hands.

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  • La Estrada is the chief town of a densely-populated mountainous district; its industries are agriculture, stockbreeding, and the manufacture of linen and woollen cloth.

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  • At Llangollen are linen and woollen manufactures, and near are collieries, lime and iron works.

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  • Flax and hemp are cultivated, though not so much as formerly, for manufacture into linen and canvas, and also rape seed for the production of oil.

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  • Saxony is predominant in the production of textiles, though Silesia and Westphalia manufacture linen.

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  • Although linen was formerly one of her most important articles of manufacture, Germany is now left far behind in this industry by Great Britain, France and Austria-Hungary, This branch of textile manufacture has its principal centres in Silesia, Westphalia, Saxony and Wurttemberg, while Hirschberg in Silesia, Bielefeld in Westphalia and Zittau in Saxony are noted for the excellence of theirproductions.

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  • In the textile industry for flax and hemp there were, in 1905, 276,000 fine spindles, 22,300 hand-looms and 17,600 power-looms in operation, and, in 1905, linen and jute materials were exported of an estimated value of over 2,000,000.

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  • Clothes, body linen, millinery - 739,900 7,321,050

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  • Tobacco, leather, linen, carpets and war-material are manufactured in Agram, which also contains the works of the Hungarian state railways, and has a brisk trade in grain, wine, potash, honey, silk and porcelain.

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  • The principal trade is in cattle, cereals, fish, linen, pottery, glue and leather.

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  • There are manufactures of linen, cigars, beet-root sugar and beer.

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  • The town has some trade in domestic produce, and in leather and linen manufactures, there being several flax spinning-mills and bleach-works in the immediate neighbourhood.

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  • There are manufactures of cloth, linen, leather, caps, boots, soap, candles, ropes; as well as breweries and distilleries.

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  • Nearly all its old industries - the coal mines, salt works, linen manufacture, and even the making of iron girdles for the baking of scones - have dwindled, but its pleasant climate and picturesqueness make it a holiday resort.

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  • The salmonfishery and fish-curing are important branches of its trade; and it has also breweries and flour-mills and manufactures snuff and coarse linen.

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  • Native industries include the weaving of silk, woollen, linen and cotton goods, the hand-woven silk shawls and draperies being often rich and elegant.

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  • The linen corslets of the Egyptian soldiery at a later time were famous, and were adopted by the Persian army.

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  • Papyrus rolls and fine linen were good merchandise in Phoenicia in the 10th century B.C. From the earliest times Egypt was dependent on.

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  • Cedar wood was brought from the forests of Lebanon, ivory, leopard skins and gold from the south, all kinds of spices and ingredients of incense from Somaliland and Arabia, fine linen and beautifully worked vessels from Syria and the islands.

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  • The corpse was treated with natron and asphalt, and wound in a copious swathing of linen bandage, with a mask of linen and stucco on the face.

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  • The manufacture of woollens and cotton, the domestic manufacture of linen in Zealand, sugar refineries, paper mills, breweries, and distilleries may also be mentioned.

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  • The production of linen from flax and hemp is a home industry throughout Transylvania.

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  • Among the earliest seem to be two examples of a method practised in Italy especially by the school of Mantegna, but almost without precedent in Germany, that of tempera-painting on linen.

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  • An interval of five years separates the Vienna "Madonna" from the two fine heads of the apostles Philip and James in the Uffizi at Florence, the pair of boys' heads painted in tempera on linen in the Bibliotheque Nationale at Paris, the "Madonna with the Pink" at Augsburg, and the portrait of Wolgemut at Munich, all of 1516.

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  • Its manufactures are lace and linen and it has a brisk trade in live-stock, oil and wine.

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  • There are numerous saw-mills, shipbuilding yards, engineering works, distilleries, sugar refineries, tobacco factories, linen bleacheries and stained glass, salt and white lead works.

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  • Peter and Paul, which was maintained until within recent years, when fairs were also held at the feast of St Mark, chiefly for linen cloth, under grant from Charles I.

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  • It is an industrial centre, linen weaving, coal mining and malting being the principal industries.

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  • The manufacture of cloth from flax is of very ancient date, and towards the close of the 16th century Scottish linen cloths were largely exported to foreign countries, as well as to England.

