How to use Lincoln in a sentence

lincoln
  • The beautiful sounds of The Coleman Hawkins Quartet doing "The Man I Love" as it ought to be done were playing and Mrs. Lincoln never looked more content.

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  • Fred's reaction startled Mrs. Lincoln from the sofa.

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  • It's a big city and a long time ago but he saw the White House and said he watched Lincoln eat with two men.

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  • Mrs. Lincoln, the Deans' cat, strolled into the room and rubbed the young girl's leg as if to ask what was the problem.

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  • He dined with Abraham Lincoln!

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  • The Deans found themselves alone on the front porch, with only Mrs. Lincoln for company, as Fred was off to the library for more research.

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  • Cynthia reached over to stroke Mrs. Lincoln as the cat began adding a steady purr to the conversation.

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  • You'll survive, Brandon said as he took over Mrs. Lincoln's chair.

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  • She asked about you, Fred, and Mrs. Lincoln.

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  • Mrs. Lincoln hopped down, stretched languidly, looked at Dawkins and hissed.

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  • Mrs. Lincoln slipped into the room amid throaty sounds of welcome and hopped onto Martha's lap as calmly as if she'd never left.

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  • Martha suggested an appropriate burial for the tiny remains she dubbed "Pinkie" and services were conducted in the back garden, next to Mrs. Lincoln's last winter mouse-victim.

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  • He began his ritual of locking up and putting out a bowl of canned cat food for Mrs. Lincoln, who came on the run at the sound of the refrigerator door.

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  • Fred stood up suddenly, much to Mrs. Lincoln's disgust.

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  • He munched on a leftover casserole some thoughtful neighbor had donated to poor hero Fred and was about to doze when the telephone startled Mrs. Lincoln from his lap.

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  • He poured a cup of cold coffee from the pot and picked up Mrs. Lincoln in one arm, interrupting her licking the remains of a bowl of chocolate pudding.

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  • Dean tossed aside the map and papers and flopped down on the living room sofa, startling Mrs. Lincoln.

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  • He plunked him­self down in the living room with a hit-me-with-your-best-shot look and lifted Mrs. Lincoln to his lap for moral support.

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  • Mrs. Lincoln sauntered into the room, blinking her eyes at the late hour, and Fred reached down and picked her up with one arm, taking a beer from Dean with the other.

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  • Instead he tried and discarded a who-done-it and then attempted a conversation with Mrs. Lincoln, but she seemed more interested in sleeping than lis­tening to a bored detective.

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  • Patience wasn't his strong suit and Mrs. Lincoln and jazz music somehow weren't sufficient evening entertainment.

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  • Dean nodded in agreement as Mrs. Lincoln came over to join them, her long tail swishing for attention.

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  • Someone has to feed Mrs. Lincoln, pick up the paper and the mail...

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  • Mrs. Lincoln's going to be lonely.

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  • Dean could be back on Collingswood Avenue, listening to John Coltrane or Charlie Parker and patting Mrs. Lincoln, or catching a Phillies game on the tube, or eating pizza and slugging down a cold Coors beer.

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  • He was educated at Harrow and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1786.

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  • A friend of the family, Lord Foley, provided the funds for his legal training, and he became a member of Lincoln's Inn on his departure from Oxford, being called to the bar in 1730.

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  • His opposition to President Lincoln's policy was mainly in respect to emancipation, military arrests and conscription.

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  • Almost the only changes which can be called events are his successful establishment of a school at Lincoln.

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  • It was destroyed in 1260 by Llewellyn ab Gruffydd, prince of Wales, with the supposed connivance df Mortimer, but its site was reoccupied by the earl of Lincoln in 277, and a new castle at once erected.

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  • The heterogeneous elements of the new organization could not be made to unite on a man who for so many years had devoted his energies to purely Whig measures, and he was considered less "available" than Fremont in 1856 and than Lincoln in 1860.

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  • After Lincoln was elected in 1860 he chose Seward for his secretary 1 In 1837 the vessel `"Caroline," which had been used by the Canadian insurgents, was seized by the Canadian authorities in American territory and was destroyed.

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  • Nine days later, while lying ill at his home at Washington, he was attacked by one Lewis Powell, alias Payne, a fellow-conspirator of John Wilkes Booth, at the same time that Lincoln was assassinated.

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  • He showed extraordinary energy, resource and military talent in stemming the advance of the royalists, who now followed up their victories by advancing into the association; he defeated them at Gainsborough on the 28th of July, and managed a masterly retreat before overwhelming numbers to Lincoln, while the victory on the 11th of October at Winceby finally secured the association, and maintained the wedge which prevented the junction of the royalists in the north with the king in the south.

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  • In March he took Hillesden House in Buckinghamshire; in May was at the siege of Lincoln, when he repulsed Goring's attempt to relieve the town, and subsequently took part in Manchester's campaign in the north.

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  • He remained at Lincoln, did nothing to prevent the defeat of Essex's army in the west, and when he at last advanced south to join Essex's and Waller's troops his management of the army led to the failure of the attack upon the king at Newbury on the 27th of October 1644.

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  • The city is the seat of the state asylum for feeble-minded children (established at Jacksonville in 1865 and removed to Lincoln in 1878), and of Lincoln College (Presbyterian) founded in 1865.

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  • The old court-house in which Abraham Lincoln often practised is still standing.

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  • Lincoln is situated in a productive grain region, and has valuable coal mines.

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  • The first settlement on the site of Lincoln was made in 1835, and the city was first chartered in 1857.

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  • The two other sealed copies belong to the cathedrals of Lincoln and of Salisbury.

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  • Both were written evidently in a less hurried fashion than those in the British Museum, and the one at Lincoln was regarded as the most perfect by the commissioners who were responsible for the appearance of the Statutes of the Realm in 1810.

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  • The city's park system includes the Western Promenade, on Bramhall Hill; the Eastern Promenade, on Munjoy Hill; Fort Allen Park, at the south extremity of the latter promenade; Fort Sumner, another small park farther west, on the same hill; Lincoln Park, containing 2 acres of beautiful grounds near the centre of the city; Deering's Oaks (made famous by Longfellow), the principal park (50 acres) on the peninsula, with many fine old trees, pleasant drives, and an artificial pond used for boating; and Monument Square and Boothby Square.

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  • Among others Asser, the instructor of Alfred the Great, and Robert Grosseteste, bishop of Lincoln, commented on it.

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  • Stephen was defeated and captured at Lincoln (1141); the empress was acclaimed lady or queen of England (she used both titles indifferently) and crowned at London.

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  • On the 31st of October President Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring Nevada a state.

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  • He went up to Christ Church, Oxford, in 1830, but his father's subsequent pecuniary embarrassments compelled him in 1833 to try for a scholarship at Lincoln College, which he succeeded in obtaining.

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  • At Lincoln, c. 1300, the candle was to weigh three stones of wax; at Salisbury in 1517 it was to be 36 ft.

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  • A cotton mill was erected in Lincoln county about 1813, and by 1840 about 25 small mills were in operation within the state.

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  • But perhaps the most celebrated of the early earls was;Ralph, Ranulf, or Randulph, de Blundevill (c. 1172-1232), who succeeded his father Hugh de Kevelioc as earl in 1181, and was created earl of Lincoln in 1217.

