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leinster

leinster

leinster Sentence Examples

  • It is recorded that the inhabitants of Leinster were defeated by the people of Dublin in the year 291.

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  • It is recorded that the inhabitants of Leinster were defeated by the people of Dublin in the year 291.

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  • For the history of the ancient Irish kings of the Hy Neill see: The Book of Leinster, edited with introduction by R.

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  • In 1773 the duke of Leinster died, and his widow soon afterwards married William Ogilvie, who superintended Lord Edward's early education.

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  • The best example of these folds is the axis of Leinster, its core being occupied by granite which is now exposed continuously for 70 m., forming a moorland from Dublin to New Ross.

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  • In 1783 Fitzgerald returned to Ireland, where his brother, the duke of Leinster, had procured his election to the Irish parliament as member for Athy.

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  • OSSORY (Osraighe), an ancient kingdom of Ireland, in the south-west of Leinster.

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  • His mother Eithne was of Leinster extraction and was descended from an illustrious provincial king.

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  • DUBLIN, a city, county of a city, parliamentary borough and seaport, and the metropolis of Ireland, in the province of Leinster.

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  • Here was once a residence of the duke of Leinster, and the buildings surround the open space of Leinster Lawn.

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  • laid the foundation stone of a college of science on a site in the vicinity of Leinster Lawn.

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  • In May 1798 the breaking out of a conspiracy planned by the United Irishmen to seize the city was prevented by the capture of Lord Edward Fitzgerald, son of the duke of Leinster and husband of the celebrated "Pamela."

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  • received in its Dominican monastery the submissions of O'Neal, O'Donnell and other chieftains of Ulster and Leinster.

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  • The town is of great antiquity, and was a residence of the kings of Leinster, the place of whose assemblies is marked by a neighbouring rath or mound.

    0
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  • It was the centre of a system, established by Charles Bianconi (1786187S) in 1815 and subsequently, for the conveyance of travellers on light cars, extending over a great part of Leinster, Munster and Connaught.

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  • The Shannon divides the town into two portions, known as the Leinster side (east), and the Connaught side (west), which are connected by a handsome bridge opened in 1844.

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  • 11 7 1), Irish king of Leinster, succeeded his father in the principality of the Hui Cinsellaigh (1115) and eventually in the kingship of Leinster.

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  • and on his death was succeeded by the earl in Leinster.

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  • The White House was built in1792-1799from designs by James Hoban, who closely followed the plans of the seats of the dukes of Leinster, near Dublin, and in 1902-1903, when new executive offices and a cabinet room were built and were connected with the White House by an esplanade, many of the original features of Hoban's plan were restored.

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  • Dermot MacMorrough, king of Leinster, an unquiet Irish prince who for good reasons had been expelled by his neighbors, came to Henrys court in Normandy, proffering his allegiance in return for restoration to his lost dominions.

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  • The two barons were promised lands, the earl a greater bribethe hand of Dermots only daughter Eva and the inheritance of the kingdom of Leinster.

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  • Early in the next spring Dermot iied, and Earl Richard, in virtue of his marriage, claimed the kingship of Leinster.

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  • Richard did hun homage or Leinster, engaging to hold it as a palatine earldom, and not .o claim the name or rights of a king.

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  • (b) Leinster (eastern midlands and southeast): Counties Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's County, Longford, Louth, Meath, Queen's County, Westmeath, Wexford, Wicklow.

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  • The north-west highlands of Donegal and the Ox Mountains, with their axes of folding running north-east and south-west, invite comparison with the great chain of Leinster, but also with the Grampians and the backbone of Scandinavia.

    0
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  • These occurrences of granite, with that of Leinster, in connexion with the folding of the Silurian strata, make it highly probable that many of the granites of the Dalradian areas, which have a similar trend and which have invaded the schists so intimately as to form with them a composite gneiss, date also from a post-Silurian epoch of earth-movement.

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  • ridges and hollows, so conspicuous in the present conformation of Donegal, Sligo and Mayo, in the axis of Newry, and in the yet bolder Leinster Chain, was impressed upon the Irish region at the close of Silurian times, and is clearly a part of the " Caledonian " system of folds, which gave to Europe the guiding lines of the Scottish Highlands and of Scandinavia.

