Legend sentence example

legend
  • He declared the whole legend was fictitious.

    257
    102
  • The Muses also gathered up the fragments of his body and buried them at Leibethra below Olympus, where the nightingales sang over his grave, while yet another legend places his tomb at Dium, near Pydna in Macedonia.

    334
    191
  • If he could hit a little white ball, he'd be a legend in the 'hood!

    478
    400
  • According to the legend, Athena, who had invented the flute, threw it away in disgust, because it distorted the features.

    151
    97
  • The Alexander legend was the theme of poetry in all European languages; six or seven German poets dealt with the subject, and it may be read in French, English, Spanish, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic, Flemish and Bohemian.

    90
    50
    Advertisement
  • The basilica reared over his tomb at Rome is still visited by pilgrims. His legend is very popular.

    51
    29
  • Is the Ripsime episode mere legend ?

    16
    5
  • Of these, Thetis and Amphitrite rule the sea according to the legend of different localities; Galatea is a Sicilian figure, who plays with and deludes her rustic lover of the shore, Polyphemus.

    65
    55
  • Legend associated Trier with the martyrdom of part of the Theban legion (c. 286) and with the relics found by St Helena in the Holy Land.

    38
    28
  • The popular legend is a very natural one.

    13
    4
    Advertisement
  • While I've never seen what lies within, legend says it's the key to the planet's survival.

    60
    53
  • In the 3rd century we find it issuing coins with an Oscan legend, but in 211 B.C. it shared the fate of Capua.

    35
    28
  • A baseless legend relates that he composed the Quicunque Vult while hiding here in a cistern.

    27
    20
  • In late versions this legend was expanded and varied, the martyrdom was connected with a refusal to take part in a great sacrifice ordered at Octodurum and the name of Exsuperius was added to that of Mauritius.

    30
    25
  • The mistletoe figures also in Scandinavian legend as having furnished the material of the arrow with which Balder (the sun-god) was slain by the blind god Hoder.

    17
    13
    Advertisement
  • A similar conclusion may be drawn from the legend which peopled primitive Rhodes with a population of skilful workers in metal, the "Telchines."

    33
    29
  • The Bible legend tells us that the absence of labor--idleness--was a condition of the first man's blessedness before the Fall.

    50
    46
  • Marsyas, as well as Midas and Silenus, are associated in legend with Dionysus and belong to the cycle of legends of Cybele.

    38
    35
  • Christina (martyred by drowning in the lake, according to the legend, in 278) which dates from the 11th century and contains some frescoes, perhaps of the school of Giotto.

    20
    17
  • Again, a legend was based on John xxi.

    7
    4
    Advertisement
  • With it is associated the legend of the "Knights of the Swan," immortalized in Wagner's Lohengrin.

    31
    29
  • He also composed in 1255 the Legend of St Clare; and he is one of those to whom the sequence Dies irae is attributed.

    4
    2
  • The legend in this form first appeared in a pamphlet of four leaves alleged to have been printed at Leiden in 1602.

    4
    2
  • The pamphlet is supposed to have been written by Chrysostomus Dudulaeus of Westphalia and printed by one Christoff Crutzer, but as no such author or printer is known at this time - the latter name indeed refers directly to the legend - it has been conjectured that the whole story is a myth invented to support the Protestant contention of a continuous witness to the truth of Holy Writ in the person of this "eternal" Jew; he was to form, in his way, a counterpart to the apostolic tradition of the Catholic Church.

    4
    2
  • In the few references to the legend in Spanish writings the Wandering Jew is called Juan Espera en Dios, which gives a more hopeful turn to the legend.

    4
    2
    Advertisement
  • George Croly's Salathiel, which appeared anonymously in 1828, gave a highly elaborate turn to the legend; this has been re-published under the title Tarry Thou Till I Come.

    2
    0
  • The subject was suggested by the Roman legend of Virginia, but the scene is laid in an Italian court, and the whole play is conceived in the spirit of the "tragedy of common life."

    3
    1
  • The original Digenes epic is lost, but four poems are extant, in which the different incidents of the legend have been worked up by different hands.

    2
    0
  • But this time, he suspected Dusty would live up to his legend.

    5
    4
  • In North Africa, probably in the 9th century, appeared the book known under the name of Eldad ha-Dani, giving an account of the ten tribes, from which much medieval legend was derived; 2 and in Kairawan the medical and philosophical treatises of Isaac Israeli, who died in 932.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • According to the legend, her worship was instituted by Titus Tatius, and her priest, the flamen Floralis, by Numa.

    1
    0
  • Some scholars, identifying Iasion with Jason, regard Thessaly as the original home of the legend, and the union with Demeter as the iEpen 'yaµos of mother earth with a health god.

    1
    0
  • O'NEILL, the name of an Irish family tracing descent from Niall, king of Ireland early in the 5th century, and known in Irish history and legend as Niall of the Nine Hostages.

    1
    0
  • Many traces of myth, legend and " primitive " thought survive in the Old Testament, and on the most cautious estimate they presuppose a vitality which is not a little astonishing.

    1
    0
  • According to the Jewish legend Heliodorus was attacked when he entered the Temple by a horse with a terrible rider and by two young men.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The legend of ritual murder (q.v.) has been revived, and every obstacle is placed in the way of the free intercourse of Jews with their Christian fellow-citizens.

    1
    0
  • Robespierre visited Marie Therese on the 11th of May, but no one, according to the legend, entered the dauphin's room for six months until Barras visited the prison after the 9th Thermidor (July 2 7, 1794).

    1
    0
  • The Judas legend, however, never really became popular, whereas that of Oedipus was handed down both orally and in written national tales (Albanian, Finnish, Cypriote).

    1
    0
  • The Theban legend, which reached its fullest development in the Thebais of Statius and in Seneca, reappeared in the Roman de Thebes (the work of an unknown imitator of Benoit de Sainte-More).

    1
    0
  • The Oedipus legend was handed down to the period of the Renaissance by the Roman and its imitations, which then fell into oblivion.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Even to the present day the legend has 1 It is probable that the story of the piercing of his feet is a subsequent invention to explain the name, or is due to a false etymology (from oih&o), 01St rovs in reality meaning the "wise" (from oTSa), chiefly in reference to his having solved the riddle, the syllable - irovs having no significance.

    0
    0
  • The cathedral, of the 12th century, has a carved portal and three apses decorated with small arches and pilasters, and contains a fine pulpit and episcopal throne in marble mosaic. Near it are two grottos 1 To the period after 335 belong numerous silver and bronze coins with the legend Caleno.

    0
    0
  • With reference to the Celtic race, P. cordata, it is interesting to note its connexion with Arthurian legend and the Isle of Avalon or Isle of Apples.

    0
    0
  • An island in Loch Awe has a Celtic legend containing the principal features of Arthurian story; but in this case the word is "berries" instead of "apples."

    0
    0
  • In the legend of Nisus and Scylla there is a trace of the custom which was still observed in classical times in the sacrifice of animals.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • But, although the legend is first told in Alexandrian times, the "cry of Hylas" occurs long before as the "Mysian cry" in Aeschylus (Persae, 1054), and in Aristophanes (Plutus, 1127) "to cry Hylas" is used proverbially of seeking something in vain.

    0
    0
  • The legend goes that Mahmud had in the meanwhile despatched the promised hundred thousand pieces of gold to Firdousi, with a robe of honour and ample apologies for the past.

    0
    0
  • Legend was not long in providing the woman of the Gospel with a name.