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  • He was subsequently a delegate to the Peace Congress in 1861, and was a loyal supporter of President Lincoln's war policy.

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  • To the west lie the fine square, with public gardens, still called, from its original character, Lincoln's Inn Fields.

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  • Of Furnival's and Thavies Inns, attached to Lincoln's Inn, only the names remain.

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  • The varied collections of Sir John Soane, accumulated at his house in Lincoln's Inn Fields, are open to view as the Soane Museum.

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  • There may also be mentioned the Royal College of Surgeons, Lincoln's Inn Fields, with museum; the Royal Colleges of Organists, and of Veterinary Surgeons, the College of Preceptors, the Jews' College, and the Metropolitan School of Shorthand.

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  • Thirty-three bishops are included in the most authentic list of signatures, among them three from Britain, - York, London and "Colonia Londinensium" (probably a corruption of Lindensium, or Lincoln, rather than of Legionensium or Caerleon-on-Usk).

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  • His ecclesiastical preferments, of which he received several in 1506-1509, culminated in his appointment by Henry to the deanery of Lincoln on February 2, 1509.

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  • One important result of its publication was that, in 1781, Lord Shelburne (afterwards first marquess of Lansdowne) called upon its author in his chambers at Lincoln's Inn.

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  • In 1817 he became a bencher of Lincoln's Inn.

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  • Other sheep societies include the Leicester Sheep Breeders' Association, the Cotswold Sheep Society, the Lincoln Longwool Sheep Breeders' Association, the Oxford.

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  • The interests of pig-breeders are the care of the National Pig Breeders' Association, in addition to which there exist the British Berkshire, the Large Black Pig, and the Lincoln CurlyCoated White Pig Societies, and the Incorporated Tamworth Pig Breeders' Association.

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  • In 1552 he was promoted to the rich deanery of Lincoln, and in July 1553 he supped with Northumberland at Cambridge, when the duke marched north on his hopeless campaign against Mary.

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  • A statement of Peter Langtoft that he was at the parliament of Lincoln in 1301, when the English barons repudiated the claim of Pope Boniface VIII.

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  • His policy was to preserve constitutional government in the South and strengthen the anti-war party in the North by convincing it that the Lincoln administration had abandoned such government; to the same end he urged, in 1864, the unconditional discharge of Federal prisoners in the South.

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  • His abilities were speedily recognized by his contemporaries, and he enjoyed the friendship of such eminent men as Adam de Marisco and Robert Grosseteste, bishop of Lincoln.

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  • He gave his support to the Republican party in 1856 and to the Lincoln administration throughout the Civil War.

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  • The region was repeatedly raided by camp followers of each army; earthworks and a fort, commanding the Hudson ferry and the ferry to Paramus, New Jersey, were built; the British army made Dobbs Ferry a rendezvous, after the battle of White Plains, in November 1776, and the continental division under General Benjamin Lincoln was here at the end of January 1777.

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  • In the subsequent civil war he fought on the side of Louis, and was captured at the battle of Lincoln (1217).

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  • In 1503 he was the first Margaret professor at Cambridge; and the following year was raised to the see of Rochester, to which he remained faithful, although the richer sees of Ely and Lincoln were offered to him.

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  • For several centuries it was wholly lost sight of, and it was not till the 13th century that it was rediscovered through the agency of Robert Grosseteste, bishop of Lincoln, who translated it into Latin, under the misconception that it was a genuine work of the twelve sons of Jacob, and that the Christian interpolations were a genuine product of Jewish prophecy.

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  • The city has a park and a boulevard system; the principal parks are Washington, Lincoln, Reservoir and Mildred.

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  • In Oak Ridge cemetery, adjacent to the city, is the Lincoln monument, erected over Abraham Lincoln's grave with funds raised throughout the country by a Lincoln Monument Association.

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  • Around the foot of the obelisk (besides an heroic statue of Lincoln) are four groups of figures in bronze, symbolizing the army and navy of the United States.

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  • Lincoln's home (erected in 1839 and bought by Lincoln in 1844) in Springfield is well preserved by the state.

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  • The election of Abraham Lincoln as president in November 1860 was the signal for the rising of the South.

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  • On the 25th of September 1725 he was ordained deacon, and on the 17th of March 1726 was elected fellow of Lincoln.

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  • As a lawyer his greatest public efforts were his lectures (1799) at Lincoln's Inn on the law of nature and nations, of which the introductory discourse was published, and his eloquent defence (1803) of Jean Gabriel Peltier, a French refugee, tried at the instance of the French government for a libel against the first consul.

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  • A bishop of York is mentioned, along with, and with precedence of, bishops of London and Lincoln (the last name is uncertain) as present at the council of Arles in 314.

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  • As early as December 1862 the Union military government, at President Lincoln's direction, had ordered elections for Congress, and the men chosen were admitted in February 1863.

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  • In 1467 Rotherham became keeper of the privy seal to this king; in 1468 he was appointed bishop of Worcester, in 1472 bishop of Lincoln and in 1475 chancellor of England.

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  • At Oxford Rotherham built part of Lincoln College and increased its endowment; at Cambridge, where he was chancellor and master of Pembroke Hall, he helped to build the University Library.

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  • He returned to America from a trip round the world in time to participate in the presidential campaign of 1860, and after Lincoln's inauguration he was appointed United States district attorney for Massachusetts.

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  • During the War of Independence his early training at the French military college at Caen enabled him to render effective service to General Benjamin Lincoln in 1778-1779, to Count d'Estaing (1779), to General Lincoln in the defence of Charleston and afterwards to General Horatio Gates.

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  • In the election of 1860 he voted for the fusion ticket in New York which was opposed to Abraham Lincoln, but he could not approve of President Buchanan's course in dealing with secession, and later supported Lincoln.

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  • He practised law at Jacksonville from 1883 to 1887, when he removed to Lincoln, Nebraska.

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  • After the 1900 election he established and edited at Lincoln a weekly political journal, The Commoner, which attained a wide circulation.

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  • He went to the place of execution in Lincoln's Inn Fields with perfect calmness, which was preserved to the last.

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  • Soon after her husband's death in 1372 Catherine became the mistress of John of Gaunt, and in 1396, nearly two years after the duke had become a widower for the second time, she was married to him at Lincoln.

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  • She died at Lincoln on the 10th of May 1403.

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  • He served in the parliamentary army, and in 1647 was admitted a member of Lincoln's Inn.

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  • The Scottish dead in the American Civil War are commemorated in a monument bearing a life-sized figure of Abraham Lincoln and a freed slave.

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  • Their captain was Abraham Lincoln, and Lieutenant Davis is said to have administered to him his first oath of allegiance.

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  • At the same time he practically told the Senate that the South would secede in the event of the election of a radical Republican to the presidency; and on the 10th of January 1861, not long after the election of Lincoln, he argued before that body the constitutional right of secession and declared that the treatment of the South had become such that it could no longer remain in the Union without being degraded.

