This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

libel

libel

libel Sentence Examples

  • For printing these Zenger was arrested for libel in November 1734.

    71
    48
  • They codify laws regarding libel and slander.

    50
    37
  • It was a miserable libel and was at once rebutted by Goodyear.

    43
    28
  • In this year he carried the Libel Bill.

    30
    28
  • He was thereupon prosecuted for libel by the owner of the vessel, fined $50, mulcted in costs, and, in default of payment, committed to gaol.

    20
    21
  • For alleged libel on General Courtot de Cissey in this paper he was heavily fined.

    16
    18
  • Resisting Pitt's attempt to draw him into alliance against the ministry he had quitted, Yorke maintained, in a speech that extorted the highest eulogy from Walpole, that parliamentary privilege did not extend to cases of libel; though he agreed with Pitt in condemning the principle of general warrants.

    16
    20
  • In 1873 he was defendant in a libel action brought against him by the Rev. R.

    13
    18
  • In 62 he prevented the execution of the praetor Antistius, who had written a libel upon the emperor, and persuaded the senate to pass a milder sentence.

    12
    13
  • Shebbeare (1709-1788), a violent party writer of the day, for a libel against the government contained in his notorious Letters to the People of England, which were published in the years 1756-1758.

    11
    13
  • When at the last moment war was averted by the surrender of Serbia and Russia, an attempt was made to withdraw the article, but the first copies had already been issued: and Count Aehrenthal now had the double embarrassment of the Zagreb trial, which no longer served any purpose of foreign policy, but suited the aggressive game of Budapest against Zagreb, and of a libel action brought against Friedjung by those leaders of the Serbo-Croat coalition whose honour he had impugned.

    11
    14
  • Seven bishops refused, were indicted by James for libel, but acquitted amid the indescribable enthusiasm of the populace.

    11
    17
  • As a proof of Pratt's moderation in a period of passionate party warfare and frequent state trials, it is noted that this was the only official prosecution for libel which he set on foot.

    10
    12
  • Many libel actions were brought against it, but in 25 between 1897 and 1907 only three verdicts were given definitely against the paper.

    9
    11
  • The first case which brought him prominently into notice and gave him assurance of ultimate success was the government prosecution, in 1752, of a bookseller, William Owen, for a libel on the House of Commons.

    9
    12
  • Previous to 1886 the crime of murder was only punishable by 10 years' imprisonment, a sentence which in practice was reduced to two-thirds of that term; slander and libel were formerly offences which the law had no power to restrain, and no responsibility attached to seditious publications.

    8
    8
  • Previous to 1886 the crime of murder was only punishable by 10 years' imprisonment, a sentence which in practice was reduced to two-thirds of that term; slander and libel were formerly offences which the law had no power to restrain, and no responsibility attached to seditious publications.

    8
    9
  • Defoe declared that Lord Annesley was preparing the army in Ireland to join a Jacobite rebellion, and was indicted for libel; and prior to his trial (1715) he published an apologia entitled An Appeal to Honour and Justice, in which he defended his political conduct.

    8
    12
  • He was now elected professor of eloquence at the university or academy of Nimes, but not without a murderous attack upon him by one of the defeated candidates and his supporters, followed by a suit for libel, which, though he ultimately won his case, forced him to leave the town.

    8
    13
  • Some thoughtful men saw clearly the danger of leaving Ireland to be seized by the first chance corner, and the Libel of English Policy, written about 1436, contains a long and interesting passage declaring England's interests in protecting Ireland as " a boterasse and a poste " of her own power.

    7
    7
  • Although shaken by the acquittal of William Hone on a charge of libel the government was supported by parliament; and after the "Manchester massacre" in August 1819 the home secretary thanked the magistrates and soldiers for their share in quelling the riot.

    7
    9
  • Having been convicted of the libel he was liberated later in the year under circumstances that only became clear in 1864, when six letters were discovered in the Record Office from Defoe to a Government official, Charles Delaf aye, which, according to William Lee, established the fact that in 1718 at least Defoe was doing not only political work, but that it was of a somewhat equivocal kind - that he was, in fact, sub-editing the Jacobite Mist's Journal, under a secret agreement with the government that he should tone down the sentiments and omit objectionable items. He had, in fact, been released on condition of becoming a government agent.

