Leicester sentence example

leicester
  • As a matter of fact, the parliament at Leicester, in which the speeches were supposed to have been made, began on the 30th of April 1414 before Chicheley was archbishop. The rolls of parliament show that he was not present in the parliament at all.
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  • Having been educated by Richard Weston, a Leicester botanist, he published in 1793 a treatise, Lessons Astronomical and Philosophical.
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  • 18 metres, occupied Leicester Square until swept away as a nuisance.
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  • Utterly discredited, Leicester -(6th of August 1587) abandoned the task, United Netherlands was to be raised.
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  • With the exception of the year 1836, when he acted as headmaster of a newly established school in Leicester, his life was divided between Cambridge and Ely.
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  • For these and other services Bonner had been rewarded by the grant of several livings, and in 1535 he was made archdeacon of Leicester.
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  • According to Clarendon the latter, though frequently victorious in a charge, dale, subsequently falling upon and defeating the royalist centre, and pursuing the fugitives as far as the outskirts of Leicester.
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  • He married Dorothy (1617-1684), daughter of Robert Sidney, 2nd earl of Leicester.
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  • This victory greatly strengthened Shane O'Neill's position, and Sir Henry Sidney, who became lord deputy in 1566, declared to the earl of Leicester that Lucifer himself was not more puffed up with pride and ambition than O'Neill.
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  • In 1254 Prince Edward, afterwards King Edward I., was created earl of Chester, and since this date the earldom has always been held by the heirs apparent to the English crown with the single exception of Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester.
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  • In 917 Derby was captured from the Danes, and in the next year Leicester and York both submitted to her.
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  • He was summoned to London, but died on his way at Leicester abbey on November 30, and was buried there on the following day.
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  • Other sheep societies include the Leicester Sheep Breeders' Association, the Cotswold Sheep Society, the Lincoln Longwool Sheep Breeders' Association, the Oxford.
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  • Down Sheep Breeders' Association, the Shropshire Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Southdown Sheep Society, the Suffolk Sheep Society, the Border Leicester Sheep Breeders' Society, the Wensleydale Longwool Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Incorporated Wensleydale Blue-faced Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Kent Sheep Breeders' Association, the Devon Longwool Sheep Breeders' Society, the Dorset Horn Sheep Breeders' Association, the Cheviot Sheep Society and the Roscommon Sheep Breeders' Association.
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  • In 1896, at Leicester, prizes were awarded after trial to potatoplanting machines, potato-raising machines and butter-drying machines.
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  • By Elizabeth it was conferred first on the earl of Leicester and then on Thomas Sackville, afterwards earl of Dorset.
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  • During the period of Leicester's governorship he remained in the background, engaged in acquiring a thorough knowledge of the military art, and in 1586 the States of Holland conferred upon him the title of prince.
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  • On the 8th of February 1662 she removed to Leicester House in Leicester Fields, and died shortly afterwards on the 13th of the same month being buried in Westminster Abbey.
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  • Societies were also formed in Somerset, Wilts, Gloucestershire, Leicester, Warwickshire, Nottinghamshire and the south of Yorkshire.
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  • In 1265, after Montfort's fall, Edmund received the earldom of Leicester, and two years later was created earl of Lancaster.
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  • The principal music halls (variety theatres) are in Shaftesbury Avenue, Piccadilly Circus, Leicester Square and the Strand.
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  • St Giles's was literally a village in the fields; Piccadilly was " the waye to Redinge," Oxford Street " the way to Uxbridge," Covent Garden an open field or garden, and Leicester Fields lammas land.
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  • In his letters he spoke of her always as Mrs Armistead, and some of his friends - Mr Coke of Holkham, afterwards Lord Leicester, with whom he stayed every year, being one of them - would not invite her to their houses.
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  • WAPENTAKE, anciently the principal administrative division of the counties of York, Lincoln, Leicester, Nottingham, Derby and Rutland, corresponding to the hundred in the southern counties of England.
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  • He was educated at Leicester school, and afterward at St Paul's school, London.
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  • In 1906 he was elected to Parliament as Labour member for Leicester, and held the seat for a dozen years.
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  • His record as a pacifist cost him his seat at Leicester at the general election of Dec. 1918; he received only 6,347 votes to the 20,570 polled for his opponent, Mr. J.
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  • In 1775 he took part in the negotiations between Leicester House and Pitt, directed against the duke of Newcastle, and in 1757 in the conferences between the two ministers which led to their taking office together.
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  • In 1756, by the special desire of the young prince, he was appointed groom of the stole at Leicester House, in spite of the king's pronounced aversion to him.
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  • After the advent of the earl of Leicester as governor-general of the Netherlands in 1585, a change took place.
