Liberals sentence example

liberals
  • The liberals put themselves on guard against the plotting of the other side.
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  • He returned with the Liberals to power in March 1901.
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  • These various movements proved in the first place that the masses were by no means ripe for revolution, and that the idea of unity, although now advocated by a few revolutionary leaders, was far from being generally accepted even by the Liberals; and, secondly, that, in spite of the indifference of the masses, the despotic governments were unable to hold their own without the assistance of foreign bayonets.
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  • Though eventually this activity of the Giovane Italia supplanted that of the older societies, in practice it met with no better success; the two attempts to invade Savoy in the hope of seducing the army from its allegiance failed miserably, and only resulted in a series of barbarous sentences of death and imprisonment which made most Liberals despair of Charles Albert, while they called down much criticism on Mazzini as the organizer of raids in which he himself took no part.
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  • Their hopes centred in the young Carignano, whose agreeable manners had endeared him to all, and who had many friends among the Liberals and Carbonari.
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  • The fact that he embellished with his own great literary ability the speeches of the Liberals and Reformers only added to the influence of his news-letters.
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  • Kossuth, indeed, was not content with advocating those reforms - the abolition of entail, the abolition of feudal burdens, taxation of the nobles - which were demanded by all the Liberals.
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  • Modern reform in Judaism is parting to some extent from this conception, but it still holds good even among the liberals.
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  • When the Liberals returned to power in 1880 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Sherbrooke, but from 1875 till his death at Warlingham, Surrey, on the 27th of July 1892, his health was constantly failing, and by degrees he figured less and less in public life.
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  • Charles Alberts somewhat equivocal conduct also roused the hatred of the Liberals, and for a long time the esecrato Carignano was regarded, most unjustly, as a traitor even by many who were not republicans.
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  • These two foreign occupations, which were almost as displeasing to the pope as to the Liberals, lasted until 1838.
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  • Romagna had continued a prey to anarchy ever since 1831; the government organized armed bands called the Centurioni (descended from the earlier Sanfedisti), to terrorize the Liberals, while the secret societies continued their propaganda by deeds.
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  • He now prorogued parliament, adopted stringent measures against the Liberals, and retired to Gaeta, the haven of refuge for deposed despots.
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  • Liberals were by no means inclined to despair of accomplishing this task...
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  • His government, however, was not characterized by cruelty like those of his brother despots, and Guerrazzi and the other Liberals of 1849, although tried and sentenced to long terms of imprisonment, were merely exiled.
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  • At Naples a trifling disturbance in September 1849, led to the lion oi arrest of a large number of persons connected with the Liberals Unitd Italiana, a society somewhat similar to the in Naples.
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  • In the Austrian provinces and in the duchies it carried all before it, and gained many adherents in the Legations, Rome and Naples, although in the latter regions the autonomist feeling was still strong even among the Liberals.
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  • With great reluctance the tsar consented to convoke a consultative chamber of deputies as a sop to public opinion, but that concession stimulated rather than calmed public opinion, and shortly after the conclusion of peace the Liberals and the Revolutionaries, combining their forces, brought about a general strike in St Petersburg together with the stoppage of railway communication all over the empire.
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  • It united the moderate Liberals throughout Germany, and at once became a great political power, notwithstanding all the efforts of the governments, and especially of the king of Hanover to suppress it.
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  • The National Verein, its work being done, was now dissolved; but Bennigsen was chiefly instrumental in founding a new political party - the National Liberals, - who, while they supported Bismarck's national policy, hoped to secure the constitutional development of the country.
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  • In order to meet the universal discontent and the financial difficulties constitutional government was introduced; a parliament was established in which all races of the empire were represented, and in place of centralized despotism was established Liberal centralization under Schmerling and the German Liberals.
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  • Within Judaism itself two parties were formed, the Liberals and the Conservatives, and as time went on these tendencies definitely organized themselves.
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  • Lvov, he founded the Octobrist party, in the hope that the Tsar's Government would recognize the necessity of great reforms and work with the moderate Liberals of the Zemstvos while safeguarding the monarchical principle.
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  • But, as he suggests himself, his studied advocacy of unfamiliar projects of reform had made him unpopular with "moderate Liberals."
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  • The Liberals only retained the confidence of the king by postponing the realization of almost all their democratic and reforming programme, and limiting their efforts to financial reorganization and treaties of commerce.
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  • Exposed thus to attack, his weakness, if not his venality, was long an article of faith among the liberals.
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  • The demands of the Liberals were as in 1868; those for personal and property rights were much more definitely stated, and among explicit reforms demanded were the separation of civil and military power, general recognition of administrative responsibility under a colonial autonomous constitutional regime; also among economic matters, customs reforms and reciprocity with the United States were demanded.
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  • The preliminaries of the elections of December 1905 and March 1906 being marked by frauds and injustice, the Liberals deserted the polls at those elections, and instead of appealing to judicial tribunals controlled by the Moderates, issued a manifesto of revolution on the 28th of July 1906.1 This insurrection rapidly assumed large proportions.
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  • It was early in 1862, when the struggle of Bismarck with the Prussian liberals was already begun.
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  • Bismarck coquetted with him as the representative of a force that might help him to combat the Prussian liberals; in 1878, in a speech before the Reichstag, he spoke of him with deep respect, as a man of the greatest amiability and ability from whom much could be learned.
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  • Imagining himself sure of a brilliant destiny in Europe if he lost his Brazilian crown, the emperor attempted to risk a decisive attack against the Liberals, and to form a new ministry composed of men favourable to absolutism.
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  • In the Upper House, however, the magnates united with the government to form a conservative party obstinately opposed to any project of reform, which frustrated all the efforts of the Liberals.
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  • The results of the diet of 1839 did not satisfy the advanced Liberals, while the opposition of the government and of the.
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  • Fresh triumphs were won by the Liberals.
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  • Szechenyi openly joined the government, while the moderate Liberals separated from the extremists and formed a new party, the Centralists.
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  • The plan, concerted by Kossuth and Apponyi, with the approval of Baron Aehrenthal, was to carry on a modified coalition government with the aid of the Andrassy Liberals, the National party, the Clerical People's party 2 and the Independence party, on a basis of suffrage reform with plural franchise, the 2 The People's party first emerged during the elections of 1896, when it contested 98 seats.
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  • Its object was to resist the anti-clerical tendencies of the Liberals, and for this purpose it appealed to the " nationalities " against the dominant Magyar parties, the due enforcement of the Law of Equal Rights of Nationalities (1868) forming a main item of its programme.
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  • He was defeated by a combination of the Kossuthists, Andrássy Liberals and Clerical People's party, the 30 Croatian deputies, whose vote might have turned the election, abstaining on Dr Wekerle promising them to deliver Croatia from the oppressive rule of the ban, Baron Rauch.
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  • During 1919 internal politics centred in a struggle between the Radicals, who still possessed the best party machine and stood for a narrowly Serbian as opposed to a Yugoslav programme, and the newly constituted Democratic party, which absorbed most of the Serbian Opposition parties, the old Serbo-Croat coalition of Zagreb, and the Slovene Liberals.
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  • Notwithstanding promises to the powers, he restored absolute government upon returning to Rome (12th April 1850) and violated the conditions of the surrender by wholesale imprisonment of Liberals.
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  • Though a prominent member of the inner Liberal circle and a stanch party man, it was not supposed by the public at this time that any ambition for the highest place could be associated with Sir Henry CampbellBannerman; but the divisions among the Liberals, and the rivalry between Lord Rosebery and Sir William Harcourt, made the political situation an anomalous one.
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  • But if Lord Rosebery once more separated himself from the official Liberals, his principal henchmen in the Liberal League were included in the cabinet, Mr Asquith becoming chancellor of the exchequer, Sir Edward Grey foreign secretary, and Mr Haldane war minister.
