Leith sentence example

leith
  • Advancing, he occupied Edinburgh and Leith.
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  • Musselburgh joins with Leith and Portobello (the Leith Burghs) in returning one member to parliament.
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  • The so-called "beetle-stones" of the coal-formation of Newhaven, near Leith, which have mostly a coprolite nucleus, have been applied to various ornamental purposes by lapidaries.
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  • from Leith by steamer.
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  • In June 1548 a French fleet, with provisions and 5000 soldiers on board, under the command of Andre de Montalembert, seigneur d'Esse, landed at Leith to reinforce the Scots army, and laid siege to Haddington, then in the hands of the English.
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  • In matters of religion she at first tried to hold the balance between the Catholic and Protestant factions and allowed the Presbyterian preachers the practice of their religion so long as they refrained from public preachings in Edinburgh and Leith.
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  • Mary, with the assistance of a French contingent, began to fortify Leith.
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  • In October 1559 they made an unsuccessful attack on Leith and the seizure of an English convoy on the way to their army by James Hepburn, earl of Bothwell, increased their difficulties.
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  • of Leith, belongs to the parish of Kinghorn.
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  • Communication with the islands is maintained by steamers from Leith and Aberdeen to Lerwick, the capital (twice a week), and to Scalloway, the former capital, and other points (once a week).
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  • JOHN HOME (1722-1808), Scottish dramatic poet, was born on the 22nd of September 1722 at Leith, where his father, Alexander Home, who was distantly related to the earls of Home, filled the office of town-clerk.
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  • Towards the north the site of the city slopes gently to the Firth of Forth and the port of Leith; while to the south, Liberton Hill, Blackford Hill, Braid Hills and Craiglockhart Hills roughly mark the city bounds, as Corstorphine Hill and the Water of Leith do the western limits.
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  • St Bernard's Well, on the Water of Leith, was embellished and restored (1888) at the cost of Mr William Nelson.
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  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.
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  • To the north of the Water of Leith lie Inverleith Park, the Arboretum and the Royal Botanical Garden.
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  • To the south of the metropolis are Colinton (pop. 5499), on the Water of Leith, with several mansions that once belonged to famous men, such as Dreghorn Castle and Bonally Tower; and Currie (pop. 2513), which was a Roman station and near which are Curriehill Castle (held by the rebels against Queen Mary), the ruins of Lennox Tower, and Riccarton, the seat of the GibsonCraigs, one of the best-known Midlothian families.
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  • Leith, Granton and Grangemouth serve as the chief passenger seaports for Edinburgh.
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  • Tramways connect the different parts of the city with Leith, Newhaven, Portobello and Joppa; and the Suburban railway, starting from Waverley station, returns by way of Restalrig, Portobello, Duddingston, Morningside and Haymarket.
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  • In summer, steamers ply between Leith and Aberdour and other pleasure resorts; and there is also a service to Alloa and Stirling.
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  • This embraced portions of South Leith parish (landward) and of Duddingston parish, including the village of Restalrig and the ground lying on both sides of the main road from Edinburgh to Portobello; and also part of Cramond parish, in which is contained the village and harbour of Granton.
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  • The old Observatory is a quaint structure on Calton Hill, overlooking the district at the head of Leith Walk.
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  • This is no longer the case, but the Lyceum theatre in Grindlay Street and the Theatre Royal at the head of Leith Walk give good performances.
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  • The seaport of Leith, though a distinct burgh, governed by its own magistrates, and electing its own representative to parliament, has also on its southern side become practically united to its great neighbour.
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  • Further immunities and privileges were granted by James III.; and by a precept of 1482, known as the Golden Charter, he bestowed on the provost and magistrates the hereditary office of sheriff, with power to hold courts, to levy fines, and to impose duties on all merchandise landed at the port of Leith.
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  • In Scotland there were works in Glasgow, Leith and Portobello.
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  • of Leith and 54 m.
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  • of Kirkwall; and steamers sail at regular intervals from the harbour to Wick, Aberdeen and Leith.
