Leonardo sentence example

leonardo
  • Leonardo was educated at Bugia, and afterwards toured the Mediterranean.
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  • He received the first elements of his artistic education from Cosimo Roselli; and after leaving him, devoted himself to the study of the great works of Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • Leonardo da Vinci's rough map of the world in 8 segments (c. 1513) seems likewise to have been intended for a globe.
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  • Leonardo cannot be regarded as the inventor of that very great variety of truths for which he mentions no earlier source.
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  • The map or diagram of which Leonardo Dati in his poem on the Sphere (Della Spera) wrote in 1422 " un T dentre a uno 0 mostra it disegno " (a T within an 0 shows the design) is one of the most persistent types among the circular or wheel maps of the world.
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  • Leonardo da Vinci, the famous artist, while in the service of Cesare Borgia as military engineer, made surveys of several districts in central Italy.
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  • His father was called Bonaccio, most probably a nickname with the ironical meaning of "a good, stupid fellow," while to Leonardo himself another nickname, Bigollone (dunce, blockhead), seems to have been given.
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  • Leonardo certainly was in relation with some persons belonging to that circle when he published in 1220 another more extensive work, De practica geometriae, which he dedicated to the imperial astronomer Dominicus Hispanus.
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  • Some years afterwards (perhaps in 1228) Leonardo dedicated to the well-known astrologer Michael Scott the second edition of his Liber abaci, which was printed with Leonardo's other works by Prince Bald.
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  • It bears the notice that the author wrote it in 1225, and in the introduction Leonardo tells us the occasion of its being written.
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  • Dominicus had presented Leonardo to Frederick II.
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  • The presentation was accompanied by a kind of mathematical performance, in which Leonardo solved several hard problems proposed to him by John of Palermo, an imperial notary, whose name is met with in several documents dated between 1221 and 1240.
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  • The methods which Leonardo made use of in solving those problems fill the Liber quadratorum, the Flos, and a Letter to Magister Theodore.
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  • We know nothing of Leonardo's fate after he issued that second edition.
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  • Leonardo's works are mainly developments of the results obtained by his predecessors; the influences of Greek, Arabian, and Indian mathematicians may be clearly discerned in his methods.
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  • In his Practica geometriae plain traces of the use of the Roman agrimensores are met with; in his Liber abaci old Egyptian problems reveal their origin by the reappearance of the very numbers in which the problem is given, though one cannot guess through what channel they came to Leonardo's knowledge.
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  • The second work of Leonardo, his Practica geometriae (1220) requires readers already acquainted with Euclid's planimetry, who are able to follow rigorous demonstrations and feel the necessity for them.
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  • - To find a square number which remains a square after the addition and subtraction of 5, put to our mathematician in presence of the emperor by John of Palermo, who, perhaps, was quite enough Leonardo's friend to set him such problems only as he had himself asked for.
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  • Leonardo gave as solution the numbers 11 i 4 4, 16, 9 4 - 7 4 and 6197 T, - the squares of 3,, 41'v and 2, 7; and the method of finding them is given in the Liber quadratorum.
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  • Leonardo's method, therefore, when the difference was a fixed condition of the problem, was necessarily very different from the Arabian, and, in all probability, was his own discovery.
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  • The Flos of Leonardo turns on the second question set by John of Palermo, which required the solution of the cubic equation x 3 -{-2x'-}-lox = 20.
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  • Leonardo, making use of fractions of the sexagesimal scale, gives X = I° 221 7 42" i 33 iv 4v 40 vi, after having demonstrated, by a discussion founded on the 10th book of Euclid, that a solution by square roots is impossible.
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  • It is much to be deplored that Leonardo does not give the least intimation how he found his approximative value, outrunning by this result more than three centuries.
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  • In the Flos equations with negative values of the unknown quantity are also to be met with, and Leonardo perfectly understands the meaning of these negative solutions.
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  • In the Letter to Magister Theodore indeterminate problems are chiefly worked, and Leonardo hints at his being able to solve by a general method any problem of this kind not exceeding the first degree.
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  • Other Italian scholars, as Leonardo Aretino, benefited by his patronage.
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  • Among the multifarious pursuits to which the young Leonardo set his hand, the favourites at first were music, drawing and modelling.
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  • As for the influence he exercised on posterity, it is enough to say that Luca Pacioli, about 1500, in his celebrated Summa, leans so exclusively to Leonardo's works (at that time known in manuscript only) that he frankly acknowledges his dependence on them, and states that wherever no other author is quoted all belongs to Leonardus Pisanus.