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  • In a petition presented to the privy council in 1684, complaining of the severe treatment of Scotsmen selling linen in England, it was stated that 12,000 persons were engaged in the manufacture.

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  • Further to encourage the trade it was enacted in 1686 that the bodies of all persons, excepting poor tenants and cotters, should be buried in plain linen only, spun and made within the kingdom.

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  • At the time of the Union the annual amount of linen cloth manufactured in Scotland is supposed to have been about 1,500,000 yards.

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  • The Union gave a considerable impetus to the manufacture, as did also the establishment of the Board of Manufactures in 1727, which applied an annual sum of £2650 to its encouragement, and in 1729 established a colony of French Protestants in Edinburgh, on the site of the present Picardy Place, to teach the spinning and weaving of cambric. From the 1st of November 1727 to the 1st of November 1728 the amount of linen cloth stamped was 2,183,978 yds., valued at £103,312, but for the year ending the 1st of November 1822, when the regulations as to the inspection and stamping of linen ceased, it had increased to 36,268,530 yds., valued at £1,396,296.

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  • In 1890 the number employed in the linen industry was 34,222, which had declined in 1901 to 23,570.

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  • The fact is that as English companies for foreign trade had long been in chartered existence, Scotsmen and Scottish capital had no profitable outlets, while agriculture was conducted on slovenly medieval or prehistoric methods; and only the linen trade of the country was really flourishing.

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  • BAYEUX TAPESTRY This venerable relic consists of a band of linen, 231 ft.

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  • The trade is chiefly in timber, corn, leather and linen.

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  • The manufactures include linen fabrics, cloth, toys, buttons, optical instruments, agricultural machines, knives, mineral waters, condensed soups and condensed milk.

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    0
  • Linen and woollen fabrics, hosiery, paper, cigars, soap, vinegar and earthenware are manufactured, and there are iron-foundries, distilleries, tanneries and shipbuilding yards.

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  • Tammerfors is an important centre for the manufacture of cotton, linen, and woollen goods, leather and paper.

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  • Blome in 1673 speaks of Warrington market as an important one "for linen cloth, corn, cattle, provisions and fish, being much resorted to by the Welshmen," and in 1730 Defoe says the market was especially famous for "a sort of table linen called Huk-a-back or Huk-abuk."

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  • The industries include manufactures of pottery, bricks, oil, linen and woollen cloth, fire-hose and paper.

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    0
  • The principal industries include the weaving of linen and damasks, bleaching, distilling and malting.

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  • a linen factory and bleaching works.

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    0
  • Its industries include linen and cotton weaving, dyeing, calico printing, brewing, ship-building and the manufacture of tobacco, glass, soap, chocolate, leather, lamps, chicory and chemicals.

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    0
  • The former kind of bleach-liquor is mostly used in the industry of cotton, the latter in that of linen.

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    0
  • Silk, linen, flour, wine, brandy, oil, salt and soap are the chief industrial products.

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    0
  • It remained a place of little importance until the 17th century, when religious persecution drove to it a number of Calvinists and Separatists from Julich and Berg (followed later by Mennonites), who introduced the manufacture of linen.

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  • Instead of acting as a little world by itself for the raising of corn, the breeding of cattle, the gathering of wool, the weaving of linen and common cloths, the fabrication of necessary implements of all kinds, the local group began to buy some of these goods and to sell some others, renouncing isolation and making its destiny dependent on commercial intercourse.

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  • Brieg carries on a considerable trade, its chief manufactures being linen, embroideries, cotton and woollen goods, ribbons, leather, machinery, hats, pasteboard and cigars.

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  • The general trade and manufactures are considerable, including woollen (stockings and cloth), linen and cotton goods, leather, paper, saltpetre, and dyeing.

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  • There are, however, many saw-mills, flour-mills, and distilleries of alcohol and liqueurs, besides a smaller number of cotton and linen factories, paper-mills, soap-works, and oil and leather factories.

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  • Leather, paper, glass, silk, linen and cloth are manufactured in the city, which has also some trade in agricultural produce.

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    0
  • The production of woollen goods (stockings, cloth, underclothing) forms the leading branch of this industry; but cotton and linen weaving and yarnspinning are also carried on.