    0
    0
  • Towards the 6th century the legend of the woman with the issue of blood became merged in the legend of Pilate, as is shown in the writings known in the middle ages as Cura sanitatis Tiberii and Vindicta Salvatoris.

    0
    0
  • The legend continued to gather accretions, and a miraculous origin came to be assigned to the image.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • On a lower level as regards credibility stands the Memorial de SainteHelene, compiled by Las Cases from Napoleon's conversations with the obvious aim of creating a Napoleonic legend.

    0
    0
  • It was long supposed to be Venetian, but has been identified as of rare Oriental workmanship. The legend tells how a seneschal of Eden Hall one day came upon a company of fairies dancing at St Cuthbert's Well in the park.

    0
    0
  • His coins of 270 struck at Alexandria bear the legend v(ir) c(onsularis) R(omanorum) im(perator) d(ux) R(omanorum) and display his head beside that of Aurelian, but the latter alone is styled Augustus.

    0
    0
  • In this connexion Yaqui tells a curious story of the opening of one of the tombs by the caliph, which in spite of fabulous incidents, recalling the legend of Roderic the Goth, shows some traces of local knowledge.

    0
    0
  • Charlemagne founded a hospital and a library in the Holy City; and later legend, when it made him the first of crusaders and the conqueror of the Holy Land, was not without some basis of fact.

    0
    0
  • The legend has been followed by modern historians; but in point of fact Peter is a figure of secondary importance.

    0
    0
  • According to the epic legend, Vishtaspa was.

    0
    0
  • Already in the later Avesta he has become a half-mythical figure, the last in the series of heroes of east Iranian legend, in the arrangement of which series priestly influence is unmistakably evident.

    0
    0
  • Among the grandees of the court of Vishtaspa mention is made of two brothers, Frashaoshtra and Jamaspa; both were, according to the later legend, vizirs of Vishtaspa.

    0
    0
  • According to later legend (Vd., 2, I), Ormazd at first wished to entrust this task to Yima (Jemshid), the ideal of an Iranian king.

    0
    0
  • Cain's subsequent founding of a city finds a parallel in the legend of the origin of Rome through the swarms of outlaws and broken men of all kinds whom Romulus attracted thither.

    0
    0
  • The legend, which has never been traced to its ultimate source, had many variants, especially as regards the situation attributed to Manoa.

    0
    0
  • But when the legend became common property, other and better-known heroes were added to their number - Orpheus, Castor and Polydeuces (Pollux), Zetes and Calais, the winged sons of Boreas, Meleager, Theseus, Heracles.

    0
    0
  • Several interpretations of the legend have been put forward by modern scholars.

    0
    0
  • There is a legend that William Pitt the younger thought of her; the somewhat notorious lover of Mlle de Lespinasse, Guibert, a cold-hearted coxcomb of some talent, certainly paid her addresses.

    0
    0
  • The Ionians in turn succumbed to the Dorians of Argos, who, according to the legend, were led by Deiphontes; and from that time the city continued to preserve its Dorian character.

    0
    0
  • The charm of the personal character of Stevenson and the romantic vicissitudes of his life are so predominant in the minds of all who knew him, or lived within earshot of his legend, that they made the ultimate position which he will take in the history of English literature somewhat difficult to decide.

    0
    0
  • The Pena de los Enamorados, or "Lovers' Peak," is a conspicuous crag which owes its name to the romantic legend adapted by Robert Southey (1774-1843) in his Laila and Manuel.

    0
    0
  • Most of the inhabitants continued heathens until, according to the legend, Salsa, a Christian maiden, threw the head of their serpent idol into the sea, whereupon the enraged populace stoned her to death.

    0
    0
  • According to the legend, her father Zeus swallowed his wife Metis ("counsel"), when pregnant with Athena, since he had been warned that his children by her might prove stronger than himself and dethrone him.

    0
    0
  • With this aspect of her character may be compared the Hesiodic legend, according to which she was the daughter of Metis.

    0
    0
  • As Such she appears in Homer and Hesiod and in post-Homeric legend as the slayer of the Gorgon and taking part in the battle of the giants.

    0
    0
  • She is prominent as the promoter of agriculture in Attic legend.

    0
    0
  • She is also connected with Poseidon in the legend of Erechtheus, not as being in any way akin to the former in nature or character, but as indicating the contest between an old and a new religion.

    0
    0
  • The legend that Athena, observing in the water the distortion of her features caused by playing that instrument, flung it away, probably indicates that the Boeotians whom the Athenians regarded with contempt, used the flute in their worship of the Boeotian Athena.

    0
    0
  • No less than thirteen historical personages bearing the name of William (Guillaume) have been thought by various critics to have their share in the formation of the legend.

    0
    0
  • Burmeister regards the legend as an incident in the struggle between the followers of Dionysus and Apollo in Thebes, in which the former were defeated and driven back to Lydia.

    0
    0
  • According to the legend a raven settled on his helmet during his combat with a gigantic Gaul, and distracted the enemy's attention by flying in his face.

    0
    0
  • The Christian legend, which is no doubt in the main based on the Jewish, is found in Greek, Syriac, Armenian, Slavonic and Medieval Latin.

    0
    0
  • The legend is found also in Ethiopic, Syriac and Anglo-Saxon.

    0
    0
  • Thecla was most probably a real personage, around whom a legend had already gathered in the 2nd century.

    0
    0
  • Of this legend the author of the Acts of Paul made use, and introduced into it certain historical and geographical facts.

    0
    0
  • In another legend he was blinded by Oenopion of Chios for having violated his daughter Merope; but having made his way to the place where the sun rose, he recovered his sight (Hyginus, loc. cit.; Parthenius, Erotica, 20).

    0
    0
  • See Ktientzle, Ober die Sternsagen der Griechen (1897), and his article in Roscher's Lexikon; he shows that in the oldest legend Orion the constellation and Orion the hero are quite distinct, without deciding which was the earlier conception.

    0
    0
  • In Greek legend it appears as the place where, the Heraclidae built a fleet to invade Peloponnesus.

    0
    0
  • It was founded by a colony of Achaeans led by Myscellus in 710 B.C. Its name was, according to the legend, that of a local prince who afforded hospitality to Heracles, but was accidentally killed by him and buried on the spot.

    0
    0
  • With this monument as a basis, Franz Cumont has arranged the small Mithraic reliefs into two groups, one illustrating the legend of the origin of the gods, and the other the legend of Mithras.

    0
    0
  • From the Margit-Legenda, or " Legend of St Margaret," composed in the early part of the 14th century, 3 it is evident that from time to time the native language continued to be employed as a means of religious edification.

    0
    0
  • Probably the foremost among them is Sigismund Justh, who died prematurely in the midst of his painful attempt at reconciling French " realistic " modes of thought with what he conceived to be Magyar simplicity (A puszta konyve, " The Book of the Puszta," prairie of Hungary; A Peitz legenddja, " The Legend of Money "; Gdnyo Julcsa, " Juliet Ganyo "; Fuimus).

    0
    0
  • Cecilia, whose musical fame rests on a passing notice in her legend that she praised God by instrumental as well as vocal music, has inspired many a masterpiece in art, including the Raphael at Bologna, the Rubens in Berlin, the Domenichino in Paris, and in literature, where she is commemorated especially by Chaucer's "Seconde Nonnes Tale," and by Dryden's famous ode, set to music by Handel in 1736, and later by Sir Hubert Parry (1889).

    0
    0
  • Surely this is the national legend of the agricultural Scythians about Olbia,.

