Lent sentence examples

lent
  • He returned to motel in mid-evening, in a car lent to him by the accommodating authorities.

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  • Occasionally, he even lent a hand with the chores at Bird Song.

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  • The amount lent on security was 4,153,229.

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  • Her confessor lent her the Genius of Christianity, and to this book she ascribes the first change in her religious views.

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  • Jenn checked her pocket, not surprised to see the phone Darian lent her was missing.

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  • We still have the vamp Jonny lent us to help track Others.

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  • LENT (0.

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  • At Constantinople, too, three Sundays were added and associated with the Easter festival in the same way as the Sundays in Lent proper.

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  • The belief in the appearance of the mandi readily lent itself to imposture.

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  • Miss Sullivan's vigorous, original mind has lent much of its vitality to her pupil.

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  • In their hurry to obtain wealth, this crowd of office-mongers from the provinces lent themselves to all kinds of bribery and corruption.

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  • The value of their land certificates or cartetle fondiarie (representing capital in circulation) rose from 10,420,000 in 1881 to 15,560,000 in 1886, and to 30,720,000 in 1891, but fell to 29,320,000 in 1896, to 27,360,000 in 1898, and to 24,360,000 in 1907; the amount of money lent increased from 1/2Io,44o,000 in 1881 to 15,600,000 in 1886, and 30,800,000 in 1891, but fell to 29,320,000 in 1896, to 27,360,000 in 1899, and to f2I,72o,000 in 1907.

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  • 6 The situation was one which lent itself to the imagination.

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  • The period of Lent is still described as "the six weeks of the fast" (E 41360µ6,5Es TWV vioreLWV), Holy Week (7) ayia Kai µeyaAn E/380µas) not being reckoned in.

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  • Anglo-Italian relations, however, regained their norma I cordiality two years later, and found expression in the support lent by Italy to the British proposal at the London conference on the Egyptian question (July 1884).

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  • They in return gladly accepted a champion who lent them the prestige and influence of the church.

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  • had lent an unwonted ring of plausibility to the papal complaint concerning the miserable position of the Holy See.

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  • I lied to Bobby—told him dad lent the car to a friend while he took the train into Philly, like he usually does.

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  • It has now come to my knowledge that you lent him your carriage for his removal from town, and that you have even accepted papers from him for safe custody.

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  • With the growth of the Oxford Movement in the English Church, the practice of observing Lent was revived; and, though no rules for fasting are authoritatively laid down, the duty of abstinence is now very generally inculcated by bishops and clergy, either as a discipline or as an exercise in self-denial.

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  • In the same year numerous experiments were tried with the assistance of an Italian battleship, the " Carlo Alberto," lent by the Italian government, and messages were transmitted from Poldhu to Kronstadt, to Spezia, and also to Sydney in Nova Scotia.

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  • Instead of opposing Francesco Sforza in Milan, he lent him his prestige and influence, foreseeing that the dynastic future of his own family and the pacification of Italy might be secured by a balance of power in which Florence should rank on equal terms with Milan and Naples.

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  • The Greek Lent begins on the Monday of Sexagesima, with a week of preparatory fasting, known as TvpoOl yca, or the "butter-week"; the actual fast, however, starts on the Monday of Quinquagesima (Estomihi), this week being known as "the first week of the fast" (050µas T&vv vriamtwv).

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  • The statute, however, would not seem to have had much effect; for in spite of a proclamation of Queen Elizabeth in 1560 imposing a fine of £ 20 for each offence on butchers slaughtering animals during Lent, in 1563 Sir William Cecil, in Notes upon an Act for the Increase of the Navy, says that "in old times no flesh at all was eaten on fish days; even the king himself could not have license; which was occasion of eating so much fish as now is eaten in flesh upon fish days."

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  • I gotta bite the bullet and go see Miss Worthington, with my hat in hand, and explain how I misplaced that picture she kindly lent me.

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  • The customs service includes British customs officers lent to the Liberian service.

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  • The supreme responsibility for this act must rest with the emperor, "who imposed it by an exercise of personal power on the only one cf his ministers who could have lent himself to such a forgetfulness of the safeguards of a parliamentary regime."

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  • After being educated at the high school of Edinburgh and at Durham, he attended the literary and law classes at the university of Edinburgh, and becoming in 1810 a member of the Edinburgh faculty of advocates, he for some time enjoyed the intimate acquaintance of Cockburn, Jeffrey, Scott and other distinguished men whose talent then lent lustre to the Scottish bar.

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  • The chords necessary in this part, which with its supporting bass is called the continuo, were indicated by figures; and the evanescent and delicate tones of the harpsichord; lent themselves admirably to this purpose where solo voices and instruments were concerned.

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  • Some Norman adventurers, on pilgrimage to St Michaels shrine on Monte Gargano, lent their swords in 1017 to the Lombard cities of Apulia against the Greeks.

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  • During the religious confusion of the Reformation, the practice of fasting was generally relaxed and it was found necessary to reassert the obligation of keeping Lent and the other periods and days of abstinence by a series of proclamations and statutes.

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  • The senate of Rome under the influence of Antony and Octavian ratified the claims of Herod, and after some delay lent him the armed force necessary to make them good.

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  • His friend Beeckman lent him a copy of Galileo's work, which he glanced through in his usual manner with other men's books; he found it good, and " failing more in the points where it follows received opinions than where it diverges from them."

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  • lenten, lente, lent; cf.

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  • As this fast falls in the early part of the year, it became confused with the season, and gradually the word Lent, which originally meant spring, was confined to this use.

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  • I was surprised to notice the vehicle lent to Howie was no longer parked in front of his door.

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  • in 1627 and 1631, again commanded abstinence from all flesh during Lent, and the High Church movement of the 17th century lent a fresh religious sanction to the official attitude.

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  • Clive selected it, on account of its commanding position, as the cantonment for the brigade of troops lent him by the nawab of Oudh.

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  • Seven other lectures were delivered during the first three weeks of the Lent term of 1842.

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  • For opposite reasons, neither the Greek nor the Jewish mind lent itself readily to mysticism: the Greek, because of its clear and sunny naturalism; the Jewish, because of its rigid monotheism and its turn towards worldly realism and statutory observance.

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  • Prices were low, foreign commerce was already large, business thriving; wealth gave social status; the official British class lent a lustre to society; and Boston " town " was drawing society from the " country."

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  • Still more important perhaps was the fact that the ports of the kingdom attracted the Italian towns; and it was therefore to the kingdom that they lent the strength of their armies and the skill of their siege-artillery - in return, it is true, for concessions of privileges so considerable as to weaken the resources of the kingdom they helped to create.

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  • After a journey of fifty-four days his companions arrived at Venice in January 1537; and here they remained until the beginning of Lent, when Ignatius sent them to Rome to get money for the proposed voyage to Palestine.

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  • Tattnall not only brought the Toeywan under fire, but lent the aid of his boats to land detachments to turn the Chinese defences.

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  • Every Lent he fell ill and had to return to Holland to recover.

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  • Where an intending borrower breaks his agreement to borrow, specific performance will not be granted, and the damages recoverable must be measured by the loss sustained through the breach and not by the sum agreed to be lent (The South African Territories, Limited v.

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  • After a time they lent a ready ear to detailed allegations of corruption brought against him by his old enemy Nuncomar.