    7
    11
  • He was sued for libel for printing a rebuke to some of his parishioners who had travestied the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; and after several years in the courts he was ordered to pay damages of £150, which was raised by his parishioners.

    7
    12
  • In 1907 Prince Billow was made the subject of a disgraceful libel, which received more attention than it deserved because it coincided with the Harden-Moltke scandals; his character was, however,completely vindicated,and the libeller, a journalist named Brand, received a term of imprisonment.

    6
    6
  • Popular Protestant feeling ran very high at the time, partly in consequence of the recent establishment of a Roman Catholic diocesan hierarchy by Pius IX., and criminal proceedings against Newman for libel resulted in an acknowledged gross miscarriage of justice.

    6
    6
  • Popular Protestant feeling ran very high at the time, partly in consequence of the recent establishment of a Roman Catholic diocesan hierarchy by Pius IX., and criminal proceedings against Newman for libel resulted in an acknowledged gross miscarriage of justice.

    6
    6
  • Lloyd was an indefatigable opponent of the Roman Catholic tendencies of James II., and was one of the seven bishops who for refusing to have the Declaration of Indulgence read in his diocese was charged with publishing a seditious libel against the king and acquitted (1688).

    5
    5
  • The jurisdiction of a justice of the peace, usually coextensive with the county, extends to the collection of notes of hand not exceeding $1000; to the settlement of accounts not exceeding $500; to suits for the recovery of property or suits demanding payment for damages, except for libel or slander, not exceeding $500; to equity cases in which the amount in controversy does not exceed $50; and to various other small cases.

    5
    6
  • A libel suit he instituted in London against Sir Valentine Chirol for statements made in Indian Unrest (1910) ended in a verdict for the defendant with costs (Feb.

    5
    6
  • Other notable trials in which he was concerned were the prosecution of Emile Zola for libel (1898), which arose out of the Dreyfus case; the Humbert affair (1902); and the trial of Madame Caillaux for the murder of M.

    5
    7
  • In 1763 he was condemned for blasphemous libel in his paper called the Free Enquirer (nine numbers only).

    5
    7
  • In 1841 Edward Moxon was found guilty of the publication of a blasphemous libel (Shelley's Queen Mab), the prosecution having been instituted by Henry Hetherington, who had previously been condemned to four months' imprisonment for a similar offence, and wished to test the law under which he was punished.

    5
    8
  • In a suit for libel brought against him in the High Court at Bombay in 1862, he won a victory on the main issue.

    5
    11
  • Action for Libel AgainstTheomnestus, x., 384-383 B.

    5
    11
  • Zola's object was a prosecution for libel, and a judicial inquiry into the whole affaire, and at the trial, which took place in Paris in February, a fierce flood of light was thrown on the case.

    4
    6
  • Human nature indignantly rejects her portrait in the Yahoo as a gross libel, and the protest is fully warranted.

    4
    6
  • in which the name of no individual was mentioned as the author of an alleged libel on the king, contained in No.

    4
    6
  • ing, but directed that he should be brought to trial within a year; the second increased the penalties for seditious libel; the third imposed the newspaper stamp duty on all pamphlets and the like containing news; the fourth (Seditious Meetings Act) once more greatly curtailed the liberty of public meetings; the fifth forbade the training of persons in the use of arms; the sixth empowered magistrates to search for and seize arms.

    4
    7
  • His own definition of blasphemous libel was enforced in the 1 Two of his later acts, allowing the defendant in an action for libel to prove veritas, and giving a right of action to the representatives of persons killed through negligence, also deserve mention.

    4
    8
  • In June 1874 he was found guilty of a libel on Prince Bismarck, whom he had compared to Frederick II.

    4
    8
  • His own definition of blasphemous libel was enforced in the 1 Two of his later acts, allowing the defendant in an action for libel to prove veritas, and giving a right of action to the representatives of persons killed through negligence, also deserve mention.

    4
    8
  • committed to custody for a libel on his superior, James Montagu (1568?-1618), bishop of Bath and Wells.

    3
    6
  • His success as a dramatist had by this time gone some way to disabuse hostile critics of the suspicions as regards his personal character which had been excited by the apparent looseness of morals which since his Oxford days it had always pleased him to affect; but to the consternation of his friends, who had ceased to credit the existence of any real moral obliquity, in 1895 came fatal revelations as the result of his bringing a libel action against the marquis of Queensberry; and at the Old Bailey, in May, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour for offences under the Criminal Law Amendment Act.

