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lectures

lectures Sentence Examples

  • I cannot make notes during the lectures, because my hands are busy listening.

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  • In 1894 he delivered the Gifford Lectures at Edinburgh, the subject being "The Philosophy and Development of Religion."

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  • These writings, mainly collections of articles and lectures intended for the general public, display enlightened views and wide information.

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  • His lectures and poems had now made him famous, and he was summoned to Munich where, in 1638, he became court chaplain to the elector Maximilian I.

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  • Stubbs, Lectures on Medieval and Modern History (3rd ed., Oxford, 1900).

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  • Jackson asked, "Do you get nervous before your lectures?"

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  • Ashley, on the other hand, was still a virgin, and Xander guessed her brother was as responsible for that as Jessi's lectures.

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  • while holding the chair of Greek, was appointed extraordinary professor of theology, and gave exegetical lectures on the New Testament.

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  • Lundy is said to have been the first to deliver anti-slavery lectures in the United States.

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  • "The Influence of the Apostle Paul on the Development of Christianity" was the title of a course of Hibbert Lectures given in London in 1885.

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  • In 1904 he delivered at the university of California a course of lectures, the object of which was to illustrate the application of the methods of physical chemistry to the study of the theory of toxins and antitoxins, and which were published in 1907 under the title Immunochemistry.

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  • Lectures on the History of Ancient Philosophy by William Archer Butler (1814-1848;(1814-1848; lecturer on moral philosophy at Trinity College, Dublin), the value of which was greatly enhanced by Thompson's notes.

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  • There the Cartesian innovations had found a patron in Adrian Heerebord, and were openly discussed in theses and lectures.

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  • In the universities of the Netherlands and of lower Germany, as yet free from the conservatism of the old-established seats of learning, the new system gained an easy victory over Aristotelianism, and, as it was adapted for lectures and examinations, soon became almost as scholastic as the doctrines it had supplanted.

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  • On his visit to Toulouse in 1665, with a mission from the Cartesian chiefs, his lectures excited boundless interest; ladies threw themselves with zeal and ability into the study of philosophy; and Regis himself .was made the guest of the civic corporation.

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  • In 1257, along with his friend Bonaventura, he was created doctor of theology, and began to give courses of lectures upon this subject in Paris, and also in Rome and other towns in Italy.

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  • All this time he was preaching every day, writing homilies, disputations, lectures, and finding time to work hard at his great work the Summa Theologiae.

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  • He wrote Practical Sermons (1858; edited by Noah Porter); Lectures on the Moral Government of God (2 vols., 1859), and Essays and Lectures upon Select Topics in Revealed Theology (1859), all published posthumously.

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  • For modern views of Alexander see Thirlwall, History of Greece; Niebuhr, Lectures on Ancient History (Eng.

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  • In addition to the educational work done by the state, communes and private individuals, there exist in France a good many societies which disseminate instruction by giving courses of lectures and holding classes both for children and adults.

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  • The number of students attending lectures is about 2500 and the annual income a little over £ioo,000.

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  • But soon coming to the conclusion that engineering was not his vocation he abandoned it in favour of physical science, and in October 1878 began to attend the lectures of G.

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  • He also delivered lectures, which were republished in his Philosophic des Lebens (1828) and in his Philosophie der Geschichte (1829).

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  • In 1849 we find him studying chemistry under Bunsen at Marburg, where his love for astronomy was revived by Gerling's lectures.

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  • He was the author of a number of works, of which the most notable besides Ocean to Ocean are, Advantages of Imperial Federation (1889), Our National Objects and Aims (1890), Religions of the World in Relation to Christianity (1894) and volumes of sermons and lectures.

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  • a selection of the lectures given to the Visitation, reported by the sisters who heard them, some of his sermons, a large number of his letters, various short treatises of devotion.

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  • "I buried myself," he says, "in my laboratory, and in fourteen months read a course of chemical lectures to a very full audience."

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  • his Life of his father (1898), his Address to London Chamber of Commerce on " Imperial Telegraphic Communication " (1902), Lecture to Royal United Service Institution on " Submarine Telegraphy " (1907), Lectures to Royal Naval War College (1910) and R.E.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906), chap. vii.; also Cantor Lectures on Hertzian wave telegraphy, Lecture iv., Journ.

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  • Fleming, " Electric Oscillations and Electric Waves," Cantor Lectures, Journ.

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  • Soc. Arts, 1901, and " Measurement of High Frequency Currents," Cantor Lectures, ib., 1905; G.

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  • 6 Published in Lectures and Essays.

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  • Rhys Davids (American Lectures, p. 37) sums up that, when the name of an earlier deity is 4 See (with writers already mentioned) Sir H.

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  • Hibbert Lectures, chap. vi.

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  • C. Fraser's Gifford Lectures, or in earlier times in the writings of Christian Wolff, whose sciences, according to the slightly different nomenclature which Kant imposed on them, were " rational psychology," " rational cosmology," and " rational theology."

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  • Max Mailer's Gifford Lectures.

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  • He quotes pages from Mansel's Bampton Lectures in favour of his own type of agnosticism, which is to make peace between religion and science by permanently silencing the former.

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  • C. Fraser's Gif f ord Lectures.

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  • Among many lectureships, the Gifford Lectures are supposed to be strictly appropriated to Natural Theology; yet subjects and 2 Dr MacTaggart's beliefs once more present themselves as an unexpected modern type (Studies in Hegelian Cosmology, chap. iii.).

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  • C. Fraser's Edinburgh lectures (Phil.

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  • Wallace (Lectures and Essays, incorporating Glasgow lectures) gives some useful historical references.

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  • The student will rarely lose by reading Gifford Lectures; but it will not always be upon theism that he finds himself better informed.

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  • His principal work was Lectures on the Catechism of the Church of England (London, 1769).

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  • A description of the contents of all these books in the canon is given in Rhys Davids's American Lectures, PP. 44-86.

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  • There he attended the lectures of A.

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  • Marx, puts forward the theory that Cicero and the Auctor have not produced original works, but have merely given the substance of two r xvai (both emanating from the Rhodian school); that neither used the 'r xvat directly, but reproduced the revised version of the rhetoricians whose school they attended, the introductions alone being their own work; that the lectures on which the Ciceronian treatise was based were delivered before the lectures attended by the Auctor.

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  • These attempts, however, to perpetuate the usage were finally discredited by Huxley's important Lectures on Comparative Anatomy (1864), in which the term was finally abolished, and the "radiate mob" finally distributed among the Echinodermata, Polyzoa, Vermes (Platyhelminthes), Coelenterata and Protozoa.