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  • The Utrechters, under the leadership of Gerard Prouninek, otherwise Deventer, vehemently took the side of Leicester in his quarrel with the estates of Holland, and the English governor-general made the town his headquarters during residence in the Netherlands, and took it under English protection.
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  • Though heartily disliked in Holland, Leicester made himself so popular in Utrecht that the burgher guard even presented him with a petition that he would, assume the sovereignty.
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  • The withdrawal of Leicester from the Netherlands was followed by the defeat of Deventer and the return of the aristocratic party to power.
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  • After holding pastorates at Burton-on-Trent (1856-1861), Surbiton (1862-1870), Leicester (1870-1876), he finally accepted the pastorate of the Congregational Church at Bowdon, Cheshire, in 1877, in which he remained till his death.
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  • SIDNEY (or [[Sydney), Algernon]] (1622-1683), English politician, second son of Robert, 2nd earl of Leicester, and of Dorothy Percy, daughter of Henry, 9th earl of Northumberland, was born at Penshurst, Kent, in 1622.
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  • Lord Leicester died in November; and legal business connected with other portions of the succession detained Sidney from returning to France as he had intended.
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  • It is best discussed by Rendel Harris's books, The Origin of the Leicester Codex (1887), The Origin of the Ferrar Group (1893), and The Ferrar Group (1900), all published at Cambridge; the text of fam.'
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  • Her other suitors were less important, except Leicester, who appealed to the least intellectual side of Elizabeth and was always a cause of distraction in her policy and her ministers.
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  • The loneliness of a queen who had no husband or children and no relatives to mention must at all times have been oppressive; it grew desolating in old age after the deaths of Leicester, Walsingham, Burghley and Essex, and Elizabeth died, the last of her race, on the 24th of March 1603.
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  • How far he was personally responsible for the Anglican Settlement, the Poor Laws, and the foreign policy of the reign, how far he was thwarted by the baleful influence of Leicester and the caprices of the queen, remains to a large extent a matter of conjecture.
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  • It was a signal triumph over Leicester; and, although Burghley had still to reckon with cabals in the council and at court, his hold over the queen strengthened with the lapse of years.
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  • It passed to Sir Philip's younger brother Robert, who in 1618 was created earl of Leicester.
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  • Elizabeth and Burghley were inclined to try an alliance with the Scottish king, and the event justified their policy, which Walsingham did his best to frustrate, although deserted on this occasion by his chief regular supporter, Leicester.
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  • P. Ellmore of Leicester, the most experienced and enterprising of Midland cultivators, preferred to plant his sets in squares, 18 to 20 in.
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  • All the leading British varieties are reared, the Shropshire, Oxford Down, Leicester and Cotswold breeds being most numerous.
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  • appointed both Robert II., earl of Leicester, and Hugh Bigod, earl of Norfolk, to be his honorary hereditary stewards; and at the Christmas festival of 1186 the successors in title of these two earls, with William, earl of Arundel, who held the similar honorary office of hereditary butler, are described as serving the king at the royal banqueting table.
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  • Subsequently the earls of Leicester bought out the rights of the earls of Norfolk for ten knights' fees.
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  • The subsequent earls and dukes of Lancaster were all recognized as stewards of England, the office apparently being treated as annexed to the earldom, or honor, of Leicester.
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  • John of Gaunt, indeed, at a time when it was possible that he would never obtain the Leicester moiety of the Lancastrian estates, seems to have made an ingenious but quite unfounded claim to the office as annexed to the honor of Hinckley.
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  • In 1787 he became pastor of a Baptist church in Leicester, and began those energetic movements among his fellow religionists which resulted in the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society, Carey himself being one of the first to go abroad.
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  • 1274), wife of William Marshal, earl of Pembroke, and then of Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester.
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  • The Leicester system is used because the greater part of the sewers are below sea-level, and it is necessary to use powerful pumps.
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  • Shortly afterwards Kelly and Dee were introduced by the earl of Leicester to a Polish nobleman, Albert Laski, palatine of Siradz, devoted to the same pursuits, who persuaded them to accompany him to his native country.
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  • He was knighted by his uncle Bedford at Leicester in May 1426, and on the 6th of November 1429 was crowned at Westminster.
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  • north-west of York and the most northerly Romano-British town; Ratae, now Leicester, capital of the Coritani; Viroconium, now Wroxeter, near Shrewsbury, capital of the Cornovii; Venta Silurum, now Caerwent, near Chepstow; Corinium, now Cirencester, capital of the Dobuni; Isca Dumnoniorum, now Exeter, the most westerly of these towns; Durnovaria, now Dorchester, in Dorset, capital of the Durotriges; Venta Belgarum, now Winchester; Calleva Atrebatum, now Silchester, 10 m.