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  • The first successful attempt to revive the study of algebra in Christendom was due to Leonardo of Pisa, an Italian merchant trading in the Mediterranean.
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  • Mathematics was more or less ousted from the academic curricula by the philosophical inquiries of the schoolmen, and it was only after an interval of nearly three centuries that a worthy successor to Leonardo appeared.
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  • In it he mentions many earlier writers from whom he had learnt the science, and although it contains very little that cannot be found in Leonardo's work, yet it is especially noteworthy for the systematic employment of symbols, and the manner in which it reflects the state of mathematics in Europe during this period.
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  • Hansen (1813-1891), finished in 1858; the Minorite church, a Gothic edifice of the 14th century, containing an admirable mosaic of Leonardo da Vinci's "Last Supper" by Raffaeli, executed in 1806-14 by order of Napoleon and placed here in 1846.
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  • The best known of these are Jose Sebastian Barranca, the naturalist and antiquary, Jose Fernandez Nodal, and Gavino Pacheco Zegarra of Cuzco, who published translations of the Inca drama of 011antay, and Leonardo Villar, of Cuzco.
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  • Leonardo also discussed the old Aristotelian problem of the rotundity of the sun's image after passing through an angular aperture, but not so successfully as Maurolycus.
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  • 4 a Vitruvius, with commentary by Cesare Caesariano, one of the architects of Milan cathedral, published at Como in 1521, shortly after the death of Leonardo, and some twenty years before Porta was born.
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  • He describes an experiment made by a Benedictine monk and architect, Dom Papnutio or Panuce, of the same kind as Leonardo's but without the demonstration.
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  • He devised an approximate numerical solution of equations of the second and third degrees, wherein Leonardo of Pisa must have preceded him, but by a method every vestige of which is completely lost.
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  • Among the most distinguished pupils of the latter was Leonardo Bruni, who, about 1405, wrote " the earliest humanistic tract on education expressly addressed to a lady."
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  • As early as the middle of the 15th century Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) recognized in seashells as well as in the teeth of marine fishes proofs of ancient sea-levels on what are now the summits of the Apennines.
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  • Leading from the fine cloisters, also the work of Bramante, is the former refectory, on the walls of which Leonardo da Vinci painted his celebrated "Last Supper," a work which is unfortunately in a bad state of preservation.
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  • Subsequently, towards the close of the 15th century, the refined court of Lodovico Sforza attracted such celebrated men as Bramante, the architect, Gauffino Franchino, the founder of one of the earliest musical academies, and Leonardo da Vinci, from whose school came Luini, Boltraffio, Gaudenzio Ferrari, Marco d'Oggiono, &c. Later, Pellegrino Tibaldi and Galeazzo Alessi of Genoa (the former a man of very wide activity) were the chief architects, and Leone Leoni of Arezzo the chief sculptor.
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  • Several of the rooms occupied by the archaeological museum bear traces of the decorations executed under Galeazzo Maria and Lodovico it Moro, and one of them has a splendid ceiling with trees in full foliage, painted so as to cover the whole vaulting, ascribed to Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • In the middle of the neighbouring Piazza della Scala stands Magni's monument of Leonardo da Vinci (1872).
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  • Having visited Milan and Pavia, and resided for several years at Venice, he went to Rome upon the invitation of Bruni Leonardo, who had been his pupil, and was then secretary to Gregory XII.
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  • This problem he here solves for the first time, with the help of an Italian example: at least his design so closely repeats that of Leonardo da Vinci's famous and early destroyed equestrian statue of Francesco Sforza that we must certainly suppose him to have seen either the model itself or such a drawing of it as is still preserved byLeonardo's own hand.
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  • Like Leonardo, but with much less than Leonardo's genius for scientific speculation and divination, Diirer was a confirmed reasoner and theorist on the laws of nature and natural appearances.
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  • Leonardo (1388-1446), brother of the preceding, was for some years a senator of Venice, and in 1443 was chosen procurator of St Mark.
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  • The claim is, however, unwarranted; Leonardo's chief work on flight, bearing the title Codice sul Volo degli Uccelli e Varie Altre Materie, written in 1505, consists of a short manuscript of twenty-seven small quarto pages, with simple sketch illustrations interspersed in the text.
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  • In none of Leonardo's manuscripts, however, and in none of his figures, is the slightest hint given of his having any knowledge of the spiral movements made by the wing in flight or of the spiral structure of the wing itself.