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  • The only important occurrences of coal in the south are in eastern Tipperary, near Killenaule, and in the Leinster coalfield (counties Kilkenny and Carlow and Queen's County), where there is a high synclinal field, including Lower and Middle Coal-Measures, and resembling in structure the Forest of Dean area in England.

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  • The earth-wrinkles of this epoch were turned into a north-easterly direction by the pre-existing Leinster Chain, and the trend of the anticlinal from Limerick to the Slieve' Bloom Mountains, and that of the synclinal of Millstone Grit and CoalMeasures from Cashel through the Leinster coalfield, bear witness to the resistance of this granite mass.

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  • Nearly one-half of the area under oats is to be found in Ulster; Leinster and Munster are fairly equal; and Connaught has something over ioo,000 acres under this crop. The area under barley and rye has also declined during the period under review by about one-half - from 345,070 acres in 1847 to 164,800 in 1905.

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  • The growing of these crops is confined almost entirely to Leinster and Munster.

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  • Perhaps the chief success of the society was seen in the establishment of creameries, which at the end of 1905 numbered 275-123 in Ulster, 102 in Munster, 20 in Leinster and 30 in Connaught.

    0
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  • Under this act between 1885 and 1902, when further proceedings were suspended, the number of loans issued was 2 5,3 6 7 (4221 in Leinster; 5204 in Munster; 12,954 in Ulster, and 2988 in Connaught) and the amount was £9,99 2, 53 6.

    0
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  • Between August 1891 and April 1906, the number of loans issued under the acts of 1891 and 1896 was 40,395 (7838 in Leinster; 7512 in Munster; 14,955 in Ulster, and 10,090 in Connaught) and the amount was £11,573,952.

    0
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  • Of the total amount advanced up to March 31, 1906, almost one-half was in respect of estates in the province of Leinster, the balance being divided pretty equally between estates in the other three provinces.

    0
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  • They are also embodied in the Leabhar Gabhala or Book of Invasions, the earliest copy of which is contained in the Book of Leinster, a 12th-century MS., Geoffrey Keating's History, Dugald MacFirbis's Genealogies and various collections of annals such as those by the Four Masters.

    0
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  • Finally, there are the extensive collections of genealogies preserved in Rawlinson B 502, the Books of Leinster and Ballymote.

    0
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  • The division into provinces or " fifths " (Ulster, Leinster, Connaught, E.

    0
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  • One party, the Fir Galeoin, landed at Inber Slangi, the mouth of the Slaney, and occupied much of Leinster.

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  • However, after two battles the newcomers succeeded in overcoming the older race; and two brothers, Eber Find and Eremon, divided the island between them, Eber Find taking east and west Munster, whilst Eremon received Leinster and Connaught.

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  • The Picts first settled in Leinster; but the main body were forced to remove to Scotland, only a few remaining behind in Meath.

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  • He was also the first to levy the famous Leinster tribute, the boroma, in consequence of an insult offered to him by one of the kings of that province.

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  • In this connexion it may be noted that practically all the Milesian pedigrees converge on three ancestors in the 2nd century - Conn Cetchathach king of Tara, Cathair Mor of Leinster, and Ailill Aulom of Munster, - whilst in scarcely any of them are mythological personages absent when we go farther back than A.D.

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  • These divisions were: Ulster with Emain Macha as capital, Connaught with Cruachu as residence, north Munster from Slieve Bloom to north Kerry, south Munster from south Kerry to Waterford, and Leinster consisting of the two kingdoms of Tara and Ailinn.

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  • The relationship of Munster and Leinster to the Tara dynasty is not so easy to define.

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  • The king of Leinster was for centuries the most determined opponent of the ardri, an antithesis which is embodied in the story of the boroma tribute.

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  • These were (1) Munster with Cashel as centre, (2) Connaught, (3) Ailech, (4) Oriel, (5) Ulidia, (6) Meath, (7) Leinster, (8) Ossory.