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  • The Liberals numbered 379, the Labour members 51, the Nationalists 83, and the Unionists only 157.
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  • It was not his ideas or his commanding personality, nor any positive programme, that brought the Liberals back to power, but the country's weariness of their predecessors and the successful employment at the elections of a number of miscellaneous issues.
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  • The elections had given the Liberals a considerable majority.
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  • After undergoing extensive alterations in committee at the hands of the Liberals and Radicals, the bill became law in August.
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  • The answer was given at Easter 1880, when the Liberals were returned by an overwhelming majority over Tories and Home Rulers combined.
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  • When Lord Beaconsfield resigned, the queen sent for Lord Hartington, the titular leader of the Liberals, but he and Lord Granville assured her that no other chief than Gladstone would satisfy the party.
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  • The general election resulted o in a majority of forty for Home Rule, heterogeneously composed of Liberals, Labour members and Irish.
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  • In 1891 the National Liberals had but a majority of one in the diet; from 1893 they could maintain themselves only with the aid of the Conservatives; and in 1897 a coalition of Ultramontanes, Socialists, Social-democrats and Radicals (Freisinnige), won a majority for the opposition in the chamber.
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  • He was urged by the Liberals to put himself into open opposition to the government; this he refused to do, but he remonstrated privately with the king.
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  • While the Liberals hoped the emperor would use his power for some signal declaration of policy, the adherents of Bismarck did not scruple to make bitter attacks on the empress.
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  • This new and obedient legislature, to which only nineteen liberals were returned, made itself into a septennial parliament, thus providing time, it was thought, to restore some part of the ancien regime.
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  • But there was great discontent, and the defeat of Charles Albert at Novara caused consternation among the Liberals.
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  • The German Liberals and the governmental Socialists had withdrawn their support from Bethmann Hollweg's Government at the time of the so-called " Peace Resolution " (July 19 1917), largely on the ground that it was inconceivable that the Allies and America should ever negotiate with politicians like Zimmermann and Bethmann, who had been guilty of the note to Mexico and other treacherous proceedings.
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  • Under Austin's influence the delegates rejected an independence resolution and recommended a union with the Mexican Liberals for the restoration of the constitution of 1824.
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  • In the Matamoras expedition the Texan forces were severely crippled on account of a quarrel between Governor Smith, who desired independence, and the majority of his council, who favoured union with the Mexican Liberals.
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  • The weakness of the Mexican Liberals and the necessity of securing aid in the States led the Austin party to abandon their opposition to independence.
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  • But he held office for little more than a month, since like all the other Italian Liberals he disapproved of the pope's change of front in refusing to allow his troops to fight against Austria, and resigned with the rest of the ministry on the 29th of April.
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  • He displayed such radical and reforming inclinations that he laid the foundations of his popularity among the lower and middle classes, which lasted more than a quarter of a century, during which time the Progressists, Democrats and advanced Liberals ever looked to him as a leader and adviser.
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  • When the liberals were in possession of power they would gladly have kept Riego in a subordinate place.
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  • The young prince found himself the most unpopular man in Italy, for while the Liberals looked on him as a traitor, to the king and the Conservatives he was a dangerous revolutionist.
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  • He had a seat in the Constituent Assembly of 1867, and while he joined the National Liberals he distinguished himself by his opposition to the introduction of universal suffrage, the effects of which he, as did many other Liberals, much distrusted.
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  • Bismarck broke with the National Liberals, who were the champions of free trade; at the same time the agricultural depression set in, and the agricultural interest demanded protection against American and other foreign competition.
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  • This "Puttkammer regime" was intensely unpopular; it was attacked in the Reichstag not only by Radicals like Richter and Rickert, but by National Liberals like Bennigsen, and when the emperor Frederick III., whose Liberal tendencies were notorious, succeeded to the throne, it was clear that it could not last.
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  • On the 15th of September 1821 Costa Rica, with the other Central American provinces, revolted and joined the Mexican empire under the dynasty of Iturbide; but this subjection never became popular, and, on the establishment of a Mexican republic in 1823, hostilities broke out between the Conservatives, who desired to maintain the union, and the Liberals, who wished to set up an independent republic. The opposing factions met near the Ochomogo Pass; the republicans were victorious, and the seat of government was transferred from Cartago, the old capital, to San Jose, the Liberal headquarters.
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  • After the murder of the duc de Berry and the enforced retirement of Decazes, he again became president of the council (21st February 1821); but his position was untenable owing to the attacks of the "Ultras" on the one side and the Liberals on the other, and on the 12th of December he again resigned.
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  • Alvarez gave place (Dec. 8, 1855) to his war minister Comonfort, who represented the less anti-Clerical Liberals.
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  • Meanwhile the reactionaries of Vienna were goading the Magyar Liberals into revolt, and Arany found a safety-valve for his growing indignation by composing a satirical poem in hexameters, entitled "The Lost Constitution."
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  • In 1886 he became first lord of the admiralty in the third Gladstone ministry; and on the return of the Liberals to power in 1892 he was appointed colonial secretary, which post he continued to hold until the resignation of the government in 1895.
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  • A coalition cabinet was formed, including the foremost Liberals and Conservatives drawn from the different provinces.
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  • Seventy-two senators - half Conservatives and half Liberals - were appointed, and lieutenantgovernors were named for the four provinces.
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  • But while a section of Quebec was eager to secure the rebel's pardon, Ontario was equally bent on the execution of justice, so that in the final vote on the question in parliament the defection of French Conservatives was compensated for by the support of Ontario Liberals.
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  • On their accession to power in 1896 it was adopted by the Liberals, who joined to it a preference for the products of the mother country.
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  • The Liberals of Quebec under the leadership of Sir Antoine Dorion were hostile to confederation, or at least to the terms of union agreed upon at the Quebec conference, and Laurier in editorials and speeches maintained the position of Dorion and his allies.
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  • After the defeat of the Mackenzie government, Laurier sat in Parliament as the leader of the Quebec Liberals and first lieutenant to the Hon.
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  • At the general election which followed, the governor-general was sustained by a narrow majority, but in 1848 the Liberals were again returned to power, and he and Mr Lafontaine formed their second administration under Lord Elgin and carried numerous important reforms, including the freeing from sectarian control of the Provincial University and the introduction into Upper Canada of an important municipal system.
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  • His first acts, indeed, allayed the worst alarms of the Liberals; but it was soon apparent that the weight of the crown would be consistently thrown into the scale of the reactionary forces.
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  • The emigres were awarded a milliard as compensation for their confiscated lands; and Gallicans and Liberals alike were offended by measures which threw increased power into the hands of the Jesuits and Ultramontanes.
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  • In the numerous other questions submitted to him be began by consulting carefully the conflicting authorities, and while leaning as, a rule rather to the side of those who were known as "Liberals," he never went so far as they desired, and always sought some middle course by which conflicting interests might be reconciled..
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  • Being in a miserable minority in parliament (1S7 Unionists against 379 Liberals, 51 Labour members, and 83 Nationalists), some form of consolidation among the Unionists was immediately necessary, and negotiations took place between Mr Balfour and Mr Chamberlain which resulted in the patching up of an agreement (expressed in a correspondence dated February 14th), and its confirmation at a meeting of the party at Lansdowne House a few days later.
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  • They won back over a hundred seats, returning 273 strong, but were still in a minority, the Liberals numbering 275, Labour members 40, and Irish Nationalists 82.
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  • By heading off reactionary Austria Napoleon hoped to conciliate the French Liberals; by helping the pope, to satisfy the Catholics; by concessions to be wrung both from Pius and from the Roman triumvirs, to achieve a bloodless victory.