    3
    6
  • His success as a dramatist had by this time gone some way to disabuse hostile critics of the suspicions as regards his personal character which had been excited by the apparent looseness of morals which since his Oxford days it had always pleased him to affect; but to the consternation of his friends, who had ceased to credit the existence of any real moral obliquity, in 1895 came fatal revelations as the result of his bringing a libel action against the marquis of Queensberry; and at the Old Bailey, in May, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour for offences under the Criminal Law Amendment Act.

    3
    6
  • As a lawyer his greatest public efforts were his lectures (1799) at Lincoln's Inn on the law of nature and nations, of which the introductory discourse was published, and his eloquent defence (1803) of Jean Gabriel Peltier, a French refugee, tried at the instance of the French government for a libel against the first consul.

    3
    7
  • The source of this equally absurd and infamous libel has never been discovered.

    3
    7
  • He was imprisoned for seditious libel in 1840, and after his release became prominent for his attack on John Bright, and the anti-corn-law league.

    3
    8
  • The Libel of English Policie, a poem of the first half of the 15th century, says with reference to Iceland (chap. x.) "Out of Bristowe, and costes many one, Men haue practised by nedle and by stone Thider wardes within a litle while."

    3
    9
  • Giusto Fontanini's Storia arcana della vita di Pietro Sarpi (1863), a bitter libel, is nevertheless important for the letters of Sarpi it contains, as Griselini's Memorie e aneddote (1760) is from the author's access to Sarpi's unpublished writings, afterwards unfortunately destroyed by fire.

    3
    66
  • Brooks (1819-1857), a congressman from South Carolina, suddenly confronted Sumner as he sat writing at his desk in the Senate chamber, denounced his speech as a libel upon his state and upon Butler, his relative, and before Sumner, pinioned by his desk, could make the slightest resistance, rained blow after blow upon his head, till his victim sank bleeding and unconscious upon the floor.

    2
    5
  • In the following year Napper Tandy took a leading part in organizing a new military association in Ireland modelled after the French National Guards; they professed republican principles, and on their uniform the cap of liberty instead of the crown surmounted the Irish harp. Tandy also, with the purpose of bringing about a fusion between the Defenders and the United Irishmen, took the oath of the Defenders, a Roman Catholic society whose agrarian and political violence had been increasing for several years; but being threatened with prosecution for this step, and also for libel, he fled to America, where he remained till 1798.

    2
    5
  • The chief and most galling of his critics at this time was the Abbe Desfontaines, and the chief of Desfontaines's attacks was entitled La Voltairomanie, in reply to a libel of Voltaire's called Le Preservatif.

    2
    6
  • In 1733 a popular organ, the New York Weekly Journal, was established under John Peter Zenger (1697-1746), and in 1735 both the freedom of the press and a great advance toward the independence of the judiciary were the outcome of a famous libel suit against Zenger.

    2
    7
  • The tablet over Schomberg's grave contains what Macaulay called a "furious libel," though it only states that the duke's relatives refused the expense of the tablet.

    2
    7
  • Yorke refused to describe the libel as treasonable, while pronouncing it a high misdemeanour.

    2
    7
  • His extensive and exact legal erudition, and the skill with which he argued the intricate libel case of Lord Cromwell (4 Rep. 13), and the celebrated real property case of Shelley (1 Rep. 94, 104), soon brought him a practice never before equalled, and caused him to be universally recognized as the greatest lawyer of his day.

    2
    7
  • Horne, thereupon, by a bold libel on the Speaker, drew public attention to the case, and though he himself was placed for a time in the custody of the serjeant-at-arms, the clauses which were injurious to the interest of Mr Tooke were eliminated from the bill.

    2
    8
  • In the final judgment of the famous libel case of the Bombay Maharajas, before the Supreme Court of Bombay, in January 1862, these improprieties were severely commented upon; and though so unsparing a critic of Indian sects as Jogendra Nath seems not to believe in actual immoral practices on the part of the Maharajas, still he admits that "the corrupting influence of a religion, that can make its female votaries address amorous songs to their spiritual guides, must be very great."