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  • He was indicted for treason by a Virginia grand jury, persistent efforts were made to connect him with the assassination of President Lincoln, he was unjustly charged with having deliberately and wilfully caused the sufferings and deaths of Union prisoners at Andersonville and for two years he was denied trial or bail.

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  • Petrus Hispanus had predecessors, however, in William of Shyreswood (died 124 9 as chancellor of Lincoln) and Lambert of Auxerre, and it has been hotly disputed whether the whole of the additions are not originally due to the Byzantine Synopsis of Psellus.

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  • Schouler points out that like Washington and Lincoln he was " conspicuous.

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  • From his brother Payn descended the barons of Bedford, of whom William held Bedford Castle against the royal forces in the struggle for the Great Charter, and was afterwards made prisoner at the battle of Lincoln, while John, who sided with the barons under Simon de Montfort, fell at Evesham.

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  • His opinions were received with marked respect by his brother prelates, and he acted as an assessor to the archbishop in the trial of the bishop of Lincoln.

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  • It was assessed at 50 hides in the Domesday survey and was then held by the bishop of Lincoln.

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  • His first important preferment was as dean of Westminster (1605); afterwards he held successively the bishoprics of Rochester (1608),(1608), Lichfield (161o), Lincoln (1614),(1614), Durham (1617) and Winchester (1628),(1628), and the archbishopric of York (1631).

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  • Map's career was an active and varied one; he was clerk of the royal household and justice itinerant; in 1179 he was present at the Lateran council at Rome, on his way thither being enter tained by the count of Champagne; at this time he apparentm held a plurality of ecclesiastical benefices, being a prebend of St Paul's, canon and precentor of Lincoln and parson of Westbury, Gloucestershire.

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  • In 1868 he became prebendary of Lincoln and examining chaplain to Bishop Christopher Wordsworth, an office which he also held for a short time in 1870 for Dr Temple, just appointed to the see of Exeter.

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  • In 1872 his acceptance of the chancellorship of Lincoln opened a new period of his life.

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  • A chapter was constituted, the bishop being dean; amongst its members was a canon missioner (the first to be appointed in England), and the Scholae Cancellarii were founded after the Lincoln pattern.

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  • The Inns of Court are four - Middle Temple, Inner Temple, Lincoln's Inn, Gray's Inn.

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  • The Royal College of Physicians is in Pall Mall East, and the Royal College of Surgeons is in Lincoln's Inn Fields.

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  • Other museums are Sir John Soane's collection in Lincoln's Inn Fields and the Museum of Practical Geology in Jermyn Street, while the scientific societies have libraries and in some cases collections of a specialized character, such as the museums of the Royal College of Surgeons, the Royal Architectural Society, and the Society of Art and the Parkes Museum of the Sanitar y Institute.

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  • Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, was built about 1629, and named in honour of Henrietta Maria.

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  • Lincoln's Inn Fields had been planned some years before.

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  • In 1858 he was made preacher at Lincoln's Inn and there preached some striking sermons, a volume of which he published in 1861.

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  • After a year's imprisonment in the Tower Prynne was sentenced by the star chamber on the 17th of February 1634 to be imprisoned for life, and also to be fined f5000, expelled from Lincoln's Inn, rendered incapable of returning to his profession, degraded from his degree in the university of Oxford, and set in the pillory, where he was to lose both his ears.

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  • Prynne died unmarried, in his lodgings at Lincoln's Inn, on the 24th of October 1669, and was buried in the walk under the chapel there.

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  • He left one portion of his books to Lincoln's Inn and another to Oriel College.

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  • In 1694 he was elected fellow of Lincoln College, and in 1697 his edition of Lycophron appeared.

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  • Even the clergy were by no means altogether on Innocent's side; the council of Lyons was attended by but 150 bishops, mainly French and Spanish, and the deputation from England, headed by Robert Grossetete of Lincoln and Roger Bigod, came mainly in order to obtain the canonization of Edmund of Canterbury and to protest against papal exactions.

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  • From 1858 to 1863 he was in the lower house of Congress, where he was noted for his strong opposition to the principles and policies of the growing Republican party, his belief that the South had been grievously wronged by the North, his leadership of the Peace Democrats or Copperheads, who were opposed to the prosecution of the war, and his bitter attacks upon the Lincoln administration, which, he said, was destroying the Constitution and would end by destroying civil liberty in the North.

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  • President Lincoln commuted this sentence to banishment, and Vallandigham was sent into the Confederate lines, whence he made his way to Canada.

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  • Though he was officially thanked by Congress, his action was later disavowed by President Lincoln.

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  • On the inauguration of President Lincoln in 1861 he was appointed secretary of the navy, a position which he held until the close of President Andrew Johnson's administration in 1869.

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  • In 1874 Welles published Lincoln and Seward, in which he refutes the charge that Seward dominated the Administration during the Civil War.

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  • In 1860 he was chairman of the Massachusetts delegation to the Republican national convention at Chicago, which nominated Lincoln for the presidency; and from 1861 to January 1866, throughout the trying period of the Civil War, he was governor of Massachusetts, becoming known as one of the ablest, most patriotic and most energetic of the remarkable group of "war governors" in the North.

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  • Notwithstanding his loyal support of the administration during the struggle, he did not fully approve of its conduct of the war, which he deemed shifting and timid; and it was with great reluctance that he supported Lincoln in 1864 for a second term.

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  • It is fair to assume that Grant would have followed other unsuccessful generals into retirement, had he not shown that, whatever his mistakes or failures, and whether he was or was not sober and temperate in his habits, he possessed the iron determination and energy which in the eyes of Lincoln and Stanton,' and of the whole Northern people, was the first requisite of their generals.

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  • He remained then with his army near Vicks 1 President Lincoln was Grant's most unwavering supporter.

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  • Hosmer's Appeal to Arms and Outcome of the Civil War (New York, 1907); John Eaton's Grant, Lincoln, and the Freedmen (New York, 1907), and various works mentioned in the articles American Civil War, Wilderness Campaign, &C.

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  • His son, Lord Lincoln, had heard Gladstone's speech against the Reform Bill delivered in the Oxford Union, and had written home that " a man had uprisen in Israel."

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  • Ten years later he became dean of Exeter, and in 1705 he was consecrated bishop of Lincoln.

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  • The plan was to overthrow the Lincoln government in the elections and give to the Democrats the control of the state and Federal governments, which would then make peace and invite the Southern States to come back into the Union on the old footing.

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  • He appears to have been educated at Lincoln College, Oxford, and to have served in the army of the Elector Palatine in the early campaigns of the Thirty Years' War, and in 1624 he was lieutenant-colonel of a regiment raised in England to serve in Mansfeld's army.

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  • Though his brother John Sherman was a leader in the party which had elected Lincoln, William Sherman was very conservative on the slavery question, and his distress at what he thought an unnecessary rupture between the states was extreme.

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  • He was patronized by Robert, earl of Gloucester, and by two bishops of Lincoln; he obtained, about 1140, the archdeaconry of Llandaff "on account of his learning"; and in 1151 was promoted to the see of St Asaph.

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  • A fragment of the ghastly structure is in the library of Lincoln cathedral.

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  • He held at the same time the chaplaincy of Lincoln's Inn, for which he had resigned Guy's (1846-1860), but when he offered to resign this the benchers refused.