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  • In Rome and Alexandria, and even in Jerusalem, Holy Week was included in Lent and the whole fast lasted but six weeks, Saturdays, however, not being exempt.

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  • 30); but the inconsistency of this period with the name Quadragesima, and with the forty days' fast of Christ, came to be noted, and early in the 7th century four days were added, by what pope is unknown, Lent in the West beginning henceforth on Ash Wednesday.

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  • In the middle ages, meat, eggs and milk were forbidden in Lent not only by ecclesiastical but by statute law; and this rule was enforced until the reign of William III.

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  • "I have often noted," writes John Taylor, the water-poet, in his Jack a Lent (1620), "that if any superfluous feasting or gormandizing, paunch-cramming assembly do meet, it is so ordered that it must be either in Lent, upon a Friday, or a fasting: for the meat does not relish well except it be sauced with disobedience and comtempt of authority."

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  • This form of tenancy, like tenancy from year to year, may be treated either by express contract or by implication, as where premises are occupied with the consent of the owner, but without any express or implied agreement as to the duration of the tenancy, or where a house is lent rent free by one person to another.

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  • He preached at the court of Versailles during the Advent of 1670 and the Lent of 1672, and was subsequently called again to deliver the Lenten course of sermons in 1674, 1675, 1680 and 1682, and the Advent sermons of 1684, 1689 and 1693.

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  • Catholics and Protestants were unanimous in praising his fiery eloquence in the Lent sermons which he preached at Montpellier in 1686.

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  • The auriphrygiata is worn during Advent, and from Septuagesima to Maundy Thursday, except on the third Sunday in Advent (Gaudete), the fourth in Lent (Laetare) and on such greater festivals as fall within this time.

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  • The gift of high offices of state to Frenchmen lent to the Protestant opposition the aspect of a national resistance to foreign domination.

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  • (r) the preparatory fast of the forty days of Lent; (2) the fifteen days, beginning with the Sunday before and ending with the Sunday after Easter, during which the ceremonies of Holy Week and the services of the Octave of Easter were observed; this period, called by the French the Quinzaine de Pdques, was specially observed in that.

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  • tariff, and in the seven financial years from 1900-1907: the British ship " Agamemnon," both being war-ships lent for the purpose by their respective governments.

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  • Charters granted to seaports often stipulated that the town should send so many herrings or other fish to the king annually during Lent.

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  • Other canons treat of intercourse with heretics, admission of penitent heretics, baptism, fasts, Lent, angel-worship (forbidden as idolatrous) and the canonical books, from which the Apocrypha and Revelation are wanting.

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  • Ignatius returned to Venice in the middle of January 1524; and, determining to devote himself for a while to study, he set out for Barcelona, where he arrived in Lent.

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  • had stood that served to render ineffectual others of his encyclicals, in which he dealt earnestly and effectively with matters in which orthodox Protestants had a sympathetic interest with him and might otherwise have lent an ear to his counsels.

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  • It was seen in the 10th century, by the Arab traveller Ibn-Haukal, in the neighbourhood of Palermo, where it throve luxuriantly in the pools of the Papireto, a stream to which it lent its name.

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  • Machinery was lent to the farmers, and free grants of seed were made.

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  • Orkhan lent the desired aid; his son Suleiman Pasha, governor of Karassi, crossed into Europe, crushed Cantacuzenus's enemies, and penetrated as far as the Balkans, returning laden with spoil.

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  • Theodore Bent and his wife followed in the same track a few months later with a well-equipped party including a surveyor, Imam Sharif, lent by the Indian government, who made a very valuable survey of the country passed through.

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  • It was at Pisa, in the church of Santa Cristina, on the fourth Sunday in Lent (April I), while rapt in ecstasy after the communion, that Catherine's greatest traditional glory befell her, viz.

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  • Seed is distributed, and agricultural machinery lent, by the government.

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  • But despite its fame, the university, though an autonomous corporation, does not seem to have had any fixed residence: the professors lectured in their own houses, or later in rooms hired or lent by the civic authorities.

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  • The new settlement was crushed by Crotona, but the Athenians lent aid to the fugitives and in 443 Pericles sent out to Thurii a mixed body of colonists from various parts of Greece, among whom were Herodotus and the orator Lysias.

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  • The ensuing Rudini cabinet lent itself to Cavallotti's campaign, and at the end of 1897 the judicial authorities applied to the chamber for permission to prosecute Crispi for embezzlement.

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  • The he Board of Education directly administers the following educational institutions - the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington, with its branch at Bethnal Green, from both of which objects are lent to various institutions for educational purposes; the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, with which is incorporated the Royal School of Mines; the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom and the Museum of Practical Geology, Jermyn Street; the Solar Physics Observatory, South Kensington; and the Royal College of Art, South Kensington.

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  • The citizens were so pleased at this unexpected occurrence that they willingly lent the king £¦000 in 1488, which he required for military preparations against France.

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  • But in Lent his celebrated sermons upon Amos were delivered in the duomo, and again he urged the necessity of reforming the church, striving by ingenious arguments to reconcile rebellion against Alexander with unalterable fidelity to the Holy See.

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  • He presided over the first meeting which issued in the foundation of the National Society, and subsequently lent the scheme his strong support.

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  • Shadows and reflections were ignored, and perspective, approximately correct for landscape distances, was isometrical for near objects, while the introduction of a symbolic sun or moon lent the sole distinction between a day and a night scene.

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  • It was a noble art, but unfortunately the rivalry of the Buddhist and later native styles permitted it to fall into comparative neglect, and it was left for a few of the faithful, the most famous of whom was a priest of the I 4th century named Kawo, to preserve it from inanition till the great Chinese renaissance that lent its stamp to the next period.

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  • He visited Spain in 1866, Egypt in 1868, when he went up the Nile with Ferdinand de Lesseps in a steamer lent by the Khedive.

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  • PASSION WEEK, the fifth week in Lent, beginning with Passion Sunday (dominica passionis or de passione domini), so called from very early times because with it begins the more special commemoration of Christ's passion.

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  • J., who lent them, with his own notes on them, to Andrew Lang for use in his book, The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1900-1904).

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  • It may be conjectured that they were selected by Lennox from his papers, and lent by him to some one who was writing against Mary.

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  • Besides the works mentioned, Liddon published several volumes of Sermons, a volume of Lent lectures entitled Some Elements of Religion (1870), and a collection of Essays and Addresses on such themes as Buddhism, Dante, &c.

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  • He collected all the money he could command, between £3000 and £4000, lent it to Congress before he set sail, and arrived at Paris on the 22nd of December.

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  • Shirley with Massachusetts troops also took part in the Oswego expedition of 1755; and Massachusetts proposed, and lent the chief assistance in the expedition of Nova Scotia in 1755 which ended in the removal of the Acadians.

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  • Situated on the high road from Berlin to Silesia, and having an extensive system of water communication by means of the Oder and its canals to the Vistula and the Elbe, and being an important railway centre, it has a lively export trade, which is further fostered by its three annual fairs, held respectively at Reminiscere (the second Sunday in Lent), St Margaret's day and at Martinmas.

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  • By this time the truce extended from the Wednesday evening to the Monday morning in every week and also, in most places, lasted during the seasons of Lent and Advent, the three great vigils and feasts of the Blessed Virgin, and those of the twelve apostles and a few other saints.