    2
    8
  • Henceforth, in spite of press prosecutions and trials for political libel, the government was supported by public opinion in its vigorous prosecution of the war.

    2
    33
  • It is desultory to a degree; it is a base libel on religion and history; it differs from its model Ariosto in being, not, as Ariosto is, a mixture of romance and burlesque, but a sometimes tedious tissue of burlesque pure and simple; and it is exposed to the objection - often and justly urged - that much of its fun depends simply on the fact that there were and are many people who believe enough in Christianity to make its jokes give pain to them and to make their disgust at such jokes piquant to others.

    1
    6
  • The latter, indeed, prosecuted the former for libel and for abuse of his position when premier, but after many vicissitudes, including the flight of Giolitti to Berlin in.

    1
    7
  • Violently attacked by the Boulangist organs, L'Intransigeant and La France, he won a suit against them for libel, and in 1889 he contested the 18th arrondissement of Paris with General Boulanger, who obtained a majority of over 2000 votes, but was declared ineligible.

    1
    7
  • This silly libel so enraged the performers at the Opera that they hanged and burned with him, the Dijon academy, which had founded his fame, announced the subject of "The Origin of Inequality," on which he wrote a discourse which was unsuccessful, but at least equal to the former in merit.

    1
    7
  • In the following year he published An Answere to a Certain Libel intituled an Admonition to the Parliament, which led to further controversy between the two divines.

    1
    7
  • Even if his decision was brought about by libel on the part of the suitor's friend this was done, and the Code enacted that the faithless friend should not marry the girl.

    1
    8
  • His defence of The Times newspaper, which had accused Sir John Conroy, equerry to the duchess of Kent, of misappropriation of money (1838), is chiefly remarkable for the confession - "I despair of any definition of libel which shall exclude no publications which ought to be suppressed, and include none which ought to be permitted."

    0
    0
  • Above all, he now, being comparatively secure in position, engaged much more strongly in public controversies, and resorted less to his old labyrinthine tricks of disavowal, garbled publication and private libel.

    0
    0
  • As early as 1615 suspicions of sorcery began to be spread against her, which she, with more spirit than prudence, met with an action for libel.

    0
    0
  • Lord Camden was a strenuous opponent of Fox's India Bill, took an animated part in the debates on important public matters till within two years of his death, introduced in 1786 the scheme of a regency on occasion of the king's insanity, and to the last zealously defended his early views on the functions of juries, especially of their right to decide on all questions of libel.

    0
    0
  • Seven bishops, who presented Trial of a petition asking him to relieve the clergy from the burthen of proclaiming what they believed to be illegal, were brought to trial for publishing a seditious libel.

    0
    0
  • All these books tended to increase the ill-feeling between author and public; the Whig press was virulent and scandalous in its comments, and Cooper plunged into a series of actions for libel.

    0
    0
  • Lipstadt libel action (index )... witness statements (index ).. .

    0
    0
  • Jason Donovan won libel damages over inaccurate claims about his sexuality, so it is still considered actionable.

    0
    0
  • blasphemous libel is still in place in the " free " country of Great Britain!

    0
    0
  • Evidently you hold the laws of defamation and the wisdom of libel juries in the utmost contempt.

    0
    0
  • It was a libel case between two very eminent and powerful financiers, against both of whom charges of considerable defalcation were brought.

    0
    0
  • online defamation In May 2001 The Times newspaper found itself on the losing side in a libel action.

    0
    0
  • However with criminal libel publication to the person defamed is sufficient.

    0
    0
  • And despite the libel laws demanding that she prove deliberate distortion by Irving, the final judgment upheld every major aspect of her defense.

    0
    0
  • handbill published by William Roberts that led to Thomas Walker bringing his libel charge: ' Mr.

    0
    0
  • Examples include the handbill published by William Roberts that led to Thomas Walker bringing his libel charge: ' Mr.

    0
    0
  • His story was entirely false, I found out later, a libel on a very hospitable house.

    0
    0
  • The charge was one of publishing seditious libel and inciting to commit breaches of the incitement to Mutiny Act of 1797.

    0
    0
  • iniquitous libel laws.

    0
    0
  • For one thing, such titles are often themselves libelous, and simply quoting it back repeats the libel.

    0
    0
  • libel published in other journals folks.

    0
    0
  • The cover is wide-ranging and includes libel and slander actions and professional indemnity.