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  • Manning's boyhood was mainly spent at Coombe Bank, Sundridge, Kent, where he had for companions Charles and Christopher Wordsworth, afterwards bishops of St Andrews and of Lincoln.

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  • Hunter did not regard Lincoln's election as being of itself a sufficient cause for secession, and on the 11th of January 1861 he proposed an elaborate but impracticable scheme for the adjustment of differences between the North and the South, but when this and several other efforts to the same end had failed he quietly urged his own state to pass the ordinance of secession.

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  • It is probable that Symonds acted throughout with the connivance of the Yorkist leaders, and especially of John de la Pole, earl of Lincoln, himself a nephew of Edward IV., who had been named heir to the crown by Richard III.

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  • But although Lincoln is said to have conversed with Warwick on this occasion, he fled abroad immediately after the council at Sheen, where he was present.

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  • In Flanders, Lincoln joined Lord Lovell, who had headed an unsuccessful Yorkist rising in 1486, and in May 1487 the two lords proceeded to Dublin, where they landed a few days before the coronation of Lambert Simnel.

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  • Making for the fortress of Newark, Lincoln and Sir Thomas Broughton, at the head of their motley forces, and accompanied by Simnel, attacked the royal army near the village of Stoke-on-Trent on the 16th of June 1487.

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  • After a fierce and stubborn struggle in which the Germans behaved with great valour, the Royalists were completely victorious, though they left 2000 men on the field; Lincoln, Schwartz and Fitzgerald with 4000 of their followers were killed, and Lovell and Broughton disappeared never to be heard of again.

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  • In 1919 he exhibited a head of Lincoln cut from a block weighing six tons.

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  • Other works include the Sheridan monument in Washington; " Mares of Diomedes " and " Ruskin " in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; statue of Lincoln, Newark, N.J.; statue of Henry Ward Beecher, Brooklyn; the Wyatt Memorial, Raleigh, N.C.; " The Flyer " at the university of Virginia; gargoyles for a Princeton dormitory; " Wonderment of Motherhood " and " Conception."

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  • He left Oxford without taking a degree in 1609, and was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1616, becoming a bencher in 1633.

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  • Although it was a slave state, the majority of the people of Delaware opposed secession in 1861, and the legislature promptly answered President Lincoln's call to arms; yet, while 14,000 of the 40,000 males between the ages of fourteen and sixty served in the Union army, there were many sympathizers with the Confederacy in the southern part of the state.

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  • After the assassination of Lincoln, Hancock was placed in charge of Washington, and it was under his command that Booth's accomplices were tried and executed.

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  • During the Civil War, although he opposed several of the war measures of President Lincoln's administration, he gave the Union cause his heartiest support.

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  • Mt Lincoln (1246 ft.) and especially Mt Wachusett (2108 ft.), to the east in a level country, are very exceptional.

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  • In the same year the amount of the various school taxes and other contributions was $30.53 for each child in the average membership of the public schools, and the highest amount for each child in any county was $35.77 in Suffolk county, and in any township or city $68 01 - in Lincoln.

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  • Generals Henry Knox and Benjamin Lincoln were the most distinguished officers contributed by the state to the revolutionary army.

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  • In January 1787, however, Governor Bowdoin raised an army of 4400 men and placed it under the command of Major-General Benjamin Lincoln (1733-1810).

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  • While Lincoln was at Worcester Shays planned to capture the arsenal at Springfield, but on the 25th of January Shepard's men fired upon Shays's followers, killing four and putting the rest to flight.

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  • Lincoln pursued them to Petersham, Worcester county, where on the 4th of February he routed them and took 150 prisoners.

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  • Levi Lincoln (acting) Christopher Gore Elbridge Gerry Caleb Strong John Brooks William Eustis Levi Lincoln .

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  • Field held this position until 1863, when he was appointed by President Lincoln a justice of the United States Supreme Court.

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  • Lincoln, The Constitutional History of New York (5 vols., Rochester, T906) is an elaborate and able study of the growth of the constitution.

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  • The result was the rapid promotion of Williams in the church; he obtained several livings besides prebends at Hereford, Lincoln and Peterborough.

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  • On the fall of Bacon in 1621 Williams, who had meantime ingratiated himself with the duke of Buckingham, was appointed lord keeper, and was at the same time made bishop of Lincoln, retaining also the deanery of Westminster.

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  • Nickel has been found near Keller in Ferry county, and molybdenum near Davenport, Lincoln (disambiguation)|Lincoln county.

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  • But it is as an anti-slavery leader, and as perhaps the chief agency in educating the mass of the Northern people to that opposition through legal forms to the extension of slavery which culminated in the election of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, that Greeley's main work was done.

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  • His active hostility to Seward did much to prevent the success of that statesman, and to bring about instead the nomination of Abraham Lincoln.

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  • In 1864 he urged negotiations for peace with representatives of the Southern Confederacy in Canada, and was sent by President Lincoln to confer with them.

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  • In 1864 he was one of the Lincoln Presidential electors for New York.

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  • Corn grows throughout the western half of the state, and especially in the south-western parts, in Lincoln, Clay, Union, Yankton and Bonhommie counties, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Lincoln county, 3,914,840 bush., nearly one-eleventh of the state crop. Oats has a distribution similar to that of corn, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Minnehaha county, 1,666,110 bush., about one-nineteenth of the state crop. Barley grows principally in the eastern and southern parts of the state - Minnehaha, Moody, Lake and Brookings counties - the largest crop in 1899 being that of Minnehaha county, 932,860 bush., more than one-seventh of the state.

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  • The In 1861 the accession of Abraham Lincoln to the presi- American dency of the United States of America caused the Civil War.

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  • In the Green Mountains the highest point, Mansfield, is 4364 ft.; Lincoln (4078), Killington (4241), Camel Hump (4088); and a number of other heights exceed 3000 ft.

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  • To Washington, Military and Lincoln parks, the older ones near the heart of the city, there have been added Branch Brook (277 acres), Weequahic (265.8 acres), West Side (23 acres), and East Side (12.5 acres) parks.

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  • In 1874 and again in 1875, he presided over the Reunion Conferences held at Bonn and attended by leading ecclesiastics from the British Isles and from the Oriental Church, among whom were Bishop Christopher Wordsworth of Lincoln; Bishop Harold Browne of Ely; Lord Plunket, archbishop of Dublin; Lycurgus, archbishop of Syros and Tenos; Canon Liddon; and Professor Ossinine of St Petersburg.

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  • He was called to the bar (Lincoln's Inn) in 1876, and made himself a thoroughly competent equity lawyer and conveyancer, but finally devoted himself to comparative jurisprudence and especially the history of English law.

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  • Before 1415 he was instituted to the rectory of Boston in Lincolnshire, and in 1420 he was consecrated bishop of Lincoln.

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  • Lincoln College was, however, completed by his trustees, and its endowments were afterwards augmented by various benefactors.

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  • He served as archdeacon of Lincoln, canon of York and dean of the court of arches before 1323, when he became bishop of Winchester, an appointment which was made during his visit to Pope John XXII.

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  • President Lincoln called out 75,000 men.