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  • These include weaving and dyeing, the manufacture of linen, plush and other textiles and brewing.

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  • The industry comprises establishments for the manufacture of woollen and linen cloth, paper, sugar, candles, soap, earthenwares, as well as breweries and distilleries.

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  • In the Glasgow case the wife of a laundryman employed in handling plague linen contracted the disease.

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  • This may serve to explain the manner in which plague-infected linen and clothing may convey the disease.

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  • The sick and suspected should be removed in special ambulances to an isolation hospital, their soiled linen, &c., should be burnt, and the premises disinfected.

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  • The greatest care should be taken in dealing with the hospital linen and discharges from patients.

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  • The exports are: - Cereals, cotton, cotton seed, dried fruits, drugs, fruit, gall nuts, gum tragacanth, liquorice root, maize, nuts, olive oil, opium, rice, sesame, sponges, storax, timber, tobacco, valonia, walnut wood, wine, yellow berries, carpets, cotton yarn, cocoons, hides, leather, mohair, silk, silk stuffs, rugs, wax, wool, leeches, live stock, minerals, &c. The imports are: - Coffee, cotton cloths, cotton goods, crockery, drysalteries, fezzes, glass-ware, haberdashery, hardware, henna, ironware, jute, linen goods, manufactured goods, matches, petroleum, salt, sugar, woollen goods, yarns, &c.

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  • The goods mostly dealt in are cotton, woollen, linen and silk stuffs (35 to 38% of the whole), iron and iron wares, furs and skins, pottery, salt, corn, fish, wine and all kinds of manufactured goods.

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  • Benjamin Franklin employed the repulsion of two linen threads, C. F.

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  • The town is entirely modern, and owes its progress to the water-power supplied by the Ericht for linen and jute factories.

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  • Especially in ancient Egypt the fibre occupied a most important place, linen having been there not only generally worn by all classes, but it was the only material the priestly order was permitted to wear, while it was most extensively used as wrappings for embalmed bodies and for general purposes.

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  • He proposed to separate the fibre by purely mechanical means without any retting whatever; but after the Irish Linen Board had expended many thousands of pounds and much time in making experiments and in erecting his machinery, his entire scheme ended in complete failure.

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  • The linen manufacture by degrees ceased to be a domestic industry, and began to centre in and become the characteristic factory employment of special localities, which depended, however, for their supply of raw material primarily on the operations of small growers, working, for the most part, on the poorer districts of remote thinly populated countries.

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  • Warden in his Linen Trade says: "For years after its introduction the principal spinners refused to have anything to do with jute, and cloth made of it long retained a tainted reputation.

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  • For detailed information regarding jute, the cloths made from it and the machinery used, see the following works: Watts's Dictionary of the Economic Products of India; Royle's Fibrous Plants of India; Sharp's Flax, Tow and Jute Spinning; Leggatt's Jute Spinning; Woodhouse and Milne's Jute and Linen Weaving; and Woodhouse and Milne's Textile Design: Pure and Applied.

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  • The manufactures consist of fine cloths, silk, cotton, woollen and linen fabrics, girdles and lace, paper, hats, leather, earthenware and soap. There are numerous oil mills and brandy distilleries.

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  • 411 to £23,020,719; iron and steel from £35,99 6, 16 7 to £20,737,410; coals from £10,442,321 to £8,904,463; machinery from £8,201,112 to £ 7,210,426; and linen manufactures from £10,956,761 to £7,070,149.

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  • After the failure of an attempt to form a cabinet in May 1881 he practically retired from public life, devoting himself to his studies and his linen factory.

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  • Enveloped in a huge blue sheet, with a yard of linen as a veil perforated for two inches square with minute holes, the feet thrust into two huge bags of colored stuff, a wife is perfectly unrecognizable, even by her husband, when out of doors.

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  • From an early period the shoemakers of Ecija have been in high repute throughout Spain; woollen cloth, flannel, linen and silks are also manufactured.

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    0
  • It is also used for glazing pottery, in glass-making and the glazing of linen.

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    0
  • The industries include flax-spinning, rope works, engineering works, and manufactures of linen thread, wincey, flannels and fishing-nets, and there are iron and steel works and coal mines in the vicinity.