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  • The Catholics and Liberals were alternately in control until 1894, when the tenfold enlargement of the electorate broke down the Liberal party completely.
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  • Allied with the Liberals against the orthodox Protestants, who were threatening religious liberty, the Catholics assisted in 1857 to establish a system of non-sectarian state schools, where attendance is not obligatory nor instruction gratuitous.
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  • Changing front, in 1868, in league with the orthodox, they tried to make these denominational; but as the Liberals defeated their attempt, they founded schools of their own.
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  • Defeated at the general election at Pontefract, he was returned as a Home Ruler (one of the few Liberals who adopted this policy before Mr Gladstone's conversion) in 1886 for South Edinburgh, and was home secretary in the ministry of 1886.
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  • In 1792 the revolutionary armies overran the Palatinate; in 1795 the French, under Moreau, invaded Bavaria itself, advanced to Munich - where they were received with joy by the long-suppressed Liberals - and laid siege to Ingolstadt.
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  • The liberals were in power from 1871 to 1888 continuously, but a Catholic-anti-revolutionary ministry under Baron Mackay held office from 1888 to 1891, and again a coalition ministry was formed in 1901 with Dr Kuyper at its h e ad.
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  • From 1894 to 1897 a ministry of moderate 94 97 Y liberals supported by a large part of the Catholic and anti-revolutionary parties were in power.
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  • The constitution of 1848 made it the duty of the state to provide free primary secular education, but it allowed to members of all creeds the liberty of establishing private schools, and this was carried into effect by a law passed in 1857 by the joint efforts of the liberals and Catholics against the opposition of the orthodox Calvinists.
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  • The elections of 1905 for the Second Chamber gave the liberals a narrow majority of four.
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  • It was supported by the radical left, by a large portion of the Orthodox-Calvinists under Dr Kuyper, and by some Catholics; it had against it the moderate liberals, the aristocratic section of the Orthodox-Calvinists, the bulk of the Catholics, and a few radicals under an influential leader van Houten.
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  • Of the 46 Takkians, 35 were liberals; of the 54 anti-Takkians, 24 were Catholics.
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  • In an electoral district with 32,000 votes which returns eight deputies, four parties send up candidates, let us say, eight Catholics, eight Liberals, eight Socialists and one Catholic-Democrat.
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  • The large powers granted to the king under the new constitution displeased the Liberals, who saw in its provision only a disguised form of personal government.
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  • But in 1828 the two extreme parties, the Catholic Ultramontanes and the revolutionary Liberals, in their common hatred to the Dutch regime, formed an alliance, the union, for the overthrow of the government.
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  • In 1842 it carried a new law of primary instruction, which aroused the dislike of the anti-clerical Liberals.
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  • In March 1846 the king formed a purely Catholic ministry, but it was fiercely attacked by the Liberals, who had for several years been steadily organizing.
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  • By these articles the grand-duchy reforms. The election of 1847 gave a majority to the Liberals and a purely Liberal ministry was formed, and from this date onwards it has been the constitutional practice in Belgium to choose a homogeneous ministry from the party which possesses a working majority in the chamber.
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  • A law was passed, despite violent protests from the Liberals, which enacted that the communes might maintain the private Catholic schools established since 1879 and suppress unsectarian schools at their pleasure.
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  • The election of 1894 had given the Liberals a much smaller number of seats than they ought to have had according to the number of votes they polled, and a cry arose for the establishment of proportional representation.
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  • The Catholics had a majority in both, but not enough to enable them to dispense with the assistance of the Liberals, the constitution requiring for every revision a two-thirds majority.
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  • If in this matter Louis Philippe had seemed to sacrifice the international position of France to dynastic interests, his attempt to re-establish it by allying himself with the reactionary monarchies against the Liberals of Switzerland finally alienated from him the French Liberal opinion on which his authority was based.
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  • The zeal and inexperience of German Liberals played into his hands.
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  • He not only left the constitution intact, but he dismissed Manteuffels feudal ministry and replaced it with moderate Liberals.
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  • The popularity she thus gained among German Liberals and Nationalists was helped by the course of events at Berlin.
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  • A party called the National Liberals was formed, whose main object was to secure the union of South with North Germany, and it at once entered into peculiar relations with Bismarck, who, in spite of his native contempt for parliaments and parliamentary government, was quite prepared to make use of any instruments he found ready to his hand.
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  • It naturally falls into two periods; the first, which ends in 1878, is that in which Bismarck depended on- the support of the National Liberals.
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  • In Baden, Wurttemberg and Hanover the railways were almost entirely the property of the state, but in all other parts public and private lines existed side by side, an arrangement which seemed to combine the disadvantages of both systems. In 1871 threequarters of the railway lines belonged to private companies, and the existence of these powerful private corporations, while they were defended by many of the Liberals, was, according to the national type of thought, something of an anomaly.
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  • Bismarck in this case gave the Liberals a free hand, and the laws eventually were carried and proclaimed on the 15th of May 1873; hence they got the name of the May laws, by whicti they are always known.
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  • The attempt of the Liberals to subjugate the Church had given to the Papacy greater power than it had had since the time of Wallenstein.
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  • The alliance with the Liberals had always been halfhearted, and he wished to regain his full freedom of action; he regarded as an uncontrollable bondage all support that was not given unconditionally.
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  • In doing this he placed himself in opposition to both the financial and the economic doctrines of the Liberals.
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  • Meanwhile the relations with the National Liberals reached a crisis.
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  • The popular expectations were expressed in the saying attributed to him, that he would crush the Liberals against the wall The opportunity was given by the Social Democrats.
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  • They were looked upon even by many Liberals as an enemy to be crushed; much more was this the case with the government.
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  • The opposition of the Liberals prevented this from being carried.
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  • The National Liberals refused to against voteforit, and itwaseasilydefeated.
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  • Bismarck had to come to an agreement with one party or the other; he chose the Centre, probably for the reason that the National Liberals were themselves divided on the policy to be pursued, and therefore their support would be uncertain; and he accepted an amendment, the celebrated Franckenstein Clause, proposed by Georg Arbogast Freiherr von Franckenstein (1825-1890), one of the leaders of the Centre, by which all proceeds of custQms and the tax on tobacco above 130 million marks should be paid over to the individual states in proportion to their population.
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  • The remainder of the National Liberals only won forty-five seats in 1881, and during the next three years they were without influence on the government; and even Bennigsen, unable to follow Bismarck in his new policy, disgusted at the proposals for biennial budgets and the misuse of government influence at the elections, retired from political life.
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  • Now that Bismarck could no longer depend on the support of the Liberals, it would be impossible to carry on the government if the Catholics maintained their End of,the Kulturpolicy of opposition to all government measures.
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  • But the cause of the conflict had been rather in the opinions of the Liberals than in the personal desire of Bismarck himself.
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  • It was opposed by the Liberals on the ground that it conceded too much, by the Clericals that it granted too little, but, though carried only in a mutilated form, it enabled the priests who had been ejected to appoint substitutes, and religious worship was restored in nearly a thousand parishes.
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  • With these exceptions absolute religious peace resulted; the Centre to a great extent succeeded to the position which the National Liberals formerly held; in Bavaria, in Baden, in Prussia they obtained a dominant position, and they became a government party.
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  • So long as the government was under the influence of the National Liberals, it was indifferent, if not hostile to these movements.
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  • It was bitterly opposed by the Liberals, especially by Bamberger; all essential features were altered by the Reichstag, and it was withdrawn by the government after it had passed the third reading.
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  • Under his influence the Conservatives and National Liberals formed a coalition or Cartel by which each agreed to support the candidates of the other.
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  • The National Liberals again became a government party, but their position was much changed.