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  • AuTH0RITIE5.Sachs, Lectures on the Physiology of Plants, translated by Marshall Ward; Vines, Lectures on the Physiology of Plants; Pfeffer, The Physiology of Plants, trans.

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  • Kant's lectures on physical geography were delivered in the university of Konigsberg from 1765 onwards.'

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  • He was denounced by the pope himself in an apostolic brief of the rlth of December 1862, and students of theology were forbidden to attend his lectures.

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  • 18 (1903); C. Tiele, Elements of the Science of Religion (Gifford lectures,lect.

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  • Seven other lectures were delivered during the first three weeks of the Lent term of 1842.

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  • The former are for the most part concerned with questions relating to the theory of light, arising out of his professorial lectures, among which may be specially mentioned his paper "On the Diffraction of an Object-Glass with Circular Aperture."

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  • anti-Christian) Thought (Bampton Lectures, 1862); R.

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  • When his master, William Varron, removed to Paris in 1301, Duns Scotus was appointed to succeed him as professor of philosophy, and his lectures attracted an immense number of students.

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  • The steady tendency of Russian society towards increasing the number of secondary schools, where instruction would be based on the study of the natural sciences, is checked by the government in favour of the classical gymnasiums. 5 Sunday schools and public lectures are virtually prohibited.

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  • See also Kuenen's National Religions and Universal Religions (Hibbert lectures) and Lagrange's Etudes sur les religions simitiques (2nd ed.).

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  • He delivered the Gifford Lectures in1892-1893and in 1895-1896.

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  • Again his Gifford Lectures are devoted to the proof of the truth of Christianity on grounds of right reason alone.

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  • Mr Taft delivered the Dodge lectures at Yale University in 1906 on the Responsibilities of Citizenship, published as Four Aspects of Civic Duty (1906).

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  • In 1869 he gave a course of lectures at Harvard on the Positive Philosophy; next year he was history tutor; in 1871 he delivered thirty-five lectures on the Doctrine of Evolution, afterwards revised and expanded as Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy (1874); and between 1872 and 1879 he was assistant-librarian.

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  • Grutzmacher's article in Hauck-Herzog's Realencyklopiidie; Robert Barclay's Inner Life of the Religious Societies of the Commonwealth (1876), and C. Beard's Hibbert Lectures (1883), ch.

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  • He made two unsuccessful ventures in journalism, and in 1857 went to Central America, where he acquired material for another series of lectures.

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  • Milbourn (1867) the defendant had broken his contract to let a lecture-room to the plaintiff, on discovering that the intended lectures were to maintain that "the character of Christ is defective, and his teaching misleading, and that the Bible is no more inspired than any other book," and the court of exchequer held that the publication of such doctrine was blasphemy, and the contract therefore illegal.

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  • He contributed to their journal, Le Producteur; and in 1828 began to give public lectures on the principles of the school (see SAINTSIMoN).

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  • He was the author of Principles of Mining (1909), based on lectures given at Stanford and at Columbia universities.

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  • He visited Italy before 1486, for he heard the lectures of Argyropulus, who died in that year; he formed a friendship with Paulus Aemilius of Verona.

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  • In addition to various essays (in his Gesammelte Schriften, Berlin, 1869-1870, 2 vols.), Hausser's lectures have been edited by W.

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  • These lectures reveal all the charm of style and directness of presentation which made Hausser's work as a professor so vital.

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  • His lectures, which were supplemented with practical laboratory teaching, were attended by many chemists who subsequently attained distinction.

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  • He first settled in Egypt, hearing the lectures of Didymus, the Origenistic head of the catechetical school at Alexandria, and also cultivating friendly relations with Macarius the elder and other ascetics in the desert.

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  • Gioja's more important treatise owes much to Genovesi's lectures.

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  • Caiman's introduction to Smith's Lectures on Justice, &c. (Clarendon Press, 1896); and H.

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  • He managed also to hear Blackstone's lectures at Oxford, but says that he immediately detected the fallacies which underlay the rounded periods of the future judge.

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  • An interesting example of the importance of his pioneer work is the fact that there has been a strong tendency to revert to the views which he advanced on the question of the Hittites in his early Oxford lectures.

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  • (1883); Ancient Empires of the East (1884); Introduction to Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther (1885); Assyria (1885); Hibbert Lectures on Babylonian Religion (1887); The Hittites (1889); Races of the Old Testament (1891); Higher Criticism and the Verdict of the Monuments (1894); Patriarchal Palestine (1895); The Egypt of the Hebrews and Herodotus (1895); Early History of the Hebrews (1897); Israel and the Surrounding Nations (1898); Babylonians and Assyrians (1900); Egyptian and Babylonian Religion (1903); Archaeology of the Cuneiform Inscr.

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  • Of the former, the first, published in 1896, was on the dynamics of a particle; and afterwards there followed a number of concise treatises on thermodynamics, heat, light, properties of matter and dynamics, together with an admirably lucid volume of popular lectures on Recent Advances in Physical Science.

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  • The Board of Agriculture in 1803 had commissioned Sir Humphry Davy to deliver a course of lectures on the connexion of chemistry with vegetable physiology.

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  • The county councils also expend sums varying at their own discretion on instruction in dairy-work, poultry-keeping, farriery and veterinary science, horticulture, agricultural experiments, agricultural lectures at various centres, scholarships at, and grants to, agricultural colleges and schools; the whole amount in 1904-1905 reaching £87,472.1 The sum spent by individual counties varies considerably.

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  • Galway); while lectures are given at farmers' meetings by 1 This sum was furnished out of a total of £693,851, forming the residue grant allocated for the purposes of education to the various county councils of England and Wales under the Local Taxation (customs and Excise) Act 1890.

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  • Subsequently recovering, he turned to the study of mind and the relations between body and mind, giving public lectures on the subjects of which his books treat.

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  • At a very early age, about the year 200, he listened to the lectures of Pantaenus and Clement in the catechetical school.

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  • where a Roman official wanted to hear his lectures, and in Antioch, in response to a most flattering invitation from Julia Mammaea (mother of Alexander Severus, afterwards emperor), who wished to become acquainted with his philosophy.

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  • There the bishops of Jerusalem and Caesarea received him in the most friendly manner, and got him to deli;per public lectures in the churches.

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  • During the period of the diet of Frankfort he had given public lectures on religion at Heidelberg.

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  • The lectures he delivered as professor form the substance of his two most important works, viz.

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  • Sidgwick, Lectures on the Philosophy of Kant (London, 1905); J.

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  • Muirhead, The Service of the State: Four Lectures on the Political Teaching of T.

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  • In this course of lectures he had already dwelt at some length on the insufficiency of the characters on which such groups as had hitherto been thought to be established were founded; but for the consideration of this part of his.