    0
    0
  • Legal: Observe copyright, cite sources, don't libel.

    0
    0
  • Remember, if it moves, its likely committing libel in some way shape or form.

    0
    0
  • The following year his attacks on the governor of New York led to him being arrested for seditious libel.

    0
    0
  • The common law offense of blasphemous libel is still in place in the " free " country of Great Britain!

    0
    0
  • The evidence copy of an alleged criminal libel may also be found in KB 1.

    0
    0
  • It is difficult to imagine a more serious libel than to accuse a business of being associated with terrorism.

    0
    0
  • Boy, by James Hanley, first published in 1931 and banned three years later on grounds of obscene libel.

    0
    0
  • libel writ against " Street " magazine.

    0
    0
  • libel suit against Baron.

    0
    0
  • libel action was expected to last six weeks.

    0
    0
  • libel trial last year.

    0
    0
  • libel lawyers sharpening their quill pens now.

    0
    0
  • libel proceedings against the Daily Telegraph.

    0
    0
  • The blood libel itself is worthy of further analysis by social scientists.

    0
    0
  • The case is thought to be the first definitive ruling by the English High Court on an issue of Internet libel.

    0
    0
  • noughts on the end of a successful libel award than there are in the Sri Lankan telephone directory.

    0
    0
  • There would be more noughts on the end of a successful libel award than there are in the Sri Lankan telephone directory.

    0
    0
  • Other areas of litigation, where ADR might be suitable, were suggested, including contested probate, libel and defamation.

    0
    0
  • But the standard operating procedure in libel trials is not to put the author on the stand.

    0
    0
  • former prostitute who gave evidence in Jeffrey Archer libel trial 15 years ago killed in collision with alleged robber in stolen car.

    0
    0
  • The case is thought to be the first definitive ruling by the English High Court on an issue of Internet libel.

    0
    0
  • But publications were still subject to the laws of the land regarding sedition, blasphemy, obscenity and libel.

    0
    0
  • seditious libel.

    0
    0
  • Like libel slander switched to a systems would improve.

    0
    0
  • sued for libel over his book Accident.

    0
    0
  • Online Archives When a libel suit is won by a claimant it is not essential to take defamatory material offline.

    0
    0
  • unconstitutional force " was seditious libel.

    0
    0
  • He issues a libel writ against " Street " magazine.

    0
    0
  • During the stormy session of 1770 he came into violent collision with Chatham and Camden in the questions that arose out of the Middlesex election and the trials for political libel; and in the subsequent years he was made the subject of the bitter attacks of Junius, in which his early Jacobite connexions, and his.

    0
    0
  • He was accused with especial bitterness of favouring arbitrary power by the law which he laid down in the trials for libel which arose out of the publications of Junius and Horne Tooke, and which at a later time he reaffirmed in the case of the dean of St Asaph (see Libel).

    0
    0
  • Even if his decision was brought about by libel on the part of the suitor's friend this was done, and the Code enacted that the faithless friend should not marry the girl.

    0
    0
  • The latter, indeed, prosecuted the former for libel and for abuse of his position when premier, but after many vicissitudes, including the flight of Giolitti to Berlin in.

    0
    0
  • In 1841 Edward Moxon was found guilty of the publication of a blasphemous libel (Shelley's Queen Mab), the prosecution having been instituted by Henry Hetherington, who had previously been condemned to four months' imprisonment for a similar offence, and wished to test the law under which he was punished.

    0
    0
  • Violently attacked by the Boulangist organs, L'Intransigeant and La France, he won a suit against them for libel, and in 1889 he contested the 18th arrondissement of Paris with General Boulanger, who obtained a majority of over 2000 votes, but was declared ineligible.

    0
    0
  • He was sued for libel for printing a rebuke to some of his parishioners who had travestied the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; and after several years in the courts he was ordered to pay damages of £150, which was raised by his parishioners.

    0
    0
  • As a lawyer his greatest public efforts were his lectures (1799) at Lincoln's Inn on the law of nature and nations, of which the introductory discourse was published, and his eloquent defence (1803) of Jean Gabriel Peltier, a French refugee, tried at the instance of the French government for a libel against the first consul.