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  • It also gave access by a branch to Leicester and Lincoln.
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  • The fifth is that known to the English as the Fosse, which joins Lincoln and Leicester with Cirencester, Bath and Exeter.
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  • Among the lay barons, the first place naturally belonged to Richard of Cornwall who, as the king's brother, was unwilling to take any steps which might impair the royal prerogative; while Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, the ablest man of his order, was regarded with suspicion as a foreigner, and linked to Henry's cause by his marriage with the princess Eleanor.
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  • Consulted as a friend by Grosseteste, as a spiritual director by Simon de Montfort, the countess of Leicester and the queen, as an expert lawyer and theologian by the primate, Boniface of Savoy, he did much to guide the policy both of the opposition and of the court party in all matters affecting the interests of the Church.
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  • John P. Hale and Leicester King as president and vice-president respectively, but in the spring of 1848 it withdrew its candidates and joined the "free soil" movement.
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  • Elizabeth was alarmed by the successes of the Spanish arms, and especially by the fall of Antwerp; and, though refusing the sovereignty, she agreed to send a force of s000 foot and I 000 horse to the aid of the Provinces under the command of the earl of Leicester, her expenses being - guaranteed by the handing over to her the towns of Flushing, Brill and Rammekens as pledges (loth of August 1585).
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  • Leicester, on landing in Holland, was in the presence of the States-General and of Maurice of Nassau invested with the title of governor-general and practically sovereign powers (February 1586).
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  • The opera of Leicester, in which they first worked together (1823), is remarkable also as showing evidences of the influence of Rossini.
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  • gave to Robert Mellent, earl of Leicester.
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  • In consequence probably of the good offices of Bubb Dodington, who was then the confidential adviser of Prince Frederick, two of his royal highness's gentlemen carried a gracious message to the printing office, and ordered seven copies for Leicester House.
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  • That Charles was his father is more than doubtful, for Lucy Walters had previously lived with Robert Sidney (son of the earl of Leicester), brother of Algernon, and the boy resembled him very closely.
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  • As this dispute was still unsettled when the parliament met at Leicester in February 1426, Bedford and the lords undertook to arbitrate.
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  • After standing unsuccessfully for the headship of the college in 1569, he became chaplain to the earl of Leicester, and received from him the livings of Warley, in Essex, and Dennington in Suffolk.
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  • On the 7th of November at Leicester Lord Rosebery insisted that what the country wanted was not fiscal reform but commercial reform, and he appealed to the free-trade section of the Unionist party to join the Liberals in a united defence, - an appeal incidentally for Liberal unity which was warmly seconded ten days later by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman.
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  • ANTHONY JOHN MUNDELLA (1825-1897), English educational and industrial reformer, of Italian extraction, was born at Leicester in 1825.
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  • The chief buildings are the Carmelite Priory (ruins dating perhaps from the 13th century); a Bluecoat school (1514); a free grammar school (1527); an orphan girl school (funds left by Thomas Howel to the Drapers' Co., in Henry VII.'s reign); the town hall (built in 1572 by Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, enlarged and restored in 1780); an unfinished church (begun by Leicester); a market hall (with arcades or "rows," such as those of Chester or Yarmouth); and the old parish church of St Marcella.
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  • Edward I.), given to the Mortimers and to Leicester (under Edward III.
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  • In the spring of 1561, Mary's brother, Lord James Stewart, lay prior of St Andrews, visited her in the mission to France, Elizabeth announced that a marriage of Mary with a Spanish, Imperial or French prince would mean war, while she still hinted at the Leicester marriage, or perhaps at a union with young Henry Darnley, son of Lennox.
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  • The negotiations for the Leicester marriage were prolonged till March 1565, when Elizabeth had let slip on Mary Henry Darnley (the young son of Lennox, who himself had been allowed to return to Scotland), and at the same time made it clear that she had never been honest in offering Leicester.
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  • Darnley was esteemed handsome, though his portraits give an opposite impression; his native qualities of cowardice, perfidy, profligacy and overweening arrogance were at first concealed, and in mid April 1565 Lethington was sent to London, not to renew the negotiations with Leicester (as had been designed till the 31st of March), but to announce Mary's intended wedding with her cousin.
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  • Having held pastorates at Shipley, Hackney, Manchester, Leicester and Cambridge, he became principal of Hackney Theological College, Hampstead, in 1901.
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  • He was a teacher at Swanzey, New Hampshire, and at the Leicester Academy, Massachusetts, in 1845-1847, and attempted the philological method of teaching English "like Latin and Greek," later described in his Method of Philological Study of the English Language (1865); at Amherst in 1847-1849; at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1852-1855; and in 1855 became a tutor at Lafayette College, where he became adjunct professor of belles-lettres and English literature in 1856, and professor of English language and comparative philology - the first chair of the kind established - in 1857.