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  • Since 1810, when it became a head port, it has gradually attained the position of the chief port of the Forth west of Leith.
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  • Thomas Gladstone (for so the name was modified), became a corn-merchant at Leith.
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  • The western or Victoria harbour is a refuge for vessels between Leith Roads and the Tyne.
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  • Leith Adams, " Monograph of British Fossil Elephants," part ii., Palaeontographical Society (1879).
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  • In the 18th century it ranked next to Leith as a port, but the growth of Grangemouth, higher up the firth, seriously affected its shipping trade, which is, however, yet considerable, coal and pig-iron forming the principal exports, and pit props from the Baltic the leading import.
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  • of Leith by steamer, it is much resorted to for its excellent sea-bathing.
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  • There is a regular communication by steamer between Stromness and Kirkwall, and Thurso, Wick, Aberdeen and Leith, and also between Kirkwall and Lerwick and other points of the Shetlands.
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  • Churches of this order were founded in Paisley, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Leith, Arbroath, Montrose, Aberdeen, Dunkeld, Cupar, Galashiels, Liverpool and London, where Michael Faraday was long an elder.
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  • Civil strife broke out in Scotland between John Knox and the queen-dowager - between the selfstyled "congregation of the Lord" and the adherents of the regent, whose French troops repelled the combined forces of the Scotch and their English allies from the beleaguered walls of Leith, little more than a month before the death of their mistress in the castle of Edinburgh, on the 10th of June 1560.
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  • She arrived nevertheless in safety at Leith, escorted by three of her uncles of the house of Lorraine, and bringing in her train her future biographer, Brantome, and Chastelard, the first of all her voluntary victims. On the 21st of August she first met the only man able to withstand her; and their first passage of arms left, as he has recorded, upon the mind of John Knox an ineffaceable impression of her "proud mind, crafty wit and indurate heart against God and His truth."
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  • At nine in the evening she was removed to Holyrood, and thence to the port of Leith, where she embarked under guard, with her attendants, for the island castle of Lochleven.
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  • After a term of mission work at Leith, he was appointed parish minister of Kelso in 1837, and at the Disruption of 1843 became minister of the newly formed Free Church, where he remained till 1866, when he went to the Chalmers memorial church, Edinburgh.
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  • He went from place to place in peril of his life denouncing the errors of Rome and the abuses in the church at Montrose, Dundee, Ayr, in Kyle, at Perth, Edinburgh, Leith, Haddington and elsewhere.
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  • The largest proportion of English-born were found in Edinburgh (with 5.43 8%) and Leith (with 4.481).
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  • Those of British-Colonial birth were most numerous in Edinburgh (with 0.933%), and foreigners in Glasgow (with 0.890), Leith (with 0.741) and Hamilton (with 0.720).
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  • The Scottish seaboard is divided for administrative purposes into twenty-seven fishery districts, namely, on the east coast, Eyemouth, Leith, Anstruther, Montrose, Stonehaven, Aberdeen, Peterhead, Fraserburgh, Banff, Buckie, Findhorn, Cromarty, Helmsdale, Lybster, Wick (15); on the north, Orkney, Shetland (2); on the west, Stornoway, Barra, Loch Broom, Loch Carron and Skye, Fort William, Campbeltown, Inverary, Rothesay, Greenock, Ballantrae (10).
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  • A similar railway, of which the chief source of profit was the passenger traffic, was opened between Edinburgh and Dalkeith in 1831, branches being afterwards extended to Leith and Musselburgh.
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  • From two reports printed by the Scottish Burgh Record Society in 1881, it appears that the number of vessels belonging to the principal ports - Leith, Dundee, Glasgow, Kirkcaldy and Montrose - in 1656 was 58, the tonnage being 3140, and that by 1692 they had increased to 97 of 5905 tons.
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  • On the east coast the leading yards are at Leith, Kirkcaldy, Grangemouth, Dundee, Peterhead and Aberdeen, which, in the days of sailing ships, was renowned for its clippers built for the tea trade.