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  • himself became a member of the fraternity of Linen Armourers, or Merchant Taylors, and other distinguished persons followed his example.

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    0
  • The industries include machine shops, breweries, and the manufacture of spirits, linen, damask, cloth, hosiery, beads and leather.

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    0
  • The meadows south of Alost are often covered with the linen undergoing the process of bleaching, which makes them assume the aspect of a whitish-blue carpet.

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    0
  • The cloth manufacture is located at Reichenberg; Rumburg and Trautenau are the centre of the linen industry; woollen yarns are made at Aussig and Asch.

    0
    0
  • There are coal mines in the neighbourhood, and the local industries include tanning and manufactures of soap, coarse linen and cloths.

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  • In the middle ages, when it was named Didymotichos, it was one of the principal marts of Thrace; in modern times it has regained something of its commercial importance, and exports pottery, linen, silk and grain.

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    0
  • It manufactures linen and flannel, and in the neighbourhood are extensive tobacco plantations.

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    0
  • The industries include linen and damask weaving, tanning, brewing and the manufacture of pins, chemicals and machinery, and a brisk river trade is carried on in agricultural produce.

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    0
  • In his history of the Punic wars Caelius Antipater (c. 130 B.C.) added fresh material, drawn probably from the works of the Sicilian Greek Silenus, while Licinius Macer (70 B.C.) distinguished himself by the use he made of the ancient "linen books."

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  • It has an important woollen and linen industry, and manufactures of jute and machinery, as well as an active trade, especially of woollens, to the East.

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    0
  • It is collected before sunrise, by shaking the grains of manna on to linen cloths spread out beneath the trees, or by dipping the small branches in hot water and evaporating the solution thus obtained.

    0
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  • It has extensive dyeworks, bleaching grounds and manufactories for linen and woollen goods.

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  • The amalgam is pressed in linen bags to eliminate a quantity of relatively silver-free liquid mercury (which is utilized as such in subsequent operations), and the remaining solid amalgam is subjected to distillation from iron retorts.

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  • thick, and placed in the anode chamber beneath the cathode cell, and separated from it by linen cloth.

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  • Acidified copper nitrate solution is run into this cell, copper is deposited, and the more or less spent solution then passes through the linen partition, and, taking up metal from the anodes by electrolytic solution, is run out of the trough through a series of vessels filled with copper by which the silver is precipitated by simple exchange; after acidification the resulting silver-free copper solution is returned to the cathode cell for the deposition of the copper, the solution being employed again and again until too impure for use.

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  • During this five-year period there was an increase of 31.2% (from $6,540,289 to $8,518,527) in the value of the cotton goods manufactured in New Jersey; of 12.6% (from $2,168,570 to $2,441,516) in that of linen goods; of 45.3% (from $1,748,148 to $2,539,178) in that of hosiery and knit goods, and of 14.8% (from $1,522,827 to $1,748,831) in that of carpets and rugs.

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  • It was not till the later part of the 18th century, when a series of inventions, unparalleled in the annals of industry, followed each other in quick succession, that the cotton manufacture took real root in the country, gradually eclipsing that of other European nations, although a linen manufacture in Lancashire had acquired some prominence as early as the 16th century.

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  • Malines, although no longer famous for its lace, carries on a large trade in linen, needles, furniture and oil, while as a junction for the.

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    0
  • The leading industries include the making of linen goods and machinery.

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    0
  • The spinning of flax by machinery was introduced early in the 19th century by 1VIr John Marshall, a Holbeck manufacturer, who was one of the first to apply Sir Richard Arkwright's water frame, invented for cotton manufacture, to the spinning of linen yarn.

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    0
  • Men wear a long linen tunic, leather belt, white woollen trousers and leather gaiters, above Turkish slippers or sandals.

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  • The linen dresses of women are fastened by a long sash or girdle, wound many times round the waist; the holiday attire being a white gown covered with embroideries, one or more brightly coloured aprons and necklaces of beads or coins.

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    0
  • Most of the leading industries date from the 18th century, amongst them woollens (1703), linen (1749) and cotton (1779).