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  • It is claimed that Leonardo knew the direction of the stroke of the wing, as revealed by recent researches and proved by modern instantaneous photography.
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  • As a matter of fact, Leonardo gives a wholly inaccurate account of the direction of the stroke of the wing.
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  • In speaking of artificial flight Leonardo says: " The wings have to row downwards and backwards to support the machine on high, so that it moves forward."
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  • There is nothing in Leonardo's writings to show that he knew either the anatomy or physiology of the wing in the modern sense.
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  • The chapel of St Hubert, said to contain the remains of Leonardo da Vinci, who was summoned to Amboise by Francis I., king of France, and died there in 1519, is in the late Gothic style; a delicately carved relief over the doorway represents the conversion of St Hubert.
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  • Leonardo's mother was called Catarina.
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  • Ser Piero on his part was four times married, and had by his last two wives nine sons and two daughters; but he had from the first acknowledged the boy Leonardo and brought him up in his own house, principally, no doubt, at Florence.
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  • In his studio Leonardo worked for several years (about 1470-1477) in the company of Lorenzo di Credi and other less celebrated pupils.
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  • According to Vasari the angel kneeling on the left, with a drapery over the right arm, was put ire by Leonardo, and when Verrocchio saw it his sense of its superiority to his own work caused him to forswear painting for ever after.
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  • The most competent opinion inclines to acknowledge the hand of Leonardo, not only in the face of the angel, but also in parts of the drapery and of the landscape background.
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  • The work was probably done in or about 1470, when Leonardo was eighteen years old.
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  • (A picture of this subject which long did duty at the Uffizi for Leonardo's work is in all likelihood merely the production of some later artist to whom the descriptions of that work have given the cue.) Lastly, Leonardo is related to have begun work in sculpture about this time by modelling several heads of smiling women and children.
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  • This little Louvre "Annunciation" is not very compatible in style with another and larger, muchdebated "Annunciation" at the Uffizi, which manifestly came from the workshop of Verrocchio about 1473-1474, and which many critics claim confidently for the young Leonardo.
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  • It may have been joint studio-work of Verrocchio and his pupils including Leonardo, who certainly was concerned in it, since a study for the sleeve of the angel, preserved at Christ Church, Oxford, is unquestionably by his hand.
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  • The landscape, with its mysterious spiry mountains and winding waters, is very Leonardesque both in this picture and in another contemporary product of the workshop, or as some think of Leonardo's hand, namely a very highly and coldly finished small "Madonna with a Pink" at Munich.
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  • The preparation in monochrome for this picture, a work of extraordinary power both of design and physiognomical expression, is preserved at the Uffizi, but the painting itself was never carried out, and after Leonardo's failure to fulfil his contract Filippino Lippi had once more to be employed in his place.
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  • But it must be remembered that Leonardo was already full of projects in mechanics, hydraulics, architecture, and military and civil engineering, ardently feeling his way in the work of experimental.
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  • No portrait of Leonardo as he appeared during this period of his life has come down to us.
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  • Lorenzo recommended the young Leonardo, who went to Milan accordingly (at some uncertain date in or about 1483), taking as a gift from Lorenzo and a token of his own skill a silver lute of wondrous sweetness fashioned in the likeness of a horse's head.
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  • Hostilities were at the moment imminent between Milan and Venice; it was doubtless on that account that in the letter commending himself to the duke, and setting forth his own capacities, Leonardo rests his title to patronage chiefly on his attainments and inventions in military engineering.
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  • The first definite documentary evidence of Leonardo's employments at Milan dates from 1487.
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  • In these drafts Leonardo describes in the first person, with sketches, a traveller's strange experiences in Egypt, Cyprus, Constantinople, the Cilician coasts about Mount Taurus and Armenia.
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  • No contemporary gives the least hint of Leonardo's having travelled in the East; to the places he mentions he gives their classical and not their current Oriental names; the catastrophes he describes are unattested from any other source; he confuses the Taurus and the Caucasus; some of the phenomena he mentions are repeated from Aristotle and Ptolemy; and there seems little reason to doubt that these passages in his MSS.
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  • That Leonardo was among the artists thus employed is proved both by notes and projects among his MSS.
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  • Again, it must have been the pestilence decimating Milan in1484-1485which gave occasion to the projects submitted by Leonardo to Ludovico for breaking up the city and reconstructing it on improved sanitary principles.