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  • An English fleet suddenly appeared, and drove the French to retreat into Leith from an expedition to the west.
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  • she expired, and hunger forced her French garrison in Leith, after a gallant and sanguinary defence, to surrender.
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  • In May the Hamiltons entered Edinburgh, and later Lennox, in a parliament held at Leith, secured the forfeiture of Lethington.
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  • C. Leith, W.
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  • The chief British ports for the landing of flax are: - Belfast, Dundee, Leith, Montrose, London and Arbroath, the two former being the chief centres of the flax industry.
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  • The son of a tea merchant, he was for some time engaged in business in Leith and in Australia, but, returning to his studies of physics at Edinburgh, he became assistant to J.
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  • The league was promised by England; but the army of France was first in the field, and towards the end of the year drove the forces of the "congregation" from Leith into Edinburgh, and then out of it in a midnight rout to Stirling - "that dark and dolorous night," as Knox long afterwards said, "wherein all ye, my lords, with shame and fear left this town," and from which only a memorable sermon by their great preacher roused the despairing multitude into new hope.
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  • Their leaders renounced allegiance to the regent; she ended her not unkindly, but as Knox calls it "unhappy," life in the castle of Edinburgh; the English troops, after the usual Elizabethan delays and evasions, joined their Scots allies; and the French embarked from Leith.
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  • They measured the length of the seconds-pendulum at Leith, and in Unst, one of the Shetland isles, the results of the observations being published in 1821, along with those made in Spain.
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  • Andrew Leith Adams >>
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  • The castle surrendered in May 1573 and on the 7th or the 9th of June following Maitland died at Leith, there being very little evidence for the theory that he poisoned himself.
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  • There is also another Old Norwegian leith, a court or judicial assembly, and modern Danish has laegd, a division of the country for military purposes.
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  • Leith Hill in the North Downs reaches 965 ft., and Butser Hill in the South Downs 889 ft.; Blackdown and Hindhead, two almost isolated masses of high ground lying between the two ranges of the Downs towards their western extremity, are respectively 918 and 895 ft.
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  • Leith Hill and Hindhead are parts of this edge in the west, where the exposure is widest.
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  • The first five years of his life were passed at Leith Fort, where his father, a captain in the Royal Artillery, was then resident.
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  • of the Spalding Club; Cosmo Innes, Registrum Episcopatus Aberdonensis, Spalding Club; Walter Thom, The History of Aberdeen (1811); Robert Wilson, Historical Account and Delineation of Aberdeen (1822); William Kennedy, The Annals of Aberdeen (1818); Orem, Description of the Chanonry, Cathedral and King's College of Old Aberdeen, 1724-1725 (1830); Sir Andrew Leith Hay of Rannes, The Castellated Architecture of Aberdeen; Giles, Specimens of Old Castellated Houses of Aberdeen (1838); James Bryce, Lives of Eminent Men of Aberdeen (1841); J.
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  • LEITH, a municipal and police burgh, and seaport, county of Midlothian, Scotland.
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  • of Edinburgh, of which it is the port and with which it is connected by Leith Walk, practically a continuous street.
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  • Lying at the mouth of the Water of Leith, which is crossed by several bridges and divides it into the parishes of North and South Leith, it stretches for 34 m.
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  • St Mary's in Kirkgate, the parish church of South Leith, was founded in 1483, and was originally cruciform but, as restored in 1852, consists of an aisled nave and north-western tower.
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  • John Logan, the hymn-writer and reputed author of "The Ode to the Cuckoo," was minister for thirteen years; and in its graveyard lies the Rev. John Home, author of Douglas, a native of Leith.
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  • The parish church of North Leith, in Madeira Street, with a spire 158 ft.
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  • Gladstone, was born - had been a merchant in Leith.
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  • Leith Links, one of the homes of golf in Scotland, is a popular resort, on Lochend Road are situated Hawkhill recreation grounds, and Lochend Loch is used for skating and curling.
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  • Leith cemetery is situated at Seafield and the Eastern cemetery in Easter Road.
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  • As a distributing, centre, Leith occupies a prominent place.