    0
    0
  • A considerable legend has attached itself to Nicholas through the persistent but mistaken identification of him with the mysterious "Friend of God from the Oberland," the "double" of Rulman Merswin, the Strassburg banker who was one of the leaders of the 14th-century German mystics known as the Friends of God.

    0
    0
  • The well-known legend of the correspondence of Abgar Ukkama, king of Edessa, with Christ and the mission of Addai to Edessa immediately after the Ascension was accepted as true by the historian Eusebius (f340) on the faith of a Syriac document preserved in the official archives of the city.

    0
    0
  • The special interest of Map lies in the perplexing question of his relation to the Arthurian legend and literature.

    0
    0
  • The legend related by Herodotus and Strabo, which ascribed the origin of the Pamphylians to a colony led into their country by Amphilochus and Calchas after the Trojan War, is merely a characteristic myth.

    0
    0
  • The legend of his choice is that Nanak with his followers was going on a journey, when they saw the dead body of a man lying by the wayside.

    0
    0
  • It is of him that the legend is told that during his imprisonment in Delhi he was accused by the emperor of looking towards the west in the direction of the imperial zenana.

    0
    0
  • The date of Sargon is placed by Nabonidus at 3800 B.C. He was the son of Itti-Bel, and a legend related how he had been born in concealment and sent adrift in an ark of bulrushes on the waters of the Euphrates.

    0
    0
  • The legend of Adapa, the first man, a portion of which was found in the record-office of the Egyptian king Amenophis IV.

    0
    0
  • Round the rim was a cuneiform legend, and in the field a Hittite figure with six Hittite symbols engraved twice over on either hand of it.

    0
    0
  • Altdorf is best known as the place where, according to the legend, William Tell shot the apple from his son's head.

    0
    0
  • According to the legend, the town in the year 1284 was infested by a terrible plague of rats.

    0
    0
  • The chief seats of her legend are Delos and Delphi, and the generally accepted tradition is a union of the legends of these two places.

    0
    0
  • In the oldest forms of the legend Hera is not mentioned; but afterwards the wanderings of Leto are ascribed to the jealousy of that goddess, enraged at her amour with Zeus.

    0
    0
  • Such are the main facts of the Leto legend in its common literary form, which is due especially to the two Homeric hymns to Apollo.

    0
    0
  • The legend of his missionary labours in Cyprus, including martyrdom at Salamis, is quite late and untrustworthy.

    0
    0
  • A fresh field for romantic legend was found in the history of the victories of Islam, the exploits of the first heroes of the faith, the fortunes of 'All and his house.

    0
    0
  • The legend of Prester John is based on the idea of the conversion of a Mongol tribe, the Karith, whose chieftain Ung Khan at baptism received the title Malek Juchana (King John).

    0
    0
  • In the chapters devoted to the origines of Britain he relies on the Brutus legend, but cannot carry his catalogue of British or English kings further than 735, where he honestly confesses that his authorities fail him.

    0
    0
  • Another development of the legend is that in which, having rejected many offers of marriage, she was taken to heaven in vision and betrothed to Christ by the Virgin Mary.

    0
    0
  • That St Catherine actually existed there is, indeed, no evidence to disprove; and it is possible that some of the elements in her legend are due to confusion with the story of Hypatia, the neo-platonic philosopher of Alexandria, who was done to death by a Christian mob.

    0
    0
  • So late as the 16th century, Bossuet delivered a panegyric upon her, and it was the action of Dom Deforis, the Benedictine editor of his works, in criticizing the accuracy of the data on which this was based, that first discredited the legend.

    0
    0
  • The legend reads that in the year 600 Dymphna, an Irish princess, was executed here by her father, and in consequence of certain miracles she had effected she was canonized and made the patron saint of the insane.

    0
    0
  • Heroic honours were at first bestowed upon the founders of a colony or city, and the ancestors of families; if their name was not known, one was adopted from legend.

    0
    0
  • It is now, however, admitted that, whatever influence the one may have from time to time exercised on the other, Teutonic myth and Teutonic heroic legend were developed on independent lines.

    0
    0
  • It is an amalgamation of the myth tof Beowa, the slayer of the water-demon and the dragon, with the historical legend of Beowulf, nephew and successor of Hygelac (Chochilaicus), king of the Geatas, who was defeated and slain (c. 520) while ravaging the Frisian coast.

    0
    0
  • As the myth of the Harlungen is connected with Ermanaric, so another Dioscuri myth (of the Hartungen) is combined with the Ortnit-Wolfdietrich legend.

    0
    0
  • Walther is not an historical figure, although the legend undoubtedly represents typical occurrences of the migration period, such as the detention and flight of hostages of noble family from the court of the Huns, and the rescue of captive maidens by abduction.

    0
    0
  • There is absolutely no historical background for his legend.

    0
    0
  • To quote his own words, it was "a terrible sermon," and legend adds that he foretold he should preach for eight years.

    0
    0
  • The legend is that India fell to St Thomas, who showed unwillingness to start until Christ appeared in a vision and ordered him to serve King Gondophares and build him a palace.

    0
    0
  • This legend is not incompatible with what is known of the chronology of Gondophares' reign.

    0
    0
  • The roof and walls are covered with arabesques, and the legend El-Mulk Lillah, " the kingdom is God's," is repeated again and again.

    0
    0
  • According to the legend it was founded by the Trojan Antenor.

    0
    0
  • The probability seems to be that the earliest Perceval-Grail romance was composed at Fescamp, and was coincident with the transformation, under the influence of the Saint-Sang legend, of the originally Pagan talisman known as the Grail into a Christian relic, and that this romance was more or less at the root of all subsequent versions.

    0
    0
  • This has been practically proved by the extraordinary success which has attended Richard Wagner's dramatic re-telling of the legend in his Parsifal.

    0
    0
  • Disregarding popular tradition, which connects the origin of the town with a legend that Charlemagne, when retreating before the Saxons, was safely conducted across the river by a doe, it may be asserted that the first genuine historical notice of the town occurs in 793, when Einhard, Charlemagne's biographer, tells us that he spent the winter in the villa Frankonovurd.

    0
    0
  • The chief motives were landscapes of a peculiarly wild and romantic type, animal life, trees and flowers, and figtire compositions drawn from Chinese and Buddhist history and Taoist legend; and these, together with the grand aims and strange shortcomings of its principles and the limited range of its methods, were adopted almost without change by Japan.

    0
    0
  • Tarentum (whether or no founded by pre-Dorian Greeks - its founders bore the unexplained name of Partheniae) became a Laconian colony at some unknown date, whence a legend grew up connecting the Partheniae with Sparta, and 707 B.C. was assigned as its traditional date.

    0
    0
  • A strange episode in the legend of the destruction of man by the gods tells how Ra (or Re), the first king of the world, finding in his old age that mankind ceased to respect him, first tried the remedy of massacre, and then ascended the heavenly cow, and organized a new world - that of heaven.9 8.

    0
    0
  • He now turned his attention to themes of classic legend, which at first he treated in a "Romantic spirit."

    0
    0
  • The combination of these two characteristics suggests some connexion with the legend of Orestes.

    0
    0
  • Pilate's place in the Christian tragedy, and perhaps also in the Creed, stimulated legend about him in two directions, equally unhistorical.

    0
    0
  • Still more important service was rendered by him in his long Saturnian poem on the first Punic war, in which he not only told the story of contemporary events but gave shape to the legend of the settlement of Aeneas in Latium, - the theme ultimately adopted for the great national epic of Rome.