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  • In the same year, 1490, Leonardo enjoyed some months of uninterrupted mathematical and physical research in the libraries and among the learned men of Pavia, whither he had been called to advise on some architectural difficulties concerning the cathedral.
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  • Neither is it possible to discriminate with certainty the sketches intended for the Sforza monument from others which Leonardo may have done in view of another and later commission for an equestrian statue, namely, that in honour of Ludovico's great enemy, Gian Giacomo Trivulzio.
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  • The same year was one of special importance in the prodigiously versatile activities of Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • Lastly, recent research has proved that it was in 1494 that Leonardo got to work in earnest on what was to prove not only by far his greatest but by far his most expeditiously and steadily executed work in painting.
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  • This picture, the world-famous "Cenacolo" of Leonardo, has been the subject of much erroneous legend and much misdirected experiment.
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  • The intensity of intellectual and manual application which Leonardo threw into the work is proved by the fact that he finished it within four years, in spite of all his other avocations and of those prolonged pauses of concentrated imaginative effort and intense self-critical brooding to which we have direct contemporary witness.
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  • A further gain obtained through these operations has been the uncovering, immediately above the main subject, of a beautiful scheme of painted lunettes and vaultings, the lunettes filled by Leonardo's.
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  • Leonardo's "Last Supper," for all its injuries, became from the first, and has ever since remained, for all Christendom the typical representation of the scene.
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  • Leonardo, though no special student of the Greeks, has perfectly carried out the Greek principle of expressive variety in particulars subordinated to general symmetry.
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  • Leonardo's triumph with his "Last Supper" encouraged him in the hope of proceeding now to the casting of the Sforza monument or "Great Horse," the model of which had stood for the last three years the admiration of all beholders, in the Corte Vecchio of the Castello.
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  • Pacioli was equally amazed and delighted at Leonardo's two great achievements in sculpture and painting, and still more at the genius for mathematical, physical and anatomical research shown in the collections of MS. notes which the master laid before him.
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  • Leonardo obtained Pacioli's help in calculations and measurements for the great task of casting the bronze horse and man.
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  • When, in the last decade of the 19th century, works of thorough architectural investigation and repair were undertaken in that building under the superintendence of Professor Luca Beltrami, a devoted foreign student, Dr Paul Muller-Walde, obtained leave to scrape for traces of Leonardo's handiwork beneath the replastered and whitewashed walls and ceilings of chambers that might be identified with these.
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  • In one small chamber there was cleared a frieze, of cupids intermingled with foliage; but in this, after the first moments of illusion, it was only possible to acknowledge the hand of some unknown late and lax decorator of the school, influenced as much by Raphael as by Leonardo.
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  • In another room (Sala del Tesoro) was recovered a gigantic headless figure, in all probability of Mercury, also wrongly claimed at first for Leonardo, and afterwards, to all appearance rightly, for Bramante.
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  • But in the great Sala dell' Asse (or della Torre) abundant traces of Leonardo's own hand were found, in the shape of a decoration of intricate geometrical knot or plait work .combined with natural leafage; the abstract puzzle-pattern, of a kind in which Leonardo took peculiar pleasure, intermingling in cunning play and contrast with a pattern of living boughs and leaves exquisitely drawn in free and vital growth.
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  • For these and other artistic labours Leonardo was rewarded in 1498 (ready money being with difficulty forthcoming and his salary being long in arrears) by the gift of a suburban garden outside the Porta Vercelli.
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  • Great artists were usually exempt from the consequences of political revolutions, and Trivulzio, now or later, commissioned Leonardo to design an equestrian monument to himself.
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  • Leonardo, having remained unmolested at Milan for two months under the new regime, but knowing that Ludovico was preparing a great stroke for the re-establishment of his power, and that fresh convulsions must ensue, thought it best to provide for his own security.
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  • Ludovico was taken prisoner and carried to France; the city, which had been strictly spared on the first entry of Louis XII., was entered and sacked; and the model of Leonardo's great statue made a butt (as eye witnesses tell) for Gascon archers.
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  • Thus, of Leonardo's sixteen years' work at Milan (1483-1499) the results actually remaining are as follows: The Louvre "Virgin of the Rocks" possibly, i.e.
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  • Lucrezia Crivelli has, with no better reason, been identified with the famous "Belle Ferronniere" (a mere misnomer, caught from the true name of another portrait which used to hang near it) at the Louvre; this last is either a genuine Milanese portrait by Leonardo himself or an extraordinarily fine work of his pupil Boltraffio.
