Library Sentence Examples

library
  • She left the library to return Damian's phone.

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  • They studied together at the library on Wednesday evenings.

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  • The city has a public library.

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  • Everything in my library that can be scanned is on a computer.

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  • He waited in the library until he'd composed himself and left for his suite.

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  • Would you have entered my library if you saw me like this?

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  • Later, he and Martha were to visit the library for more digging into the earlier disappearances now that the date of Martha's bones was better known.

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  • The young man rose and stormed to the library door.

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  • He tugged her hand, and she followed him out of the library and through the sprawling house and a large kitchen to the back door.

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  • She'd seen the dark side of Dusty in his home videos in the library before she told Damian about Claire.

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  • At the far end of the library was a creature that made her think twice about entering.

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  • Magic vibrated in the library then faded.

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  • Dusty caught his arm and motioned for those in the library to leave.

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  • If you had access to a library, its stock of medical books and journals was very small.

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  • Hell has a library, and the librarian has been teaching me about the deities through these little video tutorial things.

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  • It has a public library.

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  • She guided the crying woman inside to her library and dug through the small satchel near her favorite chair.

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  • He pointed as he walked, indicating the dining room, the library, the reception room, and others, each sounding stuffier than the last and all marked by polished oak double doors.

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  • He left the library and Traveled to one of the remaining, undiscovered safe houses at the base of one of the mountains.

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  • The Abbe Barthelemy procured for him a pension, with the appointment of interpreter of oriental languages at the Royal Library.

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  • One day as we left the library I noticed that she appeared more serious than usual, and I asked the cause.

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  • She didn't miss the way he bristled but turned her back to him to return to the library.

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  • She pushed open the cracked door to the library.

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  • She fled up the stairs and down the hallways she'd memorized on her trip to the library.

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  • Fred, who had tagged along, beat a hasty retreat downstairs, making the excuse of a trip to the library.

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  • The Immortal led him down the hallway to a familiar library.

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  • And I've got some research to do down at the library.

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  • In 1907-1908 the university had 122 instructors, 1178 students and a library of 55,395 volumes.

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  • It also has a lycee, training-colleges, a school of artillery, a library and several learned societies.

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  • The text is preserved in the Maitland folio MS. in the Pepysian library, Cambridge.

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  • A monastic library was the proper place for this gentle emotional dreamer, who clung so fondly to the ancient traditions.

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  • The city has a fine court-house, a United States government building, a Carnegie library and a large auditorium.

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  • The principal structures include the municipal buildings, corn exchange, library, public hall, and the market cross.

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  • There are several fine public buildings, as the governor's palace, the new opera-house, the public library and museum of Maltese antiquities, and the auberges or lodges of the Knights of Malta (especially the Auberge de Castile) which are now used for military offices, club-rooms, and other purposes.

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  • Among the public buildings are the Federal building, the city hall and the public library.

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  • Geneva has a public library, a city hospital and hygienic institute.

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  • The college had in 1908-1909 107 students, 21 instructors, and a library of 50,000 volumes and 15,000 pamphlets.

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  • Court formed the design of writing a history of Protestantism, and made large collections for the purpose, which have been preserved in the Public Library of Geneva; but this he did not live to carry out.

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  • His friend Chanut fell dangerously ill; and Descartes, who devoted himself to attend in the sick-room, was obliged to issue from it every morning in the chill northern air of January, and spend an hour in the palace library.

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  • A complete French edition of the collected works was begun in the Romance Library (1907 foll.).

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  • It contains a valuable library with many incunabula and old manuscripts, amongst which is one of the Nibelungenlied, an astronomical observatory, a collection of antiquities, and a mineral collection.

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  • A 14th-century MS. Book of Prayers in the Francis Douce collection in the Bodleian library at Oxford contains a drawing in which two persons are shown, but they bowl to no mark.

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  • In the town hall (1507) are the library and a small museum with two pictures by the 17th century artist Caesar van Everdingen, who with his more celebrated brother Allart van Everdingen was a native of the town.

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  • The university possesses a very important library.

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  • Among public buildings, the Stephenson memorial hall (1879), containing a free library, art and science class-rooms, a theatre and the rooms of the Chesterfield Institute, commemorates George Stephenson, the engineer, who resided at Tapton House, close to Chesterfield, in his later life; he died here in 1848, and was buried in Trinity church.

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  • There are museums of mineralogy and geology, a lower school of mining, model room and scientific library.

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  • The principal square is the Plaza de Bolivar, the conventional centre of the city, in which stands a bronze equestrian statue of Bolivar, and on which face the cathedral, archbishop's residence, Casa Amarilla, national library, general post office and other public offices.

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  • Among the more prominent buildings are the court-house - the portion first erected being designed after the Parthenon - the Steele high school, St Mary's college, Notre Dame academy, the Memorial Building, the Arcade Building, Reibold Building, the Algonquin Hotel, the post office, the public library (containing about 75,000 volumes), the Young Men's Christian Association building and several churches.

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  • Syracuse University, whose campus (of zoo acres) in the south-east part of the city commands a fine view of the lake, is a co-educational institution largely under Methodist Episcopal control, but not sectarian, which in1908-1909had 239 instructors and 3205 students (1336 in the college of liberal arts; 189 in the summer school; 62 in the library school; 933 in the college of fine arts; 147 in the college of medicine; 179 in the college of law; 401 in the college of applied science; and 78 in the teachers' college).

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  • This is a magnificent palace, with gardens, a menagerie and a good library.

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  • There are seventeen buildings, among which the Holden observatory, the John Crouse memorial college (of fine arts), the hall of languages, the Lyman Smith college of applied science, the Lyman hall of natural history, the Bowne hall of chemistry, and the Carnegie library, are the most notable.

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  • Further notable buildings in Kensington are the town-hall and free library in High Street, which is also much frequented for its excellent shops, and the Brompton Consumption Hospital, Fulham Road.

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  • Other important edifices and institutions are the university, with its schools of law and medicine, the mint, built in 1811, the modern national college and high schools, a public library of over 28,000 volumes, an episcopal seminary, an academy of fine arts, the Teatro Degollado, and the large modern granite building of the penitentiary.

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  • This achievement was anticipated or outdone by an unknown calculator, whose manuscript was seen in the Radcliffe library, Oxford, by Baron von Zach towards the end of the century, and contained the ratio correct to 152 places.

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  • Compiegne is the seat of a subprefect, and has tribunals of first instance and of commerce, a communal college, library and hospital.

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  • The city has a Carnegie library, a Federal building, an opera house, an amusement park, and the San Rafael hospital, under the charge of the Sisters of Charity.

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  • An Arabic version of the first was found towards the end of the 17th century in the Bodleian library by Dr Edward Bernard, who began a translation of it; Halley finished it and published it along with a restoration of the second treatise in 1706.3rd.