    0
    0
  • Besides cloth, which forms its staple article of commerce, it has manufactories of various linen and woollen wares, machines, railway wagons, glass, sago, tobacco, leather, chemicals and tiles.

    0
    0
  • The town owes its prosperity chiefly to its linen trade, introduced in 1733, which gives employment to the greater part of the inhabitants.

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    0
  • Brown linen is a specialty.

    0
    0
  • There are silk and linen industries, and an export of tobacco, walnut-wood, cocoons and vegetables for the Constantinople market.

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    0
  • A monopoly of bleaching was granted to the town, and thus a considerable trade in woollen and linen yarns was attracted to Chemnitz; paper was made here, and in the 16th century the manufacture of cloth was very flourishing.

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    0
  • The staple industries are linen and jute manufactures, but brewing, tanning, bleaching, ropemaking and iron-founding are also carried on.

    0
    0
  • There are manufactures of paper, linen, and woollen cloth.

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    0
  • Its staple industry is the manufacture of table linen.

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    0
  • The weaving of damask was introduced in 1718 by James Blake, who had learned the secret of the process in the workshops at Drumsheugh near Edinburgh, to which he gained admittance by feigning idiocy; and since that date the linen trade has advanced by leaps and bounds, much of the success being due to the beautiful designs produced by the manufacturers.

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  • The trade of Alicante consists chiefly in the manufacture of cotton, linen and woollen goods, cigars and confectionery; the importation of coal, iron, machinery, manures, timber, oak staves and fish; and the exportation of lead, fruit, farm produce and red wines, which are sent to France for blending with better vintages.

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  • The industrial establishments comprise manufactories of woollen cloth, linen and paper, dyeing houses, breweries, distilleries, vinegar works and the central workshops of the Buschtehrad railway.

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  • The old-established manufactures embrace linen, woollen and cotton fabrics, particularly at Esslingen and Goppingen, and paper-making, especially at Ravensburg, Heilbronn and other places in Lower Swabia.

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  • salt, oil, leather, cotton and linen fabrics, beer, wine and spirits.

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  • Its leading industries include the manufacture of linen, spinning-mills, breweries, flour-mills and tan-yards.

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  • Linen, leather, canvas, cordage, mats, tallow, potash and beer are manufactured.

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  • Men wear a long smock of homespun linen, beneath red or blue waistcoats with trousers of white frieze.

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  • Women weave most of the garments and linen for their families, besides sharing in every kind of manual labour.

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  • A large agricultural trade and manufactures of agricultural implements, linen goods and woollen gloves are carried on.

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  • The cultivation of the former is practically confined to Ulster and as compared with 20 or 30 years ago has fallen off by considerably more than 50%, despite the proximity of the linen industry.

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  • served to stimulate the manufacture, but in the succeeding reign the lord-deputy Strafford adopted the policy of fostering the linen trade at the expense of the woollen in order to prevent the latter from competing with English products.

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  • Strafford, lord-deputy in the reign of Charles I., did much to foster the linen industry.

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  • A similar policy was pursued with even more energy by his successor in office, the duke of Ormonde, at whose instigation an Irish act was passed in 1665 to encourage the growth of flax and the manufacture of linen.

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  • The English parliament in their desire to encourage the linen industry at the expense of the woollen, followed Ormonde's lead by passing an act inviting foreign workmen to settle in Ireland, and admitting all articles made of flax or hemp into England free of duty.

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  • In 1710, in accordance with an arrangement made between the two kingdoms, a board of trustees was appointed to whom a considerable sum was granted annually for the promotion of the linen manufacture; but the jealousy of English merchants interposed to check the industry whenever it threatened to assume proportions which might interfere with their own trade, and by an act of George II.

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  • Between 1700 and 1777 the board of trustees expended nearly £850,000 on the promotion of the linen trade,] and in addition parliamentary bounties were paid on a considerable scale.

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  • In 1830 the Linen Board ceased to exist, the trade having been for some time in a very depressed condition owing to the importation of machine-made yarns from Scotland and England.

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  • The experiment proved highly successful, and from this period may be dated the rise of the linen trade of Ulster, the only great industrial manufacture of which Ireland can boast.

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  • There are extensive engineering works in the same city which supply the machinery and other requirements of the linen industry.