    0
    0
  • In his Metamorphoses, which were based upon a Greek original, he takes the wonderful story of the adventures of Lucius of Madaura, and interweaves the famous legend of Cupid and Psyche.

    0
    0
  • One legend made Dorus himself originally an Aetolian prince; the participation of Oxylus, and the Aetolian claim to Elis, appear first in Ephorus (4th century).

    0
    0
  • The conquest of Laconia at least is represented in 5th-century tradition as immediate and complete, though one legend admits the previous death of the Heracleid leader Aristodemus, and another describes a protracted struggle in the case of Corinth.

    0
    0
  • In Messenia (according to a legend dramatized by Euripides in the 5th century, and renovated for political ends in the 4th century) the descendants of Cresphontes quarrelled among themselves and were exterminated by the natives.

    0
    0
  • The legend of a Dorian invasion appears first in Tyrtaeus, a 7thcentury poet, in the service of Sparta, who brings the Spartan Heracleids to Peloponnese from Erineon in the northern Doris; and the lost Epic of Aegimius, of about the same date, seems to have presupposed the same story.

    0
    0
  • The legend of an organized apportionment of Peloponnese amongst the Heracleid leaders appears first in the 5th-century tragedians, - not earlier, that is, than the rise of the Peloponnesian League, - and was amplified in the 4th century; the Aetolians' aid, and claim to Elis, appear first in Ephorus.

    0
    0
  • It was, however, the Arthurian legend which of all his fabrications attained the greatest vogue.

    0
    0
  • The story of Vortigern and Rowena takes its final form in the Historia Britonum; and Merlin makes his first appearance in the prelude to the Arthur legend.

    0
    0
  • The antiquity of Marlborough is shown by the Castle Mound, a British earthwork, which local legend makes the grave of Merlin; and the name of Marlborough has been regarded as a corrupt form of Merlin's Berg or Rock.

    0
    0
  • The legend of the former of these two is famous.

    0
    0
  • In associating St Pelagia with St Marina, St Margaret, and others, of whom either the name or the legend recalls Pelagia, Hermann Usener has endeavoured to show by a series of subtle deductions that this saint is only a Christian travesty of Aphrodite.

    0
    0
  • The legend of the second of these saints is given in the Bollandist Acta SS.

    0
    0
  • Another legend states that Arthur and his knights sleep in a vault beneath the Eildons.

    0
    0
  • Other places associated with this legend may still be identified.

    0
    0
  • The legend (for it is nothing more) that Tromp hoisted a broom at his mainmast-head to announce his intention to sweep the English off the sea, refers to this period.

    0
    0
  • One explanation has been sought in the legend of St Nicholas miraculously restoring to life three rich youths, who had been murdered, cut up and concealed in a salting tub by a thievish innkeeper or butcher, in whose house they had taken lodging.

    0
    0
  • A legend of his surreptitious bestowal of dowries upon the three daughters of an impoverished citizen, who, unable to procure fit marriages for them, was on the point of giving them up to a life of shame, is said to have originated the old custom of giving presents in secret on the Eve of St Nicholas, subsequently transferred to Christmas Day.

    0
    0
  • The history of Charles Martel especially was absorbed in the Charlemagne legend.

    0
    0
  • The legend probably originated in a desire to authenticate the relics in the abbey of Saint Denis, supposed to have been brought to Aix by Charlemagne, and is preserved in a 12th-century romance, Le Voyage de Charlemagne a Jerusalem et a Constantinople.'

    0
    0
  • The Chanson de Roland relates the historic defeat of Roncesvalles on the 15th of August 778, and forms the very crown of the whole Carolingian legend.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately the original Guiteclin is lost, but the legend is preserved in Les Saisnes (c. 1300) of Jehan Bodel, which is largely occupied by the loves of Baudouin and Sibille, the wife of Guiteclin.

    0
    0
  • The Charlemagne legend was fully developed in Italy, where it was to have later a great poetic development at the hands of Boiardo, Ariosto and Tasso.

    0
    0
  • Bousset has shown with much probability that it is part of the Antichrist legend.

    0
    0
  • The first is the advanced stage of development of this, the Neronic-Antichrist legend.

    0
    0
  • This points, we may here assume, to the Nero redivivus legend, which could not have arisen for a full generation after Nero's death, and the assumption receives large confirmation from the most probable interpretation of the enigmatical words, xiii.

    0
    0
  • The second stage of this legend was that Nero had taken refuge in the Far East, and would return with the help of his Eastern subjects for the overthrow of Rome.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, it is not improbable that from a very early date the title was assigned to the Abyssinian king, though for a time this identification was overshadowed by the prevalence of the Asiatic legend.

    0
    0
  • All the wild beasts and monstrous creatures commemorated in current legend were to be found in his dominions, as well as all the wild and eccentric races of men of whom strange stories were told, including those unclean nations whom Alexander Magnus walled up among the mountains of the north, and who were to come forth at the latter day - and so were the Amazons and the Bragmans.

    0
    0
  • He whose conquests and slaughters now revived the legend was in fact no Christian or King David but the famous Jenghiz Khan.

    0
    0
  • In the narrative of William Rubruquis (1253), though distinct reference is made to the conquering Gur Khan under the name of Coir Cham of Caracatay, the title of "King John" is assigned to Kushluk, king of the Naimans, who had married the daughter of the last lineal representative of the gur khans.(fn 2) And from the remarks which Rubruquis makes in connexion with this King John, on the habit of the Nestorians to spin wonderful stories out of nothing, and of the great tales that went forth about King John, it is evident that the intelligent traveller supposed this king of the Naimans to be the original of the widely spread legend.

    0
    0
  • Icaria (pop. about 8000) derives its name from the legend of Icarus.

    0
    0
  • It is regarded with great reverence, owing to a legend that the inner band of iron has been hammered out of one of the nails of the true cross.

    0
    0
  • The legend as to the iron being that of one of the nails of the cross is rejected by Muratori and others, and cannot be traced far back.

    0
    0
  • How it arose or how any credence came to be reposed in the legend, it is difficult to surmise.

    0
    0
  • It has no legend, but merely a cross hanging from it.

    0
    0
  • From one of them hangs a legend which relates that they were an offering to a church, which has been identified with much probability as that of Sorbas, a small town in the province of Almeria.

    0
    0
  • Dehra Dun only emerges from the mists of legend into authentic history in the 17th century A.D., when it formed part of the Garhwal kingdom.

    0
    0
  • Busolt, who suggests that Tyrtaeus was a native of Aphidnae in Laconia, conjectures that the entire legend may have been concocted in connexion with the expedition sent to the assistance of Sparta in her struggle with the revolted Helots at Ithome (464).

    0
    0
  • The warrior painted the story of conflicts on his robe only in part, to help him recount the history of his life; the Eskimo etched the prompters of his legend on ivory; the Tlinkit carved them on his totem post; the women fixed them in pottery, basketry, or blankets.

    0
    0
  • According to a local legend the name Gurramkonda, meaning "horse hill," was derived from the fact that a horse was supposed to be guardian of the fort and that the place was impregnable so long as the horse remained there.

    0
    0
  • For his work on the Arthurian legend see 12.300, 321, 669.

    0
    0
  • This story may be compared with the Celtic legend of the boyhood of Peredur or Perceval.

    0
    0
  • The legend was probably invented to account for the origin of the provocatio (right of appeal to the people), while at the same time it points to the close connexion and final struggle for supremacy between the older city on the mountain and the younger city on the plain.