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  • The painters especially recorded as Leonardo's immediate pupils during this part of his life at Milan are the two before mentioned, Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio and Ambrogio Preda or de Predis, with Marco d'Oggionno and Andrea Salai, the last apparently less a fully-trained painter than a studio assistant and personal attendant, devotedly attached and faithful in both capacities.
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  • Leonardo's own native Florentine manner had at first been not a little modified by that of the Milanese school as he found it represented in the works of such men as Bramantino, Borgognone and Zenale; but his genius had in its turn reacted far more strongly upon the younger members of the school, and exercised, now or later, a transforming and dominating influence not only upon his immediate pupils, but upon men like Luini, Giampetrino, Bazzi, Cesare da Sesto and indeed the whole Lombard school in the early 15th century.
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  • The knowledge of Leonardo's position among and familiarity with such men early helped to spread the idea that he had been at the head of a regularly constituted academy of arts and sciences at Milan.
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  • There existed no such academy at Milan, with Leonardo as president.
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  • For these last pursuits Leonardo had nothing but contempt.
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  • Here Leonardo undertook to paint an altar-piece for the Church of the Annunziata, Filippino Lippi, who had already received the commission, courteously retiring from it in his favour.
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  • In April 1501 Leonardo had only finished the cartoon, and this all Florence flocked to see and admire.
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  • Evidently two different though nearly related designs had been maturing in Leonardo's mind.
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  • It remains a matter of debate whether the Academy cartoon or that shown by Leonardo at the Annunziata in 1501 was the earlier.
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  • In spite of the universal praise of his cartoon, Leonardo did not persevere with the picture, and the monks of the Annunziata had to give back the commission to Filippino Lippi, at whose death the task was completed by Perugino.
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  • It remains uncertain whether a small Madonna with distaff and spindle, which the correspondent of Isabella Gonzaga reports Leonardo as having begun for one Robertet, a favourite of the king of France, was ever finished.
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  • Between May 1502 and March 1503 Leonardo travelled as chief engineer to Duke Caesar over a great part of central Italy.
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  • But Leonardo apparently had already had enough of that service, and was back at Florence in March.
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  • Neither Leonardo's genius nor his noble manners could soften the rude and taunting temper of the younger man, whose style as an artist, nevertheless, in subjects both of tenderness and terror, underwent at this time a profound modification from Leonardo's example.
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  • In one of the sections of his projected Treatise on Painting, Leonardo has detailed at length, and obviously from his own observation, the pictorial aspects of a battle.
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  • The place assigned to Leonardo for the preparation of his cartoon was the Sala del Papa at Santa Maria Novella.
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  • The young Raphael, whose incomparable instinct for rhythmical design had been trained hitherto on subjects of holy quietude and rapt contemplation according to the traditions of Umbrian art, learnt from Leonardo's example to apply the same instinct to themes of violent action and strife.
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  • During these years, 1503-1506, Leonardo also resumed (if it is true that he had already begun it before his travels with Cesare Borgia) the portrait of Madonna Lisa, the Neapolitan wife of Zanobi del Giocondo, and finished it to the last pitch of his powers.
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  • In the spring of 1 506 Leonardo, moved perhaps by chagrin at the failure of his work in the Hall of Council, accepted a pressing invitation to Milan, from Charles d'Amboise, Marechal de Chaumont, the lieutenant of the French king in Lombardy.
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  • The period was several times extended, at first grudgingly, Soderini complaining that Leonardo had treated the republic ill in the matter of the battle picture; whereupon the painter honourably offered to refund the money paid, an offer which the signory as honourably refused.
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  • The king arrived in May 1507, and soon afterwards Leonardo's services were formally and amicably transferred from the signory of Florence to Louis, who gave him the title of painter and engineer in ordinary.
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  • After his death Leonardo experienced unkindness from his seven half-brothers, Ser Piero's legitimate sons.
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  • One of them, who followed his father's profession, made himself the champion of the others in disputing Leonardo's claim to his share, first in the paternal inheritance, and then in that which had been left to be divided between the brothers and sisters by an uncle.
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  • The litigation that ensued dragged on for several years, and forced upon Leonardo frequent visits to Florence and interruptions of his work at Milan, in spite of pressing letters to the authorities of the republic from Charles d'Amboise, from the French king himself, and from others of his powerful friends and patrons, begging that the proceedings might be accelerated.
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  • A letter from Leonardo to Charles d'Amboise in 1511, announcing the end of his law troubles, speaks of two Madonnas of different sizes that he means to bring with him to Milan.