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  • The illness and death of the emperor, however, destroyed the last hope of the Liberals that they might at length succeed to power.
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  • The Conservatives were prepared to vote for it; the Radicals and Centre opposed it; the decision rested with the National Liberals, and they were willing to accept it on condition that the clause was omitted which allowed the state governments to exclude individuals from districts in which the state of siege had been proclaimed.
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  • An amendment had been carried omitting this clause, and the National Liberals therefore voted for the bill in its amended form.
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  • On the other hand, there were signs of a greater willingness among the Socialists to co-operate with their old enemies the Liberals.
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  • Those of the great industrialists who belonged to the National Liberals or the Moderate Conservatives did not command that influence which men of their class generally hold in Great Britain, because the influence of Social Democracy banded together the whole of the working men in a solid phalanx of irreconcilable opposition, the very first principle of which was the hostility of classes.
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  • In the disintegration of parties the Liberals suffered most.
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  • The unity of the Conservatives was preserved by social forces and the interests of agriculture; the decay of the Liberals was the result of universal suffrage.
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  • This feeling had its origin at first in a natural reaction against the excessive admiration for, English institutions which distinguished the Liberals of an older generation.
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  • The Agrarians asked for restrictions on the importation of food; the Centre for the Lex Heinze and the repeal of the Jesuit law; the Liberals for the right of combination.
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  • The most striking effect of the development of this antagonism was the gradual disappearance as a factor in politics of the Liberals, the chief builders of the Empire.
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  • An interval of negotiation between the crown and many leading Magyar Liberals followed, until at the end of October 1903 Count Stephen Tisza, son of Koloman Tisza, accepted a mission to form a cabinet after all others had declined.
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  • Tisza appealed to the country and suffered, on the 26th of January 1905, an overwhelming defeat at the hands of a coalition composed of dissentient Liberals, Clericals, Independents and a few Banffyites.
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  • Not only did the party include all the Czechs, but they were supported by many of the great nobles who were of German descent, including Count Leo Thun, his brother-in-law Count Heinrich Clam-Martinitz, and Prince Friedrich von Schwarzenberg, cardinal archbishop of Prague, who hoped in a self-governing kingdom of Bohemia to preserve that power which was threatened by the German Liberals.
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  • The maintenance of their rule was, therefore, only possible by the exercise of great political ability, the more so, since, as we have seen, they were not united among themselves, the clergy and Feudal party being opposed to the Liberals.
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  • The wording of the decree implied that the February constitution did not exist as of law; the Germans and Liberals, strenuously objecting to a "feudalfederal" constitution which would give the Sla y s a preponderance in the empire, maintained that theFebruaryconsti tution was still in force, and that changes could only be ?
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  • The concordat of 1855 had given the The Church complete freedom in the management of all Liberals ecclesiastical affairs; there was full liberty of inter- and the course with Rome, the state gave up all control over concordat.
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  • Hence the German Liberals were prevented from introducing direct elections to the Reichsrath, and the functions of the Reichsrath were slightly less extensive than they had hitherto been.
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  • By the help of the Clericals they won enough seats to put the Liberals in a minority in the Reichsrath, and it would be possible to revise the constitution if the Czechs consented to come.
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  • Hohenwart resigned, but at the same time Beust was dismissed, and a new cabinet was chosen once more from among the German Liberals, under the leadership of Prince Adolf Auersperg, whose brother Carlos had been one of the chief members in the Burger Ministerium.
    0
    0
  • These events might have secured the predominance of the Liberals for many years.
    0
    0
  • Yet within four years the government was obliged to turn for support to the Federalists and Clericals, and the rule of the German Liberals was overthrown.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals had also lost many seats, so that the House now had a completely different aspect; the constitutionalists were reduced to 91 Liberals and 54 Radicals; but the Right, under Hohenwart, had increased to 57, and there were 57 Poles and 54 Czechs.
    0
    0
  • But the Liberals again voted against the government on an important military bill, an offence almost as unpardonable in Austria as in Germany, and a great meeting of the party decided that they would not support the government.
    0
    0
  • The German members of the government resigned, their place was taken by Clericals, Poles and Czechs, Smolka was elected president of the Lower House of the Reichsrath, and the German Liberals found themselves in a minority opposed by the " iron ring " of these three parties, and helpless in the parliament of their own creation.
    0
    0
  • The government therefore veered round towards the German Liberals; some of the ministers most obnoxious to the Germans resigned, and their places were taken by Germans.
    0
    0
  • This was opposed by the Liberals, for with the growth of socialism and anti-Semitism, they knew that the extension of the franchise would destroy their influence.
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    0
  • Young Rumanians Total The most remarkable result of the elections was the disappearance of the Liberals in Vienna.
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    0
  • In 1879, out of 37 members returned in Lower Austria, 33 were Liberals, but now they were replaced to a large extent by the Socialists.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of the German Populists who felt that a German " Liberal " party could not well oppose an extension of popular rights, all the German Liberals were antagonistic, some bitterly, to the measure.
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    0
  • Serbs Slovene Liberals Italians Clerical Populists Liberals..
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    0
  • In the new parliament he voted against the Home Rule Bill, and it was generally felt that in the election of 1886 which followed its defeat, when he was re-elected without opposition, his letters told with fatal effect against the Home Rule Liberals.
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    0
  • The fate of Parga created intense feeling at the time in England, and was cited by Liberals as a crowning instance of the perfidy of the government and of Castlereagh's subservience to reactionary tendencies abroad.
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    0
  • But these consultative assemblies were regarded as insufficient by the Danish Liberals, and during the last years of Frederick VI.
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    0
  • The Bondevenlige, or philo-peasant party, which objected to the king's right of nomination and preferred a one-chamber system, now separated from the National Liberals on this point.
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    0
  • But the National Liberals triumphed at the general election; fear of reactionary tendencies finally induced the Radicals to accede to the wishes of the majority; and on the 5th of June 1849 the new constitution received the royal sanction.
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    0
  • He was one of the 93 dissentient Liberals who by voting against the Liberal Government decided the fate of the Home Rule bill of 1886.
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    0
  • To the Liberals, then and afterwards, it was clearly a hypocritical conspiracy against freedom.
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    0
  • In spite of his Imperialist views, however, he did much to smooth over the party difficulties, and when the tariff-reform movement began in 1903, he seized the opportunity for rallying the Liberals to the banner of freetrade and championing the "orthodox" English political economy, on which indeed he had been a lecturer in his younger days.
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    0
  • The sympathy which he expressed for the Agrarians increased his unpopularity among Liberals and industrials; but he pointed out that the state, which for half a century had done everything to help manufactures, might now attempt to support the failing industry of agriculture.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals were quarrelling among themselves, and the result was an overwhelming defeat.
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    0
  • On the 7th of November at Leicester Lord Rosebery insisted that what the country wanted was not fiscal reform but commercial reform, and he appealed to the free-trade section of the Unionist party to join the Liberals in a united defence, - an appeal incidentally for Liberal unity which was warmly seconded ten days later by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman.
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  • Liberals were scandalized by his apparent identification of " right " with " might," implied in the demand for a strong government; and though he often declared the true interpretation to be that the right would ultimately become might, his desire for strong government seemed too often to sanction the inverse view.
    0
    0
  • In August 1892, when the Liberals again came into power, Mundella was again appointed president of the board of trade, and he continued in this position until 1894, when he resigned office.
    0
    0
  • This action on the part of General Veintemilla led to a union between the Clericals and Moderate Liberals, and resulted in a popular rising throughout the republic, ending in his defeat and overthrow.
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    0
  • He then continued his legal studies at Breslau and Berlin, and after a visit of three years to England, then the model state for German liberals, entered the Prussian judicial service.