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  • Anlaf took York, besieged Northampton and destroyed Tamworth, but was met by Edmund at Leicester.
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  • He had been already some years archdeacon of Taunton, and the archdeaconry of Norfolk was added to it in March 1529, which two years later he resigned for that of Leicester.
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  • Leicester Ford (io vols., New York, 1892-1899); letters in Massachusetts Historical Society, Collections, series 7, vol.
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  • He was Congregational minister at Ware (1831) and Leicester (1834), and in 1841 founded the Nonconformist, a weekly newspaper in which he advocated the cause of disestablishment.
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  • The only other 9th-century MS. of the speeches is now in Lord Leicester's library at Holkham, No.
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  • In 1719 he was presented by Nicholas 1st Baron Lechmere, to the mastership of Wigston's hospital in Leicester.
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  • Pentonville was available for the first phase; Millbank was also pressed into the service, and accommodation was hired in some of the best provincial prisons, as at Wakefield and Leicester.
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  • The second was Henry, earl of Lancaster, Derby, Lincoln and Leicester, who was created duke of Lancaster in 1351.
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  • He took orders in 1629, and in 1633 in preaching before the court so won the approval of the earl of Leicester that he presented him to the living of Penshurst in Kent.
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  • thick; the Merwyn's tower of Scott's Kenilworth; the great hall built by John of Gaunt with windows of very beautiful design; and the Leicester buildings, which are in a very ruinous condition.
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  • granted it to Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester.
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  • and was granted by Elizabeth in 1562 to Robert Dudley, afterwards earl of Leicester, but on his death in 1588 again merged in the possessions of the Crown.
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  • Thence she passed through Leicester, Coventry and Warwick, finally entering Oxford, where she met Prince George, in triumph, escorted by a large company.
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  • Dutch House, close to Kew House, was sold by Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, to Sir Hugh Portman, a Dutch merchant, late in the 16th century, and in 1781 was purchased by George III.
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  • at Leicester on the 19th of May 1426.
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  • Periodicals - The British and Colonial Printer and Stationer (London, bi-weekly); The British Printer (Leicester, alternate months); The Printer's Register (London, monthly); The Printing World (London, monthly); The Caxton Magazine (London, monthl y); The Printing Art (Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A., monthly) The Inland Printer (Chicago, monthly); The American Printer (New York, monthly); The International Printer (Philadelphia, monthly).
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  • The baths were visited at least four times by Mary queen of Scots, when a prisoner in charge of George, earl of Shrewsbury, other famous Elizabethan visitors being Lord Burleigh, the earl of Essex, and Robert, earl of Leicester.
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  • Four years later he received a commission as colonel of a regiment raised by the Rutland interest in and about Leicester to assist in quelling the Highland revolt of 1745.
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  • on Lord Rich, whose son sold it in 1577 to Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester.
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  • In 184418 45, while an English master in the Collegiate School at Leicester, he made the acquaintance of H.
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  • The name Caerleon seems to be derived from the Latin Castra legionum, but it is not peculiar to Caerleon-on-Usk, being often used of Chester and occasionally of Leicester and one or two other places.
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  • The Eastern Division, lying to the east of the zone of New Red Sandstone, may be defined on the west by a slightly curved line drawn from the estuary of the Tees through Leicester and Stratford-on-Avon to the estuary of the Severn, and thence through Glastonbury to Sidmouth.
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  • The manufacture of woollen and leather goods is a natural result of the raising of live stock; Leicester, Coventry and Nottingham are manufacturing towns of the region.
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  • The outcrop of the Lias, mainly clay with thin limestones and ironstones, runs in an almost continuous band across the country from Lyme Regis, through Bath, Cheltenham, near Leicester, and Lincoln to Redcar in Yorkshire.
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  • Of these, excluding Welsh ones, we may with some certainty identify Canterbury (Caint), Caerleonon-Usk, Leicester (Lerion), Penzelwood, Carlisle, Colchester, Grantchester (Granth), London, Worcester (Guveirangon), Doncaster (Daun), Wroxeter (Guoricon), Chester (Legion - this is Roman), Lichfield (Licitcsith) and Gloucester (Gloui).
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  • Tadcaster, Lancaster; and in the south-west and in the midlands we have a group of towns with the form cester: - Bicester, Gloucester, Cirencester, Worcester, Alcester, Leicester, Towcester.
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  • The following are suffragan or assistant bishoprics (the names of the dioceses to which each belongs being given in brackets): Dover, Croydon (Canterbury), Beverley, Hull, Sheffield (York), Stepney, Islington, Kensington (London), Jarrow (Durham), Guildford, Southampton, Dorking (Winchester), Barrow-inFurness (Carlisle), Crediton (Exeter), Grantham (Lincoln), Burnley (Manchester), Thetford, Ipswich (Norwich), Reading (Oxford), Leicester (Peterborough), Richmond, Knaresborough (Ripon), Colchester, Barking (St Albans), Swansea (St.