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  • At the villa of the Melzi family at Vaprio, where Leonardo was a frequent visitor, a colossal Madonna on one of the walls is traditionally ascribed to him, but is rather the work of Sodoma or of Melzi himself working under the master's eye.
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  • Another painter in the service of the French king, Jehan Perreal or Jehan de Paris, visited Milan, and consultations on technical points were held between him and Leonardo.
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  • But Leonardo's chief practical employments were evidently on the continuation of his great hydraulic and irrigation works in Lombardy.
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  • Returning to Milan with his law-suits ended in 1511, Leonardo might have looked forward to an old age of contented labour, the chief task of which, had he had his will, would undoubtedly have been to put in order the vast mass of observations and speculations accumulated in his note-books, and to prepare some of them for publication.
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  • This prince must have been familiar with Leonardo as a child, but perhaps resented the ready transfer of his allegiance to the French, and at any rate gave him no employment.
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  • Leonardo's special friend at the papal court was the pope's youngest brother, Giuliano de' Medici, a youth who combined dissipated habits with thoughtful culture and a genuine interest in arts and sciences.
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  • By his influence Leonardo and his train were accommodated with apartments in the Belvedere of the Vatican.
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  • The pope, indeed, is said to have been delighted with Leonardo's minor experiments and ingenuities in science, and especially by a kind of zoological toys which he had invented by way of pastime, as well as mechanical tricks played upon living animals.
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  • When Leonardo, having received a commission for a picture, was found distilling for himself a new medium of oils and herbs before he had begun the design, the pope was convinced, not quite unreasonably, that nothing serious would come of it.
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  • Tradition ascribes to Leonardo an attractive fresco of a Madonna with a donor in the convent of St Onofrio, but this seems to be clearly the work of Boltraffio.
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  • After a stay of less than two years, Leonardo left Rome under the following circumstances.
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  • Leonardo accompanied his protector on the march, and remained with the headquarters of the papal army at Piacenza when Giuliano fell ill and retired to Florence.
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  • The pope, travelling by way of Florence and discussing there the great new scheme of the Laurentian library, entertained the idea of giving the commission to Leonardo; but Michelangelo came in hot haste from Rome and succeeded in securing it for himself.
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  • As the time for the meeting of the potentates at Bologna drew near, Leonardo proceeded thither from Piacenza, and in due course was presented to the king.
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  • Between the brilliant young sovereign and the grand old sage an immediate and strong sympathy sprang up; Leonardo accompanied Francis on his homeward march as far as Milan, and there determined to accept the royal invitation to France, where a new home was offered him with every assurance of honour and regard.
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  • The remaining two and a half years of Leonardo's life were spent at the Castle of Cloux near Amboise, which was assigned, with a handsome pension, to his use.
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  • In the spring of 1518 Leonardo had occasion to exercise his old talents as a festival-master when the dauphin was christened and a Medici-Bourbon marriage celebrated.
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  • Leonardo, it seems, was suffering from some form of slight paralysis which impaired his power of hand.
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  • Of the "Pomona" mentioned by Lomazzo as a work of the Amboise time his visitor says nothing, nor yet of the Louvre "Bacchus," which tradition ascribes to Leonardo but which is clearly pupil's work.
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  • But Leonardo had never been either a friend or an enemy of the Church.
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  • History tells of no man gifted in the same degree as Leonardo was at once for art and science.
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  • No imaginable strength of any single man would have sufficed to carry out a hundredth part of what Leonardo essayed.
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  • Leonardo sought to achieve that conquest and at the same time to carry the old Florentine excellences of linear drawing and psychological expression to a perfection of which other men had not dreamed.
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  • But the more the range and character of Leonardo's studies becomes ascertained the more his greatness dwarfs them all.
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  • Had the Catholic reaction not fatally discouraged the pursuit of the natural sciences in Italy, had Leonardo even left behind him any one with zeal and knowledge enough to extract from the mass of his MSS.
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  • As it was, these studies of Leonardo - "studies intense of strong and stern delight" - seemed to his trivial followers and biographers merely his whims and fancies, ghiribizzi, things to be spoken of slightingly and with apology.
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  • The MSS., with the single exception of some of those relating to painting, lay unheeded and undivulged until the present generation; and it is only now that the true range of Leonardo's powers is beginning to be fully discerned.
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  • Leonardo's chief implements were pen, silverpoint, and red and black chalk (red chalk especially).
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  • Leonardo appears to have been left-handed.