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  • Meade, who, besides steadiness and ability, possessed the confidence of Lincoln and Halleck which Hooker had lacked.

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  • Halleck, Lincoln and Stanton, the intractable, if energetic, war secretary, now stood aside, and the efforts of the whole vast army were to be directed and co-ordinated by one supreme military authority.

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  • McClellan lingered north of Richmond, despite President Lincoln's constant demand that he should "strike a blow" with the force he had organized and taken to the Yorktown peninsula in April, until General Lee had concentrated 73,000 infantry in his front; then the Federal commander, fearing to await the issue of a decisive battle, ended his campaign of invasion in the endeavour to "save his army"; and he so far succeeded that on July 3 he had established himself on the north bank of the James in a position to which reinforcements and supplies could be brought from the north by water without fear of molestation by the enemy.

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  • Bernard fought for King Stephen during the civil war, was present at the battle of the Standard in August 1138, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Lincoln in February 1141.

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  • The taking of life and " moon-shining," however, have become less and less frequent among them, and Berea College, at Berea, the Lincoln Memorial University, and other schools in Kentucky and adjoining states have done much to educate them and bring them more in harmony with the outside community.

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  • Four years later, this in turn was divided into three counties, Jefferson, Lincoln and Fayette, but the name Kentucky was revived in 1782 and was given to the judicial district which was then organized for these three counties.

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  • After the election of President Lincoln they also led in the movement to secure the adoption of the Crittenden Compromise or some other peaceful solution of the difficulties between the North and the South.

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  • On the Franconia, a much shorter range, are Mount Lafayette, 5269 ft.; Mount Lincoln, 5098 ft.; and four others exceeding 4000 ft.

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  • General Benjamin Lincoln, succeeding Howe, undertook to drive the British out of Georgia, but General Augustine Prevost, who had commanded in Florida, moved up and compelled Lincoln to retire to Charleston.

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  • In September 1 779 he was besieged by Lincoln in conjunction with a French naval and military force under Admiral d'Estaing, but successfully repelled an assault (October 9), and Lincoln again fell back to Charleston.

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  • Marching upon Charleston, Clinton compelled Lincoln to surrender on the 12th of May.

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  • The dashing rider, Colonel Banastre Tarleton, cut to pieces (April 14, 1780) a detachment of Lincoln's cavalry, and followed it up by practically destroying Buford's Virginia regiment near the North Carolina border.

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  • With Lincoln's surrender of nearly all the continental soldiers in the south, a new force had to be supplied to meet the British veterans.

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  • See also Lincoln Steffens, The Struggle for Self-Government; being an attempt to trace American Political Corruption to its Sources in Six States of the United States (New York, 1906).

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  • The church, the ground-plan of which bears a remarkable resemblance to that of Lincoln Cathedral, was of vast dimensions.

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  • Like Lincoln, it had an eastern as well as a western transept, each furnished with apsidal chapels to the east.

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  • The largest and most noteworthy are Burnet park (about 100 acres), on high land in the western part of the city, Lincoln park, occupying a heavily wooded ridge in the east, and Schiller, Kirk and Frazer parks.

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  • Yet secession was opposed by many prominent men, and in North Alabama an attempt was made to organize a neutral state to be called Nickajack; but with President Lincoln's call to arms all opposition to secession ended.

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  • Among the parks are Broadway Park, Central Hill Park, Prospect Hill Park, Lincoln Park, and Nathan Tufts Park.

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  • Stephens was about the only prominent political leader who contended that Lincoln's election was insufficient ground for such action.

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  • He supported in 1860 the ultra-Democratic ticket of Breckinridge and Lane, but he did not identify the election of Lincoln with the ruin of the South, though he thought the North should give renewed guarantees to slavery.

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  • In March 1862 Lincoln made him military governor of the part of Tennessee captured from the Confederates, and after two years of autocratic rule (with much danger to himself) he succeeded in organizing a Union government for the state.

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  • In 1864, to secure the votes of the war Democrats and to please the border states that had remained in the Union, Johnson was nominated for vice-president on the ticket with Lincoln.

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  • A month after the inauguration the murder of Lincoln left him president, with the great problem to solve of reconstruction of the Union.

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  • But, whether because he drew a distinction between the treason of individuals and of states, or was influenced by Seward, or simply, once in responsible position, separated Republican party politics from the question of constitutional interpretation, at least he speedily showed that he would be influenced by no acrimony, and adopted the lenient reconstruction policy of Lincoln.

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  • His blunt, direct style of oratory and his somewhat rough manners were characteristic. After the outbreak of the Civil War he was one of the most vigorous critics of the Lincoln administration, whose Ohio member, Salmon P. Chase, had long been a political rival.

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  • This bill was passed by both houses of Congress, just before their adjournment, but President Lincoln withheld his signature, and on the 8th of July issued a proclamation explaining his course and defining his position.

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  • Although the Sarum Use prevailed far the most widely, yet there were separate Uses of York and Hereford, and also to a less degree of Lincoln, Bangor, Exeter, Wells, St Paul's, and probably of other dioceses and cathedral churches as well.

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  • The general liberality of Tenison's religious views commended him to the royal favour, and, after being made bishop of Lincoln in 1691, he was promoted to the primacy in December 1694.

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  • After completing a two-years' course in New Inn, an inn of chancery, More was admitted in February 1496 at Lincoln's Inn, an inn of court.

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  • Finally, after President Lincoln's election, he became a Republican, and as such was re-elected in 1862 to the national House of Representatives, in which he at once became one of the most radical and aggressive members, his views commanding especial attention owing to his being one of the few representatives from a slave state.

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  • Wade of Ohio, who had piloted the bill through the Senate, in issuing the so-called "WadeDavis Manifesto," which violently denounced President Lincoln for encroaching on the domain of Congress and insinuated that the presidential policy would leave slavery unimpaired in the reconstructed states.

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  • He was one of the radical leaders who preferred Fremont to Lincoln in 1864, but subsequently withdrew his opposition and supported the President for re-election.

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  • Neville's residence in London was a palace in the street opposite the Temple, which from this association obtained the name of Chancery Lane, by which it is still known; while the palace itself, after passing into the hands of Henry de Lacy, earl of Lincoln, was called Lincoln's Inn after that nobleman when it became the abode of students of law.

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  • Neville bequeathed this property to the see of Chichester, and the memory of his connexion with the locality is further preserved in the name of a passage leading from Chancery Lane to Lincoln's Inn which still bears the name of Chichester Rents.

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  • In 1763 he became king's counsel and bencher of Lincoln's Inn, and for a short time went the northern circuits, but was more successful in obtaining business in the Court of Chancery.

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  • Legionary fortresses were established at Wroxeter (for a time only), Chester and Caerleon, facing the Welsh hills, and at Lincoln in the northeast.

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  • Adiutrix, and achieved the final subjugation of Wales and the first conquest of Yorkshire, where a legionary fortress at York was substituted for that at Lincoln.

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  • Another colonia is planted at Lincoln (Lindum), and a third at Gloucester (Glevum) in 96.