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  • Leinster was probably the province in which Christianity was already most strongly represented, and Patrick may have entrusted this part of his sphere to two fellow-workers from Gaul, Auxilius and Iserninus.

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  • The Brehon Laws assume the existence of married as well as unmarried clergy, and when St Patrick was seeking a bishop for the men of Leinster he asked for " a man of one wife."

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  • A well-known story represents him as constantly at war with the men of Leinster.

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  • Aed lost his life in endeavouring to exact the boroma tribute from Brandub, king of Leinster, who defeated him at Dunbolg in 598.

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  • In 681 St Moling of Ferns prevailed upon the ardri Finnachta (674-690) to renounce for ever the boroma, tribute, which had always been a source of friction between the supreme king and the ruler of Leinster.

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  • As a sequel Fergal's son, Aed Allan (734-743), defeated the men of Leinster with great slaughter at Ballyshannon (Co.

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  • The story goes that the ardri Aed Oirdnigthe (797-819) made a hostile incursion into Leinster and forced the primate of Armagh and all his clergy to attend him.

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  • Owing to its position and the character of the country about it, especially the coast-land to the north of the Liffey which formed a kind of border-land between the territories of the kings of Meath and Leinster, a considerable tract passed into the possession of so powerful a city as Dublin.

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  • If evidence were needed it is only necessary to point to the names of three of the Irish provinces, Ulster, Leinster, Munster, which are formed from the native names (Ulaid, Laigin, Muma-n) with the addition of Norse staor; and the very name by which the island is now generally known is Scandinavian in form (Ira-land, the land of the Irish).

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  • Waterford was retaken in 914 by Ivar, grandson of Ragnall and Earl Ottir, and Sigtrygg won a signal victory over the king of Leinster at Cenn Fuait (Co.

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  • This victory, won over the combined forces of the Scandinavians of Dublin, Man and the Isles, compelled Amlaib to deliver up all his captives and hostages, - among whom were Domnall Claen, king of Leinster, and several notables - to forgo the tribute which he had imposed upon the southern Hy Neill and to pay a large contribution of cattle and money.

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  • After reducing the Desi, who were in alliance with the Northmen of Waterford and Limerick, in 984 he subdued Ossory and took hostages from the kings of East and West Leinster.

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  • This prince was murdered in 989 and was succeeded by Sigtrygg Silkiskeggi, son of Amlaib and Gormflaith, sister of Maelmorda, king of Leinster.

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  • In 1000 Leinster revolted against Brian and entered into an alliance with the king of Dublin.

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  • Maelmorda, king of Leinster, was taken prisoner, and Sigtrygg fled for protection to Ailech.

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  • The ultimate cause of this movement was an insult offered by Murchad, Brian's son, to the king of Leinster, who was egged on by his sister Gormflaith.

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  • In the spring of 1014 Maelmorda and Sigtrygg had collected a considerable army in Dublin, consisting of contingents from all the Scandinavian settlements in the west in addition to Maelmorda's own Leinster forces, the whole being commanded by Sigurd, earl of Orkney.

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  • His strongest opponent was his son-in-law Diarmait Mael-na-mBo, king of Leinster, who was also the foster-father of his brother Tadg's son, Tordelbach (Turlough) O'Brian.

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  • Diarmait MacMurchada (Dermod MacMurrough), greatgrandson of Diarmait Mael-na-mBo, as king of Leinster was by descent and position much mixed up with foreigners, and generally in a state of latent if not open hostility to the high-kings of the Hy Neill and Dalcais dynasties.

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  • Thus armed, and provided with gold extorted from his former subjects in Leinster, Dermod went to Bristol and sought the acquaintance of Richard de Clare, earl of Pembroke, a Norman noble of great ability but broken fortunes.

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  • But Irish customs admitted no estates of inheritance, and Eva had no more right to the reversion of Leinster than she had to that of Japan.

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  • The Irish writers tell little about these great !events, except that the king of the Saxons took the hostages of Munster at Waterford, and of Leinster, Ulster, Thomond and Meath at Dublin.