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  • A rapid fall in exports followed upon the prohibition of the export of woollen manufactures to foreign countries, but in about 20 years' time a recovery took place, due in part to the increase of the linen trade.

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  • To arrive at any estimate of the national wealth is exceptionally difficult in the case of Ireland, since the largest part of its wealth is derived from agriculture, and many important factors, such as the amount of capital invested in the linen and other industries, cannot be included, owing to their uncertainty.

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  • 'Manufactures and Commerce:' Discourse on the Woollen Manufacture of Ireland (1698); An Inquiry into the State and Progress of the Linen Manufacture in Ireland (Dublin, 1 757); G.

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  • Sandals and shoes of bronze are mentioned in Irish literature, and quite a number are to be seen in museums. A loose flowing garment, intermediate between the brat and lend, usually of linen dyed saffron, was commonly worn in outdoor life, and was still used in the Hebrides about 1700.

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  • promised to depress the Irish woollen trade, he promised to do all he could for Irish linen.

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  • The principal commodity is furs (chiefly American and Russian), of which about one and a quarter million pounds worth are sold annually; other articles disposed of are leather, hides, wool, cloth, linen and glass.

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  • It is also largely used in the manufacture of cotton and linen towels.

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  • Cloth manufacture is concentrated at Biala, while the weaving of linen and of woollens is pursued as a household industry, the former in the Carpathian region, the latter in eastern Galicia.

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  • The leading branch of industry is linen and damask weaving; but woollen stuffs, trimmings, &c., are also produced in the factories of the town, and in the surrounding weaving; villages, sixty-six of which, with 113,455 (1900) inhabitants,, are included in the municipal jurisdiction.

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  • Jauer was formerly the prosperous seat of the Silesian linen trade, but the troubles of the Thirty Years' War, in the course of which it was burned down three times, permanently injured this.

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  • The cotton industry was long principally centred in Catalonia, and mainly in the province and town of Barcelona, famed also for their manufactures of lace, woollen and linen goods.

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  • The northern provinces, especially Guip6zcoa and Biscay, Navarre and Oviedo, have followed in the wake of Catalonia for linen and cotton industries and for paper-mills.

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  • In 1843 a German bee-keeper, Krechner by name, conceived the idea of first dipping fine linen into molten wax, then pressing the sheets so made between rollers, and thus forming a waxen midrib on which the bees would build their combs.

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  • This experiment was partially successful, but the instinctive dislike of bees to anything of a fibrous nature caused them completely to spoil their work of comb-building in the endeavour to tear or gnaw away the linen threads whenever they got in touch with them.

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  • It has a considerable trade in agricultural products, leather, pottery, hats, linen and cotton goods.

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  • crinis, hair, and linum, thread), a stiffening material made of horse-hair and cotton or linen thread.

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  • It manufactures woollen, linen and cotton goods, leather, delft and other earthenware, and tobacco, and has also several breweries and distilleries.

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  • Industries include the manufacture of earthenware, leather goods, sails, ropes and linen, and ironfounding.

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  • 74) mentions the wild and cultivated hemp of Scythia, and describes the hempen garments made by the Thracians as equal to linen in fineness.

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  • He concentrated hard on wiping the blood from the wound she caused before binding it with a strip of linen from his tunic.

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  • He smelled the tang of blood in the air and looked down at where she held linen over a forearm dripping blood.

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  • Repercussions of the war included a further body blow to the failing linen industry and the increased disaffection of Northern Presbyterians.

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  • ARCHIVE At present, the Linen Hall Library, Belfast, houses the Lyric Theater's extensive archive At present, the Linen Hall Library, Belfast, houses the Lyric Theater's extensive archive.

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  • Itâs full of red velvet banquettes, large tables with white linen and white aproned waiters.

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  • Walls are light and creamy, banquettes are checkered hunting pink, candles and silver and linen are everywhere.

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  • bed linen & Towels All bed linen is provided.

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  • bed linen inc. in rent.

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  • Bed linen is supplied except for any cot bedding required.

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  • You will he given freshly laundered bed linen with which to make up your bed.

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  • A charge of £ 12 per person per night includes bed linen.

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  • bed linen provided for holidays of more than 1 week.

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  • Pretty co-ordinating bed linen is provided for the beds which have duvets.