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  • Five modern cities, Colchester, Lincoln, York, Gloucester and St Albans, stand on the sites, and in some fragmentary fashion bear the names of five Roman municipalities, founded by the Roman government with special charters and constitutions.

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  • It also gave access by a branch to Leicester and Lincoln.

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  • The fifth is that known to the English as the Fosse, which joins Lincoln and Leicester with Cirencester, Bath and Exeter.

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  • Yet London and Canterbury must have recovered a certain amount of importance quite early, at all events within two centuries after the invasion, and the same is probably true of York, Lincoln and a few other places.

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  • The growth of the protectionist movement and the development of anti-slavery sentiment, however, drew it in the opposite direction, and it voted the Whig national ticket in 1840 and in 1848, and the Republican ticket for Lincoln in 1860.

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  • As an example, we may refer to the small religious house of St Mary Magdalene's, a cell of the great Benedictine house of St Mary's, York, in the valley of the Witham, to the south-east of the city of Lincoln.

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  • After other attempts to obtain a fellowship, he was elected in 1839 to a Yorkshire fellowship at Lincoln, an anti-Puseyite College.

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  • He was ordained priest in 1843, and in the same year became tutor of Lincoln College, where he rapidly made a reputation as a clear and stimulating teacher and as a sympathetic friend of youth.

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  • In 1851 the rectorship of Lincoln became vacant, and it seemed certain that Pattison would be elected, but he lost it by a disagreeable intrigue.

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  • In 1861 he was elected rector of Lincoln, marrying in the same year Emilia Francis Strong (afterwards Lady Dilke).

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  • Ten prose treatises by Richard Rolle from the Thornton MS.(c. 1440, Lincoln Cathedral Library) were edited by Canon George Perry for the Early English Text Society in 1866.

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  • But it is the general opinion of historians that he had a high sense of his responsibilities and a strong love of justice; despite the looseness of his personal morals, he commanded the affection and respect of Gilbert Foliot and Hugh of Lincoln, the most upright of the English bishops.

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  • He graduated at Exeter College, Oxford, and became preacher at Lincoln's Inn.

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  • Though slighted by the French as a traitor to his natural lord, he served Louis with fidelity until captured at the battle of Lincoln (May 1217).

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  • The son graduated at Yale in 1748; studied theology with his father; studied medicine at Edinburgh in 1752-1753; was ordained deacon by the bishop of Lincoln and priest by the bishop of Carlisle in 1753; was missionary in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1754-1757, and was rector in Jamaica, New York, in 1757-1766; and of St.

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  • He was not, however, in perfect harmony with Lincoln, who was far more conservative as well as broader minded and more magnanimous than he; besides this Stevens felt it an injustice that Lincoln in choosing a member of his cabinet from Pennsylvania had preferred Cameron to himself.

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  • Along the White Plains road (now Lincoln Avenue) Washington retreated, pursued by General Henry Clinton, before the battle of White Plains in 1776.

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  • From him it descended by marriage to the earls of Lincoln, and, then passing by marriage to Earl Thomas of Lancaster, it became parcel of the county and later of the duchy of Lancaster; an inquisition of 1352 found that Henry, duke of Lancaster, had 77s.

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  • From the grammar school of Norwich he passed to Trinity College, Cambridge; and in 1572 he entered Lincoln's Inn.

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  • Whitgift, with other heads of the university, deprived Cartwright in 1570 of his professorship, and in September 1571 exercised his prerogative as master of Trinity to deprive him of his fellowship. In June of the same year Whitgift was nominated dean of Lincoln.

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  • A visit paid by this famous orator to Lord Brougham in 1865 was made the occasion of a banquet given in his honour by the benchers of the Temple and of Lincoln's Inn.

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  • In 1664 he became preacher at Lincoln's Inn.

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  • In 1866 he was chosen by Congress to deliver the special eulogy on Lincoln; and in 1867 he was appointed minister to Berlin, where he remained until his resignation in 1874.

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  • In 1765 he was appointed preacher at Lincoln's Inn, and in 1767 he became archdeacon of Gloucester.

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  • He graduated from Brown University in 1858, studied law in the office of Abraham Lincoln, was admitted to the bar in Springfield, Illinois, in 1861, and soon afterwards was selected by President Lincoln as assistant private secretary, in which capacity he served till the president's death, being associated with John George Nicolay (1832-1901).

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  • The first charter was granted about 1283 to the burgesses by Henry de Lacy, second earl of Lincoln, confirming the liberties granted by the first Henry de Lacy, who is therefore sometimes said, although probably erroneously, to have granted a charter about 1147.

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  • On his return to England, he was successively appointed prebendary of Lincoln, archdeacon of Lincoln (1347), and in 1349 archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • His grandfather,' Abraham Lincoln, settled in Kentucky about 1780 and was killed by Indians in 1784.

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  • His father, Thomas (1778-1851), was born in Rockingham (then Augusta) county, Virginia; he was hospitable, shiftless, restless and unsuccessful, working now as a carpenter and now as a farmer, and could not read or write before his marriage, in Washington county, Kentucky, on the 12th of June 1806, to Nancy Hanks (1783-1818), who was a native of Virginia, who is said to have been the illegitimate daughter of one Lucy Hanks, and who seems to have been, in 1 Lincoln's birthday is a legal holiday in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

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  • In this frontier community law and politics claimed a large proportion of the stronger and the more ambitious men; the law early appealed to Lincoln and his general popularity encouraged him as early as 1832 to enter politics.

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  • In this year Offutt failed and Lincoln was thus left without employment.

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  • Before the election the Black Hawk Indian War broke out; Lincoln volunteered in one of the Sangamon county companies on the 21st of April and was elected captain by the members of the company.

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  • It is said that the oath of allegiance was administered to Lincoln at this time by Lieut.

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  • The company, a part of the 4th Illinois, was mustered out after the five weeks' service for which it volunteered, and Lincoln reenlisted as a private on the 29th of May, and was finally mustered out on the 16th of June by Lieut.

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  • As captain Lincoln was twice in disgrace, once for firing a pistol near camp and again because nearly his entire company was intoxicated..

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  • With a friend, William Berry, he then bought a small country store, which soon failed chiefly because of the drunken habits of Berry and because Lincoln preferred to read and to tell stories - he early gained local celebrity as a story-teller - rather than sell; about this time he got hold of a set of Blackstone.

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  • In the spring of 1833 the store's stock was sold to satisfy its creditors, and Lincoln assumed the firm's debts, which he did not fully pay off for fifteen years.

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  • In 1834 Lincoln was elected (second of four successful candidates, with only 14 fewer votes than the first) a member of the Illinois House of Representatives, to which he was re-elected in 1836, 1838 and 1840, serving until 1842.

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  • Consequently, I go for admitting all whites to the right of suffrage, who pay taxes or bear arms (by no means excluding females)" - a sentiment frequently quoted to prove Lincoln a believer in woman's suffrage.

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  • Douglas in adopting the convention system, to which Lincoln had been strongly opposed.

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  • Lincoln was very popular among his fellow legislators, and in 1838 and in 1840 he received the complimentary vote of his minority colleagues for the speakership of the state House of Representatives.

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  • Lincoln was the only Whig member of Congress elected in Illinois in 1846.