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  • The reptile doubtless frequented marshes, feeding on the succu lent vegetation, and often swimming in the water.

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  • The monasteries raised an outcry when people were found eating flesh in Lent, and the bishop of Constance accused.

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  • In 1590 there were many poor, for whose relief Elizabeth gave a fair for a day in Lent and a market on Thursdays.

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  • The money is lent by an official board, which deals with applications and manages the finance of the system.

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  • In thirteen years the board lent out over five millions and a half, and received repayment of nearly two millions of principal as well as over one million in interest at 5%.

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  • He bought wild lands, took stock in mining companies, desiccated egg companies, patent looms, photo-lithographic companies, gave away profusely, lent to plausible rascals, and was the ready prey of every new inventor who chanced to find him with money or with property that he could readily convert into money.

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  • SHROVE TUESDAY, the day before Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent, so called as the day on which "shrift" or confession was made in preparation for the great fast.

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  • The association of pancakes with the day was probably due to the necessity for using up all the eggs, grease, lard and dripping in stock preparatory to Lent, during which all these were forbidden.

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  • Thus, the Lent lily is Narcissus Pseudonarcissus; the African lily is Agapanthus umbellatus; the Belladonna lily is Amaryllis Belladonna (q.v.); the Jacobaea lily is Sprekelia formosissima; the Mariposa lily is Calochortus; the lily of the Incas is Alstroemeria pelegrina; St Bernard's lily is Anthericum Liliago; St Bruno's lily is Anthericum (or Paradisia) Liliastrum; the water lily is Nymphaea alba; the Arum lily is Richardia africana; and there are many others.

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  • Nevertheless, the concentration of all ritual at a single point, and the practical exclusion of laymen from active participation in it - for the old sacrificial feast had now shrunk into entire insignificance in comparison with the stated priestly holocausts and atoning rites2 - lent powerful assistance to the growth of a new and higher type of personal religion, the religion which found its social expression not in material acts of oblation, but in the language of the Psalms. In the best times of the old kingdom the priests had shared the place of the prophets as the religious leaders of the nation; under the second Temple they represented the unprogressive traditional side of religion, and the leaders of thought were the psalmists and the scribes, who spoke much more directly to the piety of the nation.

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  • If heroes could so debase themselves, can we wonder if men who were not heroes lent themselves to every sort of villainy ?

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  • More than ten years before Cassiodorus founded his monasteries in the south of Italy, Benedict of Nursia (480-543) had rendered a more permanent service to the cause of scholarship by building, amid the ruins of the temple of Apollo on the crest of Monte Cassino, the earliest of those homes of learning that have lent an undying distinction to the Benedictine order.

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  • The style of Deuteronomy, when once it had been formed, lent itself readily to imitation; and thus a school of writers, imbued with its spirit, and using its expressions, quickly arose, who have left their mark upon many parts of the Old Testament.

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  • In 1231 Henry lent an ear to those who asserted that the justiciar had secretly encouraged armed attacks upon the aliens to whom the pope had given English benefices.

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  • The general's vanity lent itself to what was asked of it; after various symptoms of insubordination had shown themselves, he was deprived of his command in 1888 for twice coming to Paris without leave, and finally on the recommendation of a council of inquiry composed of five generals, his name was removed from the army list.

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  • (From photos lent by the American Museum of Natural History.) XX.

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  • calendar-system lent itself to magic in the same way as the similar zodiac-signs of the Old World, each person's fate being affected by the qualities of the signs he was born under, and the astrologerpriests being called in to advise on every event of life.

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  • The French chargé d'affaires, Dubois de Saligny, who had been sent out in November 1860, urged French intervention, and took up the Jecker claims. Jecker, a Swiss banker settled in Mexico, had lent Miramon's government in 1859 $75 0, 000 (subject, however, to various deductions): in return, Miramon gave him 6% bonds of the nominal value of $15,000,000 which were ingeniously disguised as a conversion scheme.

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  • By the 13th century, with the final development of the ritual of the Mass, the chasuble became definitely fixed as the vestment of the celebrating priest; though to this day in the Roman Church relics of the earlier general use of the chasuble survive in the planeta plicata worn by deacons and subdeacons in Lent and Advent, and other penitential seasons.

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  • His life was uneventful except in so far as the variety of his work lent it colour.

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  • 9 Weeks First Sunday In Lent.

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  • Another fair at the beginning of Lent was added in 1468, and a second market on Thursday, and fairs at Midsummer and on the 21st of September were added in 1554.

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  • Reference has already been made to Bisharat Ali, who had lent Hodson money.

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  • interest on capital lent to others for use.

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  • The revenue of the state is about one million sterling; and large reserves have been accumulated, from which two millions were lent to the government of India in 1887, and later on another million for the construction of the Gwalior-Agra and Indore-Neemuch railways.

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  • ASH WEDNESDAY, in the Western Church, the first day of Lent, so called from the ceremonial use of ashes, as a symbol of penitence, in the service prescribed for the day.

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  • The European state of mind no longer lent itself to such enterprises, and, moreover, under such brief pontificates, the attenuated Roman power could not expect to succeed where Innocent III.

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  • Nicholas, again, lent the protection and encouragement of his powerful arm to science as well as art, till the papal court became a veritable domain of the Muses.

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  • of France against the Huguenots; and he lent his aid to Philip II.

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  • The erection of the obelisks of the Vatican, the Lateran, the Piazza del Popolo and the square behind the tribune of Sta Maria Maggiore lent a lustre to Rome which no other city in the world could rival.

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  • While, therefore, both parties were imperatively commanded to refrain from further dispute, Latimer was invited to preach before Henry in the Lent of 1530.

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  • He was by this time reckoned a Whig, and his refusal to favour the Van Buren administration lent colour to that view.

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  • Chalcedon was repudiated afresh, union with the Jacobites instituted, use of water and leaven in the Eucharist condemned, the five days' preliminary fast before Lent restored, Saturday as well as Sunday made a day of feasting and synaxis, any but the orthodox excluded from the Maundy Thursday Communion, the first communion of the new catechumens; union of the Baptismal and Christmas feasts was restored, and the faithful forbidden to fast on Fridays from Easter until Pentecost.

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  • With enormous toil the king drove out a mole from the mainland to the island and thus brought up his engines; ships from the other Phoenician towns and from Cyprus lent him their aid, and the town at length was forced in July 332; 8000 Tyrians were slain, 30,000 sold as slaves, and only a few notables, the king Azemilkos, and the festal envoys from Carthage who had taken refuge in the sanctuary of Melkarth, were spared (Diod.

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  • In 1623 the president Henri de Méme lent him his château of Balagni near Senlis (dep. Oise), and there Grotius passed the spring and summer of that year.

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  • Becket lent himself entirely to his master's ambitions, which at this time centred round schemes of territorial aggrandizement.

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  • Brock and 60 ratings were lent to the Dover command, where a small factory was set up to prepare the materials for it.

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  • Educated as a Catholic by his mother, he was on the death of Stephen Bathory elected king of Poland (August 19, 1587) chiefly through the efforts of the Polish chancellor, Jan Zamoyski, and of his own aunt, Anne, queen-dowager of Poland, who lent the chancellor 10o,000 gulden to raise troops in defence of her nephew's cause.