    0
    0
  • For the history of German thought it was of the greatest importance that a Liberal from the Rhine, by a systematic history of the Revolution, attempted to overthrow the influence which the revolutionary legend, as expounded by French writers, had acquired over the German mind; and the book was an essential part of the influences which led to the formation of a National Liberal school of thought.

    0
    0
  • It may be noticed that a Thamudaean legend has been found on a Babylonian cylinder of about woo B.C., and it is remarkable that the Sabaean satara, " write," seems to be borrowed from Assyrian shataru.

    0
    0
  • On the Shabwat inscription `Athtar is the father of Sin, and it is noteworthy that these two deities also appear as nearly related in the Babylonian legend of 'Ishtar's descent to Hades, where `Ishtar is conversely the daughter of the god Sin.

    0
    0
  • The oldest known pieces are imitations of the Athenian mintage of the 4th century B.C., with the legend AOE and the owl standing on an overturned amphora.

    0
    0
  • One remarkable tetradrachm with the Sabaean legend Abyath'a is imitated from an Alexander of the 2nd century B.C., the execution being quite artistic and the weight Attic. There are also coins struck at Raydan and Harib, which must be assigned to the Himyarite period (1st and 2nd century A.D.).

    0
    0
  • It was already in the hands of the Romans in 306 B.C., and since in the 3rd century B.C. it issued copper coins with a Latin legend it must have had the civitas sine suffragio.

    0
    0
  • But, in general, where the traditions are manifestly in a later form they are in agreement with later backgrounds, and it is questionable whether earlier forms can be safely recovered when it is held that they have been rewritten or when the historical kernel has been buried in legend or myth..

    0
    0
  • Of the historical Hippolytus little remained in the memory of after I According to the legend St Hippolytus was a Roman soldier who was converted by St Lawrence.

    0
    0
  • In May 1888 she attended a performance of Sir Arthur Sullivan's Golden Legend at the Albert Hall, and in August she visited Glasgow to open the magnificent new municipal buildings, remaining for a couple of nights at Blythswood, the seat of Sir Archibald Campbell.

    0
    0
  • The Hereward legend has been fully dealt with by him and by Professor Freeman, who observed that "with no name has fiction been more busy."

    0
    0
  • Francesco contains famous frescoes by Piero de' Franceschi, representing scenes from the legend of the Holy Cross, and others by Spinello Aretino, a pupil of Giotto.

    0
    0
  • The legend of St Agnes is that she was a Roman maid, by birth a Christian, who suffered martyrdom when but thirteen during the reign of the emperor Diocletian, on the 21st of January 304.

    0
    0
  • He inveighs against the oppression of the poor by the rich, reproves those who, weary of matins or mass, spend their time in church "jangling," telling tales, and wondering where they will get the best ale, and revives the legend of the dancers at the church door during mass who were cursed by the priest and went on dancing for a twelvemonth without cessation.

    0
    0
  • He loved stories for their own sake, and found fault with Wace for questioning the miraculous elements in the legend of Arthur.

    0
    0
  • Iglau is an old mining town where, according to legend, the silver mines were worked so early as 799.

    0
    0
  • In the legend of Cadmus and his family Ares plays a prominent part.

    0
    0
  • It was here, according to the legend, that he was tried and acquitted by a council of the gods for the murder of Halirrhothius, who had violated Alcippe, the daughter of Ares by Agraulos.

    0
    0
  • But before this grouping had recommended itself to the Romans, with their legend of Mars and Rhea Silvia, the Greek Ares had again become under Macedonian influence a bearded, armed and powerful god.

    0
    0
  • These scholars have been influenced by Gebhardt's statement that in the Greek Legend there is not a trace of iii.

    0
    0
  • But this statement is wrong, for at least five phrases or clauses in the Greek Legend are derived from the sections in question.

    0
    0
  • By a legend which subsequently grew up the composition of it was assigned to St Adalbert.

    0
    0
  • His mock heroics are, to say the least, amusing, and among these may be mentioned Myszeis, where he describes how King Popiel, according to the legend, was eaten up by rats.

    0
    0
  • The general reader will find Gaston Paris's study of the legend in Poemes et legendes du moyen age most interesting; also Joseph Bedier's popular retelling of the tale Tristan et Iseult.

    0
    0
  • For an exhaustive study of the Tristan legend and literature, see the recent work by Professor Golther; also an examination of the Welsh fragments by Ivor John in the Grimm Library.

    0
    0
  • The lake was also known in classical times as lacus Amyclanus, from the town of Amyclae or Amunclae, which was founded, according to legend, by Spartan colonists, and probably destroyed by' the Oscans in the 5th century B.C.

    0
    0
  • It is impossible to decide how far this legend is due to Plato's invention, and how far it is based on facts of which no record remains.

    0
    0
  • The island was variously identified with America, Scandinavia, the Canaries and even Palestine; ethnologists saw in its inhabitants the ancestors of the Guanchos, the Basques or the ancient Italians; and even in the 17th and 18th centuries the credibility of the whole legend was seriously debated, and sometimes admitted, even by Montaigne, Buffon and Voltaire.

    0
    0
  • The name and the cones are accounted for by a legend which represents that at this spot lived a sheikh who, finding his sister too beautiful to be married to anyone else, determined to espouse her himself.

    0
    0
  • A note by Cyril Lucar states that it was written by Thecla, a noble lady of Egypt, but this is probably merely his interpretation of an Arabic note of the 14th century which states that the MS. was written by Thecla, the martyr, an obviously absurd legend; another Arabic note by Athanasius (probably Athanasius III., patriarch c. 1308) states that it was given to the patriarchate of Alexandria, and a Latin note of a later period dates the presenta tion in 1098.

    0
    0
  • A popular legend represents the bishop as descending from the window of his cell by a rope which friends had conveyed to him in a cask of wine.

    0
    0
  • He was the father of the sea-god Glaucus and (in post-Homeric legend) of Odysseus.

    0
    0
  • It is suggested by Welcker that the legend is symbolical of the vain struggle of man in the pursuit of knowledge.

    0
    0
  • Blackmore in his tale The Maid of Sker (1872), based on a legend associated with Sker House, a fine Elizabethan building in the adjoining parish of Sker, which was formerly extra-parochial.

    0
    0
  • When the founding of the Round Table is ascribed to Merlin it is generally in close connexion with the Grail legend, forming the last of a series of three, founded in honour of the Trinity - the first being the table of the Last Supper, the second that of the Grail, established by Joseph of Arimathea, The number of knights whom the table will seat varies; it might seat twelve or fifty or a hundred and fifty; nowhere, save in Layamon, do we find a practically unlimited power of accommodation.

    0
    0
  • According to the legend, other members of the Groot family followed John, and acquired lands around Duncansby.

    0
    0
  • In ecclesiastical legend and 2 For the principle of the Levirate illustrated in Gen.

    0
    0
  • This Judas legend, as given by Jacobus de Voragine, obtained no small popularity; and it is to be found in various shapes in every important literature of Europe.

    0
    0
  • Cholevius, in his Geschichte der deutschen Poesie nach ihren antiken Elementen (1854), pointed out the connexion of the legend with the Oedipus story.

    0
    0
  • In the middle ages the story of Caesar did not undergo such extraordinary transformations as befell the history of Alexander the Great and the Theban legend.

    0
    0
  • And when the pagan legend of the Syrian Astarte tells how she lived for ten years in Tyre as a prostitute, this directly recalls the Gnostic myth of how Simon found Helena in a brothel in Tyre (Epiphanius, Ancoratus, c. 104).