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  • In 1834 his political friend and colleague John Todd Stuart (1807-1885), a lawyer in full practice, had urged him to fit himself for the bar, and had lent him text-books; and Lincoln, working diligently, was admitted to the bar in September 1836.

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  • Judge David Davis, who knew Lincoln on the Illinois circuit and whom Lincoln made in October 1862 an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, said that he was "great both at nisi Arius and before an appellate tribunal."

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  • From law, however, Lincoln was soon drawn irresistibly back into politics.

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  • Lincoln had early put himself on record as opposed to slavery, but he was never technically an abolitionist; he allied himself rather with those who believed that slavery should be fought within the Constitution, that, though it could not be constitutionally interfered with in individual states, it should be excluded from territory over which the national government had jurisdiction.

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  • He was elected to the state House of Representatives, from which he immediately resigned to become a candidate for United States senator from Illinois, to succeed James Shields, a Democrat; but five opposition members, of Democratic antecedents, refused to vote for Lincoln (on the second ballot he received 47 votes-50 being necessary to elect) and he turned the votes which he controlled over to Lyman Trumbull, who was opposed to the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and thus secured the defeat of Joel Aldrich Matteson (1808-1883), who favoured this act and who on the eighth ballot had received 47 votes to 35 for Trumbull and 15 for Lincoln.

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  • Lincoln before the state convention at Bloomington of "all opponents of anti-Nebraska legislation" (the first Republican state convention in Illinois) made on the 29th of May a notable address known as the "Lost Speech."

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  • The National Convention of the Republican Party in 1856 cast i ra votes for Lincoln as its vice-presidential candidate on the ticket with Fremont, and he was on the Republican electoral ticket of this year, and made effective campaign speeches in the interest of the new party.

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  • In this speech, delivered in the state House of Representatives, Lincoln charged Pierce, Buchanan, Taney and Douglas with conspiracy to secure the Dred Scott decision.

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  • Yielding to the wish of his party friends, on the 24th of July, Lincoln challenged Douglas to a joint public discussion.'

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  • At Freeport, on the Wisconsin boundary, on the 27th of August, Lincoln answered questions put to him by Douglas, and by his questions forced Douglas to "betray the South" by his enunciation of the "Freeport heresy," that, no matter what the character of Congressional legislation or the Supreme Court's decision "slavery cannot exist a day or an hour anywhere unless it is supported by local police regulations."

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  • This adroit attempt to reconcile the principle of popular sovereignty with the Dred Scott decision, though it undoubtedly helped Douglas in the immediate fight for the senatorship, necessarily alienated his Southern supporters and assured his defeat, as Lincoln foresaw it must, in the presidential campaign of 1860.

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  • Lincoln's speeches in this campaign won him a national fame.

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  • Lincoln pointed out that the majority of the members of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 opposed slavery and that they did not think that Congress had no power to control slavery in the Territories.

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  • He spoke at Concord, ' Douglas and Lincoln first met in public debate (four on a side) in Springfield in December 1839.

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  • In 1852 Lincoln attempted with little success to reply to a speech made by Douglas in Richmond.

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  • On the 4th of October 1854 in Springfield, in reply to a speech on the Nebraska question by Douglas delivered the day before, Lincoln made a remarkable speech four hours long, to which Douglas replied on the next day; and in the fortnight immediately following Lincoln attacked Douglas's record again at Bloomington and at Peoria.

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  • On the 26th of June 1857 Lincoln in a speech at Springfield answered Douglas's speech of the 12th in which he made over his doctrine of popular sovereignty to suit the Dred Scott decision.

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  • Before the actual debate in 1858 Douglas made a speech in Chicago on the 9th of July, to which Lincoln replied the next day; Douglas spoke at Bloomington on the 16th of July and Lincoln answered him in Springfield on the 17th.

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  • The Illinois State Convention of the Republican party, held at Decatur on the 9th and 10th of May 1860, amid great enthusiasm declared Abraham Lincoln its first choice for the presidential nomination, and instructed the delegation to the National Convention to cast the vote of the state as a unit for him.

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  • Both had won greater national fame than had Lincoln, and, before the convention met, each hoped to be nominated for president.

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  • Chase, however, had little chance, and the contest was virtually between Seward and Lincoln, who by many was considered more "available," because it was thought that he could (and Seward could not) secure the vote of certain doubtful states.

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  • Lincoln's name was presented by Illinois and seconded by Indiana.

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  • On the first ballot Lincoln received only 102 votes to 1732 for Seward.

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  • On the second ballot Lincoln received 181 votes to Seward's 1842.

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  • On the third ballot the 502 votes formerly given to Simon Cameron' were given to Lincoln, who received 2312 votes to 180 for Seward, and without taking another ballot enough votes were changed to make Lincoln's total 354 (2 33 being necessary for a choice) and the nomination was then made unanimeus.

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  • The convention was singularly tumultuous and noisy; large claques were hired by both Lincoln's and Seward's managers.

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  • During the campaign Lincoln remained in Springfield, making few speeches and writing practically no letters for publication.

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  • On the 4th of March 1861 Lincoln was inaugurated as president.

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  • There was much opposition in these states to such a course, but the secessionists triumphed, and by the time President Lincoln was inaugurated, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas had formally withdrawn from the Union.

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  • Lincoln's inaugural address declared the Union perpetual and acts of secession void, and announced the determinatiojl of the government to defend its authority, and to hold forts and places yet in its possession.

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  • He disclaimed any intention to invade, subjugate or oppress 1 Without Lincoln's knowledge or consent, the managers of his candidacy before the convention bargained for Cameron's votes by promising to Cameron a place in Lincoln's cabinet, should Lincoln be elected.

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  • Cameron became Lincoln's first secretary of war.

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  • Fort Sumter, in Charleston harbour, had been besieged by the secessionists since January; and, it being now on the point of surrender through starvation, Lincoln sent the besiegers official notice on the 8th of April that a fleet was on its way to carry provisions to the fort, but that he would not attempt to reinforce it unless this effort were resisted.

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  • The Unionists of the border slave states were greatly alarmed, but Lincoln by his moderate conservatism held them to the military support of the government.

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  • In April Congress passed and the president approved (6th April) an act emancipating the slaves in the District of Columbia, with compensation to owners - a measure which Lincoln had proposed when in Congress.

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  • Lincoln tolerated this latitude as falling properly within the military discretion pertaining to local army operations.

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  • But this bill, which Lincoln had hoped would introduce a system of" compensated emancipation,"was not approved by the legislature of Delaware, which considered it in February 1862.

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  • As soon as this order, by the slow method of communication by sea, reached the newspapers, Lincoln (May 19) published a proclamation declaring it void; adding further, "Whether it be competent for me as commander-in-chief of the army and navy to declare the slaves of any state or states free, and whether at any time or in any case it shall have become a necessity indispensable to the maintenance of the government to exercise such supposed power, are questions which under my responsibility I reserve to myself, and which I cannot feel justified in leaving to the decision of commanders in the field.

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  • But in the same proclamation Lincoln recalled to the public his own proposal and the assent of Congress to compensate states which would adopt voluntary and gradual abolishment.

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  • Although Lincoln's appeal brought the border states to no practical decision - the representatives of these states almost without exception opposed the plan - it served to prepare public opinion for his final act.

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  • With public opinion thus ripened by alternate defeat and victory, President Lincoln, on the 22nd of September 1862, issued his preliminary proclamation of emancipation, giving notice that on the 1st of January 1863, "all persons held as slaves within any state or designated part of a state the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward and for ever free."

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  • The foreign policy of President Lincoln, while subordinate in importance to the great questions of the Civil War, nevertheless presented several difficult and critical problems for his decision.

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  • Public opinion in America almost unanimously sustained the act; but Lincoln, convinced that the rights of Great Britain as a neutral ha .d been violated, promptly, upon the demand of England, ordered the liberation of the prisoners (26th of December).

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  • Lincoln's course was one of prudent moderation.

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  • This offer President Lincoln (on the 6th of February) declined to consider, Seward replying for him that it would only be entering into diplomatic discussion with the rebels whether the authority of the government should be renounced, and the country delivered over to disunion and anarchy.

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  • President Lincoln executed the draft with all possible justice and forbearance, but refused every importunity to postpone it.

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  • To all such suggestions, up to the time of issuing his emancipation proclamation, Lincoln announced his readiness to stop fighting and grant amnesty, whenever they would submit to and maintain the national authority under the Constitution of the United States.

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  • Certain agents in Canada having in 1864 intimated that they were empowered to treat for peace, Lincoln, through Greeley, tendered them safe conduct to Washington.

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  • As Lincoln's first presidential term of four years neared its end, the Democratic party gathered itself for a supreme effort to regain the ascendancy lost in 1860.

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  • This threatening attitude, in conjunction with alarming indications of a conspiracy to resist the draft, had the effect to thoroughly consolidate the war party, which had on the 8th of June unanimously renominated Lincoln, and had nominated Andrew Johnson of Tennessee for the vice-presidency.

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  • At the election held on the 8th of November 1864, Lincoln received 2,216,076 of the popular votes, and M'Clellan (who had openly disapproved of the resolution declaring the war a failure) but 1,808,725; while of the presidential electors 212 voted for Lincoln and 21 for M'Clellan.

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  • Lincoln's second term of office began on the 4th of March 1865.

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  • Lincoln being at the time on a visit to the army, entered Richmond the day after its surrender.

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  • President Lincoln was of unusual stature, 6 ft.

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  • Of the many statues of President Lincoln in American cities, the best known is that, in Chicago, by St Gaudens.

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  • Carpenter painted in 1864 "Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation," now in the Capitol at Washington.

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  • He strained every nerve to induce his clergy to accept his ruling on the questions of the reservation of the Sacrament and of the ceremonial use of incense in accordance with the archbishop's judgment in the Lincoln case; but when, during his last illness, a prosecutor brought proceedings against the clergy of five recalcitrant churches, the bishop, on the advice of his archdeacons, interposed his veto.

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  • The early English ancestors, the breed of which is not on record in America, were most probably of Lincoln origin.

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  • In April 1649 he entered Lincoln College, Oxford, and on the 3rd of November 1651 he became scholar of Corpus Christi College.

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  • As secretary of the treasury in President Lincoln's cabinet in 1861-1864, during the first three years of the Civil War, he rendered services of the greatest value.

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  • But the paper founded under such inauspicious circumstances exerted a mighty influence, and lived to record not only President Lincoln's proclamation of emancipation, but the adoption of an amendment to the constitution of the United States for ever prohibiting slavery.

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  • He is best known for his plastic representations of the North American Indian - especially for "The Signal of Peace" in Lincoln Park, Chicago, and "The Medicine Man," in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia.

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  • He was called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1858, was professor of political economy at University College from 1872 to 1875, and in December 1876, after a previous unsuccessful attempt, was elected to parliament for Liskeard in the Liberal interest.

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  • Henry spent some of his youth at Aix-la-Chapelle, and having entered the church received various appointments, and was consecrated bishop of Lincoln in July 1398.

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  • As a Puritan controversialist he was remarkably active; in 1580 the bishop of Ely appointed him to defend puritanism against the Roman Catholics, Thomas Watson, ex-bishop of Lincoln (1513-1584), and John Feckenham, formerly abbot of Westminster, and in 1581 he was one of the disputants with the Jesuit, Edmund Campion, while in 1582 he was among the clergy selected by the privy council to argue against any papist.

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  • The call issued by the South Carolina legislature just after the election of Lincoln for a state convention to decide upon the advisability of secession brought forward the most serious question of Buchanan's administration.

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  • Seward; he was on the commi ttee which drew up the platform and served on the committee which announced his nomination to Abraham Lincoln.

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  • In spite of Secretary Seward's objection, grounded on Schurz's European record as a revolutionary, Lincoln sent him in 1861 as minister to Spain.

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  • In the 13th century, as part of the barony of Halton, the manor passed to Henry, earl of Lincoln, who by a charter dated 1282 declared the town a free borough, with a gild merchant and numerous privileges, including power to elect a mayor, a catchpole and an aletaster.

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  • In 1282 Henry, earl of Lincoln, obtained a Saturday market and an eight days' fair at the feast of St Peter ad Vincula, and the market is still held under this grant.

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  • Before the Civil War Stanton was a Democrat, opposed to slavery, but a firm defender of the constitutional rights of the slaveholders, and was a bitter opponent of Lincoln, whose party he then hated and distrusted.

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  • Although he had often violently denounced President Lincoln, the latter thought he saw in Stanton a good war minister, and in January 1862 invited him into his cabinet.

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  • During the Civil War he was one of the closest and most constant advisers of President Lincoln, and one of the most efficient, most energetic and most patriotic of the "war governors" of the North.

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  • Denbigh Castle, surrounding the hill with a double wall, was built, in Edward I.'s reign, by Henry de Lacy, earl of Lincoln, from whom the town received its first charter.

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  • President Lincoln insisted on retaining Commander Dahlgren, and he was qualified to keep the post by special act of Congress.

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  • In 1729 he transferred the scene of his operations to Lincoln's Inn Fields.

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  • The others were the State Psychopathic Institute at Kankakee (established in 1907 as part of the insane service) for systematic study of mental and nervous diseases; one at Lincoln having charge of feebleminded children; two institutions for the blind - a school at Jacksonville and an industrial home at Marshall Boulevard and 19th Street, Chicago; a home for soldiers and sailors (Quincy), one for soldiers' orphans (Normal), and one for soldiers' widows (Wilmington); a school for the deaf (Jacksonville), and an eye and ear infirmary (Chicago).

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  • Douglas was elected, but the vote showed that Illinois was becoming more Northern in sympathy, and two years later Lincoln, then candidate for the presidency, carried the state.

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  • He visited England in 18 351836, and delivered lectures on the principles and main doctrines of Roman Catholicism in the Sardinian Chapel, Lincoln's Inn Fields, and in the church at Moorfields, now pulled down.

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  • Among beautiful specimens of carved stalls may be mentioned the Early Decorated stalls in Winchester Cathedral, the Early Perpendicular ones in Lincoln Minster, and the early 15th-century canopies in Norwich Cathedral.

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