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  • Main line - Bedford, Leicester, Sheffield, Leeds and Carlisle, affording the " Midland " route to Scotland.
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  • West and North line from Bristol, Gloucester and Birmingham to Leicester and Derby.
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  • Main line - Rugby, Nottingham, Leicester, Sheffield, Manchester.
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  • It connects with the Oxford Canal at Braunston in Northamptonshire, and through this with canals to Birmingham and the midlands, and continues to Leicester.
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  • at Leicester on the 16th of May 1414.
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  • With some difficulty Bedford effected a formal reconciliation at Leicester in March 1426, and forced Humphrey to accept Beaufort's disavowal.
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  • In 1587 the earl of Leicester made an unsuccessful attempt to seize it.
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  • As a boy he worked in a lace factory, where he attracted the notice of the leaders of the Baptist community, who sent him to the academy at Leicester and the Baptist college at Nottingham to be educated for the ministry.
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  • earl of Leicester to centralize the government of the United Provinces.
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  • In 1688 the rich uncle, whose supposed riches had dwindled so much that at his death he was almost insolvent, died, having decayed, it would seem, not less in mind than in body and estate, and Swift sought counsel of his mother at Leicester.
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  • But he soon began to grow tired of Ireland again and to pay visits in Leicester and London.
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  • It has been assumed to be Leicester, which was captured by the Royalists in May 1645, and recovered by Fairfax in the next month.
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  • In the Derwent Valley scheme, in connexion with the water supplies of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham and Sheffield, six more masonry dams have received parliamentary sanction.
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  • The three chief divisions of the Danelagh were (1) the kingdom of Northumbria, (2) the kingdom of East Anglia, (3) the district of the Five (Danish) Boroughs - lands grouped round Leicester, Nottingham, Derby, Stamford and Lincoln, and forming a loose confederacy.
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  • In 9 17 Derby was the first of the five boroughs to fall, followed by Leicester a few months later.
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  • Thus we hear of abbots going out to sport, with their men carrying bows and arrows; keeping horses, dogs and huntsmen; and special mention is made of an abbot of Leicester, c. 1360, who was the most skilled of all the nobility in harehunting.
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  • The longwool breeds are the Leicester, Border Leicester, Cotswold, Lincoln, Kent, Devon Longwool, South Devon, Wensleydale and Roscommon.
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  • These breeds are all English, except the Border Leicester, Cheviot and Scotch Black-face, which belong to Scotland; the Welsh Mountain, which belongs to Wales; and the Roscommon, which is Irish.
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  • The Leicester, though now not numerous, is of high interest.
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  • Bakewell lived at Dishley Grange, Leicestershire, and in France the Leicester sheep are still called Dishleys.
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  • In past times Leicester blood was extensively employed in the improvement or establishment of other longwool breeds of sheep. The Leicester, as seen now, has a white wedge-shaped face, the forehead covered with wool; thin mobile ears; neck full towards the trunk, short and level with the back; width over the shoulders and through the heart; a full broad breast; fine clean legs standing well apart; deep round barrel and great depth of carcass; firm flesh, springy pelt, and pink skin, covered with fine, curly, lustrous wool.
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  • The Border Leicester originated after the death in 1795 of Bakewell, when the Leicester breed, as it then existed, diverged into two branches.
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  • The one is represented by the breed still known in England as the Leicester.
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  • The other, bred on the Scottish Borders, with an early admixture of Cheviot blood, acquired the name of Border Leicester.
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  • They are longwool sheep, derived from the old Teeswater breed by crossing with Leicester rams. They have a tuft of wool on the forehead.
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  • The Lincolns are descended from the old native breed of Lincolnshire, improved by the use of Leicester blood.
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  • It originated in a strong infusion of Leicester blood amongst the old Bampton stock of Devonshire.
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  • The Roscommon - the one breed of modern sheep native to Ireland - is indebted for its good qualities largely to the use of Leicester blood.
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  • They were gradually, like the Cotswolds, improved from the original type of slow-maturity sheep by selection in preference to the use of rams of the Improved Leicester breed.
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  • It is supplanting the Border Leicester as a sire of mutton sheep; for, although its progeny is slower in reaching maturity, tegs can be fed to greater weights in spring - 65 to 68 lb per carcass - without becoming too fat to be classed as finest quality.
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  • In past times it did for the improvement of the shortwool breeds of sheep very much the same kind of work that the Leicester performed in the case of the longwool breeds.