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  • Early in 1855 he conducted large-scale experiments at Javel in a factory lent him for the purpose, where he produced sufficient to show at the French Exhibition of 1855.

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  • To the outward eye his gigantic strength and herculean build lent him the appearance of health and vigour, but forty years of unintermittent toil and anxiety had told upon him, and during the last two-and-twenty years of his reign, by which time all his old self-chosen counsellors had died off, he apathetically resigned himself to the course of events without making any sustained effort to stem the rising tide of Protestantism and democracy.

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  • When he entered upon this office he intended to have prelected upon the tragedies of Sophocles; but he altered his intention and made choice of Aristotle's rhetoric. His lectures on this subject, having been lent to a friend who never returned them, are irrecoverably lost.

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  • William, now supreme in the States, while on land struggling with chequered success against the superior forces of the French, strove by his diplomacy, and not in vain, to gain allies for the republic. The growing power of France caused alarm to her neighbours, and Sweden, Denmark, Spain and the emperor lent a willing ear to the persuasions of the stadholder and were ready to aid his efforts to curb the ambition of Louis.

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  • The charter of 1562 granted three annual fairs to Langport, on the 28th of June, the 11th of November and the second Monday in Lent.

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  • &c.) we learn that Genesis was read in Lent, Job and Jonah in Passion Week, the Acts of the Apostles in Eastertide, lessons on the Passion on Good Friday and on the Resurrection on Easter Day.

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  • In spite of opportunities and provocations he never lent himself to treason.

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  • In 1834 his political friend and colleague John Todd Stuart (1807-1885), a lawyer in full practice, had urged him to fit himself for the bar, and had lent him text-books; and Lincoln, working diligently, was admitted to the bar in September 1836.

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  • On the one side there was a small party, die Jun gen, in Berlin, who attacked the parliamentary leaders on the ground that they had lent themselves to compromise and had not maintained the old intransigeant spirit.

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  • Perhaps an indication of it may be discerned as early as the 4th century in a custom, current in Spain, northern Italy and elsewhere, of washing the feet of the catechumens towards the end of Lent before their baptism.

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  • In the expedition a force of 500 Hausa, drilled and trained by the company, and led by thirty white officers - of whom some were lent for the occasion by the War Office - decisively defeated a force of some thousands of native troops, led by the emir of Nupe himself.

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  • Egyptian writing lent itself only too easily to misunderstanding, and the writings of one period were but half intelligible to the learned scribes of another.

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  • This national party lent what weight it had to the pan-Islamic agitation which arose in the summer and autumn of 1905, regardless of the fact that a pan-Islamic triumph meant the re-assertion of direct Turkish rule in Egypt and the end of the liberty the Egyptians enjoyed.

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  • Beaufort was a man of considerable wealth, and on several occasions he lent large sums of money to the king.

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  • His grandfather was that Vilkinus, king of Norway, who lent his name to the Vilkina- or iOrekssaga.

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  • Old commercial disputes and the support which the French had lent to Glendower gave a sufficient excuse for war, whilst the disordered state of France afforded no security for peace.

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  • Certain obscure religious usages, as regards Lent, the Communion, the non-observance of Sunday, non-communicating at Easter, and the Forbidden Degrees in marriage, were brought into conformity with western Christendom.

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  • The cause of the troubles under President Cordero was the assistance lent by Ecuador to Chile in the matter of the sale of the cruiser Esmeralda to the Japanese government in 1894, in the middle of the Japanese-Chinese War.

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  • He learned the letters from the transcription of a few verses in the Star of the Messiah of Petrus Niger, and, with a subsequent hint or two from Reuchlin, who also lent him the grammar of Moses Kimhi, made his way through the Bible for himself with the help of Jerome's Latin.

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  • which he invented after years of laborious effort - lent themselves particularly well to the reproduction of designs based on the later phases of Greek art.

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  • He was also, though he deplored the conduct of the militants, a decided supporter of woman suffrage; and he took an active interest in, and lent a helping hand to, many social movements, the Working Men's College, Toynbee Hall, the Hampstead Garden Suburb, Children's Country Holidays, the Shakespeare National Memorial, as well as to a number of miscellaneous church societies.

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  • His eyes were keen and piercing, but a long hooked nose lent grotesqueness to a face marked with cunning rather than with dignity.

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  • became a favourite preacher in Paris, and was Lent preacher at court in 1781, when King Louis XVI.

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  • 1022) writing to his bishop says that he has lent a MS. containing the Philippics and a commentary upon the Topics, but has received as a pledge something far more valuable, viz.

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  • In some instances, in fact, the Huns lent their aid to the Romans against third parties; thus in 404-405 certain Hunnic tribes, under a chief or king named Uldin, assisted Honorius in the struggle with Radagaisus (Ratigar) and his Ostrogoths, and took a prominent part in the decisive battle fought in the neighbourhood of Florence.

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  • It was led by what may be called the spiritual noblesse of Islam, which, as distinguished from the hereditary nobility of Mecca, might also be designated as the nobility of merit, consisting of the "Defenders" (Ansar), and especially of the Emigrants who had lent themselves to the elevation of the Koreish, but by no means with the intention of allowing themselves thereby to be effaced.

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  • In the presidential campaign of 1792 Madison seems to have lent his influence to the determined efforts of the Jeffersonians to defeat John Adams by electing George Clinton vice-president.

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  • " It is not an algebra," said Kant 3 of his technical logic, and the kind of support lent recently to symbolic logic by the Gegenstandstheorie identified with the name of Alexius Meinong (b.

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  • The disgrace to his name is indelible that on the 19th of March 1792, when the perpetrators of the massacre of Avignon had been introduced to the Assembly by Collot d'Herbois, Vergniaud spoke indulgently of their crimes and lent the authority of his voice to their amnesty.

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  • When war became inevitable he threw himself zealously into the Union cause, and lent his great influence to keep Kentucky in the Union.

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  • " In 1899 a court in Larnaca, Cyprus, awarded 80 (Turkish) as damages for the loss of a snake's horn which had been lent to cure a certain disease " (Murison, p. 117, n.

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  • As the Hague grew up round the court of the counts of Holland, so Leeuwarden round the 1 Tusser, in his verse for the month of March, writes: - "Now leckes are in season, for pottage ful good, And spareth the milck cow, and purgeth the blood, These hauving with peason, for pottage in Lent, Thou spareth both otemel and bread to be spent."

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  • He attended the meetings of the Saint-Simonists, lent an ear to the romantic mysticism of Pere Enfantin and later to the teaching of Abbe Lamennais.

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  • granted them licence to hold another fair on the Thursday before the first week in Lent and two following days.

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  • Charles the Great (Charlemagne) lent his forces to the plan of resuscitating the Roman empire at a moment when his own power made him the arbiter of western Europe, when the papacy needed his alliance, and when the Eastern Empire had passed under the usurped regency of a female.

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  • The church itself at this epoch lent its influence to the prevalent enthusiasm.

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  • Milton, the greatest humanistic poet of the English race, lent his pen and moral energies during the best years of his life to securing that principle on which modern political systems at present rest.

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  • Under the superintendence of an officer lent by the government of Madras, two great works of irrigation, from the lack of which agriculture had seriously suffered, were undertaken in 1898 and 1899.