    0
    0
  • It is worth while to mention these few early incidents of the Rational legend of Guatemala, because their Biblical incidents show how native tradition incorporated matter learnt from the white men.

    0
    0
  • Legend tells stories of his teaching men picture-writing and the calendar, and also the artistic work of the silversmith, for which Cholula was long famed; but at last he departed, some say towards the unknown land of Tlapallan, but others to Coatzacoalcos on the Atlantic coast on the confines of Central America, where native tradition still keeps up the divine names of Gucumatz among the Quiches and Cukulcan among the Mayas, these names have the same meaning as Quetzalcoati.

    0
    0
  • Written as this name is in pictures or rebus, it probably suggested the invention of the well-known legend of a prophecy that the war-god's temple should be built where a prickly pear was found growing on a rock, and perched on it an eagle holding a serpent; this legend is still commemorated on the coins of Mexico.

    0
    0
  • For the legend of his treatment by Cronus and its meaning, see Saturn.

    0
    0
  • It is a not uncommon theory that the fairies survive in legend from prehistoric memories of a pigmy people dwelling in the subterranean earth-houses, but the contents of these do not indicate an age prior to the close of the Roman occupation of Britain; nor are pigmy bones common in neolithic sepulchres.

    0
    0
  • On the shore of the lake is the stalactite cave of Jobitsinal, of great local celebrity; and in its depths, according to the popular legend, may still be discerned the stone image of a horse that belonged to Cortes.

    0
    0
  • In later legend he is the horse of Eos, the morning.

    0
    0
  • The legend of the Omophorus and Splenditeneus, rival giants who sustain earth and luminous heavens on their respective shoulders, even if it already figures in the cuneiform texts of Assyria, is yet to be traced in Mithraic bas-reliefs.

    0
    0
  • This tale, which still finds a place in Burke's Peerage in the account of the baron Kingsale, a descendant of the de Courci family, is a legend without historic foundation which did not obtain currency till centuries after John de Courci's death.

    0
    0
  • This office of bearing the sacrament is an ancient one, and is mentioned in the legend of Tarcisius, the Roman acolyte, who was martyred on the Appian Way while carrying the Hosts from the catacombs.

    0
    0
  • Probably there was as much foundation for this legend as for the more rationalistic explanation of William Newton (Display of Heraldry, p. 145), that the fleur-de-lis was the figure of a reed or flag in blossom, used instead of a sceptre at the proclamation of the Frankish kings.

    0
    0
  • There are many variations in the treatment of the legend, for which, as also for a discussion of the modern plays on the subject by Voltaire and Alfieri, see Jebb's Introduction to his edition of the Electra of Sophocles.

    0
    0
  • All shrines of Osiris were called P-usiri, but the principal city of the name was in the centre of the Delta, capital of the 9th (Busirite) nome of Lower Egypt; another one near Memphis (now Abusir) may have helped the formation of the legend in that quarter.

    0
    0
  • The name Busiris in this legend may have been caught up merely at random by the early Greeks, or they may have vaguely connected their legend with the Egyptian myth of the slaying of Osiris (as king of Egypt) by his mighty brother Seth, who was in certain aspects a patron of foreigners.

    0
    0
  • Phrasius, Chalbes and Epaphus (for the grandfather of Busiris) are all explicable as Graecized Egyptian names, but other names in the legend are purely Greek.

    0
    0
  • That he returned at last to the bosom of the Catholic church is a mere legend, the motive of which is obvious; his adherents after his death continued to maintain themselves as a small community in Carthage.

    0
    0
  • This legend may have given rise to the derivation "Holy Land."

    0
    0
  • On Charles's death in 1788 Henry issued a manifesto asserting his hereditary right to the British crown, and likewise struck a medal, commemorative of the event, with the legend "Hen.

    0
    0
  • If we say that he carried on a successful war against the Saxons, was probably betrayed by his wife and a near kinsman, and fell in battle, we have stated all which can be claimed as an historical nucleus for his legend.

    0
    0
  • Numerous parallels exist between the Arthurian and early Irish heroic cycles, notably the Fenian or Ossianic. This Fenian cycle is very closely connected with the Tuatha de Danaan, the Celtic deities of vegetation and increase; recent research has shown that two notable features of the Arthurian story, the Round Table and the Grail, can be most reasonably accounted for as survivals of this Nature worship, and were probably parts of the legend from the first.

    0
    0
  • Professor Rhys' Studies in the Arthurian Legend are largely based on Welsh material, and may be consulted for details, though the conclusions drawn are not in harmony with recent research.

    0
    0
  • The legend is that they are the souls of unbaptized children wandering through the air till the day of judgment.

    0
    0
  • The still later form of the legend, a product of the Hellenistic period, is due to a mistaken etymology of the name.

    0
    0
  • The most famous of these stories is contained in the Thdttr of Nornagesti, and has a curious resemblance to the Greek legend of Althaea and Meleager.

    0
    0
  • The facades are frequently adorned with carvings and inscriptions, one of which records the legend of the capture of a siren in 1403, who lived for some time among the people of Edam, but escaped again to the sea.

    0
    0
  • As she appears in the Nibelungen legend, however, Kriemhild would seem to have an historical origin, as the wife of Attila, king of the Huns, as well as sister of the Nibelung kings.

    0
    0
  • It has been suggested (Symons, Heldensage, p. 55) that when the legend of the overthrow of the Burgundians, which took place in 437, became attached to that of the death of Attila (453), Hild, the supposed sister of the Burgundian kings, was identified with the daemonic Grimhild, the sister of the mythical Nibelung brothers, and thus helped the process by which the Nibelung myth became fused with the historical story of the fall of the Burgundian kingdom.

    0
    0
  • Similarly, in Notre Dame de Lorette; etude critique sur l'authenticite de la Santa Casa (1906), he dissipated by the aid of authentic documents the legend which had embellished and falsified the primitive history of that sanctuary.

    0
    0
  • Already, only eighty years after More's execution, hagiography had taken possession of the facts and was transmuting them into an edifying legend.

    0
    0
  • Hence it is often difficult to decide whether a given rite or legend which is mentioned only in Icelandic literature was really peculiar to that country alone or to the North generally, or whether it was once the common property of all Teutonic peoples.

    0
    0
  • In the same country we find the legend of a king who worshipped a cow.

    0
    0
  • From this passage arose a legend, which took shape only in the 17th century, that the compass was invented in the year 1302 by a person to whom was given the fictitious name of Flavio Gioja, of Amalfi.

    0
    0
  • The wealth of the ancient Siphniotes was shown by their treasury at Delphi, where they deposited the tenth of their gold and silver; but, says the legend, they once failed to do this, and Apollo in his anger flooded their mines.

    0
    0
  • That the "district" of the author is the north-east of Scotland cannot be doubted in the face of a passage such as this, in the fortieth legend (St Ninian), 1, 1359 et seq.

    0
    0
  • The legend connected with its foundation is given by Peter Damiani in his Life of St Odilo.

    0
    0
  • This threefold succession is apparently an imitation or a debased form of the ancient legend of heavenly, earthly and human rulers, which was carried into Persia and China, and from the latter country into Japan and Tibet - the relative number of kings being altered in the last-named countries to suit local convenience and the small amount of truth which they contain.

    0
    0
  • No trustworthy account exists of the evangelization of Armenia, for the legend of King Abgar's correspondence with Christ, even if it contained any historical truth, only relates to Edessa and Syriac Christianity.