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  • In Rome he made a fairly long stay, giving lectures in a class-room of his own, though not without opposition from his fellow-teachers.

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  • Welcker returned to Giessen in 1808, and resuming his schoolteaching and university lectures was in the following year appointed the first professor of Greek literature and archaeology at that or any German university.

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  • About 1257, Bonaventura, general of the order, interdicted his lectures at Oxford, and commanded him to place himself under the superintendence of the body at Paris.

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  • The Lowell Institute, established in 1839 (by John Lowell, Jr., who bequeathed $237,000 for the purpose), provides yearly courses of free public lectures, and its lecturers have included many of the leading scholars of America and Europe.

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  • During each winter, also, a series of public lectures on American history is delivered in the Old South meeting house.

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  • Three years later he removed to Warrington as classical tutor in a new academy, and there he attended lectures on chemistry by Dr Matthew Turner of Liverpool and pursued those studies in electricity which gained him the fellowship of the Royal Society in 1766 and supplied him with material for his History of Electricity.

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  • For thirty years (1842-1872) Pittsfield was the home of the Rev. John Todd (1800-1873), the author of numerous books, of which Lectures to Children (1834; 2nd series, 1858) and The Student's Manual (1835) were once widely read.

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  • After his death a succession of volumes, representing his various courses of lectures, appeared (1856-1864), in addition to the Lectures on the History of Dogma (Theologische Vorlesungen), admirable in spirit and execution, which were edited by J.

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  • His public lectures, indeed, were never largely attended, but in his more private classes, where he dealt with the technical work of a historian, he trained generations of scholars.

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  • These lectures, which dealt with such special subjects as Gnosticism and the Apocalypse, attracted considerable attention, and in 1876 he was appointed professor extraordinarius.

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  • i., 1897); and in 1900 appeared his popular lectures, Das Wesen des Christentums (5th ed., 1901; English translation, What is Christianity?

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  • In 1489 it was acquired by Venice, which claimed the island on the death of the last king, having adopted his widow (a Venetian lady named Catarina Cornaro) as a daughter of the republic. On the history of Cyprus, see Stubbs, Lectures on Medieval and Modern History, 156-208.

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  • Falconer's Bampton Lectures in 1811.

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  • His analogical arguments resemble those found in the Bampton Lectures of Dean Mansel.

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  • The favourite subjects of his lectures were logic and dogmatic theology.

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  • When Ignatius arrived in Paris, he lodged at first with some fellow-countrymen; and for two years attended the lectures on humanities at the college de Montaigu, supporting himself at first by the charity of Isabella Roser; but, a fellowlodger defrauding him of his stock, he found himself destitute and compelled to beg his bread.

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  • Owing to failing health he gave up his lectures in 1904, and in May 1906 resigned his mastership, in which he was succeeded by James Leigh Strachan-Davidson, who had previously for some time, as senior tutor and fellow, borne the chief burden of college administration.

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  • His publications include Philosophy of Kant (1878); Critical Philosophy of Kant (1889); Religion and Social Philosophy of Comte (1885); Essays on Literature and Philosophy (1892); Evolution of Religion (Gifford Lectures, 1891-1892); Evolution of Theology in the Greek Philosophers (1904); and he is represented in this encyclopaedia by the article on Cartesianism.

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  • The necessity for experimental demonstration and practical instruction, in addition to academic lectures, appears to have been urged by the French chemists L.

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  • Rouelle, while in England Humphry Davy expounded the same idea in the experimental demonstrations which gave his lectures their brilliant charm.

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  • van't Hoff, Lectures on Theoretical and Physical Chemistry; J.

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  • His love for Cambridge never waned, and his own benefactions took the form of scholarships, fellowships and lectures.

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  • IV., V., 1914); King, Schweich Lectures, 1916, p. 20, ff.; (39) Poebel, loc. cit.

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  • Workman, Persecution in the Early Church (London, 1906); Paul Allard, Ten Lectures on the Martyrs (London, 1907); John Foxe, The Book of Martyrs; Mary I.

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  • Columbus and Magellan had such globes, those of the latter produced by P. Reinel (1519), and Conrad Celtes tells us that he illustrated his lectures at the university of Vienna with the help of globes (1501).

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  • An excellent portraiture of early Quakerism is given in William Tanner's Lectures on Friends in Bristol and Somersetshire.

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  • Grubb, and the series of " Swarthmore Lectures " as well as the histories above mentioned.

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  • He wrote his lectures at high pressure, and devoted much time to the editing and publication of the numerous poems which he had written at various times during his life.

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  • He was also engaged in preparing an abstract of his lectures as a handbook for his class.

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  • His friend and biographer, David Welsh (1793-1845), superintended the publication of his text-book, the Physiology of the Human Mind, and his Lectures on the Philosophy of the Human Mind was published by his successors, John Stewart and the Rev. E.

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  • Hamilton's Discussions and Lectures on Metaphysics; and for a high estimate of his merits, see J.

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  • As a lawyer his greatest public efforts were his lectures (1799) at Lincoln's Inn on the law of nature and nations, of which the introductory discourse was published, and his eloquent defence (1803) of Jean Gabriel Peltier, a French refugee, tried at the instance of the French government for a libel against the first consul.

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  • Lefroy's Lectures in Ecclesiastical History (1896); Th.

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  • He held this position till 1848, and worked with a remarkable intensity - holding teachers' conventions, delivering numerous lectures and addresses, carrying on an extensive correspondence, introducing numerous reforms, planning and inaugurating the Massachusetts normal school system, founding and editing The Common School Journal (1838), and preparing a series of Annual Reports, which had a wide circulation and are still considered as being "among the best expositions, if, indeed, they are not the very best ones, of the practical benefits of a common school education both to the individual and to the state" (Hinsdale).

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  • Meanwhile his lectures and publications (among the latter a Grundriss der Neutestamentlichen Hermeneutik, 1816) had brought him into considerable repute, and he was appointed professor extraordinarius in the new university of Bonn in the spring of 1818; in the following autumn he became professor ordinarius.

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  • Third Series of Lectures (N.Y., 1852); then, based upon the preceding, History of Louisiana: The French Domination (2 vols., N.Y., 1854) and The Spanish Domination (N.Y., 1854); a second edition of the last two works, supplemented by The American Domination (N.Y., 1866-1867, 4 vols.

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  • Peano (with various collaborators of the Italian school), Formulaire de mathematiques (Turin, various editions, 1894-1908; the earlier editions are the more interesting philosophically); Felix Klein, Lectures on Mathematics (New York, 1894); W.

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  • For his theological position see Harnack, Dogmengeschichte; Hort, Six Lectures on the Ante-Nicene Fathers; Westcott, " Clem.