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  • During his brother Richard I.'s reign, John's viceroy was William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, who married Strongbow's daughter, and thus succeeded to his claims in Leinster.

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  • Art MacMurrough, the great hero of the Leinster Celts, practically had the best of the contest.

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  • Three days after the verdict a great meeting was held in the Leinster Hall, Dublin, attended by 25 members of the Irish parliamentary party.

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  • The All Ireland points situation is more clear-cut: Smyth is the series leader going into the final double-header at the Leinster Trophy meeting.

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  • Afterward he succeeded St Aidan as bishop of Ferns, which included the entirety of Leinster.

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  • five-star hotels in Wexford, Leinster.

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  • He is said to have made war not only against lesser rulers in Ireland, but also in Britain and Gaul, stories of his exploits being related in the Book of Leinster and the Book of Ballymote, both of which, however, are many centuries later than the time of Niall.

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  • The exploit was celebrated by Cormacan, the king's bard, in a poem that has been printed by the Irish Archaeological Society; and a number of Murkertagh's other deeds are related in the Book of Leinster.

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  • For the history of the ancient Irish kings of the Hy Neill see: The Book of Leinster, edited with introduction by R.

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  • COLUMBAN (543-615), Irish saint and writer, was born in Leinster in 543, and was educated in the monastery of Bangor, Co.

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  • OSSORY (Osraighe), an ancient kingdom of Ireland, in the south-west of Leinster.

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  • Patrick landed at Inverdea, the mouth of the river Vartry in Wicklow, but we are not informed as to any of his doings in Leinster at this period.

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  • In 1773 the duke of Leinster died, and his widow soon afterwards married William Ogilvie, who superintended Lord Edward's early education.

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  • In 1783 Fitzgerald returned to Ireland, where his brother, the duke of Leinster, had procured his election to the Irish parliament as member for Athy.

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  • His mother Eithne was of Leinster extraction and was descended from an illustrious provincial king.

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  • DUBLIN, a city, county of a city, parliamentary borough and seaport, and the metropolis of Ireland, in the province of Leinster.

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  • Here was once a residence of the duke of Leinster, and the buildings surround the open space of Leinster Lawn.

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  • laid the foundation stone of a college of science on a site in the vicinity of Leinster Lawn.

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  • In May 1798 the breaking out of a conspiracy planned by the United Irishmen to seize the city was prevented by the capture of Lord Edward Fitzgerald, son of the duke of Leinster and husband of the celebrated "Pamela."

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    0
  • received in its Dominican monastery the submissions of O'Neal, O'Donnell and other chieftains of Ulster and Leinster.

    0
    0
  • The town is of great antiquity, and was a residence of the kings of Leinster, the place of whose assemblies is marked by a neighbouring rath or mound.

    0
    0
  • It was the centre of a system, established by Charles Bianconi (1786187S) in 1815 and subsequently, for the conveyance of travellers on light cars, extending over a great part of Leinster, Munster and Connaught.

    0
    0
  • The Shannon divides the town into two portions, known as the Leinster side (east), and the Connaught side (west), which are connected by a handsome bridge opened in 1844.

    0
    0
  • 11 7 1), Irish king of Leinster, succeeded his father in the principality of the Hui Cinsellaigh (1115) and eventually in the kingship of Leinster.

    0
    0
  • and on his death was succeeded by the earl in Leinster.

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    0
  • The White House was built in1792-1799from designs by James Hoban, who closely followed the plans of the seats of the dukes of Leinster, near Dublin, and in 1902-1903, when new executive offices and a cabinet room were built and were connected with the White House by an esplanade, many of the original features of Hoban's plan were restored.

    0
    0
  • Dermot MacMorrough, king of Leinster, an unquiet Irish prince who for good reasons had been expelled by his neighbors, came to Henrys court in Normandy, proffering his allegiance in return for restoration to his lost dominions.

    0
    0
  • The two barons were promised lands, the earl a greater bribethe hand of Dermots only daughter Eva and the inheritance of the kingdom of Leinster.