    0
    0
  • In ancient times the island was sacred to Hephaestus, who as the legend tells fell on Lemnos when his father Zeus hurled him headlong out of Olympus.

    0
    0
  • According to a famous legend the women were all deserted by their husbands, and in revenge murdered every man on the island.

    0
    0
  • One legend localized in Lemnos still requires notice.

    0
    0
  • J., and to the beaks of the two heads of the eagle is attached a chain on which is the legend Viribus Unitis.

    0
    0
  • Popes, princes and nobles endowed it with estates and privileges, including that of administering and succeeding to the property of lepers, which eventually led to grave 1 It has been taken as the Latin word meaning " he bears " or as representing the initials of the legend Fortitudo Ejus Rhodum Tenuit, with an allusion to a defence of the island of Rhodes by an ancient count of Savoy.

    0
    0
  • He lived about two centuries later than Wallace, during which a considerable body of legend had probably gathered round the name, and these popular "gestis" he incorporates in his narrative.

    0
    0
  • In the 15th century a legend arose that both name and organization were traceable to St Begga, daughter of Pippin of Landen, who consequently in 1630 was chosen by the Beguines as the patron saint of their association.

    0
    0
  • The confusion caused by the spurious documents of Puteanus, however, led, even when the legend of St Begga was rejected, to other suggestions for the derivation of the name, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The site of his palace is marked by a ruined enclosure containing a fragment of the tower of Queen Militsa, whither, according to legend, tidings of the defeat were brought her by crows from the battlefield.

    0
    0
  • A legend of later days has it that at the last moment a sudden blaze of light surrounded the king, and when it cleared away he had disappeared.

    0
    0
  • His two chief works are the Chronicon januense and the Golden Legend or Lombardica hystoria.

    0
    0
  • The Golden Legend, one of the most popular religious works of the middle ages, is a collection of the legendary lives of the greater saints of the medieval church.

    0
    0
  • The saints lives are full of puerile legend.

    0
    0
  • The Golden Legend was translated into French by Jean Belet de Vigny in the 14th century.

    0
    0
  • The tradition of Gelert, Llewelyn's hound, being buried there is old in Wales; and common to it and India is the legend of a dog (or ichneumon) saving a child from a beast of prey (or reptile), and being killed by the child's father under the delusion that the animal had slain the infant.

    0
    0
  • Ball thinks that the former legend originated in the Indian practice of sacrificing cattle to the evil spirits when a new mine is opened; birds of prey would naturally carry off the flesh, and might give rise to the tale of the eagles carrying diamonds adhering to the meat.

    0
    0
  • The legend says that Okba determined to found a city which should be a rallying-point for the followers of Mahomet in Africa.

    0
    0
  • According to the legend, when he was asleep in the last-named church, the Virgin appeared to him and commanded him to eat a scroll.

    0
    0
  • The three kings of Cologne (Kaspar, Melchior and Balthazar) were supposed to be the three wise men who came from the East to pay adoration to the infant Christ; according to the legend, the emperor Frederick I.

    0
    0
  • Besides these may be mentioned the church of St Pantaleon, a 13th-century structure, with a monument to Theophano, wife of the emperor Otto II.; St Cunibert, in the Byzantine-Moorish style, completed in 1248; St Maria im Capitol, the oldest church in Cologne, dedicated in 1049 by Pope Leo IX., noted for its crypt, organ and paintings; St Cecilia, St Ursula, containing the bones of that saint and, according to legend, of the 1 r,000 English virgins massacred near Cologne while on a pilgrimage to Rome; St Severin, the church of the Apostles, and that of St Andrew (1220 and 1414), which contains the remains of Albertus Magnus in a gilded shrine.

    0
    0
  • In the grounds is a huge conglomerate rock called the Dog Stone (Clack-a-choin), from the legend that Fingal.

    0
    0
  • The Attic legend of Eleusis also represented him as one of the judges of the underworld.

    0
    0
  • According to Chinese legend, the virtues of tea were discovered by the Emperor Chinnung, 2137 B.C., to whom all agricultural and medicinal knowledge is traced.

    0
    0
  • Later legend transferred their abode to Mt Aetna, the Lipari islands or Lemnos, where they assisted Hephaestus at his forge.

    0
    0
  • But though Guenevere has changed her lover, the tradition of her infidelity is of much earlier date and formed a part of the primitive Arthurian legend.

    0
    0
  • A curious fragment of Welsh dialogues, printed by Professor Rhys in his Studies on the Arthurian Legend, appears to represent Kay as the abductor, In the pseudo-Chronicles and the romances based upon them the abductor is Mordred, and in the chronicles there is no doubt that the lady was no unwilling victim.

    0
    0
  • The legend of Athamas is probably founded on a very old custom amongst the Minyae - the sacrifice of the first-born of the race of Athamas to Zeus Laphystius.

    0
    0
  • Finally the romance to which it owed much of its popular appeal, became, through the medium of Rufinus's Latin, the parent of the late medieval legend of Faust, and so the ancestor of a famous type in modern literature.

    0
    0
  • He had distinguished himself in various military enterprises and diplomatic negotiations in the course of an active career, and although over seventy years old and of very weak sight (the story that he had been made blind by the emperor Manuel Comnenus while he was at Constantinople is a legend), he proved a most energetic and capable ruler.

    0
    0
  • That Sicily and Africa were once joined we know only from modern scientific research; that Sicily and Italy were once joined is handed down in legend.

    0
    0
  • The oldest form of the legend makes Godiva pass through Coventry market from one end to the other when the people were assembled, attended only by two soldiers, her long hair down so that none saw her, " apparentibus cruribus tamen candidissimis."

    0
    0
  • The coins, of course, are adduced on the other side, being not only Greek in type and legend, but (in many cases) of a peculiarly fine and vigorous execution; and excellence in one branch of art is thought to imply that other branches flourished in the same milieu.

    0
    0
  • The description of Alexander as " the Horned " in the Koran is, however, in accordance with the result of recent researches, to be traced to a Syrian legend dating from A.D.

    0
    0
  • This detail of the legend is ultimately traceable, as Hottinger long ago supposed, to the numerous coins on which Alexander is represented with the ram's horns of Ammon.'

    0
    0
  • His inspiration may be traced in some measure to the Pre-Raphaelites and also to Blake, Shelley and Maeterlinck; but he found in his native Irish legend and life matter apt for his romantic and often elfin music, with its artful simplicities and unhackneyed cadences, and its elusive, inconclusive charm.

    0
    0
  • The cuckoo was also sacred to Hera, who, according to the Argive legend, was wooed by Zeus in the form of the bird.

    0
    0
  • On the tenth day of the last month of the year the Great Festival (Al-id al-kabir), or that of the Sacrifice (commemorating the willingness of Ibrahim to slay his son Ismailaccording to the Arab legend), closes the calendar.

    0
    0
  • A legend now arose, we know how or why, which made Seth the brother and murderer of is; and this led to a fusion of the Horus-Seth and the SethOsiris moe-ifs.

    0
    0
  • The Osirian legend, as we have already seen, was early accepted as symbolizing the conflict between good and evil.

    0
    0
  • Egypt was largely governed by his favorite Karaksh, who lives in popular legend as the unjust judge, though he does not appear to have deserved that title.

    0
    0
  • There is a legend that here the Servian tsar Lazar (1374-1389) was visited by an angel, who bade him choose between an earthly and a heavenly crown.

    0
    0
  • Six miles to the south is the large Benedictine monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore, founded in 1320, famous for the frescoes by Luca Signorelli (1497-1498) and Antonio Bazzi, called Sodoma (1505), in the cloister, illustrating scenes from the legend of St Benedict; the latter master's work is perhaps nowhere better represented than here.