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  • Schlozer's activity was enormous, and he exercised great influence by his lectures as well as by his books, bringing historical study into touch with political science generally, and using his vast erudition in an attempt to solve practical questions in the state and in society.

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  • Spurgeon's lectures, aphorisms, talks, and "Saplings for Sermons" were similarly stenographed, corrected and circulated.

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  • Sir Henry Savile (1549-1622) thereupon appointed him in 1619 to the Savilian chair of astronomy just founded by him at Oxford; Bainbridge was incorporated of Merton College and became, in 1631 and 1635 respectively, junior and senior reader of Linacre's lectures.

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  • After a successful course of study at the College Rollin, he proceeded to Munich, where he attended the lectures of Schelling, and took his degree in philosophy in 1836.

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  • Professor now at the Institut Catholique, he published successively his lectures: Histoire du canon du N.T.

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  • His lucid style and the perfection of his experimental demonstrations drew to his lectures a crowd of enthusiastic scholars, on whom he impressed the importance of applied science by conducting them round the factories and workshops of the city; and he further found time to hold weekly "colloquies" on physical questions at his house with a small circle of young students.

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  • The Anglican casuists are discussed in Whewell, Lectures on Moral Philosophy (London, 1862).

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  • At the age of twenty-three he repaired to Bologna, and there varied his studies of canon law by attending the astronomical lectures of Domenico Maria Novara (1454-1504).

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  • Through his father's lectures Christian came under the influence of the political philosophy of Hugo Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf, and continued the study of law at Frankfort-on-Oder.

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  • A number of gentlemen in Boston, however, invited him to give a series of lectures there.

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  • The result was that he delivered in the Masonic Hall, in the winter of 1841-1842, as lectures, substantially the volume afterwards published as the Discourse of Matters pertaining to Religion.

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  • The lectures in their published form made his name famous throughout America and Europe, and confirmed the stricter Unitarians in America in their attitude towards him and his supporters.

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  • Lectures are delivered in Lettish, Russian and German, and nearly all the staff is Latvian.

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  • He attended lectures on the numerical solution of equations and on definite integrals by M.

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  • He appears to have attended Dirichlet's lectures on theory of numbers, theory of definite integrals, and partial differential equations, and Jacobi's on analytical mechanics and higher algebra.

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  • His academic lectures for 1843-1844 were published in 2 vols., 1845-1849, under the title Legons de geologie pratique.

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  • Arbitration and mediation will be found briefly noticed in Phillimore's International Law; in Sir Henry Maine's Lectures, delivered in Cambridge in 1887; in W.

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  • In the Hunterian lectures delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1863, Huxley divided the Vertebrata into Mammals, Sauroids and Ichthyoids, the latter division containing the Amphibia and Pisces.

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  • Its graduates also give lectures on the various branches of medicine and science requisite for the degree of doctor of medicine, and those extra-academical courses are recognized, under certain restrictions, by the University Court, as qualifying for the degree.

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  • Classical concerts and concerts of the better sort, chiefly held in the M ` Ewan and Music Halls, are well attended, and lectures are patronized to a degree unknown in most towns.

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  • Through London and Elsinore he reached Copenhagen a third time, and began to lecture at the university; his lectures were attended, but he got no money.

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  • The first course of lectures under the benefaction was delivered in 1820.

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  • In 1830 the number of annual lectures or sermons was reduced from twenty to eight; after 1861 they were further reduced to a minimum of four.

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  • An account of the Hulsean lectures from 1820 to 1894 is given in J.

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  • After his death his lectures on political subjects were published under the title Politik.

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  • Pierpont, Lectures on the Theory of Functions of Real Variables (1905).

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  • Hamilton, Lectures on Quaternions (Dublin, 1853), Elements of Quaternions (ibid., 1866); H.

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  • The classification adopted by Owen in his lectures (1855) does not adequately illustrate the progress of zoological classifi- knowledge between Cuvier's death and that date, but, such as it is, it is worth citing here.

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  • Huxley adopted in his lectures (1869) a classification which was in many respects similar to both of the foregoing, but embodied improvements of his own.

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  • After completing his studies in law at the university of Padua, he attracted the attention of the Austrian police by his lectures on political economy, and was obliged to emigrate.

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  • After visiting and examining the principal churches, first of Normandy, then of central and southern France, he was on his return appointed by Guizot secretary to the Historical Committee of Arts and Monuments (1835); and in the following years he delivered several courses of lectures on Christian iconography at the Bibliotheque Royale.

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  • Origin of the Psalter, Bampton Lectures (1891), and the article Psalms (in Ency.

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  • Otric, suspecting that Gerbert erred in his classification of the sciences, sent one of his own pupils to Reims to take notes of his lectures, and, finding his suspicions correct, accused him of his error before Otto II.

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  • vi., and the Tagore Law Lectures (1870) by Herbert Cowell, lect.

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  • His lectures were thinly attended, and he found them grievous interruptions to his historical work.

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  • Some of his statutory lectures are published in his Lectures on Mediaeval and Modern History.

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  • Modern Works: Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History, pp. 195-276 (London, 1906); Moritz Brosch, Geschichte von England, Bd.

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  • v.; Metchnikoff, Lectures on Comp. Path.

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  • He began his lectures at Basel by burning the books of Avicenna and others; he afterwards boasted of having read no books for ten years; he protested that his shoe-buckles were more learned than Galen and Avicenna.

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  • In this Italy, and especially the renowned school of Padua, took the first step, where Giovanni De Monte (Montanus), (1498-1552), already mentioned as a humanist, gave clinical lectures on the patients in the hospital of St Francis, which may still be read with interest.

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  • Pupils flocked to him from all European countries; Germans are especially mentioned; a Polish student reported and published some of his lectures; and the Englishman Kaye was a zealous disciple, who does not, however, seem to have done anything towards transplanting this method of instruction to his own country.

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  • Robert James Graves (1796-1853) was a most eminent clinical teacher and observer, whose lectures are regarded as the model of clinical teaching, and indeed served as such to the most popular teacher of the Paris school in the middle of this century, Trousseau.

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  • No aid to the trained eye was necessary for such observations, and for many other such; yet, if we take Sir Thomas Watson (1792-1882) as a modern Sydenham, we may find in his lectures no suspicion that there may be a palsy of muscular co-ordination apart from deprivation of strength.

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  • The lectures at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, which he attended from its foundation in 1868, revealed his true bent; and henceforth he devoted himself almost entirely to scholarship. He began modestly by the study of the municipal charters of St Omer.

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  • Having been appointed assistant lecturer and afterwards full lecturer at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes, it was to the town of St Omer that he devoted his first lectures and his first important work, Histoire de la vile de Saint-Omer et de ses institutions jusqu'au XI V e siecle (1877).