    0
    0
  • While he again and again was able to compel the government to withdraw or amend proposals which seemed dangerous to liberty, he opposed those liberals who, unable to obtain all the concessions which they called for, refused to vote for the new laws as a whole.
    0
    0
  • The position was complicated by the somewhat enigmatic attitude of Russia; for the Neapolitan Liberals, with many of whom Count Capo d'Istria, the Russian minister of foreign affairs, had been on friendly terms, proclaimed that they had the " moral support " of the tsar.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the regent, in spite of his declaration that he would lead the Neapolitan army against the invader, was secretly undermining the position of the government, and there were divisions of opinion in the ranks of the Liberals themselves.
    0
    0
  • But as yet the idea of unity made but little headway, for southern Italy was too widely separated by geographical conditions, history, tradition and custom from the rest of the peninsula, and the majority of the Liberals - themselves a minority of the population - merely aspired to a constitutional Neapolitan monarchy, possibly forming part of a confederation of Italian states.
    0
    0
  • On the 28th he granted the constitution, and the Liberals Bozzelli and Carlo Poerio afterwards joined the cabinet.
    0
    0
  • But although there was much activity and plotting among the Liberals, there was as yet no revolution.
    0
    0
  • Disorders having taken place between Liberals and reactionaries, Liberio Romano was made minister of police in the place of Aiossa.
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    0
  • By his alliance with the Liberals under Nicotera in 1891, and by his understanding with the Radicals under Cavallotti in 1894-98; by abandoning his Conservative colleague, General Ricotti, to whom he owed the premiership in 1896; and by his vacillating action after his fall from power, he divided and demoralized a constitutional party which, with greater sincerity and less reliance upon political cleverness, he might have welded into a solid parliamentary organization.
    0
    0
  • In 1831 he published his important Essentials of Parliamentary Reform (an elaboration of his previous Statement), and, after refusing to stand as parliamentary candidate for the city in 1831, changed his mind and was elected head of the poll, with three other Liberals, in December 1832.
    0
    0
  • One outstanding incident was the filibustering expedition of William Walker, who was at first invited by the Liberals of Leon to assist them against the Conservatives of Granada, and who, after seizing the supreme power in 1856, was expelled by the combined forces of the neighbouring states, and on venturing to return was shot at Trujillo in Honduras on the 12th of September 1860.
    0
    0
  • General Sheridan stated in his memoirs that material assistance was afforded to the Liberals out of the U.S. arsenals, and the moral effect of his presence on the frontier certainly influenced the course of the struggle to a very great extent.
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    0
  • After filling for several years the post of director-general of indirect taxes, he was created in 1819 a peer of France and was prominent among the Liberals.
    0
    0
  • The elections of 1890, when the metropolis returned free traders and Liberals to the Second Chamber, certainly effected a change in the latter, as the representatives of the towns and the old " Landtmanna " party joined issue and established a free-trade majority in the chamber, but in the combined meetings of the two chambers the compact protectionist majority in the First Chamber turned the scale.
    0
    0
  • After the elections in 1890, the alliance already mentioned between the old " Landtmanna " party and the representatives of the towns had the result that the Liberals in the Second Chamber to whom the re resentatives of the Franchise ' ', p Reform.
    0
    0
  • Carlson, of the High School of Gothenburg, succeeded in forming a party of Liberals and Radicals to the number of about 90 members, who, besides being in favour of the extension of the franchise, advocated the full equality of Norway with Sweden in the management of foreign affairs.
    0
    0
  • In spite of the discontent of the Liberals, the Conservative ascendancy secured a long period of firm stable government, which was essential to put an end to the confusion in public life and to give time for the people to awake to a fuller realization of the duties and responsibilities of national independence.
    0
    0
  • Montt's successors, Jose Joaquin Perez (1861-1871), Federico Errazuriz (1871-1876) and Anibal Pinto (1876-1881), abandoned the repressive policy of their predecessors, invited the co-operation of the Liberals, and allowed discontent to vent itself freely in popular agitation.
    0
    0
  • The administration of President Santa Maria met with violent opposition from the Conservatives, who included the Clerical party in their ranks, and also from a certain section of the Liberals.
    0
    0
  • This intervention caused great irritation amongst the Conservatives and dissentient Liberals, and the political situation on more than one occasion became so strained as to bring the country to the verge of armed revolution.
    0
    0
  • The election of Balmaceda was bitterly opposed by the Conservatives and dissentient Liberals, but was finally successfully carried by the official influence exercised by President Santa Maria.
    0
    0
  • But before the new constitution could be established a change of ministry in Great Britain put the Liberals in office, with Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman as premier (Dec. 1906).
    0
    0
  • With the Liberal reaction and strong reform movement which characterized the earlier years of Alexander II.'s reign (1855-1881) he thoroughly sympathized, and for some time he warmly advocated the introduction of liberal institutions of the British type, but when he perceived that the agitation was assuming a Socialistic and Nihilist tinge, and that in some quarters of the Liberal camp indulgence was being shown to Polish national aspirations, he gradually modified his attitude until he came to be regarded by the Liberals as a renegade.
    0
    0
  • He was an obscure republican student when the Spanish revolutionary movement of 1854 took place, and the young liberals and democrats of that epoch decided to hold a meeting in the largest theatre of the capital.
    0
    0
  • Regarded at first with distrust by Turkey, Russia and Austria, he succeeded in gaining general recognition in six months; but he had to contend for ten years with fierce party struggles between the Conservatives and the Liberals.
    0
    0
  • The brother of Ferdinand, Don Carlos, the first pretender, fought seven years, during the minority of Isabella, to dispute her title, and her rights were only maintained through the gallant support of the army, the Cortes and the Liberals and Progressists, who at the same time established constitutional and parliamentary government, dissolved the religious orders, confiscated the property of the orders and of the Jesuits, disestablished the Church property, and attempted to restore order in finances.
    0
    0
  • In 1857 the archduke Maximilian tried to conciliate the Milanese by the promise of a constitution, and Cantu was one of the few Liberals who accepted the olive branch, and went about in company with the archduke.
    0
    0
  • The leading Liberals had promoted a conspiracy for the arrest and expulsion of the prince, and the formation of a provisional government under General Dabija.
    0
    0
  • C. Bratianu, in 1891, his brother Dimitrie was proclaimed chief of the united Liberal party, but he also died in June 1892, and the veteran statesman Dimitrie Sturdza was recognized as the head of the Liberals.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals were those who thought unjust the proscriptionary legislation passed against the Secessionists and Democrats; and to this issue of local politics were added the issues of national reform which the course of President Grant's administration had forced upon his party.
    0
    0
  • There has, been a long struggle between liberals and churchmen in Colombia, and at one time the latter completely lost their political influence over the government, but the common people remained loyal to the Church, and the upper classes found it impossible to sever the ties which bound them to it.
    0
    0
  • President Nunez had no sooner returned to Colombia than the Liberals discovered that his political opinions had changed and had become strongly Conservative.
    0
    0
  • In 1895 the Liberals made another attempt to seize the government of the country, but the movement was suppressed without any very great difficulty.
    0
    0
  • In October 1899 the Liberals organized another revolutionary outbreak for the purpose of trying to wrest the power from Conservatives, but this attempt had no better success than the movements of 1885 and 1895.
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    0
  • He ruled the province with economy and efficiency, but was defeated in December 1871 by the Liberals, resigned the premiership, and died on the 1st of June 1872.
    0
    0
  • When he was accused by the Liberals in 1904 of being a Protectionist, he explained on Feb.
    0
    0
  • In spite of his efforts the bill was carried through all its stages by an unbroken phalanx of Liberals, Labour men, and Nationalists, showing a majority in important divisions of rio; and was only rejected by the Lords in the early months of 1913.