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  • Put to the Border Leicester ram the Cheviot ewe produces the Half-bred, which as a breeding ewe is unsurpassed as a rent-paying, arableland sheep.
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  • Drysdale, " Resistance Coils and Comparisons," British Association Report (Leicester, 1907), or the Electrician, 57, p. 955 (1907), and 60, p. 20 (1907); J.
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  • He obtained lands in Leicestershire, and it has been said he was created earl of Leicester; this statement, however, is an error, although he exercised some of the privileges of an earl.
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  • Robert De Beaumont (1104-1168), justiciar of England, married a granddaughter of Ralph Guader, earl of Norfolk, and receiving his father's English fiefs in 1118 became earl of Leicester.
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  • The earl founded the abbey of St Mary de Pre at Leicester and other religious houses, and by a charter confirmed the burgesses of Leicester in the possession of their merchant-gild and customs. His son, Robert, succeeded to the earldom of Leicester, and with other English barons assisted prince Henry in his revolt against his father the king in 1173.
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  • In 874 they harried Mercia so cruelly that King Burgred fled in despair to Rome; the victors divided up his realm, taking the eastern half for themselves, and establishing in it a confederacy, whose jarls occupied the five boroughs of Stamford, Lincoln, Derby, Nottingham and Leicester.
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  • But Alfred was not to see the happy day when York and Lincoln, Colchester and Leicester, were to become mere shire-capitals in the realm of United England.
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  • thelfind won Derby and Leicester, while her brother reduced Stamford and Nottingham.
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  • At the sftme moment the king of Sects iflvadedNorthumberlund, and the earls of Norfolk, Chester and Leicester rose in the name of the younger Henry.
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  • The justiciar, Richard de Lucy, routed the army of the earl of Leicester at Fornham in Snifolk, the castles of the rebel earls were subdued one after another, and William of Scotland was surprised and captured by a force of northern loyalists while he was besieging Alnwick (1173-1174).
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  • But it only found its permanent gujding spirit somewhat late in the reign, when Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, became the habitual mouthpiece of the grievances of the nation.
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  • He was the grandson of Amicia, countess of Leicester, but his father, Simon the Elder, a magnate whose French interests were greater than his English.
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  • had adhered to the cause of Philip Augustus in the days of King John and the Leicester estates had been.
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  • But many of the barons stood neutral, not seeing how they could refuse to accept the arbitration they had courted, while a number not inconsiderable joined the king, deciding that Leicester had passed the limits of reasonable loyalty, and that their first duty was to the crown.
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  • Let him beware, she wrote, for the earl of Leicester coveted the castle by the Severn.
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  • In 1324, two years after Thomas had lost his life for opposing the king, Henry was made earl of Leicester by his cousin, Edward II., but he was not able to secure the titles and estates of Lancaster to which he was heir, and he showed openly that his sympathies were with his dead brother.
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  • being now on the throne, Leicester secured the earldom of Lancaster and his brother's lands, becoming also steward of England; he knighted the young king and was the foremost Table Of The Principal Descendants Of John Of Gaunt.
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  • In 1337 he was made earl of Derby; in 1345 he succeeded to his father's earldoms of Lancaster and Leicester; in 1349 he was created earl of Lincoln, and in 1351 he was made duke of Lancaster.
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  • He died at Leicester on the 13th of March 1361.
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  • Thus protected, the "poor preachers" won masses of the people to their opinions, and Leicester, London and the west of England became their headquarters.
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  • The misgovernment and lack of high statesmanship of the earl of Leicester had caused faction to be rampant in the United Provinces; and on his return to England he left the country without organized forces or experienced generals to oppose an advance of a veteran army under the greatest commander of his time.
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  • Brackley (Brachelai, Brackele) was held in 3086 by Earl Alberie, from whom it passed to the earl of Leicester and thence to the families of De Quinci and Holand.
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  • A minor when Earl Edmund died in 1296, Thomas received his father's earldoms of Lancaster and Leicester in 1298, but did not become prominent in English affairs until after the accession of his cousin, Edward II., in July 1307.
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  • Living in the Netherlands he became very intimate with Eliza beth's envoy, Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, but he failed to get assistance for renewing the war either from the English queen or in any other quarter.
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  • As regards foreign affairs, Mr Chamberlain more than once (and particularly at Leicester on 30th November 18 9 9) indicated his leanings towards a closer understanding between the British empire, the United States and Germany, - a suggestion which did not save him from an extravagant outburst of German hostility during the Boer War.
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  • Between 1214 and 1231 Grosseteste held in succession the archdeaconries of Chester, Northampton and Leicester.