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  • "Thou shalt not lend upon usury to thy brother; usury of money, usury of victuals, usury of anything that is lent upon usury.

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  • This change in the attitude of common-sense morality in respect to "anything that is lent upon usury" is one of the most peculiar and instructive features in the economic progress of society.

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  • As there was no gold in the country the number of settlers was small, the loose tribal organization of the natives made it impossible to inflict a vital defeat on them, and the mountainous and thickly wooded country lent itself admirably to a warfare of surprises and ambuscades.

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  • However, in November 1907, when the national assembly or council demanded a budget and made inquiries as to the financial position, it was found that the expenditure foz some years past had been half a million sterling per annum in excess of the receipts and that considerable sums were owing to banks and commercial firms who had lent money.

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  • Augustus lent nc support to Tiridates in his second march on Ctesiphon (26 B.C.), but Phraates was all the more inclined on that account tc stand on good terms with him.

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  • MNeill gave a certain time for ag and, decision, at the end of which, no satisfactory reply haying reached him, he broke off diplomatic relations, ordered the British officers lent to the shah to proceed towards Bagdad en -route to India, and retired to Erzerum with the members of his mission.

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  • The appointment greatly pleased the Persian court, and the shah lent a willing ear to his advocacy for the development of trade and commerce, construction of roads, abolition of various restrictions hampering Persian merchants, &c. The shah soon afterwards (May 26, i888) issued a proclamation assuring freedom of life and property to all his subjects, and (Oct.

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  • Between 1899 and 1903 the Russian Bank had lent Persia 4,000,000, of which fully half was paid to the shah for his personal requirements.

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  • In his reaction from the prevailing view he sometimes expressed himself without due qualification: the declaration, for instance, made at the commencement of the Theory of Political Economy, that "value depends entirely upon utility," lent itself to misinterpretation.

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  • He gave and lent enormous sums to successive popes, and at the bidding of Clement XI.

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  • On the 24th of November 1394 Wykeham lent the king the sum of £t000 (some £30,000 of our money), which same sum or another £1000 he promised on the 21st of February 1395 XXVIII.

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  • On the 23rd of July 1400 he lent Henry IV.

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  • The Ember weeks are the complete weeks next following Holy Cross day (September 14), St Lucy's'day (December 13), the first Sunday in Lent and Whitsun day.

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  • ' The epistle was so systematic in treatment and wide in scope that it lent itself readily to this " catholicizing " manipulation; thus the fact that xv.-xvi.

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  • Besides Wednesdays and Fridays, there are four fasting seasons, Lent, Pentecost to SS.

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  • He had thoroughly convinced himself of the abuses to which monachism lent itself.

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  • The habit of burlesquing the romans d'aventures was no new one, and the form lent itself easily to the two literary exercises to which he was most disposed - apt and quaint citation from and variation on the classics and satirical criticism of the life he saw around him.

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  • They carried on a perpetual war with the native tribes, and in this were supported by their Roman suzerains, who even lent the assistance of garrison and fleet.

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  • Hooper became Warwick's chaplain, and after a course of Lent lectures before the king he was offered the bishopric of Gloucester.

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  • It was a philosophy of history which lent itself to magnificent dramatic creations; but it explained nothing.

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  • Act 1888 the only form of countygovern 1' S' g lent in England was that of the justices in quarter sessions (q.v.).

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  • He conducted in person the war against the Visigoths under Fritigern (in Macedonia and Epirus), and on one occasion was nearly betrayed into the enemy's hands; this campaign, in which Gratian's general Arbogast eventually lent help, was ended by Fritigern's death.

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  • In 1767 he made a voyage to the East Indies in the Company's service, and put £2000 lent him by an uncle to such good purpose in a private trading venture that he laid the foundation of a handsome fortune.

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  • The simplicity and symmetry of his sentences, the modulations of his thrilling voice, the radiance of his fine face, even his slight hesitations and pauses over his manuscript, lent a strange charm to his speech.

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  • The growth of missionary enterprise in India lent colour to this theory, which was supported by the fact that no precautions had been taken to grease the Indian cartridges with a neutral fat, such as that of sheep and goats.

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  • The imperial commissioner General Basta lent his support to the disaffected party, and Michael was driven out of Transylvania by a successful revolt, while a Polish army invaded Walachia from the Moldavian side.

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  • From the 6th century the season was kept as a period of fasting as strict as that of Lent; but in the Anglican and Lutheran churches the rule is now relaxed.

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  • The first authentic allusions to it are in a canon of the council of Toledo (656), and another of the council of Constantinople "in Trullo" (692), forbidding the celebration of all festivals in Lent, excepting the Lord's day and the Feast of the Annunciation.

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  • Probably there was in the very greatness of his character and the extent of his popular influence a certain species of dominance which lent a colour of truth to some of the things said against him.

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  • His call as a poet came when a teacher lent to him the poems of Burns.

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  • And some years ago I lent out a manuscript containing such theorems; and having since met with some things copied out of it, I have on this occasion made it public, prefixing to it an introduction, and joining a Scholium concerning that method.

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  • The abbe, however, lent his copy to M Freret, an antiquary at Paris, who translated it, and endeavoured to refute it.

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  • This was usually done at the beginning of Lent.

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  • When the reign of Louis Philippe came to a close through the opposition of his ministry, with Guizot at its head, to the demand for electoral reform and through the policy of the Spanish marriages, Cousin, who was opposed to the government on these points, lent his sympathy to Cavaignac and the Provisional government.

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  • Penitents, therefore (as a rule), were excused the painful ordeal of public humiliation, but performed their penances in secret; only at the end they were publicly reconciled by the bishop. This was at Rome and Milan appointed to be done on the Thursday before Easter, and gradually became a regular practice, the same penitent year after year doing penance during Lent, and being publicly restored to communion in Holy Week.

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  • Essex, which had received its first bishop from Augustines hands but had relapsed into heathenism after a few years, also owed its ultimate conversion to a Northumbrian preacher, Cedd, whom Oswio lent to King Sigeberht after the latter had visited his court and been baptized, hard by the Roman wall, in 653.

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  • The bureaucracy, the minor, landholders, the towns, and the clergy refused to join in the rising, and lent their aid for its suppression, because they were unwilling to see anarchy recommence.

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  • They were not even popularthe small landholders and subtenants discovered that their interests had not been sufficiently regarded, and lent themselves to an agitation against the provisional government, which was got up by Edward, the kings eldest son, who now appeared prominently in history for the first time.

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  • Northumberland was a greedy and unscrupulous Border chief, who regarded himself as entitled to exact whatever he chose from his master, because he had been the first to join him at his landing in 1399, and had lent him a consistent support ever since.

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  • The English deputation lent their aid to Sigismund at the council of Constance, when Christendom was at last reunited under a single head, though all the reforms which were to have accompanied the reunion were postponed, and ultimately avoided altogether, by the restored papacy.

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  • As long as the Burgundian party lent the regent their aid, the limits of the land still unsubdued continued to shrink, though the process was slow.

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  • resolved to tr~ his fortune once more, and landed near Hull on the 15th of March Edward 1471 with a body of mercenaries lent him by the ~ duke of Burgundy.