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  • A full critical discussion and catalogue of the extant drawings of Leonardo are to be found in Berenson's Drawings of the Florentine Painters.
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  • - The only printed book bearing Leonardo's name until the recent issues of transcripts from his MSS.
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  • The original MS. draft of Leonardo has been lost, though a great number of notes for it are scattered through the various extant volumes of his MSS.
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  • It is indeed doubtful whether Leonardo himself ever completed the MS. treatise (or treatises) on painting and kindred subjects mentioned by Fra Luca Pacioli and by Vasari, and probable that the form and order, and perhaps some of the substance, of the Trattato as we have it was due to compilers and not to the master himself.
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  • In recent years a whole body of scholars and editors have been engaged in giving to the world the texts of Leonardo's existing MSS.
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  • In 1796 Napoleon swept away to Paris, along with the other art treasures of Italy, the whole of the Leonardo MSS.
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  • It seems needless to give references to the voluminous discussion in newspapers and periodicals concerning the authenticity of a wax bust of Flora acquired in 1909 for the Berlin Museum and unfortunately ascribed to Leonardo da Vinci, its real author having been proved by external and internal evidence to be the Englishman Richard Cockle Lucas, and its date 1846.
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  • Leonardo, nearer Foggia, belonging to the Teutonic order, is of the same date.
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  • He was assassinated, however, in 1862; and his successor, Leonardo Canal, came to terms with Mosquera at Cali.
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  • Leonardo da Vinci, more than a hundred years earlier, had come to the same conclusion.
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  • Michael Scott, the translator of some treatises of Aristotle and of the commentaries of Averroes, Leonardo of Pisa, who introduced Arabic numerals and algebra to the West, and other scholars, Jewish and Mahommedan as well as Christian, were welcome at his court.
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  • In conjunction with his brother Leonardo, he wrote in Latin a history of the first crusade, entitled De Bello a Christianis contra Barbaros gesto pro Christi Sepulchro et Judaea recuperandis libri tres (Venice, 1432, translated into Italian, 1543, and into French, 1620), which, though itself of little interest, is said to have furnished Tasso with the historic basis for his Jerusalem Delivered.
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  • Raphael has larger bandanna and double attack power Enter Raphael, Donatello, Splinter, Raphael, Leonardo as a password.
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  • Leonardo has smaller bandanna and double defense power Enter Michaelangelo, Raphael, Leonardo, Leonardo, Michaelangelo as a password.
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  • In 1483 Leonardo was commissioned by the confraternity of the Immaculate Conception to paint The Virgin of the Rocks.
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  • Here in his first solo work he follows a related path, with a tale of the young Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • Security will be extremely tight at Rome's main passenger airport, Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • Leonardo, making use of fractions of the sexagesimal scale, gives X = I° 221 7 42" i 33 iv 4v 40 vi, after having demonstrated, by a discussion founded on the 10th book of Euclid, that a solution by square roots is impossible.
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  • The 16th century boasts the names of Bernardino Fungai, Guidoccio Cossarelli, Giacomo Pacchiarotto, Girolamo del Pacchia and especially Baldassare Peruzzi (1481-1537), who while especially celebrated for his frescoes and studies in perspective and chiaroscuro was also an architect of considerable attainments (see Rome); Giovanni Antonio Bazzi, otherwise known as 11 Sodoma (1477-1549), who, born at Vercelli in Piedmont, and trained at Milan in the school of Leonardo da Vinci, came to Siena in 1504 and there produced some of his finest works, while his influence on the art of the place was considerable; Domenico Beccafumi, otherwise known as Micharino (1486-1550), noted for the Michelangelesque daring of his designs; and Francesco Vanni.
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  • There is a museum of zoology and mineralogy in Palazzo Carignano (another of Guarini's buildings), and the royal palace contains the royal armoury (a fine collection made by Charles Albert in 1833) and the royal library with its rich manuscript collection and its 20,000 drawings, among which are sketches by Raphael, Michelangelo, and Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • It may be well to explain here that a claim has been set up by his admirers for the celebrated artist, architect and engineer, Leonardo da Vinci, to be regarded as the discoverer of the principles and practice of flight (see Theodore Andrea Cook, Spirals in Nature and Art, 1903).
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  • They made a brief stay at Mantua, where Leonardo was graciously received by the duchess Isabella Gonzaga, the most cultured of the many cultured great ladies of her time, whose portrait he promised to paint on a future day; meantime he made the fine chalk drawing of her now at the Louvre.