    0
    0
  • Early in the next spring Dermot iied, and Earl Richard, in virtue of his marriage, claimed the kingship of Leinster.

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  • Richard did hun homage or Leinster, engaging to hold it as a palatine earldom, and not .o claim the name or rights of a king.

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  • In April 1780 Tandy was expelled from the Dublin volunteers (see Flood, Henry) for proposing the expulsion of the duke of Leinster, whose moderation had offended the extremists.

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  • (b) Leinster (eastern midlands and southeast): Counties Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's County, Longford, Louth, Meath, Queen's County, Westmeath, Wexford, Wicklow.

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  • The north-west highlands of Donegal and the Ox Mountains, with their axes of folding running north-east and south-west, invite comparison with the great chain of Leinster, but also with the Grampians and the backbone of Scandinavia.

    0
    0
  • The best example of these folds is the axis of Leinster, its core being occupied by granite which is now exposed continuously for 70 m., forming a moorland from Dublin to New Ross.

    0
    0
  • These occurrences of granite, with that of Leinster, in connexion with the folding of the Silurian strata, make it highly probable that many of the granites of the Dalradian areas, which have a similar trend and which have invaded the schists so intimately as to form with them a composite gneiss, date also from a post-Silurian epoch of earth-movement.

    0
    0
  • ridges and hollows, so conspicuous in the present conformation of Donegal, Sligo and Mayo, in the axis of Newry, and in the yet bolder Leinster Chain, was impressed upon the Irish region at the close of Silurian times, and is clearly a part of the " Caledonian " system of folds, which gave to Europe the guiding lines of the Scottish Highlands and of Scandinavia.

    0
    0
  • The only important occurrences of coal in the south are in eastern Tipperary, near Killenaule, and in the Leinster coalfield (counties Kilkenny and Carlow and Queen's County), where there is a high synclinal field, including Lower and Middle Coal-Measures, and resembling in structure the Forest of Dean area in England.

    0
    0
  • The earth-wrinkles of this epoch were turned into a north-easterly direction by the pre-existing Leinster Chain, and the trend of the anticlinal from Limerick to the Slieve' Bloom Mountains, and that of the synclinal of Millstone Grit and CoalMeasures from Cashel through the Leinster coalfield, bear witness to the resistance of this granite mass.

    0
    0
  • Nearly one-half of the area under oats is to be found in Ulster; Leinster and Munster are fairly equal; and Connaught has something over ioo,000 acres under this crop. The area under barley and rye has also declined during the period under review by about one-half - from 345,070 acres in 1847 to 164,800 in 1905.

    0
    0
  • The growing of these crops is confined almost entirely to Leinster and Munster.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps the chief success of the society was seen in the establishment of creameries, which at the end of 1905 numbered 275-123 in Ulster, 102 in Munster, 20 in Leinster and 30 in Connaught.

    0
    0
  • Under this act between 1885 and 1902, when further proceedings were suspended, the number of loans issued was 2 5,3 6 7 (4221 in Leinster; 5204 in Munster; 12,954 in Ulster, and 2988 in Connaught) and the amount was £9,99 2, 53 6.

    0
    0
  • Between August 1891 and April 1906, the number of loans issued under the acts of 1891 and 1896 was 40,395 (7838 in Leinster; 7512 in Munster; 14,955 in Ulster, and 10,090 in Connaught) and the amount was £11,573,952.

    0
    0
  • Of the total amount advanced up to March 31, 1906, almost one-half was in respect of estates in the province of Leinster, the balance being divided pretty equally between estates in the other three provinces.

    0
    0
  • They are also embodied in the Leabhar Gabhala or Book of Invasions, the earliest copy of which is contained in the Book of Leinster, a 12th-century MS., Geoffrey Keating's History, Dugald MacFirbis's Genealogies and various collections of annals such as those by the Four Masters.

    0
    0
  • Finally, there are the extensive collections of genealogies preserved in Rawlinson B 502, the Books of Leinster and Ballymote.

    0
    0
  • The division into provinces or " fifths " (Ulster, Leinster, Connaught, E.