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  • He continued to take part in the proceedings of various learned societies; and only a few months before his death, at the Leicester meeting of the British Association, he attested the keenness with which he followed the current developments of scientific speculation by delivering a long and searching address on the electronic theory of matter.
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  • During the governorship of Leicester he was the leader of the strenuous opposition offered by the States of Holland to the centralizing policy of the governor.
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  • During the two critical years which followed the withdrawal of Leicester, it was the statesmanship of the advocate which kept the United Provinces from falling asunder through their own inherent separatist tendencies, and prevented them from becoming an easy conquest to the formidable army of Alexander of Parma.
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  • from Leicester on the Nuneaton-Leicester branch of the London & NorthWestern railway, and near the Ashby-de-la-Zouch canal.
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  • The government was then carried on by Æthelflaed, who built a number of fortresses, and in conjunction with her brother, King Edward the Elder, succeeded in expelling the Danes from Derby and Leicester by the year 917-18.
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  • Evesham gave its name to the famous battle, fought on the 4th of August 1265, between the forces of Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, and the royalist army under Prince Edward.
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  • After a masterly campaign, in which the prince had succeeded in defeating Leicester in the valleys of the Severn and Usk, and had destroyed the forces of the younger Montfort at Kenilworth before he could effect a junction with the main body, the royalist forces approached Evesham in the morning of the 4th of August in time to intercept Leicester's march towards Kenilworth.
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  • antiquarian book collector, golfer and supporter of Leicester Tigers, he is also a magistrate.
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  • armory of instruments is an X-ray Telescope (XRT ), designed and built by the University of Leicester.
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  • Sir John Fleming Leicester, the 5th baronet was created Baron de Tabley in 1826.
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  • What happens is there were a lot of extremely skilled out-of-work bricklayers in Leicester.
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  • They were ruthlessly crushed by a crusade launched by Pope Innocent III, involving Simon de Montfort of Leicester.
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  • The works involved excavations in Leicester Road to lay a large 1000 mm x 650 mm elliptical culvert to replace the existing defective culvert.
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  • Back to the top local demography The following figures were taken from Ethnic Minorities in Leicester.
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  • With Leicester getting desperate, we could finally laugh at them.
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  • diptych dial provided here was designed by Dr. Allan Mills, Astronomy Group, Leicester University, UK.
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  • Local Businesses back expo '05 The Leicester Expo festival offers a number of opportunities to the business community.
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  • Rather than the usual cladding of beige tiles, Leicester Square has impressive black granite facings.
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  • farce of a game in 1974 against Leicester City having lost to Newcastle in the semi-final.
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  • He wasn't even fazed by a wasted weekend in England watching Clermont Auvergne at Leicester and Biarritz at Saracens.
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  • While todays game will be a pressure cooker for former boss Peter Taylor Leicester have a great chance to ease their relegation fears.
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  • following signs for Leicester.
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  • I had the same grader for years and he followed [the print] all the way up to the Empire, Leicester Square.
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  • Saturday's game against Leicester never really lived up to the pre-match hype.
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  • The Corporation of Leicester made no attempt to prosecute the alleged Secularist lawbreakers, who had of course broken no law.
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  • Leicester square!
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  • Leicester Churchill spur him on direct line norwich was not covered.
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  • alliance Leicester churchill spur him on direct line norwich was not covered.
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  • Posts: 424 | From: Leicester | Registered: Apr 2004 | IP: Logged | Stewart luck Member # 26123754 posted 12.
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  • lumbering oaf with a poor goalscoring record at Leicester, his England prospects were laughed at.
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  • milliners shop near Leicester Square.
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  • Leicester: NIACE, 2000 The reinvention of politics: rethinking modernity in the global social order.
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  • mohair bouclé and our irresistible " teddy bear " Blue-faced Leicester bouclé .
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  • Leicester city-centre on a weekday morning more than lives up to this promise.
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  • motorway at junction 22, taking the A50 toward Leicester.
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  • Piccadilly line to Leicester Square, then northern to Tottenham Court Road.
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  • Heskey was a lumbering oaf with a poor goalscoring record at Leicester, his England prospects were laughed at.
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  • overpower the man during the journey from Leicester to the capital.
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  • He was a cultured man who enjoyed the patronage of Robert Dudley, later Earl of Leicester.
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  • Somewhere up around Leicester I was getting a bit punchy and needed fuel, so I pulled into the services.
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  • Thirlwall Castle also carries 1,500 Swaledale ewes, three quarters of which are crossed with the Bluefaced Leicester with the remainder bred pure.
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  • Leicester was ranked in the top quartile of cities suitable for public sector relocation - the only city to ranked in the top quartile of cities suitable for public sector relocation - the only city to rank in all relocation scenarios.
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  • re mortgage customers can also choose from a wide range of Alliance & Leicester mortgage deals available.