    0
    0
  • Some of the subjects are borrowed in altered form from the old mythology, while a few derive from Christian legend, and many deal with national history.

    0
    0
  • Pram (1756-1821), author of Staerkodder, a romantic epic, based on Scandinavian legend, and Edvard Storm (1749-1794), were associates and mainly fellowstudents at Copenhagen, where they introduced a style peculiar to themselves, and distinct from that of the true Danes.

    0
    0
  • According to legend, the ship conveying the relics of the three kings and of Bishop Apollinaris from Milan to Cologne in 1164 could not be got to move away from the spot until the bones of St Apollinaris had been interred .in St Martin's chapel.

    0
    0
  • The idea that Alfred, during his retreat at Athelney, was a helpless fugitive rests upon the foolish legend of the cakes.

    0
    0
  • This is the one grain of truth in the legend that Alfred was the inventor of shires, hundreds and tithings.

    0
    0
  • Alfred's care for the administration of justice is testified both by history and legend; and the title " protector of the poor " was his by unquestioned right.

    0
    0
  • It would seem, therefore, that the legend was undoubtedly oriental in origin, though the relationship of the various versions can scarcely be recovered.

    0
    0
  • The legend of Wayland probably had its home in the north, where he and his brother Egil l 2 were the types of the skilled workman, but there are abundant local traditions of the wonderful smith in Westphalia and in southern England.

    0
    0
  • The earliest extant record of the Wayland legend is the repre - sentation in carved ivory on a casket of Northumbrian workmanship of a date not later than the beginning of the 8th century.

    0
    0
  • Later legend made him the paramour of Margaret of Anjou.

    0
    0
  • The Lancastrians were defeated in 1464 near Hexham, and legend says that it was in the woods round the town that Queen Margaret and her son hid until their escape to Flanders.

    0
    0
  • The Sala de los Abencerrajes (Hall of the Abencerrages) derives its name from a legend according to which Boabdil, the last king of Granada, having invited the chiefs of that illustrious line to a banquet, massacred them here.

    0
    0
  • Johnny Armstrong of Gilnockie, famed in ballad and legend, was hanged, with forty of his clan, at Carlanrigg, in Teviotdale.

    0
    0
  • About this date occurs the legend of a list of hundreds of heretics, whom the clergy asked James to proscribe.

    0
    0
  • The castle of Edinburgh was surrendered by Gordon, and Balcarres was put in that prison where, according to legend, he was visited by the wraith of Dundee, on the night of the battle of Killiecrankie.

    0
    0
  • The reward which many of the clansmen of the Peninsula and Waterloo received may be appreciated by those who read the introduction to Scott's Legend of Montrose.

    0
    0
  • During the period of its independence, the town struck coins with the legend Tutere.

    0
    0
  • Later the Portiuncula church at Assisi displaced all other religious resorts, with the exception of Rome; but in the 15th century it was overshadowed in turn by the "Holy House" at Loretto on the Adriatic. According to an extravagant legend, the house of Joseph and Mary in Nazareth was transported by angels, on the night of the 9th - 10th of May 1291 to Dalmatia, then brought to the Italian coast opposite (Dec. 10, 1294), till, on the 7th of September 1295 it found rest on its present site.

    0
    0
  • Vischer (1867) has carefully traced out the successive steps in the growth of the legend, and Rochholz (1877) has worked out the real history of Gessler as shown in authentic documents.

    0
    0
  • Now Gessler is the name of a real family, the history of which from 1250 to 1513 has been worked out by Rochholz, who shows in detail that no member ever played the part attributed to the bailiff in the legend, or could have done so, and that the Gesslers could not have owned or dwelt at the castle of Kiissnacht; nor could they have been called Von B runeck.

    0
    0
  • Now Hagenbach is known to have committed many cruelties like those attributed to the bailiffs in the legend, and it has been plausibly conjectured that his case has really given rise to these stories, especially when we find that the Confederates had a hand in his capture and execution, that in a document of 1358 Hagenbachs and Gesslers appear side by side as witnesses, and that the Hagenbachs had frequent transactions with the Habsburgs and their vassals.

    0
    0
  • The setting up in 1895 in the market-place in Altdorf of a fine statue (by the Swiss sculptor Richard Kissling) of Tell and his son, and the opening in 1899 just outside Altdorf of a permanent theatre, wherein Schiller's play is to be represented every Sunday during the summer months, show that the popular belief in the Tell legend is still strong, despite its utter demolition at the hands of a succession of scientific Swiss historians during the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • His book is a striking proof that the popular Tell legend cannot.

    0
    0
  • These three works deal only quite briefly and incidentally with any point of Buddhism outside of the Buddha legend.

    0
    0
  • The legend relates that Aegeus, being childless, went to Pittheus, who contrived that Aegeus should have intercourse with his daughter Aethra, and that in due time Aethra brought forth Theseus.

    0
    0
  • His chief festival, called Theseia, was on the 8th of the month Pyanepsion (October 21st), but the 8th day of every other month was also sacred to him.5 Whatever we may think of the historical reality of Theseus, his legend almost certainly contains recollections of historical events, e.g.

    0
    0
  • With this agrees the legend of the contest between Athena and Poseidon for supremacy on the acropolis of Athens, for Theseus is intimately connected with Poseidon, the great Ionian god.

    0
    0
  • Milchhofer considers he has found one of them in the neighbourhood of Peiraeus.s Our chief authority for the legend of Theseus is the life by Plutarch, which is a compilation from earlier writers; see also Bacchylides.

    0
    0
  • There is a modern Greek folk-tale which preserves some features of the legend of Theseus and the Minotaur, but for the Minotaur has been substituted a seven-headed snake.

    0
    0
  • One of them relates, probably following the legend of St Eustace, the miracle of the conversion of St Hubert.

    0
    0
  • The death of Pelias was the subject of Sophocles' Rhizotmnoi (Root-cutters), and in the Tyro he treated another portion of the legend.

    0
    0
  • Later English writers allege that he died of starvation in the mountains; but Welsh legend represents him as spending a peaceful old age with his sons-in-law at Ewyas and Monington in Herefordshire, till his death and burial at the latter place.

    0
    0
  • But Victorinus of Pettau, who wrote during the persecution under Diocletian, still knows the relation of the Apocalypse to the legend of Nero; and Commodian, whose Carmen Apologeticum was perhaps not written until the beginning of the 4th century, knows two Antichrist-figures, of which he still identifies the first with Nero redivivus.

    0
    0
  • For the later history of the legend, see Bousset, Antichrist, where will be found a more detailed discussion of nearly all the sources named; Bousset, "Beitrage zur Geschichte der Eschatologie," in Zeitschrift fiir Kirchengeschichte, xx.

    0
    0
  • There is no proof for the legend that Bernard Saisset earned Philip IV.'s hatred in 1300-1301 by boldly sustaining the pope's demand for the liberation of the count of Flanders, and by publicly proclaiming the doctrine of papal supremacy.

    0
    0
  • Poseidon plays a considerable part in Greek legend.

    0
    0
  • This legend probably arose from the connexion of Acca Larentia, as mater Larum, with the Lares who had a part in the religious ceremonies of the Arvales.

    0
    0
  • According to the legend given by Metaphrastes the Byzantine hagiologist, and substantially repeated in the Roman Ada sanctorum and in the Spanish breviary, he was born in Cappadocia of noble Christ