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  • This time it was successfully carried out, and the earl of Richmond landed at Milford Haven with many exiles, both Yorkists and Lancastrians, and 1000 mercenaries lent him by the princess regent of France.

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  • He lent an army to Ferdinand for the invasion of Gascony, and landed himself at Calais with 25,000 men, to beat up the northern border of France.

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  • But the very passage which proves the early origin of " quadragesima," conclusively shows how uncertain it was in its character, and how unlike the Catholic " Lent."

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  • The church thus came to be more and more involved in discussions as to the number of days to be observed, especially in " Lent," as fast days, as to the hour at which a fast ought to terminate (whether at the 3rd or at the 9th hour), as to the rigour with which each fast ought to be observed (whether by abstinence from flesh merely, abstinentia, or by abstinence from lacticinia, xerophagia, or by literal jejunium), and as to the penalties by which the laws of fasting ought to be enforced.

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  • 3 The synod of Laodicea framed several rules with regard to the observance of " Lent," such as that " during Lent the bread shall not be offered except on Saturday and Sunday " (can.

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  • 51), and that " no wedding or birthday feasts shall be celebrated during Lent " (can.

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  • The tendency to increased rigour may be discerned in the 2nd canon of the synod of Orleans (541), which declares that every Christian is bound to observe the fast of Lent, and, in case of failure to do so, is to be punished according to the laws of the church by his spiritual superior; in the 9th canon of the synod of Toledo (653), which declares the eating of flesh during Lent to be a mortal sin; in Charlemagne's law for the newly conquered Saxony, which attaches the penalty of death to wanton disregard of the holy season.'

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  • Baronius mentions that in the 11th century those who ate flesh during Lent were liable to have their teeth knocked out.

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  • Of the nine fundamental laws of that Priscillian, whose widespread heresy evoked from the synod of Saragossa (418) the canon, " No one shall fast on Sunday, nor may any one absent himself from church during Lent and hold a festival of his own," appears, on the question of fasting, not to have differed from the Encratites and various other sects of Manichean tendency (c. 406).

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  • A week before the Great Fast (Lent), a fast of three days is observed in commemoration of that of the.

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  • In many parts of Germany the seasons of Lent and Advent are still marked by the use of emblems of mourning in the churches, by the frequency of certain phrases (Kyrie eleison, Agnus Dei) and the absence of others (Hallelujah, Gloria in excelsis) in the liturgical services, by abstinence from some of the usual social festivities, and by the non-celebration of marriages.

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  • In the practice of modern Roman Catholicism the following are recognized as fasting days, that is to say, days on which one meal only, and that not of flesh, may be taken in the course of twenty-four hours: - The forty days of Lent (Sundays excepted), all the Ember days, the Wednesdays and Fridays in Advent, and the vigils of certain feasts, namely, those of Whitsuntide, of St Peter and St Paul, of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, of All Saints and of Christmas day.

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  • The following are simply days of abstinence, that is to say, days on which flesh at all events must not be eaten: - The Sundays in Lent, the three Rogation days, the feast of St Mark (unless it falls in Easter week), and all Fridays which are not days of fasting.

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  • In the Anglican Church, the " days of fasting or abstinence " are the forty days of Lent, the Ember days, the Rogation days, and all the Fridays in the year, except Christmas day.

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  • (4) The enthusiastic view of the possibilities of the Christian life - associated, as modern and especially Western Christians must suspect, with shallow external views of sin - lent itself to belief in sinless perfection.

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  • The direction of affairs having passed into the hands of Talleyrand and his associates, Daunou turned once more to literature, but in 1 798 he was sent to Rome to organize the republic there, and again, almost against his will, he lent his aid to Napoleon in the preparation of the constitution of the year VIII.

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  • In politics Daunou was a Girondist without combativeness; a confirmed republican, who lent himself always to the policy of conciliation, but whose probity remained unchallenged.

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  • But by the help of Poseidon, who lent him winged steeds, or of Oenomaus's charioteer Myrtilus, whom he or Hippodameia bribed, Pelops was victorious in the race, wedded Hippodameia, and became king of Pisa (Hyginus, Fab.

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  • In China, Egypt and Babylonia, strength and continuity were lent to this native tendency by the influence of a centralized authority; considerable proficiency was attained in the arts of observation; and from millennial stores of accumulated data, empirical rules were deduced by which the scope of prediction was widened and its accuracy enhanced.

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  • Yet he unquestionably ranks as the true founder of descriptive astronomy; while his splendid presentment of the laws of projectiles in his dialogue of the " New Sciences " (Leiden, 1638) lent potent aid to the solid establishment of celestial mechanics.

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  • Those possessed of large herds of kine lent out stock under various conditions.

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  • Large numbers of Norman horses are sold in Lent, at the fair known as the Foire fleurie,.

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  • A sermon by him at St Paul's on the second Sunday in Lent, 1549, was immediately followed by the pulling down of "the sacrament at the high altar."

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  • Any deprivation or supersession of the count might impoverish, dispossess or ruin the vassals of the entire county; so that all, vassals or officials, small and great, feeling their danger, united their efforts, and lent each other mutual assistance against the permanent menace of an overweening monarchy.

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  • After Colberts day, when the crutches lent by privilege were removed, his achievements lost vigour; industries that ministered to luxury alone escaped decay; the others became exhausted in struggling against the persistent and teasing opposition of the municipal bodies and the bourgeoisieconceited, ignorant and terrified at any innovationand against the blind and intolerant policy of Louis XIV.

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  • The former had united the Jacobins and the more violent members of the Convention in their club, the Socit du Pantheon; and their fusion, after the closing of the club, with the the zesecret society of the Babouvists lent formidable publicanstrength to this party, with which Barras was secretly ~7ats in league.

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  • followed in the footseps of James, and lent such patronage to the breeding of a better kind of horse that a memorial was presented to him, asking that some measures might be taken to prevent the old stamp of horse " fit for the defence of the country" from dying out.

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  • On the sudden death of Albert in 1439, Hunyadi, feeling acutely that the situation demanded a warriorking on the throne of St Stephen, lent the whole weight of his influence to the candidature of the young Polish king Wladislaus III.

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  • 2 The references in the Fathers, however, imply that for practical purposes it was limited to the forty days of Lent.

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  • Andre's gift lent him great power and control over the mind, enough so that he had no problem recruiting spies as the others did.

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  • I lied to Bobby—told him dad lent the car to a friend while he took the train into Philly, like he usually does.

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  • There was a very intimate atmosphere on the course that lent itself well to working collaboratively, which is what acting is all about.

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  • I want you to put money into this little box during Lent.

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  • abstinence from meat are still mandated by the Church for all Catholics on some days of Lent.

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  • The first (Très lent) opens with a flute and clarinet theme answered by the strings followed by harp arpeggios.

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  • The event was lent authenticity by the appearance of our very own Wine Queen, Alice Bamber.

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  • I lent him, grudgingly, my special screw cutting tool with instructions not to let it get blunt.

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  • The city has an annual wine festival in September and a colorful carnival at the start of Lent.

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  • cassette deck ever lent a friend a CD?

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  • Introduction " Liberal policies are lent coherence only by their incoherence.

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  • obtained a dispensation from the Vice-Chancellor to eat meat in Lent, 1662, for his health's sake.

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  • Denying self isn't about giving up chocolate for Lent and taking up our cross isn't about enduring backache.