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  • Duvets & pillows provided, please bring own bed linen.

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  • N.B. All duvets and pillows provided - tenants require bed linen, towels and tea towels.

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  • bed linen on a hot wash, to prevent re-infection.

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  • Ample luxury towels and crisp bed linen are provided.

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  • Private pools, outdoor showers and Egyptian bed linen boost the luxury quotient.

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  • The beds are made up with fresh bed linen for your arrival.

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  • clean towels and clean bed linen daily, is good.

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  • With crisp white bed linen and soft towels one night just won't be enough.

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  • bed linen inc. in rent, towels available for hire at £ 4.50 per person.

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  • bed linen etc supplied for max occupancy.

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  • Their unique product range includes stunning chandeliers, luxurious cushions and giftware to crisp cotton bed linen and beautifully hand crafted cabinet furniture.

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  • Large with king sized bed and quality bed linen.

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  • The White Company Buy luxury bed linen, bedding and quality home accessories from The White Company's Online Store.

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  • Q. What temperature should I wash my baby bed linen in to kill bacteria?

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  • All duvets, pillows bed linen and hand towels excluding beach and full sized towels are provided.

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  • bedrolls with linen, feather duvets and pillows, towels and all amenities (soap etc) are provided.

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  • billowing white linen curtains on a hot summers day!

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  • bleaching linen is to use urine.

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  • They are suitable for cotton, linen and viscose as well as cotton and polyester blends which will produce a lighter shade.

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  • For an ultra-realistic effect I imagine you would need a fine-grain linen canvas.

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  • This award winning center is situated in the 18th centaury Linen Market House in Lisburn.

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  • A woman calls asking where her linen closet went.

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  • clothed in linen who had a writing kit at his side.

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  • Her long, dark hair was bound up under a simple white linen coif over which she wore her usual headdress.

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  • combing the wool and linen.

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  • cot linen with you.

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  • crewel wool on linen.

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  • My husband wants a beige linen suit, the sort that Classics teachers used to wear to watch cricket.

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  • crisp clean linen & copious amounts of hot water.

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  • crisp linen tablecloths, outside seating and walls decorated with art from local artists mean the surroundings are more than adequate too.

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  • The flats are fully furnished and include crockery, cutlery and bed linen.

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  • cutty sark ", a short shirt or chemise made of Paisley linen.

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  • damask table linen bordered with a rose design.

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  • For a grand occasion choose our luxurious White linen damask tablecloth with damask napkins.

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  • Fabrics for clothes from mail order company Toast are crisp poplin or voile, linen, indigo denims and silk.

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  • Each suit also includes two sword fighting lessons, a steel display stand, and a custom- fitted arming doublet undergarment of padded linen.

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  • McGregor had moved to Birmingham to seek his fortune and opened a linen draper 's shop near Villa Park.

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  • He was the son of a linen draper of the town of Bristol, where he was born in 1744.

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  • duvets with linen supplied.

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  • embossed with a pattern or texture - a linen look or a plaster effect for example.

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  • It looks terrific mixed with gingham, ticking stripe table linen and hand painted stripe enamelware.

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  • endpaper fabric is an Omega Workshop linen, dating from 1913 when the novel begins.

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  • Prices quoted for both properties are inclusive of bed linen, gas, electricity and heating - no added extras!

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  • spinning the wool, spinning the flax, making the scarlet, making the linen, making the purple garments.

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  • In the 18th century the production of linen made from local flax became an important industry in the area.

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  • Linen is made out of the natural fiber flax.

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  • fluffy towels, crisp clean linen & copious amounts of hot water.

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  • four-poster canopy beds, luxurious Egyptian linen and red-brick fireplaces.

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  • The man wears a linen smock frock originally a protective overall.

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  • A young man, wearing nothing but a linen garment, was following Jesus.

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  • girded with a linen ephod.

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  • The patient should sit upright and bite against a clean rolled up linen handkerchief for about half an hour.

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  • inclusive of bed linen, gas, electricity and heating - no added extras!

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  • ironing facilities, linen provided free, Tea towels included.

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  • Dirty Linen April / May 03... simply irresistible.. .

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  • ivory linen guestbooks.

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