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  • Space can always be had for more dock room by reclaiming the east sands, where in the 17th and 18th centuries Leith Races were held, the theme of a humorous descriptive poem by Robert Fergusson..
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  • Leith Fort, built in North Leith in 1779 for the defence of the harbour, is.
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  • Leith is the head of a fishery district.
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  • Leith figures as Inverleith in the foundation charter of Holyrood Abbey (1128).
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  • Several of the quaint bits of ancient Leith yet remain, and the appearance of the shore as it was in the 17th and 18th centuries, and even at a later date, was picturesque in the extreme.
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  • In the troublous times that followed the death of James V., Leith became the stronghold of the Roman Catholic and French party from 1548 to 1560, Mary of Guise, queen regent, not deeming herself secure in Edinburgh.
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  • of the links lies the ancient village of Restalrig, the home of the Logans, from whom the superiority of Leith was.
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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (the Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line, the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic; the Northern Central; the Western Maryland and the Maryland & Pennsylvania railways; and by steamship lines running directly to all the more important ports on the Atlantic coast of the United States, to ports in the West Indies and Brazil, to London, Liverpool, Southampton, Bristol, Leith, Glasgow, Dublin, Belfast, Havre, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Bremen, Hamburg and other European ports.
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  • Among the chief buildings are the town hall, county buildings, corn exchange, Fife and Kinross asylum, Duncan Institute, Adamson Institute (a holiday home for poor children from Leith), cottage hospital, Union Street Hall and the Bell-Baxter school.
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  • Postal connexion is maintained with Denmark by steamers, which sail from Copenhagen and call at Leith.
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  • The great centres of the seed-oil trade (linseed, cotton-seed, rapeseed, castor-seed) are Hull, London, Liverpool, Bristol, Leith and Glasgow.
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  • brasserie on the waterfront of the bohemian port of Leith.
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  • The pedestrian bridge across Leith Street can just be seen in the distance.
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  • Mark and his wife went on to be founders of the Leith School or Art before their untimely death.
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  • A hidden gem, it is a high quality Italian deli situated at the top of Leith Walk.
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  • gentrifyown to the newly gentrified port of Leith for a look round the Queen's cabin cruiser.
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  • The bright galley kitchen seats up to 3 people at a pretty round table in the window overlooking Leith walk.
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  • Photo: Marcus Leith enlarge Like much of Whiteread's work, EMBANKMENT also makes reference to the legacy of American minimalism.
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  • The house overlooks picturesque Leith Links where the first rules of golf were put to paper.
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  • There is a student refectory on the Leith Campus, on the ground floor.
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  • regenerate central Leith.
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  • Behind an impressive facade overlooking the recently rejuvenated shore area of the Port of Leith, is a unique hotel.
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  • stream of consciousnesse of the streets of Leith in stream-of-consciousness style with a powerful chorus.
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  • tern colony noted at the entrance to Imperial Dock, Leith Docks.
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  • On the west side of this narrow thoroughfare stood the early Episcopal Chapel of Leith.
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  • In the same year, ' Hawk ', the first Scottish purpose built steam trawler, was launched at Leith.
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  • He wrote also Ueber die Idee der Universitdten (1835), and Ueber geheime Verbindungen auf Universitdten (1835); works on religious subjects, Karikaturen des Heiligsten (1819-1821); Wie ich weeder Lutheraner wurde and was mir das Luthertum ist (1831); Von der falschen Theologie and dem wahren Glauben (new ed., 1831); poetical works, Die Familien Walseth and Leith (1827); Die vier Norweger (1828); Malcolm (1831), collected in 1837 under the title of Novellen.
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  • Veteran Posts: 104 Location: Leith £ 945 for a Vega reconditioned 1600 twin port engine.
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  • Harbor A total of £ 2.7m of council funding has been secured to regenerate central Leith.
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  • This was an urban tale of the streets of Leith in stream-of-consciousness style with a powerful chorus.
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  • There is a common tern colony noted at the entrance to Imperial Dock, Leith Docks.
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