    0
    0
  • The king returned to Naples soon afterwards, and ordered wholesale arrests and executions of supposed Liberals, which continued until the French successes forced him to agree to a treaty in which amnesty for members of the French party was included.
    0
    0
  • The parliament was now dismissed, and Ferdinand inaugurated an era of savage persecution, supported by spies and informers, against the Liberals and Carbonari, the Austrian commandant in vain protesting against the savagery which his presence alone rendered possible.
    0
    0
  • He was no friend of arbitrary government; but he judged it better that oppressed nationalities and persecuted Liberals should suffer than that Europe should be again plunged into war.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals could see no more than that he appeared to be committed to international engagements, the logical outcome of which might beas an orator of the Opposition put itthat Cossacks would be encamped in Hyde Park for the purpose of overawing the House of Commons.
    0
    0
  • The Wellington ministry, hated by the Liberals, denounced even by the Tories as traitorous for the few concessions made, resigned on the 16th of November; and the Whigs at last came into office under Lord whig Grey, the ministry also including a few of the more ministry Liberal Tories.
    0
    0
  • They were reinforced by many Liberals, who cared very little for protection, but a great deal about the abolition of slavery, and consequently objected to reducing the duties on foreign or slave-grown sugar.
    0
    0
  • The bill naturally encountered opposition from many Liberals, while it failed to excite any enthusiasm among.
    0
    0
  • He suCceeded in securing the co-operation of his own friends, of Lord John Russell, and of other independent Liberals, as well as of the Conservative party, and in inflicting a signal defeat on the government.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals, who complained that their leaders were pursuing a Conservative policy, could at least console themselves by the reflection that, the chancellor of the exchequer was introducing satisfactory budgets.
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    0
  • The language, moreover, which Gladstone was holding on other subjects encouraged the more advanced Liberals to expect that he would ultimately place himself at the head of the party of progress.
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    0
  • The bill did not create much enthusiasm among Liberals, and it was naturally opposed by the Conservatives, who were reinforced by a large section of moderate Liberals, nicknamed, in consequence of a phrase in one Of Brights speeches, Adullamites.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals secured an even.
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    0
  • At the general election of 1880, the borough of Northampton, which of late years has shown an unwaveringpreference for Liberals of an advanced type,returned as its members Henry Labouchere and Charles Bradlaugh.
    0
    0
  • As a matter of fact, the new parliament comprised 334 Liberals, 250 Conservatives and 86 Irish Nationalists.
    0
    0
  • But the English Liberals were already a little weary of allies who were quarrelling among themselves, and whose disputes were introducing a new factor into politics.
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  • Campbell-Bann.erman (q.v.), as head of the Liberal party; and the general election of January 1906 resulted in an overwhelming victory for the Liberals and their allies, the Labor party (now a powerful force in politics) and the Irish Nationalists.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals had long arrears to make up in their political programme, and their supremacy in the House of Commons was an encouragement to assert their views in legislation.
    0
    0
  • The Unionists came back equal in numbers to the Liberals, but the latter could also count on the Labor party and the Irish Nationalists; and the battle was fully arrayed for a frontal attack on the powers of the Second Chamber when the kings death in May upset all calculations.
    0
    0
  • The union in the London fund was ruptured in 1693; in course of time differences in the administration of the two funds led to the attaching of the Presbyterian name to theological liberals, though many of the older Unitarian chapels were Independent foundations, and at least half of the Presbyterian chapels (of 1690-1710) are now in the hands of Congregationalists.
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    0
  • His first budget was a quaint failure, and was thrown out by a coalition of Liberals and Peelites which he believed was formed against Mr Disraeli more than against the chancellor of the exchequer.
    0
    0
  • Another Reform Bill, memorable for driving certain good Liberals into a Cave of Adullam, broke up the new government in a few months; Disraeli contributing to the result by the delivery of opinions not new to him and of lasting worth, though presently to be subordinated to arguments of an inferior order and much less characteristic. "At this rate," he said in 1866,"you will have a parliament that will entirely lose its command over the executive, and it will meet with less consideration and possess less influence."
    0
    0
  • Its followers were still a minority in the House of Commons; an angry Reform agitation was going on; an ingenious resolution founded on the demand for an enlarged franchise serviceable to Liberals might extinguish the new government almost immediately; and it is pretty evident that the Tory leaders took office meaning to seek a cure for this desperate weakness by wholesale extension of the suffrage.
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    0
  • His popularity among all Liberals was increased by his resignation in 1851, as a protest against the failure of the government to establish the constitution they had promised.
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    0
  • Faults of manner, natural in a man whose life had been spent as an official and a judge, prevented him from keeping together the German Liberals as a strong and united party; he was opposed by a powerful faction at court, and by the Clerical leaders.
    0
    0
  • The regents thereupon dismissed the Radical cabinet and called the Liberals to the government (August 1892).
    0
    0
  • This increased the bitterness of the Liberals, who, though not so numerous as the Radicals, included in their ranks more men of wealth and culture.
    0
    0
  • When the restoration took place, Camacho sat in the Cortes among the dynastic Liberals with Sagasta as leader, and became finance minister in 1881 at a critical moment when Spain had to convert, reduce, and consolidate her treasury and other debts with a view to resuming payment of coupons.
    0
    0
  • He then seceded from the Liberals, and during the last years of his life he affected to vote with the Conservatives, who made him governor of the Bank of Spain.
    0
    0
  • As secretary of the municipal commission, which sat at the hotel-de-ville and formed itself into a provisional government, he was charged to convey to the chamber of deputies a protest embodying the terms which the advanced Liberals wished to impose on the king to be elected.
    0
    0
  • Isaac Butt, who died in May 1879, led a parliamentary party of fifty-four, but the Conservatives were strong enough to outvote them and the Liberals together.
    0
    0
  • The lord-lieutenant had an interview with Parnell, of which very conflicting accounts were given, but the Irish leader issued a manifesto advising his friends to vote against the Liberals as oppressors and coercionists, who promised everything and did nothing.
    0
    0
  • The shortening of the time was perhaps accounted for by the fact that the new House of Commons consisted of 331 Liberals, 249 Conservatives, 86 Home Rulers and Independents, Parnell thus holding the balance of parties.
    0
    0
  • The " dissentient Liberals," as Gladstone always called them, were not converted by the abandonment of the Purchase Bill, and on the 7th of June 93 of them voted against the second reading, [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] of this movement was that tenants should offer what, , they were pleased to consider a fair rent, and if it was refused, should pay the money into the hands of a committee.
    0
    0
  • Mr John Redmond was chosen chairman, and the alliance of Nationalists and Gladstonian Liberals was dissolved.
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    0
  • By this enterprise, which his whole tradition imposed upon him, he reckoned to flatter the amour-propre of his subjects, and rally to him the liberals and even the republicans, with their passion for propagandism.
    0
    0
  • Although an orthodox Serb, he was from the first a devoted adherent of the Magyar liberals.
    0
    0
  • Godoy found himself between two parties, the Liberals and the Ultramontanes, who agreed only in hatred of himself.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals were divided into sub-sections, distinguished from one another by a rising scale of violence.
    0
    0
  • Any tendency to listen to liberal counsels was denounced by them as weakness and met by demands for the restoration of the Inquisition and by the organization of absolutist demonstrations, and even revolts, such as that which broke out in Catalonia in 1828, organized by the supreme junta set up at Manresa, with the object of freeing the king from the disguised Liberals who swayed him.
    0
    0
  • Yet the absolute monarchy would probably have lasted for long if a dispute as to the succession had not thrown one of the monarchical parties on the support of the Liberals.