    0
    0
  • One party, the Fir Galeoin, landed at Inber Slangi, the mouth of the Slaney, and occupied much of Leinster.

    0
    0
  • However, after two battles the newcomers succeeded in overcoming the older race; and two brothers, Eber Find and Eremon, divided the island between them, Eber Find taking east and west Munster, whilst Eremon received Leinster and Connaught.

    0
    0
  • The Picts first settled in Leinster; but the main body were forced to remove to Scotland, only a few remaining behind in Meath.

    0
    0
  • He was also the first to levy the famous Leinster tribute, the boroma, in consequence of an insult offered to him by one of the kings of that province.

    0
    0
  • In this connexion it may be noted that practically all the Milesian pedigrees converge on three ancestors in the 2nd century - Conn Cetchathach king of Tara, Cathair Mor of Leinster, and Ailill Aulom of Munster, - whilst in scarcely any of them are mythological personages absent when we go farther back than A.D.

    0
    0
  • These divisions were: Ulster with Emain Macha as capital, Connaught with Cruachu as residence, north Munster from Slieve Bloom to north Kerry, south Munster from south Kerry to Waterford, and Leinster consisting of the two kingdoms of Tara and Ailinn.

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  • The relationship of Munster and Leinster to the Tara dynasty is not so easy to define.

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  • As for Leinster none of the Brythonic peoples mentioned by Ptolemy left traces of their name, although it is possible that the ruling 1 Scholars are only beginning to realize how close was the connexion between Ireland and Wales from early times.

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  • The king of Leinster was for centuries the most determined opponent of the ardri, an antithesis which is embodied in the story of the boroma tribute.

    0
    0
  • These were (1) Munster with Cashel as centre, (2) Connaught, (3) Ailech, (4) Oriel, (5) Ulidia, (6) Meath, (7) Leinster, (8) Ossory.

    0
    0
  • Leinster was probably the province in which Christianity was already most strongly represented, and Patrick may have entrusted this part of his sphere to two fellow-workers from Gaul, Auxilius and Iserninus.

    0
    0
  • The Brehon Laws assume the existence of married as well as unmarried clergy, and when St Patrick was seeking a bishop for the men of Leinster he asked for " a man of one wife."

    0
    0
  • In 590 Columbanus, a native of Leinster (b.

    0
    0
  • A well-known story represents him as constantly at war with the men of Leinster.

    0
    0
  • Aed lost his life in endeavouring to exact the boroma tribute from Brandub, king of Leinster, who defeated him at Dunbolg in 598.

    0
    0
  • In 681 St Moling of Ferns prevailed upon the ardri Finnachta (674-690) to renounce for ever the boroma, tribute, which had always been a source of friction between the supreme king and the ruler of Leinster.

    0
    0
  • As a sequel Fergal's son, Aed Allan (734-743), defeated the men of Leinster with great slaughter at Ballyshannon (Co.

    0
    0
  • The story goes that the ardri Aed Oirdnigthe (797-819) made a hostile incursion into Leinster and forced the primate of Armagh and all his clergy to attend him.

    0
    0
  • Owing to its position and the character of the country about it, especially the coast-land to the north of the Liffey which formed a kind of border-land between the territories of the kings of Meath and Leinster, a considerable tract passed into the possession of so powerful a city as Dublin.

    0
    0
  • If evidence were needed it is only necessary to point to the names of three of the Irish provinces, Ulster, Leinster, Munster, which are formed from the native names (Ulaid, Laigin, Muma-n) with the addition of Norse staor; and the very name by which the island is now generally known is Scandinavian in form (Ira-land, the land of the Irish).

    0
    0
  • Waterford was retaken in 914 by Ivar, grandson of Ragnall and Earl Ottir, and Sigtrygg won a signal victory over the king of Leinster at Cenn Fuait (Co.

    0
    0
  • This victory, won over the combined forces of the Scandinavians of Dublin, Man and the Isles, compelled Amlaib to deliver up all his captives and hostages, - among whom were Domnall Claen, king of Leinster, and several notables - to forgo the tribute which he had imposed upon the southern Hy Neill and to pay a large contribution of cattle and money.