    0
    0
  • 1813) for seditious libel in 1800, drove the lawyers for the defence from the court, and evoked the wrath of the Republicans, who were stirred to action by a political harangue on the evil tendencies of democracy which he delivered as a charge to a grand jury at Baltimore in 1803.

    0
    0
  • He was now elected professor of eloquence at the university or academy of Nimes, but not without a murderous attack upon him by one of the defeated candidates and his supporters, followed by a suit for libel, which, though he ultimately won his case, forced him to leave the town.

    0
    0
  • His defence of The Times newspaper, which had accused Sir John Conroy, equerry to the duchess of Kent, of misappropriation of money (1838), is chiefly remarkable for the confession - "I despair of any definition of libel which shall exclude no publications which ought to be suppressed, and include none which ought to be permitted."

    0
    0
  • Horne, thereupon, by a bold libel on the Speaker, drew public attention to the case, and though he himself was placed for a time in the custody of the serjeant-at-arms, the clauses which were injurious to the interest of Mr Tooke were eliminated from the bill.

    0
    0
  • When at the last moment war was averted by the surrender of Serbia and Russia, an attempt was made to withdraw the article, but the first copies had already been issued: and Count Aehrenthal now had the double embarrassment of the Zagreb trial, which no longer served any purpose of foreign policy, but suited the aggressive game of Budapest against Zagreb, and of a libel action brought against Friedjung by those leaders of the Serbo-Croat coalition whose honour he had impugned.

    0
    0
  • Seven bishops refused, were indicted by James for libel, but acquitted amid the indescribable enthusiasm of the populace.

    0
    0
  • The chief and most galling of his critics at this time was the Abbe Desfontaines, and the chief of Desfontaines's attacks was entitled La Voltairomanie, in reply to a libel of Voltaire's called Le Preservatif.

    0
    0
  • Above all, he now, being comparatively secure in position, engaged much more strongly in public controversies, and resorted less to his old labyrinthine tricks of disavowal, garbled publication and private libel.

    0
    0
  • It is desultory to a degree; it is a base libel on religion and history; it differs from its model Ariosto in being, not, as Ariosto is, a mixture of romance and burlesque, but a sometimes tedious tissue of burlesque pure and simple; and it is exposed to the objection - often and justly urged - that much of its fun depends simply on the fact that there were and are many people who believe enough in Christianity to make its jokes give pain to them and to make their disgust at such jokes piquant to others.

    0
    0
  • The source of this equally absurd and infamous libel has never been discovered.

    0
    0
  • In June 1874 he was found guilty of a libel on Prince Bismarck, whom he had compared to Frederick II.

    0
    0
  • In this year he carried the Libel Bill.

    0
    0
  • Defoe declared that Lord Annesley was preparing the army in Ireland to join a Jacobite rebellion, and was indicted for libel; and prior to his trial (1715) he published an apologia entitled An Appeal to Honour and Justice, in which he defended his political conduct.

    0
    0
  • Having been convicted of the libel he was liberated later in the year under circumstances that only became clear in 1864, when six letters were discovered in the Record Office from Defoe to a Government official, Charles Delaf aye, which, according to William Lee, established the fact that in 1718 at least Defoe was doing not only political work, but that it was of a somewhat equivocal kind - that he was, in fact, sub-editing the Jacobite Mist's Journal, under a secret agreement with the government that he should tone down the sentiments and omit objectionable items. He had, in fact, been released on condition of becoming a government agent.

    0
    0
  • In 1733 a popular organ, the New York Weekly Journal, was established under John Peter Zenger (1697-1746), and in 1735 both the freedom of the press and a great advance toward the independence of the judiciary were the outcome of a famous libel suit against Zenger.

    0
    0
  • For printing these Zenger was arrested for libel in November 1734.

    0
    0
  • This silly libel so enraged the performers at the Opera that they hanged and burned with him, the Dijon academy, which had founded his fame, announced the subject of "The Origin of Inequality," on which he wrote a discourse which was unsuccessful, but at least equal to the former in merit.

    0
    0
  • In a suit for libel brought against him in the High Court at Bombay in 1862, he won a victory on the main issue.

    0
    0
  • He was imprisoned for seditious libel in 1840, and after his release became prominent for his attack on John Bright, and the anti-corn-law league.

    0
    0
  • The tablet over Schomberg's grave contains what Macaulay called a "furious libel," though it only states that the duke's relatives refused the expense of the tablet.