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    0
  • It was resented by the Liberals and provoked a military rising, headed by the mosi popular of the Cristino generals, Baldomero Espartero.
    0
    0
  • Liberals arid discontented Moderates, supported as usual by troops led into mutiny by officers whose chief object was promotion, imposed some restraint on the queen.
    0
    0
  • The premier not only approved Sagastas efforts to gather round him as many Liberals and Democrats as possible, but did not even oppose the return of Emilio Castelar and a few Republicans.
    0
    0
  • In 1881 the Dynastic Liberals began to show impatience at being kept too long in the cold shade of opposition.
    0
    0
  • It served, however, to weaken the prestige of Sagastas administration just when a Dynastic Left was being formed by some discontented Liberals, headed by Marshal Serrano and his nephew, General Lopez-Dominguez.
    0
    0
  • The support of Sagasta did not last long, and he managed with skill to elbow the Dynastic Left out of office, and to convince all dissentients and free lances that there was neither room nor prospect for third parties in the state between the two great coalitions of Liberals and Conservatives under Sagasta and Canovas.
    0
    0
  • When Posada Herrera resigned, the Liberals and Sagasta did not seem much displeased at the advent to power of Canovas in 1884, and soon almost all the members of the Dynastic Left joined the Liberal party.
    0
    0
  • Outside, the Republicans and Carlists were getting troublesome, and the tone of their press vied with that of the Liberals in their attacks on the Conservative cabinet.
    0
    0
  • A wave of Clericalism and ultra-Catholic influences swept over the land, affecting the middle classes, the universities and learned societies, and making itself very perceptible also among the governing classes and both dynastic parties, Liberals and Conservatives.
    0
    0
  • Sagasta reconstructed his ministry for the last time, and announced his intention to make the re-establishment of universal suffrage the crowning act of the Liberal policy, knowing very well that he would thus rally round him all the Liberals,.
    0
    0
  • Marshals Campos, Jovellar and Novaliches, and Generals Pavia, Primo de Rivera, Daban and others, wereangry with Sagasta and the Liberals not only because they deemed their policy too democratic, but because they ventured to curb the insubordinate attitude of general officers, who shielded themselves behind the immunities of their senatorial position to.
    0
    0
  • Sagasta loyally furnished the queen with a constitutional pretext for carrying out her desire, and tendered the resignation of the whole cabinet, so that Her Majesty might consult, as usual, the party leaders and generals on the grave question of the expediency of entrusting to new ministers or to the Liberals the mission of testing the new electoral system.
    0
    0
  • When Canovas found himself deserted on so delicate a matter by a numerous section of his party, he resigned, and advised the queen to send for Sagasta and the Liberals.
    0
    0
  • These two moderate Liberals acted in concert to grapple with colonial questions, which in 1894 had assumed a very serious aspect.
    0
    0
  • This motion was negatived by all the Conservatives, by most of the Dynastic Liberals and by some of the Republicans.
    0
    0
  • Maura was warmly supported in Congress by the Cuban home rulers and by some far-sighted Liberals and Republicans.
    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, his bill did not find favor with the Conservatives or the majority of the Liberals, and Sagasta, trimming according to his inveterate habit, found a pretext to get rid of Maura and Gamazo.
    0
    0
  • In the place of Maura he found a more pliant minister for the colonies, Seor Abarzuza, who framed a Cuban Reform Bill so much short of what his predecessor had thought an irreducible minimum of concessions, that it was censured in Havana by all the colonial Liberals and home rulers, and by their representatives in Madrid.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals left office after having done all that was morally and materially possible, considering the extremely difficult, indeed inextricable, situation in which they found the country in October 1897.
    0
    0
  • At the eleventh hour he attempted to retrieve his mistake by vague promises of amendment, chiefly because all the opposition groups, above all Sagasta and the Liberals, announced their intention of adopting much the same programme as the National Union.
    0
    0
  • This was none the less distasteful to the Republicans, who thundered, against personal government, and to the Liberals, who clamoured for the Cortes and the budget.
    0
    0
  • Count Romanones, desiring to educate the electors, had been busy establishing schools; but the sweeping victory of the Liberals at the polls2 was probably far more due to the fact that this was the first election held under Seor Mauras Local Administration Act, and that the ignorant electors, indignant at being forced to vote under penalty of a fine, where they did not spoil their ballot papers, voted against the Conservatives as the authors of their grievance.
    0
    0
  • Unlike Lord Hartington (afterwards duke of Devonshire) and other Liberals, who declined to join Mr Gladstone in view of the altered attitude he was adopting towards Ireland, Mr Chamberlain entered the cabinet as president of the Local Government Board (with Mr Jesse Collings as parliamentary secretary), but on the 15th of March 1886 he resigned, explaining in the House of Commons (8th April) that, while he had always been in favour of the largest possible extension of local government to Ireland consistently with the integrity of the empire and the supremacy of parliament, and had therefore joined Mr Gladstone when he believed that this was what was intended, he was unable to consider that the scheme communicated by Mr Gladstone to his colleagues maintained those limitations.
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    0
  • Mr Chamberlain was the object of the bitterest attacks from the Gladstonians for his share in this result; he was stigmatized as "Judas," and open war was proclaimed by the Home Rulers against the "dissentient Liberals" - the description used by Mr Gladstone.
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  • The influence of his mother, and his own wide reading and critical character, made him at one time inclined to hold liberal opinions on govern the extreme right, and distinguished by ished himself b the vigour and originality with which he defended the rights of the king and the Christian monarchy against the Liberals.
    0
    0
  • The Radicals still continued their opposition, but he thereby made possible the formation of a large party of moderate Liberals, who thenceforward supported him in his new Nationalist policy.
    0
    0
  • When King Ferdinand felt himself securely re-established at Naples he determined to exterminate the Carbonari, and to this end his minister of police, the prince of Canosa, set up another secret society called the Calderai del Contrappeso (braziers of the counterpoise), recruited from the brigands and the dregs of the people, who committed hideous excesses against supposed Liberals, but failed to exterminate the movement.
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    0
  • A former leader of Liberals, he proved to be now the strongest upholder of reaction.
    0
    0
  • In 1890 Canovas took office under the queen regent, and one of his first acts was to reverse the tariff policy of the Liberals, denouncing all the treaties of commerce, and passing in 1892 a highly protectionist tariff.
    0
    0
  • Singer did much to reunite Conservatives and Liberals in the community, and he himself preached at the Reform Synagogue in Manchester.
    0
    0
  • The great majority of the Bavarian Catholic Volkspartei, however, as well as Liberals of various shades, not to speak of the Royalists and reactionaries, wanted further guarantees against a recurrence of the Bolshevist terror.
    0
    0
  • Yet have such composure some liberals say european polls the whole area.
    0
    0
  • On 11 Jul 1828 Miguel was proclaimed king by the traditional Cortes and the Liberals Wars began in earnest.
    0
    0
  • Liberals live only in their own reality, and seek to transpose their own moral degeneracy upon everyone else.
    0
    0
  • About 30 leading Chinese liberals, many of them very well-known public figures, wrote a vigorous denunciation of this statement.
    0
    0
  • These liberals also tended to throw doubt on the full divinity of Jesus.
    0
    0
  • It is not only church liberals who have felt embattled over recent decades.
    0
    0
  • As is always the case with liberals, they have been plunged to the Left by the first and still formless revolutionary wave.
    0
    0
  • The Liberals called this an ' expensive gimmick ' .
    0
    0
  • The radical hippies were liberals in the social sense of the word.
    0
    0
  • As their circumstances improve, American leftists in time might acquire the self-confidence to call themselves social democrats rather than liberals!
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  • Those who do are often dismissed as " bleeding heart liberals " who care more for the criminal than for their victims.