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  • A minute knowledge of printed books and a methodical examination of departmental and communal archives furnished him with material for a long course of successful lectures, which gave rise to some important works on municipal history and led to a great revival of interest in the origins and significance of the urban communities in France.

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  • He started a theological college (the Scholae Cancellarii), founded night schools, delivered courses of lectures on church history, held Bible classes, and was instrumental in founding a society of mission preachers for the diocese, the "Novate Novale."

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  • Before he was sixteen he attended lectures at Owens College, and at eighteen he gained a mathematical scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1871 as senior wrangler and first Smith's prizeman, having previously taken the degree of D.Sc. at London University and won a Whitworth scholarship. Although elected a fellow and tutor of his college, he stayed up at Cambridge only for a very short time, preferring to learn practical engineering as a pupil in the works in which his father was a partner.

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  • The general scope of the polytechnics is to give instruction both in general knowledge and special crafts or trades by means of classes, lectures and laboratories, instructive entertainments and exhibitions, and facilities for bodily and mental exercise (gymnasia, libraries, &c.).

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  • At Gresham College, Basinghall Street, City, founded in 1 597 by Sir Thomas Gresham, and moved to its present site in 1843, lectures are given in the principal branches of science, law, divinity, medicine, &c.

    0
    0
  • The Royal Geographical Society, occupying a building close to Burlington House in Savile Row, maintains a map-room open to the public, holds lectures by prominent explorers and geographers, and takes a leading part in the promotion of geographical discovery.

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    0
  • In 1594 he began to give theological lectures at Jena, and in 1596 accepted a call as professor of theology at Wittenberg, where he died on the 23rd of October 1616.

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    0
  • He also attended lectures in theology, but, a relative having persuaded him to change his subject, he studied medicine for two years.

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  • Having graduated and begun to give lectures at Jena in 1605, he in 1606 accepted the invitation of John Casimir, duke of Coburg, to the superintendency of Heldburg and mastership of the gymnasium; soon afterwards he became general superintendent of the duchy, in which capacity he was engaged in the practical work of ecclesiastical organization until 1616, when he became theological professor at Jena, where the remainder of his life was spent.

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  • His collected speeches and lectures were published under the title of Altertum and Gegenwart (5th ed., 1903 foll.), to which a third volume was added under the title of Unter drei Kaisern (2nd ed., 1895).

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    0
  • He was made a professor at the university of Breslau in 1811, and in 1819 he became professor of political science and history at Berlin, holding the chair until 1847, and giving occasional lectures until 1853.

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  • Macauliffe, The Sikh Religion: Its Gurus, Sacred Writings and Authors (6 vols., 1909), and two lectures before the United Service Institution of India on "The Sikh Religion and its Advantages to the State" and "How the Sikhs became a Militant Race."

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  • Finding himself unequal to the labour of teaching, he resigned his professorship in 1785, and devoted himself to the revision of his lectures, which he published (1792) under the title of Principles of Moral and Political Science.

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  • In 1847 he was made tutor of his college, and in 1853 he delivered the Bampton lectures, his subject being "The Atoning Work of Christ viewed in Relation to some Ancient Theories."

    0
    0
  • These thoughtful and learned lectures established his reputation and did much to clear the ground for subsequent discussions on the subject.

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  • Pollock, The King's Peace (Oxford Lectures); F.

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  • In 1850 he published a tragedy, Galileo Galilei, and two volumes of his Lectures on the Atomic Theory and Essays Scientific and Literary appeared in 1858, with a preface by his kinsman Dr John Brown, the author of Horae Subsecivae.

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  • He was a contemporary of Averroes, who, according to Leo Africanus, heard his lectures, and learned physic of him.

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  • Douglas Ainslie was the first in Great Britain to draw attention to his importance as one of the leaders of European thought, and made him known in many articles and lectures both in Great Britain and in America.

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  • His principal works (5 vols., Andover, 1849-50) were Lectures on the Inspiration of the Scriptures (1829), Memoirs of American Missionaries (1833), Examination of the Doctrine of Perfection (1841), Lectures on Church Government (1843), and Lectures on Swedenborgianism (1846); he also wrote a History of Andover Seminary (1848), completed by his son.

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  • He soon became the most popular teacher of Hebrew and of Old Testament introduction and exegesis in Germany; during his later years his lectures were attended by nearly five hundred students.

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  • His Theological Works, consisting of sermons, charges, divinity lectures and the Discourse on Church Government, were published in 3 vols.

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  • This work was abridged by Bleek for his college lectures, and was published in that condensed form in 1868.

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  • Holtzmann (1862); (4) his Lectures on the Apocalypse (Vorlesungen fiber die Apokalypse), (Eng.

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  • Besides these there has also appeared a small volume containing Lectures on Colossians, Philemon and Ephesians (Berlin, 1865).

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  • His formal lectures were supplemented by discussions amongst his pupils.

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  • He gave lectures on mechanics and hydrostatics in Morpeth, Alnwick and Newcastle, and was elected F.R.S.

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  • He also published two sermons and a handbook to his lectures on mechanics, &c., and projected a history of Northumberland and Durham, collections for which were found among his papers.

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  • In 1808 he went to Winchester, and in 1810 he was elected to a demyship at Magdalen College, Oxford, where the lectures of Dr Kidd first awakened in him a desire for the cultivation of natural science.

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  • In 1841 Daubeny published his Lectures on Agriculture; in 1857 his Lectures on Roman Husbandry; in 1863 Climate: an inquiry into the causes of its differences and into its influence on Vegetable Life; and in 1865 an Essay on the Trees and Shrubs of the Ancients, and a Catalogue of the Trees and Shrubs indigenous to Greece and Italy.

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  • He was the author of numerous papers on light and in 1903 published Light Waves and Their Uses, being Lowell lectures for 1899.

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  • The cloister garden was too small for the crowds attending his lectures, and on the 1st of August 1490 he gave his first sermon in the church of St Mark.

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    0
  • The preparation of lectures thus took up much of his time, and he was also gaining an extensive practice as a physician.

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  • This doctrine of latent heat he taught in his lectures from 1761 onwards, and in April 1762 he described his work to a literary society in Glasgow.

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  • In 1766 he succeeded Cullen in the chair of chemistry in Edinburgh, where he devoted practically all his time to the preparation of his lectures.

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  • Holding that chemistry had not attained the rank of a science - his lectures dealt with the "effects of heat and mixture" - he had an almost morbid horror of hasty generalization or of anything that had the pretensions of a fully fledged system.