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  • ex Libris | 1 Comment » Countdown Saturday, April 15th, 2006 Lent ends in 5 hours 15 minutes.

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  • They married without the proper license required for a marriage during the Lent period and were subsequently excommunicated by the Bishop of Worcester.

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  • We have lent Maria one of our traps so that she can trap any females and they can be neutered at Martina's clinic.

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  • But that does not make lent or Easter into a pagan festival today.

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  • Along with three rescued greyhounds, Advocates ' committee member, the Duchess of Hamilton, also lent her support on the day.

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  • lend Indian doll lent by a Bangladeshi member of the local community.

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  • lendgood diverse, above mediocre album which should perhaps have lent more on his dancefloor material.

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  • lendis was done with a pump kindly lent to us by WRG North West.

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  • lendd 9th December - Cates gets ' lent out ' to go to a birthday party.

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  • lendelve have already arrived and taken up their places at a large estate which is being lent for the purpose by Mr Ian Anderson.

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  • Here I was lent a pamphlet which contained fascinating snippets of plant lore.

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  • mended when everyone lent a hand or tool to the process.

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  • mimosa bushes rose like islets, and lent additional interest to the scene.

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  • The Lent Term began very promisingly, with the second schoolboy oarsman joining his colleague who had rowed in the Fairbairns ' .

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  • All first year ordinands attend the Focus on Prayer weekend in the Lent Term.

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  • preoccupied expression, which lent her cold beauty a hint of humanity.

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  • We hired these punts - for the French lent nothing: each item of service had its price.

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  • These rent rebates are normally decided during the Lent Term.

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  • It takes place at the end of the lent term and showcases a wealth of talent from the student body and residents of Cambridge.

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  • toiletry too to everyone who supported our appeal (during Lent) for basic toiletries to help with the work of the Peace House.

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  • top-notch speakers for the Lent Term.

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  • trace of an accent which lent it charm.

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  • As a measure of precaution, he procured documentary evidence of the rebellious intentions of the raja and the begum, to the validity of which Impey obligingly lent his extra-judicial sanction.

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  • The former had written in lucid German an attack on the national neglect of native philosophers (principally Leibnitz), and lent the manuscript to Lessing.

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  • In concert with Jeanne Francoise Fremyot (1572-1641), widow of the baron de Chantal, whose acquaintance he made while preaching through Lent at Dijon in 1604, he founded the order of the Visitation, in favour of "strong souls with weak bodies," as he said, deterred from entering the orders already existing, by their inability to undertake severe corporal austerities.

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  • There remained Prussia, which, now that the Danish apaign of 1864 was otTer, was completing, her preparais for the final struggle with Austria for the hegemony Germany; and Napoleon, who saw in the furthering of marcks plans the surest means of securing his own influence divided Europe, willingly lent his aid in negotiating a PrussoIn the summer of 1865 Bismarckmade formal posals to La Marmora; but the pourparlers were interrupted by conclusion of the convention of Gastein (August 14), to which stria agreed partly under pressure of the Prusso-Italian enlenle.

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  • During the Greco-Turkish War of 1897 Visconti Venosta labored to maintain the Europe-an concert, joined Great Britain in preserving Greece from the worst consequences of her folly, and lent moral and material aid in establishing an autonomous government in Crete.

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  • But during the 18th century, though the strict observance of the Lenten fast was generally abandoned, it was still observed and inculcated by the more earnest of the clergy, such as William Law and John Wesley; and the custom of women wearing mourning in Lent, which had been followed by Queen Elizabeth and her court, survived until well into the 19th century.

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  • Mid-Lent, or the fourth Sunday in Lent, was long known as Mothering Sunday, in allusion to the custom for girls in service to be allowed a holiday on that day to visit their parents.

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  • Such a device inevitably lent itself to abuse (see Aristotle, Pol.

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  • It strengthened the hands of church democracy; it formed an alliance with the pure souls who held up to the church the ideal of apostolic poverty; it united itself for a time even with mysticism in a common opposition to the supremacy of the church; nay, it lent the strength of its convictions to the support of states and princes in their efforts to break the political power of the church.

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  • It seems that Voltaire lent himself to the duchess's frantic hatred of the regent Orleans, and helped to compose lampoons on that prince.

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  • They agreed with Byzantines in observing Lent, Christmas and Epiphany, but differed from them in the observance of all other feasts and fasts.

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  • Prophetic lection, now obsolete, except on the Wednesday and Saturday Ember Days, Good Friday and Easter Even, and Wednesday after fourth and sixth Sundays in Lent.

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  • It differed only from the three Russian instruments in having a mounting by the Cookes in which the declination circle reads from the eye-end.5 This instrument was afterwards most generously lent by Lord Lindsay to Gill for his expedition to Ascension in 1877.6 These four Repsold heliometers proved to be excellent instruments, 5 For a detailed description of this instrument see Dunecht Publications, vol.

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  • A few friends lent him money and found him pupils, and in this way he was enabled to enter upon a rigorous course of study (he is said to have worked for sixteen hours a day), partly devoted to Fux's treatise on counterpoint, partly to the " Friedrich " and " Wurttemberg " sonatas of C. P. E.

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  • Additional impetus was also lent by the revolution of 1848.

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  • The French chargé d'affaires, Dubois de Saligny, who had been sent out in November 1860, urged French intervention, and took up the Jecker claims. Jecker, a Swiss banker settled in Mexico, had lent Miramon's government in 1859 $75 0, 000 (subject, however, to various deductions): in return, Miramon gave him 6% bonds of the nominal value of $15,000,000 which were ingeniously disguised as a conversion scheme.

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  • It was in consequence of the aid which the people of Miletus lent to the Eretrians on this occasion that Eretria sent five ships to aid the Ionians in their revolt against the Persians (see IoNiA); and owing to this, that city was the first place in Greece proper to be attacked by Datis and Artaphernes in 490 B.C. It was utterly ruined on that occasion, and its inhabitants were transported to Persia.

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  • for the year 1164), the socalled sudarium of St Veronica, which from the 12th century onwards was preserved in the Capella Santa Maria ad praesepe of St Peter's in Rome (see Dobschiitz, Christusbilder, p. 218 seq.), and the seamless robe of Christ, the possession of which lent renown to the cathedral of Trier since the beginning of the 12th century (Gesta Trevir., Mon.

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  • In 1623 the president Henri de Méme lent him his château of Balagni near Senlis (dep. Oise), and there Grotius passed the spring and summer of that year.

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  • The speedily restored democracy put little heart into the conflict, and beyond sending mercenary detachments, lent Athens no further help in the war (see Peloponnesian War).

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  • he lent the weight of his authority to that system of coercion and repression which enslaved Italy, desolated Germany with war, and drowned the Low Countries in blood.

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  • The Proprium de Tempore contains the office of the seasons of the Christian year (Advent to Trinity), a conception that only gradually grew up. There is here given the whole service for every Sunday and week-day, the proper antiphons, responsories, hymns, and especially the course of daily Scripture-reading, averaging about twenty verses a day, and (roughly) arranged thus: for Advent, Isaiah; Epiphany to Septuagesima, Pauline Epistles; Lent, patristic homilies (Genesis on Sundays); Passion-tide, Jeremiah; Easter to Whitsun, Acts, Catholic epistles and Apocalypse; Whitsun to August, Samuel and Kings; August to Advent, Wisdom books, Maccabees, Prophets.