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  • Better than Leicester University, which is solely reliant on BIDS.
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  • ruinous buildings dating from the 12th to the 16th century, including Leicester's Building.
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  • Leicester is a a proven sire, throwing kittens with wild faces.
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  • The majority of pathological specimens from the museum were transferred to the Clinical Sciences Department of Leicester Royal Infirmary in 1985.
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  • The northwest of the district is crossed by the old Leicester Causeway and Stoney Stanton Road, a former turnpike.
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  • El tren de Leicester a Derby solo tarda Una media hora.
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  • In raw audio recordings from largely unedited interviews people from the Leicester area recall life in the East Midlands during the First World War.
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  • unsecured lending with the Alliance & Leicester Group does not exceed £ 25,000.
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  • waste recycling facility in Leicester.
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  • wholesale: Established in 1986, we are a wholesaling hosiery business based in Leicester.
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  • In the latter half of the century another Norfolk farmer, Thomas William Coke of Holkham, earl of Leicester, 1.13 a (1752-1842), figures as a pioneer of high-farming.
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  • On the withdrawal of Leicester from the Netherlands in August 1587, Johan van Oldenbarneveldt, the advocate of Holland, became the leading statesman of the country, a position which he retained for upwards of thirty years.
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  • Krenkow of Leicester) appears to represent one of the recensions mentioned by Muhammad an-Nadim in the Fihrist (p. 68), to which reference has been made above.
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  • The last of these earls of Leicester to inherit the hereditary stewardship was Simon V.
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  • On the 26th of January 1569 she had been removed from Bolton Castle to Tutbury in Staffordshire, where proposals were conveyed to her, at the instigation of Leicester, for a marriage with the duke of Norfolk, to which she gave a graciously conditional assent; but the discovery of these proposals consigned Norfolk to the Tower, and on the outbreak of an insurrection in the north Mary, by Lord Hunsdon's advice, was again removed to Coventry, when a body of her intending deliverers was within a day's ride of Tutbury.
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  • The Field of November 6, 18 75, p. 512, contains an engraving of a hunting-horn then in the possession of the late master of the Cheshire hounds, and upon the horn is the inscription: - "Thomas Boothby, Esq., Tooley Park, Leicester.
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  • - Windsor: Nine MSS., chiefly on anatomy, published entire in simple facsimile by Rouveyre (Paris, 1901); partially, with transliterations and introduction by Piumati and Sabachnikoff (Paris, 1898, foil.); British Museum: one MS., miscellaneous, unpublished; Victoria and Albert Museum: ten note-books bound in 3 vols.; facsimile by Rouveyre, Holkham (collection of Lord Leicester), 1 vol., on hydraulics and the action of water; published in facsimile with transliteration and notes by Gerolamo Calvi.
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  • The white-faced breeds include the Leicester, Border Leicester, Lincoln, Kentish, Cheviot, Ryeland, Devon Longwool, South Devon, Dorset and Somerset Horn, Limestone, Penistone, Exmoor and Roscommon.
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  • On the day that followed his victory Leicester extorted from the captive king the document called the mise of Lewes, in which Henry promised to abide by all the terms Mo7,tfort~s of the Provisions of Oxford, as well as to uphold the meat.
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  • The government was then carried on by Æthelflaed, who built a number of fortresses, and in conjunction with her brother, King Edward the Elder, succeeded in expelling the Danes from Derby and Leicester by the year 917-18.
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  • Leicester was ranked in the top quartile of cities suitable for public sector relocation - the only city to rank in all relocation scenarios.
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  • New re mortgage customers can also choose from a wide range of Alliance & Leicester mortgage deals available.
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  • The inner court contains a range of ruinous buildings dating from the 12th to the 16th century, including Leicester 's Building.
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  • El tren de Leicester a Derby solo tarda una media hora.
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  • Checks will be carried out to ensure your total unsecured lending with the Alliance & Leicester Group does not exceed £ 25,000.
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  • In May 2003 the contract was confirmed and work commenced on the building of a new £ 30million waste recycling facility in Leicester.
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  • Profile: Established in 1986, we are a wholesaling hosiery business based in Leicester.
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  • Leicester Junior College, which was founded in 1784, is one of the United States' oldest educational institutions.
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  • Between its Worcester, Massachusetts and Leicester, Massachusetts campuses, Becker College has a total enrollment of just under 1,800 students.
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  • As one of the first colleges established in the United States, Leicester's charter boasts the signature of John Hancock.
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  • In general, applicants to Leicester Junior College and Becker College need to have obtained a 2.0 or better grade point average, although some programs require a 2.5 grade point average.
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  • A., et al. "The Use of Complementary Medicine in Children with Atopic Dermatitis in Secondary Care in Leicester."
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