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  • After his death his lectures were written out from his own notes, supplemented by those of some of his pupils, and published with a biographical preface by his friend and colleague, Professor John Robison (1739-1805), in 1803, as Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry, delivered in the University of Edinburgh.

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  • By his will he devoted his personal property to found a lectureship on foreign missions on the model of the Bampton Lectures.

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  • In 1864 he delivered the first series of Cunningham lectures, taking for his subject The Fatherhood of God.

    0
    0
  • Published immediately afterwards, the lectures excited considerable discussion on account of the peculiar views they represented.

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  • Further illustrations of these views were given in two works published about the same time as the lectures, one a treatise On the Sonship and Brotherhood of Believers, and the other an exposition of the first epistle of St John.

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  • He announced a course of lectures (1826), which it was hoped would bring money as well as fame, and which were to be the first dogmatic exposition of the Positive Philosophy.

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  • The lectures attracted hearers so eminent as Humboldt the cosmologist, Poinsot the geometer and Blainville the physiologist.

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  • In 1828 the lectures were renewed, and in 1830 was published the first volume of the Course of Positive Philosophy.

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  • It was this which made him add to his labours the burden of delivering every year from 1831 to 1848 a course of gratuitous lectures on astronomy for a popular audience.

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  • In the years 1849, 1850 and 1851 Comte gave three courses of lectures at the Palais Royal.

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  • To Kant's lectures and conversations he further owed something of his large interest in cosmological and anthropological problems. Among the writers whom he most carefully read were Plato, Hume, Shaftesbury, Leibnitz, Diderot and Rousseau.

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  • In English he published his Royal Institution Lectures on German Thought during the Last Two Hundred Years (1880).

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  • Sidgwick, Lectures on the Ethics of Green, Spencer and Martineau (1902); and J.

    0
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  • Whether or no Vacarius ever resumed his Oxford lectures after their interruption by Stephen we are not informed.

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  • A History of Modern Liberty, in eight volumes, of which the third appeared in 1906, has been written by James Mackinnon; see also Lord Acton's lectures, and such works as J.

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  • Baths, lunch-rooms, restrooms, clubs, lectures, schools and kindergartens have been supplied, and the company has also cultivated domestic pride by offering prizes for the best-kept gardens, &c. From April to July 1901 there was a strike in the already thoroughly unionized factories; complaint was made of the hectoring of union men by a certain foreman, the use in toilet-rooms of towels laundered in non-union shops (the company replied by allowing the men to supply towels themselves), the use on doors of springs not union-made (these were removed by the company), and especially the discharge of four men whom the company refused to reinstate.

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  • Meanwhile Ramus, as graduate of the university, had opened courses of lectures; but his audacities drew upon him the hostility of the conservative party in philosophy and theology.

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  • By him it was referred to a commission of five, who found Ramus guilty of having "acted rashly, arrogantly and impudently," and interdicted his lectures (1544).

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  • A very good list of writers on heresy, ancient and medieval, is given in Burton's Bampton Lectures on Heresies of the Apostolic Age (1829).

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  • In1778-1779Muller delivered a brilliant set of lectures on general history, which were not published till 1839 under the title of Vierundzwanzig Bucher allgemeiner Geschichte.

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  • In 1806 and 1807 he delivered a course of lectures at the Athenee on the language and literature of France from the earliest years; and in 1808 at the emperor's request, he prepared his Tableau historique de l'etat et du progres de la littrature francaise depuis 1789 jusqu'd 1808, a book containing some good criticism, though marred by the violent prejudices of its author.

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  • C. Roberts-Austen's six Reports (1891 to 2904) to the Alloys Research Committee of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, London, the last report being concluded by William Gowland; the Cantor Lectures on Alloys delivered at the Society of Arts and the Contribution a l'etude des alliages (2902), published by the Societe d'encouragement pour l'industrie nationale under the direction of the Commission des alliages (2896-2900), should be consulted.

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  • Tyrrell's Lectures on Latin Poetry, will also be found of service.

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  • Making rapid progress, he was soon qualified to give a course of lectures on archaeology, which was attended by the principal artists then at Rome.

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  • As Duke Albert sided with Osiander, Chemnitz resigned the librarianship. Returning (1553) to Wittenberg, he lectured on Melanchthon's Loci Communes, his lectures forming the basis of his own Loci Theologici (published posthumously, 1591), which constitute probably the best exposition of Lutheran theology as formulated and modified by Melanchthon.

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  • His lectures were thronged, and a university career of great influence lay before him, when he accepted a call to become coadjutor at Brunswick to the superintendent, Joachim Morlin, who had known him at Konigsberg.

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  • (1909); and the various volumes of the Yale Lectures on Preaching.

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  • The Religions of the World (1847); Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy (at first an article in the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana, 1848); The Church a Family (1850); The Old Testament (1851); Theological Essays (1853); The Prophets and Kings of the Old Testament (1853); Lectures on Ecclesiastical History (1854); The Doctrine of Sacrifice (1854); The Patriarchs and Lawgivers of the Old Testament (1855); The Epistles of St John (1857); The Commandments as Instruments of National Reformation (1866); On the Gospel of St Luke (1868); The Conscience: Lectures on Casuistry (1868); The Lord', Prayer, a Manual (1870).

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  • The greater part of these works were first delivered as sermons or lectures.

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  • Manning thereupon proceeded to Rome to pursue his theological studies, residing at the college known as the "Academy for Noble Ecclesiastics," and attending lectures by Perrone and Passaglia among others.

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  • In 1860 he delivered a course of lectures on the pope's temporal power, at that date seriously threatened, and shortly afterwards he was appointed a papal domestic prelate, thus becoming a "Monsignor," to be addressed as "Right Reverend."

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  • Some of Cyril's personal preferences expressed in his catechetical lectures find expression, e.g.

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  • Stewart, Croall Lectures (in the press); S.

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  • At the close of his term Colfax returned to private life under a cloud, and during the remainder of his lifetime earned a livelihood by delivering popular lectures.

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  • Farrar's Barnpton Lectures; G.

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  • He went to the schools of philosophy, and heard lectures on Plato, Diogenes, Clitomachus and Carneades; the conjunction of names show how philosophy had become a dead tradition.

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  • In the university most of the textbooks used are English, nevertheless many of the lectures are still delivered in Italian - for the convenience of some professors or to please the politicians, rather than for the benefit of the students.

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  • He also wrote Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1856), in which he applied to history the doctrine of organic evolution; Discourses and Essays (1856); A Manual of Church History (2 vols., 1857), a translation of Guericke; A History of Christian Doctrine (2 vols., 1863); Theological Essays (1877); Literary Essays (1878); Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (1879); The Doctrine of Endless Punishment (1885); and he edited Coleridge's Complete Works (7 vols., New York, 1894).