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  • Parliament was prorogued in April 1671, not assembling again till February 1673,and on the 2nd of January 167 2 was announced the " stop of the exchequer," or national bankruptcy, one of the most blameworthy and unscrupulous acts of the reign, by which the payments from the exchequer ceased, and large numbers of persons who had lent to the government were thus ruined.

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  • Bad generalship, which is sufficiently obvious, unwholesome food - it was Lent, and they ate the Nile fish which had been feasting on the carcases of the slain - and Greek fire did the rest, and personal valour was of little avail,not merely against superior numbers and better generals,but against dysentery and a certain "mal de l'ost" which attacked the mouth and the legs, a curious human version of a well-known bestial malady.

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  • ORTHODOX EASTERN CHURCH (frequently spoken of as " the Greek Church," and described officially as " The Holy Orthodox 1 The Orthodox Eastern Church has always laid especial stress upon the unchanging tradition of the faith, and has claimed orthodoxy as its especial characteristic. The " Feast of Orthodoxy " (,, cvpcasd rijs ope050Eias), celebrated annually on the first Sunday of the Greek Lent, was founded in honour of the restoration of the Catholic Apostolic Eastern Church "), the historical representative of the churches of the ancient East.

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  • The best-known series is the papal series of leaden seals which have lent their name to the documents of the papal chancery which they authenticate, popularly known as papal " bulls."

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  • The glory attaching to the name of Prince Henry does not rest merely on the achievements effected during his own lifetime, but on the subsequent results to which his genius and perseverance had lent the primary inspiration.

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  • The aim is to encourage your child to put money into this little box during Lent.

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  • It takes place at the end of the Lent term and showcases a wealth of talent from the student body and residents of Cambridge.

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  • Thanks too to everyone who supported our appeal (during Lent) for basic toiletries to help with the work of the Peace House.

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  • Nevertheless, we have secured two top-notch speakers for the Lent Term.

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  • She spoke excellent French, with a trace of an accent which lent it charm.

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  • During Lent, many religious people decide to abstain from something to focus more clearly on God.

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  • Science has proven some of the benefits, while it has lent just theory to others.

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  • She worked with Sherman Williams and then Lowe's to create paint colors and she lent her name to a series of suburban home designs by Kaufman Broad.

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  • Jesse McCartney has also lent his voice to the Kingdom Hearts II video game.

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  • To get the restaurant off the ground, several Hollywood mongrels lent their support in the form of endorsements and cash to put Earl's dream on the map.

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  • She also lent her voice to the films Charlotte's Web 2: Wilbur's Great Adventure (2003) and Robots (2005).

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  • He lent his voice to the animated film, Shrek the Third (2007) as ship captain.

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  • Since then he's lent his voice to several animated series including Oswald and Family Guy.

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  • Reese Witherspoon - She not only appears as one of Hollywood's top leading actresses, but also lent her voice to the animated film Monsters vs. Aliens.

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  • In addition, Sandra Bullock has lent her musical talents to writing or performance singles for movie soundtracks.

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  • Hybrid Narcissi - The species which have best lent themselves to the hybridisers art are N. pseudonarcissus, N. poeticus, N. montanus, N. triandrus, N. jonquilla, and N.

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  • After ELO, Lynne lent his writing and producing services to some of the biggest names in rock-n-roll.

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  • Turquoise - this stone lent its name to the distinctive yellowy-blue color.

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  • At the very least, the jewelry can remind you of the meaning of Easter during Lent.

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  • Another rock legend, The Moody Blues, lent the name of one of their biggest hits to another roller coaster.

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  • Warp somewhere else, turn human, and you will have infinite bomb arrows from the "Lent Bomb Bag" and a glitched quiver.

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  • He lent his voice and likeness to the game and it was interesting to see him move and groove in a video game.

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  • Zhu) for selling his "virtual sword" that he lent to him.

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  • The origin of Carnaval is a celebration that comes before Lent.

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  • Other stars and directors lent their own vision to it, though.

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  • If banks lent money to everyone using reverse mortgages, no money would be paid back and within probably just a few weeks, these banks would go broke!

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  • She also designs her own line of clothing and swimsuits, has produced her own fragrance, "Heidi," and has lent her celebrity to jewelry designer Mouawad.

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  • The high quality of the fabric and unique triple-stitching design, as well as the great prints, soon lent themselves to ladies' swimwear, and Billabong bikinis are becoming increasingly popular worldwide.

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  • His distinctive style lent him the moniker "King of Jeans", but it wasn't long before he moved on to other ventures.

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  • Heidi Klum, Tyra Banks, Christie Brinkley and Kathy Ireland have all lent their fabulous faces and physiques to the pages.

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  • She designs her own line of clothing and swimsuits, has produced her own fragrance, "Heidi", and has lent her celebrity to jewelry designer Mouawad.

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  • She lent her parenting expertise to publications such as Parenting, Child, Family Circle and Ladies Home Journal.

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  • The simple lines of the dress lent her a classic and elegant look.

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  • Its one-piece construction lent itself well to such industries, because the body remained fully covered.

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  • A cadre of U.K.-based singers lent their voices to the powerful song "Do They Know It's Christmas", still a holiday favorite more than 20 years later.

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  • Brezny also lent his musical talents to an album released by the band Tao Chemical in 1983.

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  • The Knights were somewhat wealthy and powerful; they even lent money to the King himself in order to fund his wars.

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  • His role lent a needed air of gravitas to the medical drama.

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  • The famous architect lent his style to a set of Bulova watches.

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  • The model has also lent its name to a line of original mechanical chronographs, all of which are fitted with the Navitimer's slide rule.

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  • During the 1990s, Swatch lent its support to various sports events and musical projects like MTV.

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  • Eating oatmeal can help prevent heart disease and the Food and Drug Administration has lent its seal of approval since 1997.

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  • A large cast of musicians lent a hand to the score of the film, including big names in the bluegrass and folk world like Tim O'Brien and Jerry Douglas.

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  • However, neither man believed that their story lent itself well to being developed into a stage musical.

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  • You should invite everyone who lent a hand during this busy time of year.

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  • To make these characters come alive, a variety of Star Wars cast members have lent their special physical and vocal talents to creating startling and remarkable portrayals.

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  • Through the years, different actors including Stephen Moore, who lent his voice to the robot in the BBC radio and television series, have voiced Marvin the robot.

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  • Meanwhile the Cretan campaign continued, and here also France lent her aid to the Venetians; this assistance could not, however, prevent the capture of Candia in 1669; on the 5th of September of that year Morosini, the Venetian commander, signed a treaty of peace with the Turks by which, after twenty-five years' warfare, they were placed in possession of the fortress of Candia, and with it of the effective rule over the whole island, Venice retaining only the fortresses of Suda, Grabusa and Spinalonga, and the islets along the coast.

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  • These events and the friction caused by mutual complaints of infringements of the treaty stirred up public opinion in Turkey, and the British ambassador lent his support to the war party.

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  • 4 9), that " the fast shall not be relaxed on the Thursday of the last week of Lent, thus dishonouring the whole season; but the fast shall be kept throughout the whole period " (can.

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