    0
    0
  • As early as 1615 suspicions of sorcery began to be spread against her, which she, with more spirit than prudence, met with an action for libel.

    0
    0
  • In 1873 he was defendant in a libel action brought against him by the Rev. R.

    0
    0
  • The Libel of English Policie, a poem of the first half of the 15th century, says with reference to Iceland (chap. x.) "Out of Bristowe, and costes many one, Men haue practised by nedle and by stone Thider wardes within a litle while."

    0
    0
  • Yorke refused to describe the libel as treasonable, while pronouncing it a high misdemeanour.

    0
    0
  • Resisting Pitt's attempt to draw him into alliance against the ministry he had quitted, Yorke maintained, in a speech that extorted the highest eulogy from Walpole, that parliamentary privilege did not extend to cases of libel; though he agreed with Pitt in condemning the principle of general warrants.

    0
    0
  • His extensive and exact legal erudition, and the skill with which he argued the intricate libel case of Lord Cromwell (4 Rep. 13), and the celebrated real property case of Shelley (1 Rep. 94, 104), soon brought him a practice never before equalled, and caused him to be universally recognized as the greatest lawyer of his day.

    0
    0
  • In the following year he published An Answere to a Certain Libel intituled an Admonition to the Parliament, which led to further controversy between the two divines.

    0
    0
  • Action for Libel AgainstTheomnestus, x., 384-383 B.

    0
    0
  • He was thereupon prosecuted for libel by the owner of the vessel, fined $50, mulcted in costs, and, in default of payment, committed to gaol.

    0
    0
  • For alleged libel on General Courtot de Cissey in this paper he was heavily fined.

    0
    0
  • Other notable trials in which he was concerned were the prosecution of Emile Zola for libel (1898), which arose out of the Dreyfus case; the Humbert affair (1902); and the trial of Madame Caillaux for the murder of M.

    0
    0
  • The first case which brought him prominently into notice and gave him assurance of ultimate success was the government prosecution, in 1752, of a bookseller, William Owen, for a libel on the House of Commons.

    0
    0
  • Shebbeare (1709-1788), a violent party writer of the day, for a libel against the government contained in his notorious Letters to the People of England, which were published in the years 1756-1758.

    0
    0
  • As a proof of Pratt's moderation in a period of passionate party warfare and frequent state trials, it is noted that this was the only official prosecution for libel which he set on foot.

    0
    0
  • Lord Camden was a strenuous opponent of Fox's India Bill, took an animated part in the debates on important public matters till within two years of his death, introduced in 1786 the scheme of a regency on occasion of the king's insanity, and to the last zealously defended his early views on the functions of juries, especially of their right to decide on all questions of libel.

    0
    0
  • In the final judgment of the famous libel case of the Bombay Maharajas, before the Supreme Court of Bombay, in January 1862, these improprieties were severely commented upon; and though so unsparing a critic of Indian sects as Jogendra Nath seems not to believe in actual immoral practices on the part of the Maharajas, still he admits that "the corrupting influence of a religion, that can make its female votaries address amorous songs to their spiritual guides, must be very great."

    0
    0
  • committed to custody for a libel on his superior, James Montagu (1568?-1618), bishop of Bath and Wells.

    0
    0
  • In 1763 he was condemned for blasphemous libel in his paper called the Free Enquirer (nine numbers only).

    0
    0
  • It was a miserable libel and was at once rebutted by Goodyear.

    0
    0
  • Zola's object was a prosecution for libel, and a judicial inquiry into the whole affaire, and at the trial, which took place in Paris in February, a fierce flood of light was thrown on the case.

    0
    0
  • In 62 he prevented the execution of the praetor Antistius, who had written a libel upon the emperor, and persuaded the senate to pass a milder sentence.

    0
    0
  • Human nature indignantly rejects her portrait in the Yahoo as a gross libel, and the protest is fully warranted.

    0
    0
  • Giusto Fontanini's Storia arcana della vita di Pietro Sarpi (1863), a bitter libel, is nevertheless important for the letters of Sarpi it contains, as Griselini's Memorie e aneddote (1760) is from the author's access to Sarpi's unpublished writings, afterwards unfortunately destroyed by fire.