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  • There, in addition to the learned lectures by which he endeavoured to revive mathematical science in the university, he gave a public course of experimental physics.

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  • Farrar, Critical History of Free Thought (Bampton Lectures, 1862); Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopadie (ed.

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  • Except during the first few years at Manchester, he delivered his lectures without manuscripts.

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  • In 1903, under the title The Development of Modern Philosophy and Other Essays, his more important lectures were published with a short biographical introduction by Prof. W.

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  • Throughout his lectures, Adamson pursued the critical and historical method without formulating a constructive theory of his own.

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  • His more important publications were Lectures on Human Society (1860); Memorials of a Quiet Life (1874); and The Golden Rule applied to Business and Social Conditions (1892).

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  • In 1738 Dr Robert Smith published Cotes' Hydrostatical and Pneumatical Lectures, a work which was held in great estimation.

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  • He attended lectures on grammar, and his favourite work was St Augustine's De civitate Dei, He caused Frankish sagas to be collected, began a grammar of his native tongue, and spent some of his last hours in correcting a text of the Vulgate.

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  • He graduated in arts, and claims to have graduated in medicine (of this there is no record at Paris), published six lectures on " syrups " (the most popular of his works), lectured on geometry and " astrology " (from a medical point of view) and defended by counsel a suit brought against him (March 1538) by the medical faculty on the ground of his astrological lectures.

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  • Among attendants on his Paris lectures was Pierre Paulmier, since 1528 archbishop of Vienne.

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  • Syruporum universa ratio, &c. (Paris, 1537); four subsequent editions; latest, Venice, 1548 (six lectures on digestion; syrups treated in fifth lecture).

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  • Michaelis Villanovani in quendam medicum apologetics disceptatio pro astrologia (Paris, 1538; reprinted, Berlin, 1880); the medicus is Jean Tagault, who interrupted Servetus's lectures on astronomy, including meteorology.

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  • In 1866 he delivered his Bampton Lectures on the doctrine of the divinity of Christ.

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  • As a theologian his outlook was that of the 16th rather than the 9th century; and, reading his Bampton Lectures now, it is difficult to realize how they can ever have been hailed as a great contribution to Christian apologetics.

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  • Besides the works mentioned, Liddon published several volumes of Sermons, a volume of Lent lectures entitled Some Elements of Religion (1870), and a collection of Essays and Addresses on such themes as Buddhism, Dante, &c.

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  • He at once refused, but was permitted to deliver lectures.

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  • He became assistant bishop of Virginia in 1829; was pastor of Christ Church, Norfolk, in 1834-1836; in 1841 became bishop of Virginia; and in1842-1862was president of the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia, near Alexandria, delivering an annual course of lectures on pastoral theology.

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  • Fichte, while accepting the call, desired to spend a year in preparation; but as this was deemed inexpedient he rapidly drew out for his students an introductory outline of his system, and began his lectures in May 1794.

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  • His residence there from 1799 to 1806 was unbroken save for a course of lectures during the summer of 1805 at Erlangen, where he had been named professor.

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  • In 1804 were also delivered the noble lectures entitled Grundziige des gegenwdrtigen Zeitalters (Characteristics of the Present Age, 1804), containing a most admirable analysis of the Aufkltirung, tracing the position of such a movement of thought in the natural evolution of the general human consciousness, pointing out its inherent defects, and indicating as the ultimate goal of progress the life of reason in its highest aspect as a belief in the divine order of the universe.

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  • viii.), with its sharp critique of Schelling; from 1810 we have the Thatsachen des Bewusstseyns, published in 1817, of which another treatment is given in lectures of 1813 (Nachgel.

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  • As these consist mainly of notes for lectures, couched in uncouth phraseology, they cannot be held to throw much light on Fichte's views.

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  • Perhaps the most interesting are the lectures of 1812 on Transcendental Logic (Nach.

    0
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  • Debarred from taking an active part, Fichte made his contribution by way of lectures.

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  • It lay in the nature of the thing that more precise utterances should be given on this subject, and these we find in the Thatsachen des Bewusstseyns and in all the later lectures.

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  • This ultimate view is expressed throughout the lectures (in the Nachgel.

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  • This became the great object of his lectures, when he was appointed regius professor of scriptural interpretation at Louvain in 1630.

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  • (Munich, 1892), and by Albert Sorel in his Lectures historiques (pp. 70 -112).

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  • Nettleship, Lectures and Remains (1897); D.

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  • Acts have been passed extending the common-law liability of employers, prohibiting the manufacture and sale of sweat-shop clothing, and authorizing cities and towns to provide free lectures and to maintain public baths, gymnasia and playgrounds.

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  • Of importance in more modern views is a volume of Lectures Delivered ...

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  • by Members of the Massachusetts Historical Society on Subjects Relating to the Early History of Massachus etts (Boston, 1869), perhaps especially the lectures of G.

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  • He was a famous preacher, and many of his homilies, including a series of lenten lectures on the Hexaemeron, and an exposition of the psalter, have been preserved.

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  • As catechist at his college he read lectures on the Decalogue, which, both on their delivery and on their publication (in 1630), created much interest.

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  • These seem to have been worked up later into a compilation called The Orphan Lectures (1657).

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  • In 1901 he delivered a series of lectures at Hartford Theological Seminary, Connecticut, U.S.A., published under the title The Evolution of Congregationalism.

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  • To the more strictly exegetical lectures the names E nyncmtc, 4-07-Amara, i nynTuca, O o€t, were sometimes applied.

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  • He published Presidential Problems (New York, 1904), made up in part of lectures at Princeton University, and Fishing and Hunting Sketches (1906).

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  • In 1906 he began to publish, under the title of Histoire ancienne de l'eglise, a course of lectures which he had already delivered upon the early ages of the Church, and of which a few manuscript copies were circulated.

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  • In these lectures Duchesne touches cleverly upon the most delicate problems, and, without any elaborate display of erudition, presents conclusions of which account must be taken.

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  • His other works include Origines Germanicae (1840); the lectures Die Krisis der Reformation (1845) and Feudalitat and Aristokratie (1858); Aus der Zeit Friedrichs des Grossen and Friedrich Wilhelms III.

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  • Siborne, R.E., Waterloo Letters; Colonel Chesney, Waterloo Lectures; Wellington, Despatches and Memorandum on the Battle of Waterloo; Correspondance and Cornmentaires of Napoleon.

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  • When he reached Leiden (June 6, 1738) he found that the lectures were over for the term and that the MSS.

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  • He heard the lectures of A.

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  • In 1747 an Arabic dedication to the electoral prince of Saxony got him the title of professor, but neither the faculty of arts nor that of medicine was willing to admit him among them, and he never delivered a course of lectures.