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  • The date of his birth cannot be exactly determined, but from various indications in his work it seems to have been about 63 B.C. He studied at Nysa under the grammarian Aristodemus, under Tyrannio the grammarian at Rome, under the philosopher Xenarchus either at Rome or at Alexandria, and he had studied Aristotle along with Boethus (possibly at Rome under Tyrannio, who had access to the Aristotelian writings in Sulla's library).

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  • Moreover Strabo probably amassed his material in the library of Alexandria, so that Greek authorities would naturally furnish the great bulk of his collections.

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  • About 1285 he was placed in charge of the abbey library as custos cartarum, and he died in June or July 1300.

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  • Grant Lodge, an old mansion of the Grant family, occupying the south-west corner of the park, was converted into the public library.

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  • A very ancient fragment (dated 1080) of al-Anbari's recension, containing five poems in whole or part, is in the Royal Library at Leipzig.

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  • An excellent bibliography of Canadian history will be found in the volume Literature of American History, published by the American Library Association.

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  • He studied with earnest zeal the Greek philosophers; Plato in particular, and the writings of the Stoics, he had fully at command, and his treatise De Anima shows that he himself was able to investigate and discuss philosophical problems. From the philosophers he had been led to the medical writers, whose treatises plainly had a place in his working library.

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  • He was, says Strabo (608), the first we knew who collected books and taught the kings in Egypt the arrangement of a library.

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  • In leis library no doubt were books of others, but also his own.

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  • On the other hand, there are the curious and puzzling catalogues of Aristotelian books, one given by Diogenes Laertius, another by an anonymous commentator (perhaps Hesychius of Miletus) quoted in the notes of Gilles Menage on Diogenes Laertius, and known as " Anonymus Menagii," and a third copied by two Arabian writers from Ptolemy, perhaps King Ptolemy Philadelphus, son of the founder of the library at Alexandria.

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  • Finally, having a great number of discourses and treatises, containing all those small blemishes, around him in his library, and determined to collect, consolidate and connect them into a philosophical system, he would naturally be often taking them down from their places to consult and compare one with another, and as naturally enter in them references one to the other, and cross-references between one another.

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  • Thus he would enter in the Metaphysics a reference to the Physics, and in the Physics a reference to the Metaphysics, precisely because both were manuscripts in his library.

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  • No doubt then Aristotle's library contained published copies of the works of other authors, as well as the autographs of his own.

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  • It does not follow that his own works went beyond his library and his school.

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  • Such then was the method of composition by which Aristotle began in early manhood to write his philosophical works, continued them gradually and simultaneously, combined shorter discourses into longer treatises, compared and connected them, kept them together in his library without publishing them, communicated them to his school, used the co-operation of his best pupils, and finally succeeded in combining many mature writings into one harmonious system.

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  • But in the gradual process of composition, by which a work once begun was kept going with the rest, although a work such as the Politics (begun in 357) was begun early, and some works more rudimentary came earlier than others, the general body of writings was so kept together in Aristotle's library, and so simultaneously elaborated and consolidated into a system that it soon becomes impossible to put one before another.

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  • The railway company built its principal schools, provided it with a mechanics' institute, containing library, science and art classes, reading rooms, assembly rooms, &c. Victoria Park, also the gift of the company, was opened in 1888.

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  • The Zeughaus (armoury) contains the ducal library of 100,000 volumes, and among other public buildings may be mentioned the Augustenstift, formerly the seat of the ministerial offices, and the Marstall (royal mews).

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  • At the west end of Vasa Street is the city library, the most important in the country except the royal library at Stockholm and the university libraries at Upsala and Lund.

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  • A people's library was founded by members of the family of Dickson, several of whom have taken a prominent part in philanthropical works in the city.

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  • When the municipal museum was founded in 1849 a reference library formed part of the institution, and from this has developed a free library system in which there are also nine lending libraries.

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  • The two existing manuscripts of the Liber are in the Vatican library, Rome, and in the library of St Ambrose at Milan.

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  • In 1817 he visited Rome, where he made researches in the Vatican Library.

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  • Among its public buildings and institutions are a fine public library (1872) with 80,000 volumes in 1908, the city hall, a state armoury, Somerville Hospital, the city poor house, a Roman Catholic home for the aged, and two high schools (English and classical).

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  • A MS. collection of seventy-two sonnets, entitled The Tarantula of Love, and a translation (1587) from the Italian of the Triumphs of Petrarke are preserved in the library of the university of Edinburgh, in the collection bequeathed by his nephew, William Drummond.

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  • Two other volumes of his manuscript notes, scrolls of poems, &c., are preserved among the Drummond MSS., now in the library of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

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  • The interior is very richly decorated, notably with fine frescoes, and its treasury and fine library of over 60,000 volumes are famous.

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  • Besides several other churches and two monastic houses, the principal buildings include the handsome palace of the primate, erected in 1883; the archiepiscopal library, with valuable incunabula and old MSS.; the seminary for the education of Roman Catholic priests; the residences of the chapter; and the town-hall.

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  • The reforms in the regulations for degrees in divinity, the formation and first revision of the new theological tripos, the inauguration of the Cambridge mission to Delhi, the institution of the Church Society (for the discussion of theological and ecclesiastical questions by the younger men), the meetings for the divinity faculty, the organization of the new Divinity School and Library and, later, the institution of the Cambridge Clergy Training School, were all, in a very real degree, the result of Westcott's energy and influence as regius professor.

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  • Literary men owed him also much; not only did he throw his famous library open to them, but he pensioned all their leaders, including Descartes, Vincent Voiture (1598-1648), Jean Louis Guez de Balzac (1597-1654) and Pierre Corneille.

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  • In the prince's library Bergler discovered the introduction and the first three chapters of Eusebius's Demonstratio Evangelica.

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  • Fogg; and the Tufts Library (1879, in Weymouth village), endowed by Quincy Tufts and his sister Susan Tufts.

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  • The library of the episcopal palace, built between 1694 and 1701, possesses the oldest maps of Bohemia made in 1518 by Nicolaus Claudianus of Jung-Bunzlau.

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  • Grosart's reprint (1872) in the Fuller Worthies Library, was published by Mr Charles Edmonds in his Isham Reprints (1895).

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  • Among the chief edifices are a public hall, institute and library.

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  • The original building contains the valuable library (now national), many of the treasures of which were destroyed by fire in 1906, and a collection of Roman antiquities.

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  • His autograph manuscripts and his large and valuable library passed to his eldest son, Philippe du Fresne, who died unmarried in 1692.

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  • The French government, however, aware of the importance of all the writings of Du Cange, succeeded, after much trouble, in collecting the greater portion of the manuscripts, which were preserved in the imperial library at Paris.