    0
    0
  • Brooks (1819-1857), a congressman from South Carolina, suddenly confronted Sumner as he sat writing at his desk in the Senate chamber, denounced his speech as a libel upon his state and upon Butler, his relative, and before Sumner, pinioned by his desk, could make the slightest resistance, rained blow after blow upon his head, till his victim sank bleeding and unconscious upon the floor.

    0
    0
  • Seven bishops, who presented Trial of a petition asking him to relieve the clergy from the burthen of proclaiming what they believed to be illegal, were brought to trial for publishing a seditious libel.

    0
    0
  • in which the name of no individual was mentioned as the author of an alleged libel on the king, contained in No.

    0
    0
  • Henceforth, in spite of press prosecutions and trials for political libel, the government was supported by public opinion in its vigorous prosecution of the war.

    0
    0
  • ing, but directed that he should be brought to trial within a year; the second increased the penalties for seditious libel; the third imposed the newspaper stamp duty on all pamphlets and the like containing news; the fourth (Seditious Meetings Act) once more greatly curtailed the liberty of public meetings; the fifth forbade the training of persons in the use of arms; the sixth empowered magistrates to search for and seize arms.

    0
    0
  • Although shaken by the acquittal of William Hone on a charge of libel the government was supported by parliament; and after the "Manchester massacre" in August 1819 the home secretary thanked the magistrates and soldiers for their share in quelling the riot.

    0
    0
  • In 1907 Prince Billow was made the subject of a disgraceful libel, which received more attention than it deserved because it coincided with the Harden-Moltke scandals; his character was, however,completely vindicated,and the libeller, a journalist named Brand, received a term of imprisonment.

    0
    0
  • All these books tended to increase the ill-feeling between author and public; the Whig press was virulent and scandalous in its comments, and Cooper plunged into a series of actions for libel.

    0
    0
  • The most important instances at present existing in England are the privilege of parliament (see Parliament), which protects certain communications from being regarded as libellous (see Libel And Slander), and certain privileges enjoyed by the clergy and others, by which they are to some extent exempt from public duties, such as serving on juries.

    0
    0
  • In the following year Napper Tandy took a leading part in organizing a new military association in Ireland modelled after the French National Guards; they professed republican principles, and on their uniform the cap of liberty instead of the crown surmounted the Irish harp. Tandy also, with the purpose of bringing about a fusion between the Defenders and the United Irishmen, took the oath of the Defenders, a Roman Catholic society whose agrarian and political violence had been increasing for several years; but being threatened with prosecution for this step, and also for libel, he fled to America, where he remained till 1798.

    0
    0
  • Some thoughtful men saw clearly the danger of leaving Ireland to be seized by the first chance corner, and the Libel of English Policy, written about 1436, contains a long and interesting passage declaring England's interests in protecting Ireland as " a boterasse and a poste " of her own power.

    0
    0
  • Many libel actions were brought against it, but in 25 between 1897 and 1907 only three verdicts were given definitely against the paper.

    0
    0
  • Lloyd was an indefatigable opponent of the Roman Catholic tendencies of James II., and was one of the seven bishops who for refusing to have the Declaration of Indulgence read in his diocese was charged with publishing a seditious libel against the king and acquitted (1688).

    0
    0
  • The jurisdiction of a justice of the peace, usually coextensive with the county, extends to the collection of notes of hand not exceeding $1000; to the settlement of accounts not exceeding $500; to suits for the recovery of property or suits demanding payment for damages, except for libel or slander, not exceeding $500; to equity cases in which the amount in controversy does not exceed $50; and to various other small cases.

    0
    0
  • A libel suit he instituted in London against Sir Valentine Chirol for statements made in Indian Unrest (1910) ended in a verdict for the defendant with costs (Feb.

    0
    0
  • But publications were still subject to the laws of the land regarding sedition, blasphemy, obscenity and libel.

    0
    0
  • Like libel slander switched to a systems would improve.

    0
    0
  • Return to Index: Notes on some of the lies: David Irving was never sued for libel over his book Accident.

    0
    0
  • Online Archives When a libel suit is won by a claimant it is not essential to take defamatory material offline.

    0
    0
  • The authorities claimed that his description of the Metropolitan police as a " blood thirsty and unconstitutional force " was seditious libel.

    0
    0
  • Errors and omissions insurance will also protect you from libel, slander, and if you were to hire an independent contractor to help you complete a job.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →