Lexington sentence example

lexington
  • At Lexington, not far from Concord, there was a sharp fight in which several men were killed.

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  • Upon reaching America, he heard of the fighting at Lexington and Concord, and with the news of an actual outbreak of hostilities his feeling toward England seems to have changed completely.

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  • The difficulties which surrounded him in the execution of his office at this time of the gravest unrest culminated in 1775, and the action of the 19th of April at Lexington initiated the American War of Independence.

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  • Scarcely had they done this when news of the encounter at Lexington produced a strong reaction in their favour, and in May 1775 they called a Provincial Congress which usurped the powers of the Assembly.

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  • A few days after the fight at Lexington and Concord, Connecticut authorized an expedition under Ethan Allen which surprised and captured Ticonderoga and Crown Point.

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  • The famous expedition sent by General Thomas Gage of Massachusetts to Lexington and Concord on the 18th-19th of April 1775 had for its object, besides the destruction of materials of war at Concord, the capture of Hancock and Adams, who were temporarily staying at Lexington, and these two leaders were expressly excepted in the proclamation of pardon issued on the 12th of June by Gage, their offences, it was said, being "of too flagitious a nature to admit of any other consideration than that of condign punishment."

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  • Mulligan (1830-1864) throwing up intrenchments on Masonic College Hill, an eminence adjoining Lexington on the N.E.

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  • Soon afterwards, after a steady resistance, the Unionist garrison of Lexington surrendered to Sterling Price.

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  • Railway building was begun in the state in 1830, and in 1835 the first train drawn by a steam locomotive ran from Lexington to Franklin, a distance of 27 m.

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  • The Eastern Lunatic Asylum at Lexington, established in 1815 as a private institution, came under the control of the state in 1824.

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  • Under an act of 1898 two houses of reform for juvenile offenders, one for boys, the other for girls, were established near Lexington.

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  • What was formerly the State Agricultural and Mechanical College at Lexington became the State University by legislative enactment (1908) there is no tuition fee except in the School of Law.

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  • Bryant's (or Bryan's) Station, near Lexington, was besieged in August 1782 by about 600 Indians under the notorious Simon Girty, who after raising the siege drew the defenders, numbering fewer than 200, into an ambush and in the battle of Blue Licks which ensued the Kentuckians lost about 67 killed .and 7 prisoners.

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  • Forrest assaulted Fort Anderson at Paducah but failed to capture it; and in June General Morgan made an unsuccessful attempt to take Lexington.

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  • For administration, see the Official Manual for the Use of the Courts, State and County Officials and General Assembly of the State of Kentucky (Lexington), which contains the Constitution of 1891; The Report of the Debates and Proceedings of the Convention..

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  • In 1851 he applied for and obtained a professorship at the Virginia military institute, Lexington; and here, except for a short visit to Europe, he remained for ten years, teaching natural science, the theory of gunnery and battalion drill.

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  • Though he was not a good teacher, his influence both on his pupils and on those few intimate friends for whom alone he relaxed the gravity of his manner was profound, and, little as he-was known to the white inhabitants of Lexington, he was revered by the slaves, to whom he showed uniform kindness, and for whose moral instruction he worked unceasingly.

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  • As to the great question at issue in 1861, Major Jackson's ruling motive was devotion to his state, and when Virginia seceded, on the 17th of April, and the Lexington cadets were ordered to Richmond, Jackson went thither in command of the corps.

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  • He was buried, according to his own wish, at Lexington, where a statue and a memorial hall commemorate his connexion with the place; and on the spot where he was mortally wounded stands a plain granite pillar.

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  • Lexington is best known as the seat of Washington and Lee University, and of the Virginia Military Institute.

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  • The Virginia Military Institute was established in March 1839, when its cadet corps supplanted the company of soldiers maintained by the state to garrison the Western Arsenal at Lexington.

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  • The first superintendent (1839-1890) was General Francis Henney Smith (1812-1890), a graduate (1833) of the United States Military Academy; and from 1851 until the outbreak of the Civil War "Stonewall" Jackson was a professor in the Institute - he is buried in the Lexington cemetery and his grave is marked by a monument.

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  • Flour is manufactured in Lexington and lime in the vicinity.

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  • The first settlers of Rockbridge county established themselves in 1737 near the North river, a short distance below Lexington.

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  • August he was offered, and accepted, the presidency of WashingHe was himself a voluminous contributor to the work, writing ton College, Lexington (now Washington and Lee University), a some Boo articles, mainly on Elizabethan authors or statesmen.

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  • A state normal school (the first normal school in the United States, established at Lexington in 1839, removed to Newton in 1844 and to Framingham in 1853) is situated here; and near South Framingham, in the township of Sherborn, is the state reformatory prison for women.

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  • The Virginia Military Institute, at Lexington, is governed by a board of visitors consisting of the adjutant general,-the superintendent of public instruction and nine other members appointed by the governor with the concurrence of the Senate.

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  • When Congress, after the fights at Lexington and Concord, resolved that the colonies ought to be put in a position of defence, the first practical step was the unanimous selection (June I 5), on motion of John Adams of Massachusetts, of Washington as commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the United Colonies.

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  • He was tail, rawboned and awkward; his early instruction was scant; but he "read books," talked well, and so, after his admission to the bar at Richmond, Virginia, in 1797, and his removal next year to Lexington, Kentucky, he quickly acquired a reputation and a lucrative income from his law practice.

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  • Owing to its historic interest the village of Lexington is visited by thousands of persons annually, for it was on the green or common of this village that the first armed conflict of the American War of Independence occurred.

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  • The Hancock-Clarke House (built in part in 1698) is now owned by the Lexington Historical Society and contains a museum of revolutionary and other relics, which were formerly exhibited in the Town Hall.

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  • Lexington was settled as a part of Cambridge as early as 1642.

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  • It was organized as a parish in 1691 and was made a township (probably named in honour of Lord Lexington) in 1713.

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  • In the evening of the 18th of April 1775 a British force of about Boo men under Lieut.-Colonel Francis Smith and Major John Pitcairn was sent by General Thomas Gage from Boston to destroy military stores collected by the colonists at Concord, and to seize John Hancock and Samuel Adams, then at Parson Clarke's house (now known as the Hancock-Clarke House) in Lexington.

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  • Early in the morning of the 19th Pitcairn arrived at the green in the village of Lexington, and there found between sixty and seventy minute-men under Captain John Parker drawn up in line of battle.

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  • Hancock and Adams had escaped before the British troops reached Lexington.

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  • The British proceeded from Lexington to Concord (q.v.).

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  • On their return they were continually fired upon by Americans from behind trees, rocks, buildings and other defences, and were threatened with complete destruction until they were rescued at Lexington by a force of moo men under Lord Hugh Percy (later, 1786, duke of Northumberland).

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  • In 1839 a state normal school for women (the first in Massachusetts and the first public training school for teachers in the United States) was opened at Lexington; it was transferred to West Newton in 1844 and to Framingham in 1853.

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  • See Charles Hudson, History of the Town of Lexington (Boston, 1868), and the publications of the Lexington Historical Society, (1890 seq.).

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  • The village became thereafter a storehouse of provisions and munitions of war, and hence became the objective of the British expedition that on the 19th of April 1775 opened with the armed conflict at Lexington the American War of Independence.

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  • Volleys were exchanged, the British retreated, the minute-men hung on their flanks and from the hillsides shot them down, driving their columns on Lexington.

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  • John Cabell Breckinridge graduated in 1838 at Centre College, Danville, Kentucky, continued his studies at Princeton, and then studied law at Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky.

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  • He practised law in Frankfort, Kentucky, in1840-1841and in Burlington, Iowa, from 1841 to 1843, and then returned to Kentucky and followed his profession at Lexington.

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  • In 1868 he returned to the United States and resumed the practice of law at Lexington, Kentucky, where he died on the 17th of May 1875.

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  • Osage, Liberty, Sibley, Lexington, Independence and Westport had successively been abandoned as terminals, as the transferpoint from boat to prairie caravan was moved steadily up the Missouri.

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  • The Transylvania seminary was opened here in 1785, but four years later was removed to Lexington, and a Presbyterian theological seminary was founded here in 1853, but was merged with the Louisville theological seminary (known after 1902 as the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky) in 1901.

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  • Macon, Lafayette and Adair are the leading counties in output; Lexington and Bevier are the leading mining centres.

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  • The Campbells gradually lost sight of Christian unity, owing to the unfortunate experience with the Baptists and to the tone taken by those clergymen who had met them in debates; and for the sake of Christian union it was peculiarly fortunate that in January 1832 at Lexington, Kentucky, the followers of the Campbells and those of Stone (who had stressed union more than primitive Christianity) united.

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  • It is served by the Louisville & Nashville, the Southern, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific, the Lexington & Eastern, and electric railways.

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  • Lexington is the seat of Transylvania University (non-sectarian; coeducational), formerly Kentucky University (Disciples of Christ), which grew out of Bacon College (opened at Georgetown, Ky., in 1836), was chartered in 1858 as Kentucky University, and was opened at Harrodsburg, Ky., in 18J9, whence after a fire in 1864 it removed to Lexington in 1865.

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  • At Lexington it was consolidated with the old Transylvania University, a well-known institution which had been chartered as Transylvania Seminary in 1783, was opened near Danville, Ky., in 1785, was removed to Lexington in 1789, was re-chartered as Transylvania University in 1798, and virtually ceased to exist in 1859.1 In 1908 Kentucky University resumed the old name, Transylvania University.

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  • At Lexington are the State University, two colleges for girls - the Campbell-Hagerman College and Sayre College - and St Catherine's"Academy (Roman Catholic).

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  • Lexington was the home of Henry Clay from 1797 until his death in 1852, and in his memory a monument has been erected, consisting of a magnesian-limestone column (about 120 ft.) in the Corinthian style and surmounted by a statue of Clay, the head of which was torn off in 1902 by a thunderbolt.

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  • There are two race-tracks in Lexington, and annual running and trotting race meetings attract large crowds.

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  • Lexington was named from Lexington, Massachusetts, in 1775 by a party of hunters who were encamped here when they received the news of the battle of Lexington; the permanent settlement dates from 1779.

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  • The markets, especially the Lexington market, are noted for the abundance and great variety of their produce.

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  • The first skirmish of the inevitable war was fought at Lexington in 1775.

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  • The original township of Cambridge was very large, and there have been successively detached from it, Newton (1691), Lexington (1713), Brighton (1837) and Arlington (1867).

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  • Woburn is served by the southern division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Burlington, Lexington, Reading, Stoneham, Wilmington, Winchester, Arlington, Boston and Lowell by electric railways.

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  • His midnight ride from Charlestown to Lexington on the 18th-19th of April 1775, to give warning of the approach of British troops from Boston, is Revere's most famous exploit; it is commemorated by Longfellow, who, however, has "paid little attention to exactness of fact" (Justin Winsor).

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  • Connecticut volunteers were among the first to go to Boston after the battle of Lexington and more than one-half of Washington's army at New York in 1776 was composed of Connecticut soldiers.

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  • In the same year, a general amnesty admitting of his return to America, he accepted the professorship of meteorology in the Virginia Military Institute, and settled at Lexington, Virginia, where he died on the 1st of February 1873.

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  • Harrodsburg was formerly the seat of Bacon College (see Lexington, Kentucky).

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  • His paternal grand-father, Captain John Parker (1729-1775), was the leader of the Lexington minute-men in the skirmish at Lexington.

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  • For his conduct in signing the advertisement soliciting subscriptions for the relief of the relatives of the Americans " murdered by the king's troops at Lexington and Concord," he was tried at the Guildhall on the 4th of July 1777, before Lord Mansfield, found guilty, and committed to the King's Bench prison in St George's Fields, from which he only emerged after a year's durance, and after a loss in fines and costs amounting to X1 200.

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  • This war, by which the United States definitely separated themselves from the British connexion, began with the affair of Lexington in Massachusetts, on the 10th of April 1775, and was virtually ended by the capitulation of Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia, on the 19th of October 1781.

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  • His principal expedition brought about the skirmish of the 19th of April 1775 (see Lexington), in which a detachment sent to seize some military stores collected at Concord suffered heavily at Lexington, Concord and other places, at the hands of the surrounding militia.

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  • This, in history, is called the Battle of Lexington.

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  • He was eight years old when he heard about the ride of Paul Revere and the famous fight at Lexington.

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  • Some of the stores include Heritage Home Furnishings, Lexington Gallery, and Ashley Furniture Home Store.

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  • George Timothy Clooney was born May 6, 1961 in Lexington, KY.

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  • Born in 1961 in Lexington, Kentucky, George Clooney is known for his rugged good looks and outstanding acting in such television shows as ER and Roseanne, and movies including Ocean's 11 and Syriana.

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  • The University of Kentucky near Lexington, for example, has a beautiful arboretum and demonstration vegetable garden, and the staff loves to share their knowledge of raised bed gardening with visitors.

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  • Major cities in the Ohio Valley include Cincinnati, Columbus, and Cleveland, Ohio; Lexington, Louisville, Covington, and Bowling Green, Kentucky; and Fort Wayne, South Bend, and Indianapolis, Indiana.

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  • Speaking of work, this is a place to be vague and speak in general terms - rather than saying, "I work at the Anderson Realty on the corner of 5th and Lexington", just saying "I work in real estate" is enough.

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  • Women may find themselves drawn to the soft curves and flowing shape of the Transatlantic Leather Lexington Brief.

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  • Berea, Kentucky is located just off the I-75, 40 miles south of Lexington (it's where the Bluegrass meets the mountains).

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  • Lexington Collection - Watches from this collection are chronograph watches with round faces.

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  • Forms may be mailed to Aetna Dental, PO Box 14094, Lexington KY 40512-4094.

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  • Lexington, the horse capital of the world, is a bustling city surrounded by acres of pasture land and forests.

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  • Here he became an instructor in German at Harvard in 1825, and in 1830 obtained an appointment as professor of German language and literature there; but his anti-slavery agitation having given umbrage to the authorities, he forfeited his post in 1835, and was ordained Unitarian minister of a chapel at Lexington in Massachusetts in 1836.

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  • Ashland was laid out as a town in 1847, and was named in honour of Henry Clay's home at Lexington, Ky.; in 1857 it was incorporated.

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  • At the edge of the Common, which is now well within the city, the British troops in 1775 took their boats on the eve of the battle of Lexington; and the post-office, now in the very heart of the business section of the city, stands on the original shore-line.

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  • Finally came war, with Lexington and Bunker Hill, and beleaguerinent by the colonial army; until on the 17th of March 1776 the British were compelled by Washington to evacuate the city.

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  • It is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio (being a terminal of the Lexington and Big Sandy Divisions) and the Norfolk & Western railways, and is connected with Huntington, West Virginia, by an electric line.

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  • Jefferson Davis was educated at Transylvania University (Lexington, Kentucky) and at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

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  • After completing his preliminary education in the little school at Lexington, Virginia, which later developed into Washington and Lee University, he came under the influence of the religious movement known as the "great revival" (1789-1790) and devoted himself to the study of theology.

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  • In1824-1828he was professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Brown University, acting as president in 1826-1827; in1828-1831was president of Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky; and in1831-1837was president of the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, where he organized the Alabama Female Athenaeum.

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  • One of the objects of the expedition sent by Governor Thomas Gage to Lexington and Concord on April 18-19, 1775, was the capture of Adams and John Hancock, temporarily staying in Lexington, and when Gage issued his proclamation of pardon on June 12 he excepted these two, whose offences, he said, were "of too flagitious a Nature to admit of any other Consideration than that of condign Punishment."

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  • The popular agitators, headed by Samuel Adams - with whom John Hancock, an opulent merchant and one of the few of the richer people who deserted the crown, leagued himself - forced on the movement, which became war in April 1775, when Gage sent an expedition to Concord and Lexington to destroy military stores accumulated by the patriots and to capture Adams and Hancock, temporarily staying at Lexington.

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  • Lexington is the seat of the Lexington College for Young Women (Baptist, established 1855), the Central College for Women (Methodist Episcopal, South; opened 1869), and the Wentworth Military Academy (1880).

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  • Lexington was founded in 1819, was laid out in 1832, and, with various additions, was chartered as a city in 1845.

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  • Lexington succeeded Sibley as the eastern terminus of the Santa Fe trade, and was in turn displaced by Independence; it long owed its prosperity to the freighting trade up the Missouri, and at the opening of the Civil War it was the most important river town between St Louis and St Joseph and commanded the approach by water to Fort Leavenworth.

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  • Again, during General Price's Missouri expedition in 1864, a Federal force entered Lexington on the 16th of October, and three days later there was some fighting about 4 m.

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