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  • The city is the seat of the state hospital for tuberculosis, has a fine court-house, a public library, and various manufacturing establishments.

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  • Among the principal buildings are the Federal building, the county court-house, the Soldiers and Sailors' Monumental Building, containing a large auditorium, the Masonic and Oddfellows' temples, the Market building, containing city offices, a National Guard armoury, the John McIntire public library, the John McIntire Children's Home (1880), the Helen Purcell home for women, the county infirmary, the Bethesda Hospital (1890), and the Good Samaritan hospital (1902; under the Franciscan Sisters).

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  • The John McIntire public library (about 20,000 volumes) is a consolidation of the Zanesville Athenaeum (1827) and the Eunice Buckingham library of the former Putnam Female Seminary (1835) here; Andrew Carnegie contributed $50,000 for the erection of the building.

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  • Only one complete MS. of his invaluable work (obtained by Count Gobineau in Persia) exists in any public library, the Bibliotheque Nationale at Paris.

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  • In1908-1909the university comprised a college, a school of commerce, a school of engineering and a school of law, and had a library of 47,000 volumes, 23 instructors and 565 students.

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  • Among other educational institutions are a conservatory of music, school of fine arts, normal school, a national library with upwards of 260,000 volumes and a large number of manuscripts, maps, medals and coins, the national observatory on Castle Hill, the national museum now domiciled in the Sao Christovao palace in the midst of a pretty park, a zoological garden in the suburb of Villa Isabel, and the famous Botanical Garden founded by Dom Joao VI.

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  • It was thrown open to foreign commerce, foreign mercantile houses were permitted to settle there, printing was introduced, industrial restrictions were removed, and a college of medicine, a military academy and a public library were founded.

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  • The most noteworthy public buildings are the Cathedral (Porto Alegre being the see of a Roman Catholic bishop), the handsome church of Nossa Senhora das Dores, the municipal palace, school of engineering, government palace, legislative halls, school of medicine, athenaeum, normal school and public library and military barracks.

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  • The library of Simopetra was destroyed by fire in 1891, and that of St Paul in 1905.

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  • The principal intellectual institution is the Royal Institution, a fine classical building opened by Albert, prince consort, in 1854, and containing a museum and large library.

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  • The magnificent library formed by the Montefeltro and Della Rovere dukes was removed to Rome, and incorporated in the Vatican library (but with a separate numbering) in 1657.

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  • In 1830 the library and museum were presented to him as a free gift by the creditors.

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  • Two large rolls containing the desired information, which he presented to the queen, are still preserved in the Cottonian Library.

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  • A learned treatise on the reformation of the calendar, written by him about the same time, is also preserved in the Ashmolean Library at Oxford.

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  • The city is a summer resort, has a public library, and is the seat of Wayland Academy (1855, Baptist), a co-educational preparatory school affiliated with the university of Chicago.

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  • Canisius College is a Roman Catholic (Jesuit) institution for men (established in 1870 and chartered in 1883), having in 1907 a college department and an academic (or high school) department, and a library of about 26,000 volumes.

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  • The Buffalo public library, founded in 1837, is housed in a fine building erected in 1887 (valued at $1,000,000), and contains about 300,000 books and pamphlets.

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  • Other important libraries, with the approximate number of their books, are the Grosvenor (founded in 1859), for reference (75,000 volumes and 7000 pamphlets); the John C. Lord, housed in the building of the Historical Society (10,620); the Law (8th judicial district) (17,000); the Catholic Institute (12,000); and the library of the Buffalo Historical Society (founded 1862) (26,600), now in the handsome building in Delaware Park used as the New York state building during the PanAmerican Exposition of 1901.

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  • The Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences has a museum in the public library building.

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  • Torelli; it has also a library of 20,000 volumes.

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  • The Japanese palace in the Neustadt, built in 1715 as a summer residence for Augustus II., receives its name from certain oriental figures with which it is decorated; it is sometimes called the Augusteum and contains the royal library.

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  • The Japanese palace contains a public library of more than 400,000 volumes, with about 3000 MSS.

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  • The educational institutions are numerous and of a high order, including a technical high school (with about 1100 students), which enjoys the privilege of conferring the degrees of doctor of engineering, doctor of technical sciences, &c., a veterinary college, a political-economic institution (Gehestiftung), with library, a school of architects, a royal and four municipal gymnasia, numerous lower grade and popular schools, the royal conservatorium for music and drama, and a celebrated academy of painting.

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  • Tenison, according to Gilbert Burnet, "endowed schools, set up a public library, and kept many curates to assist him in his indefatigable labours."

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  • The library contains upwards of 250,000 volumes and 600 MSS., and among the other auxiliary establishments are an anatomical hall and museum and botanical gardens.

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  • He died on the 23rd of September 1571, and was buried in Salisbury Cathedral, where he had built a library.

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  • Five years later he built the monastery of St Peter at Wearmouth, on land granted him by Ecgfrith of Northumbria, and endowed it with an excellent library.

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  • Reprints were made by Hearne (Oxford, 1716), by Lewis (1729, 1731), who added an appendix of documents, and by Singer (1817, 1822) and for the King's Library (1902).

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  • The plaza itself had been converted from a barren, sandy square into a well-shaded park, through the efforts of the Woman's Board of Trade, an unique institution, which also controls the public library, housed in a brick and stone building (1907) in the Mission style of architecture.

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  • Also of interest are the Rosario chapel; the ruined earthworks of Fort Marcy, north of the city, constructed by General Kearny in 1846; the ruins of the Garita, an old Spanish fortification used as a custom house under the Mexican government; the so-called "oldest house," a dilapidated adobe structure claimed to be the oldest building, continuously inhabited, in the United States; the state library; and the national cemetery, in which 1022 American soldiers are buried.

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  • The territorial legislature of 1907 established the College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts of the Territory of Hawaii, and also founded a public library.

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  • The city has a Carnegie library, which also houses the library of the Ripon Historical Society, and is the seat of Ripon College (nonsectarian, co-educational), which was founded in 1850 as the Lyceum of Ripon, and was named Ripon College in 1864; in 1908 it had 23 instructors and 279 students.

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  • The city is the seat of a Greek and a Roman Catholic archbishop; and it possesses a gymnasium, a theatre, an agricultural and industrial society, and a library and museum preserved in the buildings formerly devoted to the university, which was founded by Frederick North, 5th earl of Guilford (1766-1827, himself the first chancellor in 1824) in 1823, but disestablished on the cessation of the English protectorate.

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  • During his prolonged residences abroad he acquired a thorough knowledge of the Arabic, Turkish and Persian languages and literatures, which, on his final return to France, enabled him to render valuable assistance to Thevenot, the keeper of the royal library, and to Barthelemy d'Herbelot.

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  • Lock Haven is the seat of the Central State Normal School (opened 1877), and has a public library and a hospital.

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  • Among the points of interest within it are the old chapel of 1318, with Leopold's tomb and the altar of Verdun, dating from the 12th century, the treasury and relic-chamber, the library with 30,000 volumes and many MSS., the picture gallery, the collection of coins, the theological hall, and the winecellar, containing an immense tun like that at Heidelberg.

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  • Here is the museum of the Essex Archaeological Society, with a remarkable collection of Roman antiquities, and a library belonging to the Round family, who own the castle.

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  • The principal modern buildings are the town hall, corn exchange, free library, the Eastern Counties' asylum, Essex county hospital and barracks.

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  • The city has a public library and four large parks; in Court House Square there is a monument erected by popular subscription in honour of the soldiers from Kankakee county who died in the Civil War.

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  • Near both is the splendid Palais de Rumine (on the Place de la Riponne), opened in 1906 and now housing the university as well, as the cantonal library, the cantonal picture gallery (or Musee Arlaud, founded 1841) and the cantonal collections of archaeology, natural history, &c. The university was raised to that rank in 1890, but, as an academy, dates from 1537.

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  • The library numbers upwards of 230,000 volumes; and the antiquarian museum contains a valuable collection of Roman relics discovered in the neighbourhood.

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  • The Vatican library was enriched and thrown open for public use, Platina - the historian of the popes--receiving the post of librarian.

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  • He introduced a strictly ordered administration, encouraged the sciences, and enlarged the Vatican library, housing it in a splendid building erected for the purpose in the Vatican itself.

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  • On the conditions at Ilarran some light is thrown by the census partly preserved in Ashurbanipal's library.'

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  • In the library of the Massachusetts Historical Society at Boston, there are sixty-two manuscript volumes of the Pickering papers, an index to which was published in the Collections of the society, 6th series, vol.

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  • The Pennsylvania state college at State College, Center county, was established in 1855 as the farmers' high school of Pennsylvania, in 1862 became the Agricultural College of Pennsylvania, and received its present name in 1874 after the income from the national land grant had been appropriated to the use of the institutions; in1909-1910it had 147 instructors, 1400 students and a library of 37,000 volumes.

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  • There are several good business, municipal and county buildings, and a Carnegie library.

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  • It was equally from Jerusalem that they subsequently adopted their lectionary and arrangement of the Christian year; and a 9th-century copy of this lectionary in the Paris library preserves to us precious details of the liturgical usages of Jerusalem in the 4th century.

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  • In Vincennes are a Roman Catholic cathedral, erected in 1835, one of the oldest in the West, occupying the site of a church built early in the 18th century; Vincennes University (1806), the oldest educational institution in the state, which in 1910 had 14 instructors and 236 students; St Rose Female Academy, and a public library.

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  • In 1823 a fund was raised on his behalf, and he was sent to board with the clerk of the guardians, having his time at his own disposal, and the privilege of making use of a public library.

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  • Among modern public buildings the principal are St Ninian's Episcopal Cathedral, in the Early Middle Pointed style, an important example (completed 1890) of the work of William Butterfield (1814-1900); the municipal buildings (1881); the city-hall; the Marshall Memorial Hall (1823), housing the public library and the museum of the Perth Literary and Antiquarian Society; the Perthshire natural history museum; the Sandeman public library (1898), founded by a bequest of Professor Sandeman of Owens College, Manchester.

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  • It has tribunals of first instance and of com merce, training colleges, a communal college, a museum and a library; the three latter are established in the Palais Fesch, founded by Cardinal Fesch, who was born at Ajaccio in 1763.

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  • There are some remains (including a portion in the square, now used as a public library established in 1799) of the magnificent abbey of St Mary and St Rumon, founded in 961 by Orgar, earl of Devon.

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  • The city has a soldiers' memorial hall, erected by popular subscription, and a Carnegie library.

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  • The princely château, now the property of the crown prince of Prussia, dating from 1558 and beautifully restored in 1891-1894, contains a good library and a collection of pictures.

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  • Noteworthy public buildings are the County Court-house, the Public Library (about 85,000 volumes in 1910), the Soldiers' Memorial Building, the Toledo Club and the Toledo Museum of Art (1901).

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  • There are a market house, and institute with library and museum.

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  • Rollin held Jansenist (2 vols., 1895-96), in the "Library of Early English Writers."

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  • Ten prose treatises by Richard Rolle from the Thornton MS.(c. 1440, Lincoln Cathedral Library) were edited by Canon George Perry for the Early English Text Society in 1866.

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  • The city has a public library and a soldiers' monument.

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  • There was some talk at this time in Paris of calling Grotius to be librarian of the royal library.

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  • De Thou gave him facilities to borrow books from the superb library formed by his father.

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  • The Fletcher free public library (47,000 volumes in 1908) is housed in a Carnegie building.

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  • In the city is a Carnegie library, and 3 m.

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  • The city is the seat of the state Institute for the Blind (1875), and has three public parks and a public library.

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  • The public buildings include the church of Sao Francisco, dating from the early part of the 19th century, the municipal hall, a fine theatre, the Misericordia hospital, a public library containing about 25,000 volumes and a great central market.

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  • His library, he was once heard to declare, he could carry on his back, yet he had not read half the books it contained.

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  • In the middle ages the abbey was famous for its library.

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  • The city has a public library (1865), and is the seat of St John's School and the Academy of Our Lady of Lourdes (both Roman Catholic), of a state hospital for the insane (1878), originally planned (1877) as an inebriate asylum, liquor dealers being taxed for its erection, and of St Mary's Hospital (1889), a famous institution founded and maintained by the Sisters of St Francis.

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  • It has several beautiful parks, two hospitals, a number of fine churches and school buildings, and a public library.

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  • The college comprises an academy, a college of liberal arts, a school of expression, a school of commerce, schools of music and of art, and a school of correspondence; and in 1907-1908 had 33 instructors, 575 students and a library of 24, 4 00 volumes.

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  • At this college is the missionary printing-press of the Roman Church, and its library contains an unrivalled collection of literary treasures bearing on the work.

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  • The city has a public library and a library owned by the Ladies' Library Association, and is the seat of the Northern Michigan Asylum for the Insane (opened 1885).

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  • The most important original authorities are the voluminous State Papers of the period, with other MS. documents preserved at the British Museum, the Cambridge University Library, Hatfield and elsewhere.

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  • It was built as a Jesuit college in 1651, but since 1776 has been the seat of the Accademia di Belle Arti, and contains besides the picture gallery a library of some 300,000 volumes, a collection of coins numbering about 60,000, and an excellent observatory founded in 1766.

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  • The market hall is the chief public building; there are technical schools, a free library, and two public parks.

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  • The college library includes the historical collection of James Gilmary Shea.

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  • Among its prominent buildings are the United States Government Building, the United States marine hospital, the city and county hospital, the county court house, the city hall (which houses the public library) and the masonic temple.

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  • Most of the objects discovered in the necropolis are preserved in the Roman collections, especially in the Kircherian Museum (which possesses the Ficoroni casket) and the Barberini library.

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  • The town possesses two Protestant and a Roman Catholic church, a technical institute, a natural history museum, a library, a theatre, a monument to the emperor William I.

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  • The museums of the city comprise an ethnographical museum, the maritime museum established by the Yacht Club in 1874, and the Boyman's Museum (1867) containing pictures, drawings and engravings, as well as the town library.

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  • Among the remaining buildings must be mentioned the town hall (17th century; restored 1823), the court-house, the concert-hall of the "Harmonic" club, the record office (1900), the leeskabuiet, or subscription library and reading-rooms, and the ten-storeyed Witte Huis (1897), which is used for offices and is one of the highest private buildings on the Continent.

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  • The principal buildings are the royal palace, built in1837-1840as a residence for the dukes of Nassau, and now a residence of the king of Prussia; the Court Theatre (erected 1892-1894); the new Kurhaus, a large and handsome establishment, with colonnades, adjoining a beautiful and shady park; the town-hail, in the German Renaissance style (1884-1888); the government offices and the museum, with a picture gallery, a collection of antiquities, and a library of 150,000 vols.

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  • The city has two large public parks and a Carnegie library, and is the seat of the Curtice Industrial School.

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  • Returning to Beaune for a vacation, he made, on a large scale, a plan of the town, inventing the methods of observation and constructing the necessary instruments; the plan was presented to the town, and preserved in their library.

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  • The Bureau has a library of some 15,000 volumes, and publishes numerous handbooks, pamphlets and maps, in addition to its monthly Bulletins.

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  • Among the principal buildings and institutions are several churches, of which the oldest, the parish church of St Mary, was built in 1821 on an early site; court house, public hall, institute and free library.

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  • His valuable library was bought and presented to the United Presbyterian College.

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  • He did not, however, lose sight of his`true goal; he collected a large library, and, after the conclusion of the Seven Years' War, in 1763, he resumed more enthusiastically than ever the studies which had been partially interrupted.

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  • His friends there exerted themselves to obtain for him the office of keeper of the royal library, but Frederick had not forgotten Lessing's quarrel with Voltaire, and declined to consider his claims. During the two years which Lessing now spent in the Prussian capital, he was restless and unhappy, yet it was during this period that he published two of his greatest works, Laokoon, oder fiber die Grenzen der Malerei and Poesie (1766) and Minna von Barnhelm (1767).

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  • Having completed Emilia Galotti, which the younger generation of playwrights at once accepted as a model, Lessing occupied himself for some years almost exclusively with the treasures of the Wolfenbiittel library.

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  • Among its auxiliary establishments are a good natural history museum, an observatory, a laboratory, and a library which contains a copy of Erasmus' New Testament with marginal annotations by Luther.

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  • In 1908 it had a permanent endowment of about $425,000, a faculty of 46 and 607 students; the library contained 40,000 bound volumes and as many pamphlets.

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  • It has a national college and public library, but no great progress in education has been made.

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  • Doddridge's academy is now represented by New College, Hampstead, in the library of which there is a large collection of his manuscripts.

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  • It has a public library and a botanic garden.

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  • The palace chapel, adorned with works by Thorvaldsen and Bissen, was preserved from the fire, as was the royal library of about 540,000 volumes and 20,000 manuscripts, for which a new building in Christiansgade was designed about 1900.

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  • The university library, incorporated with the former Classen library, collected by the famous merchants of that name, contains about 200,000 volumes, besides about 4 000 manuscripts, which include Rask's valuable Oriental collection and the Arne-Magnean series of Scandinavian documents.

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  • It shares with the royal library the right of receiving a copy of every book published in Denmark.

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  • These have no date; but they are the earliest tracts issued from his press, and are called by him "Precursors of the Greek Library."

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  • His papers became the property of, the university of Oxford, and were deposited in the Bodleian library.

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  • In the following year he received, in spite of the usual accusations of heresy, the librarianship of the Advocates' Library in Edinburgh, small in emoluments (40 a year) but rich in opportunity for literary work.

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  • The church or minster of St Cuthberga is a fine cruciform structure of various styles from Early Norman to Perpendicular, and consists of a central lantern tower, nave and choir with aisles, transepts without aisles, western or bell tower, north and south porches, crypt and vestry or sacristy, with the library over it.

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  • The most important and imposing among the more modern architectural additions to the city are the handsome Gothic exchange, completed in 1867, the municipal theatre, the municipal library, the post office (1878), the law courts (1891-1895), the wool exchange, the German bank, the municipal museum for natural science, ethnology and commerce, and the fine railway station (1888).

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  • The modern buildings of Allahabad include Government House, the High Court, the Mayo memorial and town hall, the Muir central college, the Thornhill and Mayne memorial library and museum, the Naini central jail, and the Anglican and Roman Catholic cathedrals.

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  • Of other buildings the principal are the town hall (1876), the corporation buildings, and the school of science and art and free library.

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  • The new county buildings (1891) possess a handsome council hall, and the castellated municipal buildings (1818-1821) were the former county buildings; the sheriff court house (1885) in St James Street, and the free library and museum (including a picture gallery) at the head of High Street, were erected (1869-1872) by Sir Peter Coats (1808-1890).

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  • Among Erie's more prominent buildings are the United States government building, the city hall, the public library, and the county court house.

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  • See the Heims-Kringla, in the Saga Library, trans.

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  • The state library is housed in the Capitol.

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  • The public buildings include the town hall - a substantial edifice with a tower rising in three tiers from the body of the structure, the Telford library, and the Hope hospital for aged poor.

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  • Wickstead neglected his pupil entirely, but Baxter's eager mind found abundant nourishment in the great library at the castle.

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  • There is a good portrait of Baxter in the Williams library, Gordon Square, London.

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  • The principal buildings in Mauch Chunk are the county court house, a county gaol, a Young Men's Christian Association building, and the Dimmick Memorial Library (1890).

    0
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  • The town hall, the public library, the assembly hall, and the great Anglican church of All Saints are the chief buildings.

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  • The town-hall and library building is a fine structure; the library contains about 20,000 volumes, and the museum and collections of the Winchester Historical and Genealogical Society.

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  • The principal public buildings are the court-house (in a small public park), the public library and a high school.

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  • One only of these - the "Osma" of 1203 - preserves the Apostolic pictures; among the remaining examples, that of "St Sever," now at Paris, and dating from about 1030, is the most valuable; that of "Valcavado," recently in the Ashburnham Library, executed in 970, is the earliest; that of "Turin," dating from about 110o, is perhaps the most curious.

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  • Only one MS. of the history is known; it was stolen by a Turkish soldier from the library at Buda during the reign of Matthias Corvinus of Hungary and taken to Constantinople, where it was bought by a Christian and eventually reached the 'imperial library at Vienna.

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  • His collections of original materials were vast; beginning with his residence in England, he brought together at enormous pains and expense the authenticated copies of archives, family papers, and personal journals written by historic personages, which now constitute an invaluable treasure in the New York public library.

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  • He lived chiefly at Hartlebury Castle, where he built a fine library, to which he transferred Alexander Pope's and Warburton's books, purchased on the latter's death.

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  • In the city are St Ann's Academy, the St James Mercy Hospital, the Steuben Sanitarium, a public library, and a county court-house - terms of the county court being held here as well as in Bath (pop. in 1905, 3 6 95), the county-seat, and in Corning.

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  • Among the more prominent secular buildings are the Giirzenich, a former meeting-place of the diets of the Holy Roman Empire, built between 1441 and 1447, of which the ground floor was in 1875 converted into a stock exchange, and the upper hall, capable of accommodating 3000 persons, is largely utilized for public festivities, particularly during the time of the Carnival; the Rathaus, dating from the 13th century, with beautiful Gobelin tapestries; the Tempelhaus, the ancestral seat of the patrician family of the Overstolzens, a beautiful building dating from the 13th century, and now the chamber of commerce; the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, in which is a collection of paintings by old Italian and Dutch masters, together with some works by modern artists; the Zeughaus, or arsenal, built on Roman foundations; the Supreme Court for the Rhine provinces; the post-office (1893); the Imperial Bank (Reichsbank); and the municipal library and archives.

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  • The newer buildings, all in the modern west quarter of the city, include law courts, a theatre, and a municipal library with 200,000 volumes.

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  • Among Valencia's public edifices and institutions are some good churches, the government palace, a university, a national college for women, a normal school for men and a public library.

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  • Among the principal buildings are the state capitol, the state library, the city hall, the county court-house, the post-office, the Fowler public library, the state hospital, the state prison, the Centennial home for the aged, the Margaret Pillsbury memorial hospital, the Rolfe and Rumford asylum for orphan girls, founded by the countess Rumford, and several fine churches, including the Christian Science church built by Mrs Eddy.

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  • But though about this time he had got ready all or most of the materials for his fundamental work on Body, not even now was he able to make way with its composition, 1 The book, of which the copies are rare (one in Dr Williams's library in London and one in the Bodleian), was printed in quarto size (Paris, 1642), with a pictorial title-page (not afterwards reproduced) of scenes and figures illustrating its three divisions, " Libertas," " Imperium," " Religio."

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  • Among these was the grand-duke of Tuscany (Ferdinand II.), who took away some works and a portrait to adorn the Medicean library.

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  • He was entrusted by Ptolemy with the task of arranging the comedies in the Alexandrian library, and as the result of his labours composed a treatise On Comedy.

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  • In March 1876 the trustees of the British Museum despatched Smith once more to excavate the rest of Assur-banipal's library.

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  • Among its institutions is the John Tyler Library, established as Salem Library in 180 4 and said to be the third oldest public library in the state.

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  • When Sloane retired from active work in 1741 his library and cabinet of curiosities, which he took with him from Bloomsbury to his house in Chelsea, had grown to be of unique value.

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  • The bequest was accepted on those terms by an act passed the same year, and the collection, together with George II.'s royal library, &c., was opened to the public at Bloomsbury as the British Museum in 1759.

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  • The history, to which Diodorus gave the name flL/3XL68JKrt ivropua 7 (Bibliotheca historica, " Historical Library"), consisted of forty books, and was divided into three parts.

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  • There is a valuable library.

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  • In the garrets was his library, a large and miscellaneous collection of books, falling to pieces and begrimed with dust.

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  • He lived during the reigns of the first two Ptolemies, and was at the height of his reputation about 280 B.C. He was the first superintendent of the library at Alexandria and the first critical editor (8copOc,rns) of Homer.

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  • It occupies the site of the church of the abbey of St Vaast, the buildings of which adjoin it and contain the bishop's palace, the ecclesiastical seminary, a museum of antiquities, paintings and sculptures, and a rich library.

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  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).

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  • In it are the business and industrial quarters; the palace of justice; the academy of science, with picture-galleries, a library and a collection of antiquities; the theatre; the Franz Josef University, founded in 1874 to teach theology, law and philosophy; the synagogue; and the only Protestant church existing in the country at the beginning of the 10th century.

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  • Meanwhile he had published several small historical works; but his college and university duties left little time for writing, and in 1875 he accepted the vicarage of Embleton, a parish on the coast of Northumberland, near Dunstanburgh, with an ancient and beautiful church and a fortified parsonage house, and within reach of the fine library in Bamburgh Keep. Here he remained for nearly ten years, acquiring that experience of parochial work which afterwards stood him in good stead, taking private pupils, studying and writing, as well as taking an active part in diocesan business.

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  • The city has a public park and a public library.

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  • In 1906 it had a library of 16,50o volumes, a faculty of 19, and an enrolment of 483 (211 being women).

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  • His nephew, Federigo Borromeo (1564-1631), was archbishop of Milan from 1595, and in 1609 founded the Ambrosian library in that city.

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  • A very full list of his Latin and English works is given (pp. 36-43) in Dr Carl Horstmann's edition (1895-96) of his works in the Library of Early English Writers.

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  • Rosehaugh, near Avoch, belonged to Sir George Mackenzie, founder of the Advocates' library in Edinburgh, who earned the sobriquet of "Bloody" from his persecution of the Covenanters.

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  • He steadily investigated the muniments of all the colleges, and in 1667 made his first journey to London, where he visited Dugdale, who introduced him into the Cottonian library, and Prynne showed him the same civility for the Tower records.

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  • The city is the seat of a state normal school, and has a free public library, formerly the New Britain Institute, and a public park of about loo acres.

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  • The public library building (1888) was given to the city by the heirs of Captain John Bertram.

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  • The Essex Institute (1848) is housed in a brick building (1851) with freestone trimmings and in old Plummer Hall (1857); its museum contains some old furniture and a collection of portraits; it has an excellent library and publishes quarterly (1859 sqq.) Historical' Collections.

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  • The Brukenthal palace, built in1777-1787by Baron Samuel von Brukenthal (1721-1803), governor of Transylvania, contains an interesting picture-gallery with 'good examples of the Dutch school, and a library.

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  • It also has a lycee for boys, training-colleges, theological seminaries, a library and a museum rich in paintings.

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  • A pavilion in the park contains the library of 117,000 volumes, the chief feature in which is the collection of over 3000 Bibles and over 5000 volumes of hymnology.

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  • Formerly the palace of the Brignole-Sale family, it was presented by the duchess of Galliera to the city in 1874, along with its valuable contents, its library and picture gallery, which includes fine examples of Van Dyck and Paris Bordone.

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  • Attached to it are a library, an observatory, a botanical garden, and a physical and natural history museum.

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  • Mention must also be made of the Academy of Fine Arts, the municipal library, the great Teatro Carlo Felice and the Verdi Institute of Music.

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  • A library of twelve hundred volumes was presented to Bright as a memorial of the struggle.

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  • Among the public buildings are the state capitol, the post office building, the county court house, the city hall, the second regiment armoury, public library (containing about 42,000 volumes in 1909), and the building (1910) given by Henry C. Kelsey to the city for the school of industrial arts (founded in 1898).

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  • Here also are the state normal and model schools (1855), the state library, housed in the capitol, the state school for deaf mutes, the state home for girls, one of the two state hospitals for the insane (opened in 1848), the state arsenal - the building being the old state prison - the state prison (1836), St Francis hospital (1874), Mercer hospital (1892), the William McKinley memorial hospital (1887), the city hospital, two children's day nurseries, the Friends' home, the Union industrial home (for destitute children), the Florence Crittenton home (1895), the indigent widows' and single women's home (1854), the Har Sinai charity society, the home for friendless children, and the society of St Vincent de Paul.

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  • Here also are to be found the churches, schools, theatres, asylums, and hospitals, academies of law and medicine, governor's palace, public library, and museum, and an interesting public garden on the edge of the bluff, overlooking the bay.

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  • The town-hall, public library and mechanic's institute are noteworthy buildings.

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  • The Public Library with walls of white limestone and Texas granite, contained (1908) 95,000 volumes.

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  • In the vicinity are the Governor's Mansion, the Supreme Court Building, the State Library, the building of the State Department of Agriculture, housing the State Museum (of geology, mineralogy, agriculture and horticulture, botany, zoology, ethnology, &c.), and the Post Office.

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  • In 1908 the State Library (founded 1841) contained 39,000 volumes, the Supreme Court Library (founded 1870) about 17,000 volumes and the Olivia Raney public library (founded 1901) 9250 volumes.

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  • Tashkent has a public library containing a valuable collection of works on Central Asia, an astronomical observatory and a museum.

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  • These, of course, are barefaced forgeries, although of very ancient date; so are those which profess to be from the hand of *Ali, one of which is preserved in the same library.

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  • In 1891 he wrote anonymously two Irish stories, John Sherman and Dhoya, for Mr Fisher Unwin's "Pseudonym Library."

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  • A library edition of his collected works in prose and verse was issued by Mr Bullen from the Shakespeare Head Works, Stratford-on-Avon, in 8 vols., 1908.

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  • The Arab museum and khedivial library are housed in a building erected for the purpose, at a cost of £66,000, and opened in 1903.

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  • The khedivial library contains some 64,000 volumes, over two-thirds being books and MSS.

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  • The Mission archeologique fran4aise au Caire, established as a school by the French government in 1881, was re-organized in 1901 on a lavish scale under the title Institut francais darchologie orientale du Caire, and domiciled with printing-press and library in a fine building near the museum.

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  • A more reputable expedient with the same end in view was the construction of a great library in Cairo, with ample provision for students; this was mpdelled on a similar institution at Bagdad.

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  • Hamdgn got possession of Cairo, and at the end of 1068 plundered the caliphs palace; the valuable library which had been begun by IJakim was pillaged, and an accidental fire caused great destruction.

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  • Athenodorus Cordylion, also of Tarsus, was keeper of the library at Pergamum, and was an old man in 47 B.C. In his enthusiasm for Stoicism he used to cut out from Stoic writings passages which seemed to him unsatisfactory.

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  • Numerous gifts from the Russian court, such as gospels lettered in gold and silver relief, or jewelled crucifixes, are preserved on the spot; but the valuable library was removed, in the 15th century, to Mount Athos.

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  • South Orange has a public library and a town hall, and is the seat of Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), named in honour of Mother Elizabeth Seton, founded at Madison, N.J., in 1856, and removed to South Orange in 1860.

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  • Amongst numerous other institutions for the furtherance of science and training of various kinds may be mentioned the large polytechnic schools; the high school for agriculture and veterinary art; the royal library; the royal society of sciences; the museum of northern antiquities; the society of northern antiquaries, &c. The art museums of Denmark are not considerable, except the museum of Thorvaldsen, at Copenhagen, but much is done to provide first-rate training in the fine arts and their application to industry through the Royal Academy of Arts, and its schools.

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  • His later works include "Pioneer Monument," Salt Lake City; "Sir Isaac Newton," Congressional Library, Washington; and "Don Quixote."

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  • In the village of Grafton there is a public library.

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  • He employed hundreds of copyists and scholars, giving as much as ten thousand gulden for a metrical translation of Homer, and founded a library of nine thousand volumes.

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  • Entering the university of Erlangen in 1843, he soon began to devote his attention to the history of the German language and literature, and in 1848 went to Munich, where he remained five years, and diligently availed himself of the use of the government library for the purpose of prosecuting his historical studies.

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  • It has a palace standing in extensive grounds, a gymnasium, a normal seminary, a library, a synagogue, and three churches, one of which has the appropriate inscription, Religionis non structurae exemplum.

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  • It has also the Taylor Library (founded in 1894), and along the Sound are many summer residences.

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  • There is a fine Carnegie library with a music-hall.

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  • The city has a Carnegie library (1896), two beautiful cemeteries, a park, and a Home for Aged Women.

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  • Besides these there is a fever hospital, erected by Lord John George Beresford; a college, which Primate Robinson was anxious to raise to the rank of a university; a public library founded by him, an observatory, which has become famous from the efficiency of its astronomers; a number of churches and schools, and barracks.

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  • It has the Morrill Memorial Library (12,000 volumes in 1909).

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  • At the head of the lawn is the Rotunda, modelled after the Roman Pantheon and now containing the university library; and at the foot of the lawn are three modern recitation and laboratory buildings.

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  • There is a free public library.

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  • In the public square is a soldiers' monument, and the city has a public library and a park.

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  • Among the public buildings are the county court house and the public library.

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  • The principal public buildings are the city hall, the public library, the post-office and the city hospital.

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  • The city has a small public library.

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  • Dunkirk is attractively situated high above the lake, and has several parks, including Point Gratiot and Washington; in the city are the Dunkirk free library, the Brooks Memorial hospital (1891), and St Mary's academy.

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  • Irving had a library, in which Carlyle devoured Gibbon and much French literature, and they made various excursions together.

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  • There Carlyle found materials in the Advocates' Library for the article on the Diamond Necklace, one of his most perfect writings, which led him to study the history of the French Revolution.

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  • The public buildings include a town-hall and a library.

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  • Many important manuscripts in muniment rooms are still uncalendared; those of the French Foreign Office are imperfect in places, and have been little consulted; and a complete calendar of the treasures of the Advocate's Library was only recently begun.

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  • Towards the end of the 16th century Miguel Leite Ferreira, son of the Portuguese poet, Antonio Ferreira, declared that the original manuscript of Amadis de Gaula was then in the Aveiro archives, and an Amadis de Gaula in Portuguese, which is alleged to have existed in the conde de Vimeiro's library as late as 1586, had vanished before 1726.

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  • See Strutt, Sports and Pastimes, who also gives an illustration, "taken from a manuscriptal painting of the 9th century in the Cotton Library," representing "a Saxon chieftain, attended by his huntsman and a couple of hounds, pursuing the wild swine in a forest."

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  • The Franco-German War engaged Flach's activities in other directions, and he spent two years (described in his Strasbourg apres le bonabardement, 1873) at work on the rebuilding of the library and the museum, which had been destroyed by Prussian shells.

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  • Owing to the confined area, the buildings are closely packed together; but each monastery contains beside the monks' cells and water-cisterns, at least one church and a refectory, and some also a library.

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  • A number of the manuscripts from these monasteries have now been brought to the National Library at Athens.

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  • There are a public library, established by subscription in 1858; and a students' union, for helping the sick and poor and promoting the intellectual and physical improvement of boys.

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  • He established an excellent library, and through his strict discipline and consummate scholarship soon raised the monastery to an educational institution of a high order.

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  • The principal buildings are the church of St Hilda, with a picturesque old tower; the town hall in the market-place, exchange, customhouse, mercantile marine offices, public library and museum, grammar school, marine school, master-mariners' asylum and seamen's institute.

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  • The chief buildings include the public library, the Masonic hall and the district hospital.

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  • Among its notable public buildings and institutions are the old government palace in Santo Antonio built upon the foundations of the official residence of Prince Maurice of Nassau, with a pretty garden attached; a theatre facing upon the Praga da Republica, dating from the second empire; the palace of the Provincial Assembly in Boa Vista, built in 1860-66, surmounted by a high dome; the municipal palace, or prefecture, on Rua do Imperador, with the public library (Biblioteca Publica) occupying its third floor and containing about 30,000 volumes; the Gymnasium, a large plain building of two floors standing near the legislative palace; the Pedro II.

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  • Morris was at the school three years, but got very little good from it beyond a taste for architecture, fostered by the school library, and an attraction towards the Anglo-Catholic movement.

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  • It is well provided with scientific laboratories, botanic garden, and various collections, and possesses a library with nearly a quarter of a million volumes.

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  • Next to it comes the national museum, founded in 1807 through the donations of Count Stephan Szechenyi, which contains extensive collections of antiquities, natural history and ethnology, and a rich library which, in its manuscript department of over 20,000 MSS., contains the oldest specimens of the Hungarian language.

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  • Amiens has a rich library and admirable collections of paintings, sculptures and antiquities in the museum of Picardy.

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  • In 1908 the University had a library of 103,000 volumes.

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  • The original MS. is in the Hamburg town library; a copy was made for the university library of Göttingen, 1814, and other copies are known to exist.

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  • At one time Erfurt had a university, of which the charter dated from 1392; but it was suppressed in 1816, and its funds devoted to other purposes, among these being the endowment of an institution founded in 1758 and now called the royal academy of sciences, and the support of the royal library, which now contains 60,000 volumes and over loco manuscripts.

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  • On returning to Ruffach, he taught gratis in the Minorite convent school that he might borrow books from the library, and in his sixteenth year resolved to become a friar.

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  • C. P.; in 1822 regius professor of medicine in succession to Sir Christopher Pegge; and in 1834 he was appointed keeper of the Radcliffe Library.

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  • Some of the commentaries and homilies are translated in the Oxford Library of the Fathers.

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  • Besides numerous churches and chapels the public buildings comprise a large town hall (1856), market house, exchange, county court, municipal offices, chamber of commerce, free library, and, outside the town, an infirmary.

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  • The city has a public library; the principal public buildings are the County Court House and the Federal building.

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  • To this institution he left his valuable library.

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  • Besides his printed works he made vast collections of historical material which remains in MS. and fills the greater part of the Godefroy collection of over five hundred portfolios in the Library of the Institute in Paris.

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  • Another period of want followed, and it was only by persistent solicitation that Heyne was able to obtain the post of under-clerk in the count's library, with a salary of somewhat less than twenty pounds sterling.

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  • The bombardment of Dresden (to which city he had meanwhile returned) on the 18th of July 1760, destroyed all his possessions, including an almost finished edition of Lucian, based on a valuable codex of the Dresden Library.

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  • It is a residential suburb of Newark and New York, is the seat of a German theological school (Presbyterian, 1869) and has the Jarvie Memorial library (1902).

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  • The other chief buildings are the museum and free library, with technical institute and the market hall.

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  • Among the public institutions are the State School for Feeble-minded Children, a cottage hospital and the Laconia Public Library, lodged in the Gale Memorial Library building (1903).

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  • He was the possessor of a very fine library, which he bequeathed to the republic of Genoa.

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  • The city has a Carnegie library, a railway Young Men's Christian Association, and a hospital for the employes of the Wabash railroad.

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  • There is, as yet, no uniform English edition, but Goethe's chief works have all been frequently translated and a number of them will be found in Bohn's standard library.

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  • The old hospital on the island-quarter contains a museum with interesting collections of paintings, Gallo-Roman antiquities, sculpture, &c. Close by stands the library, which possesses many valuable MSS.

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  • It is the seat of a State Normal Training School, and has a public library and Dunham Hall Library (1878).

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  • In 1873 he was appointed keeper of the Royal Library, Berlin, which, like the Berlin Museum, owes much to his care.

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  • In 1764 he officiated as a priest in Dundee, but in May 1765 accepted an invitation to live with the earl of Traquair, where, with abundance of leisure and the free use of an adequate library, he made further progress in his favourite biblical studies.

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  • Among other public buildings are the exchange (El Muelle), the custom-house (formerly the church of San Francisco; begun about 1575, rebuilt in 1731-1737), and the Maestranza (c. 1723), once the navy yard and the headquarters of the artillery and now the home of the national library.

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