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  • When he became disaffected with his party he migrated to join the liberals in 1906.
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  • The bedrock value on which classical liberals ought to rest is freedom.
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  • In this respect, as in many others, the gentlemen Anarchists fully imitate the bourgeois liberals.
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  • Those attacking the doctrine are certainly not all theological liberals; many conservatives too are uneasy with it.
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  • The Islamists want to draw the limits of world freedoms and the western liberals reject that limitation.
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  • Only bleeding-heart liberals, subversives and anarchists could possibly object, and we know what should be done with them, don't we?
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  • Why did nonconformists generally support the Liberals - and what political impact did they have?
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  • They say that the liberals are just pandering to what is fashionable in their country.
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  • I am, perhaps, in a minority among socially permissive liberals in not viewing pornography as a ' victimless crime ' .
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  • The rise of the Liberals in Aberdeen underlines the pitfalls of coalition politics at the level of the Parliament.
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  • All right thinking liberals wore a red ribbon to mark World Aids Day.
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  • Liberals think you should practice self-restraint and conservatives don't mind how many offspring you have as long as you stay off welfare.
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  • The Marshall Plan had mobilized the European liberals and terminated the experiment with national reconstruction based on a broad class truce.
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  • The liberals who believed in the union with Ireland, the Liberal unionists, moved into coalition with the Conservatives.
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  • Although the word remains unspeakable, the Western intelligentsia, conservatives and liberals alike, boldly echo the preferred euphemism, " civilization " .
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  • I had veal, which I haven't had in years due to the bleeding heart liberals in the UK.
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  • He at once became chief leader of the Extreme Liberals.
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  • Seizing the agitation in Romagna as a pretext, he had the town of Ferrara occupied by Austrian troops, which provoked the indignation not only of the Liberals but also of the pope, for according to the treaties Austria had the right of occupying the citadel alone.
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  • Liberals were by no means inclined to despair of accomplishing this task; for hatred of the foreigners, and of the despots restored by their bayonets, had been deepened by the humiliations and cruelties suffered during the war into a passion common to all Italy.
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  • Farini, who in August was elected dictator of Parma as well as Modena, and Ricasoli, who since, on the withdrawal of the Sardinian commissioner Boncompagni, had become supreme in Tuscany, were now the men who by their energy and determination achieved the annexation of central Italy to Piedmont, in spite of the strenuous opposition of the French emperor and the weakness of many Italian Liberals.
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  • The process was accelerated by Sellas illness and death (14th March 1884), an event which cast profound discouragement over the more thoughtful of the Conservatives Ind Moderate Liberals, by whom Sella had been regarded as a supreme political reserve, as a statesman whose experienced vigour and patriotic sagacity might have been trusted to lift Italy from any depth of folry or misfortune.
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  • The effect of this teaching was manifest at the diet of 1832, when the Liberals in the Lower Chamber had a large majority, prominent among whom were Francis Deák and Edon Betithy.
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  • He was defeated by a combination of the Kossuthists, Andrássy Liberals and Clerical People's party, the 30 Croatian deputies, whose vote might have turned the election, abstaining on Dr Wekerle promising them to deliver Croatia from the oppressive rule of the ban, Baron Rauch.
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  • In Guatemala the Clerical, Conservative or antiFederal party was supreme; after a protracted struggle it overthrew the Liberals or Federalists, and declared the country an independent republic, with Rafael Carrera (1814-1865) as president.
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  • The National Democrats (Liberals), whose organ was the " Narodni Listy," numbered twenty-nine.
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  • In the long and acrimonious debates that followed in the Reichstag itself the strange spectacle was presented of the chancellor fighting a coalition of the Conservatives and the Catholic Centre with the aid of the Socialists and Liberals.
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  • Not even the pleasure of ruining the Liberals was sufficient to persuade the Conservatives to vote for a measure which would transfer the power from the well-to-do to the indigent, and Hohenwart justly complained that they ought to have been secure against surprises of this kind.
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  • German Liberals Progressives Populists Pan-German radicals (Wolf group) Unattached Pan-Germans.
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  • In deference to the wishes of supporters such as Mr Asquith, Sir Henry Fowler and Sir Edward Grey he determined to "put his views into the common stock" at a representative meeting of Liberals held at Chesterfield in December 1901.
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  • Deak would not go to the diet of 1843-1844, though he had received a mandate, because his election was the occasion of bloodshed in the struggle between the Clericals who would have ousted him and the Liberals who brought him in.
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  • Nunez from motives of ill-health did not openly assume the presidential office, but from his house near Cartagena he practically directed the government of the republic. The Liberals now began to foment a series of revolutionary movements, and these led in 1885 to a civil war extending over the departments of Boyaca, Cundinamarca, Magdalena and Panama.
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  • Erzberger continued to be pursued by the relentless animosity of the reactionary parties, the Conservatives (now called Deutsch-Nationalen) and the National Liberals (now styling themselves the Deutsche Volkspartei).
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  • Mr Birrell began by introducing a bill for the establishment of an Irish Council, which would have given the Home Rulers considerable leverage, but, to the surprise of the English Liberals, it was summarily rejected by a Nationalist convention in Dublin, and was forthwith abandoned.
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  • This constitution was far from satisfying the advanced Liberals, and the supporters of Christinaknown as Crislinos broke into two sections, the Moderados, or Moderates, and Pro gressisias or Exalt ados, the Progressists or Hot-heads.
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  • The Liberals had to act cautiously and slowly, because they perceived that any premature move towards reform or democratic legislation wculd not be welcome at court, and might displease the generals.
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  • He took for colleagues some of the strongest and most popular statesmen of the Liberal party, virtually representing the three important groups of men of the Revolution united under his leadershipveteran Liberals like Camacho and Venancio Gonzalez; Moderates like Alonzo Martinez, Gamazo and Marshal Jovellar; and Democrats like Moret, Montero Rios and Admiral Beranger.
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  • The tax rates when the "conservatives" are in power are very little different than when the "liberals" are in power.
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  • And many Western liberals have seen the promotion of secularism in the Muslim world as a form of Western cultural imperialism.
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  • Liberals think you should practice self-restraint and conservatives do n't mind how many offspring you have as long as you stay off welfare.
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  • The Liberals who believed in the union with Ireland, the Liberal Unionists, moved into coalition with the Conservatives.
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  • Although the word remains unspeakable, the Western intelligentsia, conservatives and liberals alike, boldly echo the preferred euphemism, " civilization ".
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  • I had veal, which I have n't had in years due to the bleeding heart liberals in the UK.
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  • I dont see a set of wishy washy liberals not being sure there.
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  • The story is good for a laugh by liberals, given Meghan's father's archaic and old fashioned views on everything from gay marriage to gay adoptions.
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  • Liberals feel as though a massive overhaul is the only thing that will save healthcare.
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  • Its incompleteness displeased the liberals; only 1,532,527 votes were given for it in the plebiscite, a total less than half of those of the plebiscites of the Consulate.
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  • In 1880 he retired, like so many other Liberals, disheartened by the change in political life, which _he attributed to universal suffrage.
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  • Lords Onslow and Glasgow came into collision with Ballance over a proposal to nominate a large batch of Liberals to the then Conservative legislative council.
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  • The orthodox were at first cool because they had always dreamed of a nationalism inspired by messianic ideals, while the liberals had long come to dissociate those universalistic ideals from all national limitations.
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  • Thus it happened that the elections to the Reichsrat in July 1911 were characterized by a temporary coalition of the German Liberals with the Social Democrats against the Christian Socialist party; this led to heavy losses on the part of the latter, especially in the towns.
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  • To the conservatives, call it a tax rebate; to the liberals, an entitlement.
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