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  • Nc painting by Leonardo from the Academy cartoon exists, but in the Ambrosiana at Milan there is one by Luini, with the figure of St Joseph added.
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  • About the same time Leonardo took part in the debate on the proper site for Michelangelo's newly finished colossal "David," and voted in favour of the Loggia dei Lanzi, against a majority which included Michelangelo himself.
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  • Michelangelo and Raphael, who had both, as we have seen, risen to greatness partly on Leonardo's shoulders, were fresh from the glory of their great achievements in the Sistine Chapel and the Stanze.
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  • P. Richter's Literary Works of Leonardo da Vinci (see Bibliography): this work included, besides a history and analytical index of the MSS., facsimiles of a number of selected pages containing matter of autobiographical, artistic, or literary interest, with transcripts and translations of their MS. contexts.
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  • Security will be extremely tight at Rome 's main passenger airport, Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • Leonardo da Vinci is known for his iconic paintings and scientific drawings.
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  • Greensburg: Greensburg is a moving program produced by Leonardo DiCaprio that follows the citizens of Greensburg, Kansas, as they rebuild their community after a deadly tornado rips apart their hometown.
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  • Paintings from the Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci have come under recent scrutiny through the popularity of the novel The DaVinci Code, which speculates that the art contains hidden messages about Christianity.
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  • Lindsay has been linked romantically to singer Aaron Carter, Wilmer Valderrama, and Leonardo DiCaprio.
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  • Tobey Maguire's film career dates back to his teen years when he appeared with Robert De Niro and Leonardo DiCaprio in This Boy's Life.
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  • Is rumored to have been in the running for the role of Jack Dawson in Titanic (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) and Will Turner in Pirates of the Caribbean (played by Orlando Bloom).
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  • Gisele Bundchen is famously known for her Victoria's Secret ad campaigns and was once equally famous for dating Leonardo DiCaprio.
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  • Leonardo DiCaprio - After the massive success of Titanic, Leonardo DiCaprio could have rested on his laurels and ridden the wave of success that came with it, but instead the dedicated actor pursued tough roles in high quality films.
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  • Other celebs you may or may not recognize at first glance include Pamela Anderson, Sharon Stone, Leonardo DiCaprio, Snoop Dogg, Robin Williams, Madonna, Fergie from the Black Eyed Peas, Eminem and Cher.
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  • Leonardo DiCaprio flies with commercial airlines for almost all of his trips.
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  • Leonardo DiCaprio plays Jack Dawson to Kate Winslet's Rose DeWitt Bukater.
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  • Leonardo DiCaprio: He's not known for summer blockbusters but DiCaprio can still pull viewers into theaters, which is why the star of Titanic rakes in $20 million for each of his roles.
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  • Michelangelo, Leonardo, Donatello and Raphael are more than names of famous artists.
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  • Leonardo Da Vinci understood the Golden Ratio's importance and used it in practical applications to create beauty with his art.
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  • Leonardo Da Vinci illustrated a dissertation called De Divina Proportion or The Divine Proportion.
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  • Excellent examples are The Last Supper and The Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci.
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  • The 1996 version, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, used Shakespeare's original lines, but the film's setting was a modern one, with guns instead of swords and cars rather than carriages.
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  • Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet play Jack Dawson and Rose Dewitt Bukater, two young people from very different social classes that find themselves on the infamous Titanic at the same moment in time.
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  • Along with high-profile clientele such as Leonardo DiCaprio and Bruce Springsteen, Kobold's diving watches attract deep sea divers like James Samaki and Ingo Vollmer as well.
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  • Matt Damon, Jason Statham and Leonardo DiCaprio, who is also a brand ambassador, are a few film stars who prefer this well-respected brand.
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  • Leonardo da Vinci created drawings and designs of transport vehicles, but no prototypes were developed.
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  • Many features of the castle are world-renowned, but perhaps the most famous is the double-helix staircase (shown at right) which is though to perhaps have been designed by Leonardo da Vinci.
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  • In between projects she has dated actor Leonardo Dicaprio, and surfer Kelly Slater.
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  • Thanks to the paparazzi, Gisele may be seen in the arms of her on-again, off-again beau Leonardo di Caprio.
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  • An avid tennis player in her youth, she takes up the sport again on Voyager's holodecks, and shows her science bent by relaxing in a holographic representation of Leonardo Da Vinci's studio.
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  • Bernardo (1408-1489), son of Leonardo, was a pupil of Guarino and of George of Trebizond, and entered the Venetian senate at an early age.
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