    0
    0
  • After reducing the Desi, who were in alliance with the Northmen of Waterford and Limerick, in 984 he subdued Ossory and took hostages from the kings of East and West Leinster.

    0
    0
  • This prince was murdered in 989 and was succeeded by Sigtrygg Silkiskeggi, son of Amlaib and Gormflaith, sister of Maelmorda, king of Leinster.

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    0
  • In 1000 Leinster revolted against Brian and entered into an alliance with the king of Dublin.

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  • Maelmorda, king of Leinster, was taken prisoner, and Sigtrygg fled for protection to Ailech.

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  • Towards the end of Brian's reign a conspiracy was entered into between Maelmorda, king of Leinster, and his nephew Sigtrygg of Dublin.

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  • The ultimate cause of this movement was an insult offered by Murchad, Brian's son, to the king of Leinster, who was egged on by his sister Gormflaith.

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  • In the spring of 1014 Maelmorda and Sigtrygg had collected a considerable army in Dublin, consisting of contingents from all the Scandinavian settlements in the west in addition to Maelmorda's own Leinster forces, the whole being commanded by Sigurd, earl of Orkney.

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  • His strongest opponent was his son-in-law Diarmait Mael-na-mBo, king of Leinster, who was also the foster-father of his brother Tadg's son, Tordelbach (Turlough) O'Brian.

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  • Diarmait MacMurchada (Dermod MacMurrough), greatgrandson of Diarmait Mael-na-mBo, as king of Leinster was by descent and position much mixed up with foreigners, and generally in a state of latent if not open hostility to the high-kings of the Hy Neill and Dalcais dynasties.

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  • In 1156 Dermod MacMurrough (Diarmait MacMurchada), deposed for his tyranny from the kingdom of Leinster, repaired to Henry in Aquitaine (see Early History above).

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  • Thus armed, and provided with gold extorted from his former subjects in Leinster, Dermod went to Bristol and sought the acquaintance of Richard de Clare, earl of Pembroke, a Norman noble of great ability but broken fortunes.

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  • But Irish customs admitted no estates of inheritance, and Eva had no more right to the reversion of Leinster than she had to that of Japan.

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  • The Irish writers tell little about these great !events, except that the king of the Saxons took the hostages of Munster at Waterford, and of Leinster, Ulster, Thomond and Meath at Dublin.

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  • During his brother Richard I.'s reign, John's viceroy was William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, who married Strongbow's daughter, and thus succeeded to his claims in Leinster.

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  • Art MacMurrough, the great hero of the Leinster Celts, practically had the best of the contest.

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  • Three days after the verdict a great meeting was held in the Leinster Hall, Dublin, attended by 25 members of the Irish parliamentary party.

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  • He is said to have made war not only against lesser rulers in Ireland, but also in Britain and Gaul, stories of his exploits being related in the Book of Leinster and the Book of Ballymote, both of which, however, are many centuries later than the time of Niall.

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  • COLUMBAN (543-615), Irish saint and writer, was born in Leinster in 543, and was educated in the monastery of Bangor, Co.

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  • Patrick landed at Inverdea, the mouth of the river Vartry in Wicklow, but we are not informed as to any of his doings in Leinster at this period.

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  • LORD EDWARD FITZGERALD (1763-1798), Irish conspirator, fifth son of James, 1st duke of Leinster, by his wife Emilia Mary, daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd duke of Richmond, was born at Carton House, near Dublin, on the 15th of October 1763.

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  • As for Leinster none of the Brythonic peoples mentioned by Ptolemy left traces of their name, although it is possible that the ruling 1 Scholars are only beginning to realize how close was the connexion between Ireland and Wales from early times.

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  • Towards the end of Brian's reign a conspiracy was entered into between Maelmorda, king of Leinster, and his nephew Sigtrygg of Dublin.

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  • LORD EDWARD FITZGERALD (1763-1798), Irish conspirator, fifth son of James, 1st duke of Leinster, by his wife Emilia Mary, daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd duke of Richmond, was born at Carton House, near Dublin, on the 15th of October 1763.

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