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  • His published works include Lectures on Welsh Philology (1877); Celtic Britain (1882, last ed.

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  • From notes of his lectures, William S.

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  • From 1757 he delivered lectures on clinical medicine in the Royal Infirmary.

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  • The first volume of an account of Cullen's Life, Lectures and Writings was published by Dr John Thomson in 1832, and was reissued with the second volume (completing the work) by Drs W.

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  • See Memorial Lectures delivered before the Chemical Society, 18 931900 (London, 1901).

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  • Lady Duff-Gordon published in 1861 an English translation of part of this book, to which are added lectures on the crusades delivered in Munich in 1858, under the title History and Literature of the Crusades.

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  • He was the author of The Religious Aspects of Philosophy (1885); California (1886, in the American Commonwealth Series) The Feud of Oakfield Creek (1887, a novel); The Spirit of Modern Philosophy (1892); The Conception of God (1895); Studies of Good and Evil (1898); The World and the Individual (2 vols., 1900-1, Gifford Lectures at the university of Aberdeen); The Conception of Immortality (1900); Outlines of Psychology (1903); Herbert Spencer: An Estimate and Review (1904); The Philosophy of Loyalty (1908); Race Questions, Provincialism and Other American Problems (1908);' William James and Other Essays on the Philosophy of Life (1911); Bross Lectures on the Sources of Religious Insight (1912); The Problem of Christianity (2 vols., 1913, lectures before Manchester College, Oxford); War and Insurance (1914); The Hope of the Great Community (1916, war addresses) and the posthumously published Lectures on Modern Idealism (1919).

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  • He studied at Heidelberg and Tubingen, and in 1820 delivered exegetical and historical lectures at Heidelberg.

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  • Crossing to England towards the end of 1582, he attended the lectures of John Rainolds (1549-1607) at Oxford, and those of William Whitaker (1548-1595) at Cambridge.

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  • In 1851 he established his fame as a philologist by The Study of Words, originally delivered as lectures to the pupils of the Diocesan Training School, Winchester.

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  • He had found time for Lectures on Medieval Church History (1878); his poetical works were rearranged and collected in two volumes (last edition, 1885).

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  • John Tyndall, Sound (5th ed., 1893), originally delivered as lectures, treats the subject descriptively, and is illustrated by a large number of excellent experiments.

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  • His lectures on biblical theology (Vorlesungen ilber biblische Theologie u.

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  • He made the first elaborate reports of popular scientific lectures by Louis Agassiz and other authorities.

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  • Of detailed military histories the principal are the semi-official series of narratives and monographs produced by the Austrian military journal " Streffleur " (Einzelschriften fiber den russ.-japanischen Krieg); the volumes of lectures delivered at the Russian Staff College after the war, French translation (Conferences sur la guerre russo-japonaise faites it l'Academie Nicolas); British official History of the RussoJapanese War (1907-); German official Russisch japanischer Krieg (1906 -; English translation by K.

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  • Nettleship, Lectures and Essays (1885).

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  • See Chadwick 33, 35; Frazer, Lectures, 225; and Hartland ii.

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  • of Kant, lectures x.

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  • p. 553; Sayce, J-Iibbert Lectures, p. 242.

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  • Austin, Lectures on Jurisprudence (3rd ed., London, 1869); Sir H.

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  • His lectures, in which he endeavoured to show that Catholic theology is in complete harmony with reason, were received with eager interest by the younger generation of thinkers.

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  • Mohl) published his Histoire de la litterature provencale (3 vols., 1846) - his lectures for 1831-1832.

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  • Since the Poles were at first unyielding, Ruthenian demonstrations and strikes of students arose, and the Ruthenians were no longer content with the reversion of a few separate professorial chairs, and with parallel courses of lectures.

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  • In the autumn of 1849 Waitz began his lectures at Göttingen.

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  • His style of speaking was dry and uninteresting; but the matter of his lectures was so practical and his teaching so sound that students were attracted in crowds to his lecture-room, and the reputation of the Göttingen historical school spread far and wide.

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  • He was educated at the gymnasium of Stettin and at the university of Berlin; in 1829 he became a master at the Graue Kloster (or Grey Friars), one of the oldest schools in Berlin; besides his work there he gave lectures at the university, from 1833 as privat-dozent, and from 1835 as professor, without a salary.

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    0
  • His lectures drew large audiences, including many Protestants.

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  • Previously a certain amount of regular instruction had no doubt been given here and there by individual physicians and surgeons; lectures to nurses were delivered in the New York Hospital as early as 1790.

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  • The Medico-Psychological Association of Great Britain and Ireland holds examinations and grants certificates in mental nursing; candidates must undergo three years' regular training, with instruction by lectures, &c., which may be obtained in a large number of public asylums by arrangement with the Association; one county asylum (Northampton) gives its own certificates after a three years' course.

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  • Members of the Albert Society of Saxony, however, spend two years in the wards at Dresden, and a third at Leipzig, attending lectures and demonstrations.

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  • Propagandism is carried on by lectures, literature, cookery demonstrations and restaurants.

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  • He returned to Strassburg in 1663, where he was appointed preacher without pastoral duties, with the right of holding lectures.

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  • He was warmly welcomed in the United States, which he visited in 1872, but the lectures on Ireland which he delivered there caused much dissatisfaction.

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  • His lectures on Erasmus and other 16th-century subjects were largely attended.

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  • His lectures were thinly attended, for he did not care to adapt them to the requirements of the university examinations, and he was not perhaps well fitted to teach young men.

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  • In 1108 he retired into the abbey of St Victor, where he resumed his lectures.

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  • of Melanges historiques, part of Documents inedits), &c. These works did not wholly occupy his time: in 1847 he inaugurated a course of archaeological lectures at the Ecole des Chartes, and in 1849 was appointed professor of diplomacy at the same college.

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  • Of his lectures the public saw only some articles on special subjects which were distributed in a number of reviews.

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  • Following the advice of his friends, he began to write out, towards the end of his life, his lectures on archaeology, but only the introductory chapters, up to the 11th century, were found among his papers.

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  • After 1871, his course of lectures on diplomacy having been given up, Quicherat, still professor of archaeology, was nominated director of the Ecole des Chartes.

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  • de Lasteyrie, 1886); among these are some important fragments of his archaeological lectures, but his Histoire de la laine, with which he was occupied for many years, is missing.

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  • On the Ile in the Rhone stands the tower (built c. 1219) of the old castle belonging to the bishop. Among the modern buildings we may mention the following: the University(founded in 1559, but raised to the rank of a University in 1873 only), the Athenee, the Conservatoire de Musique, the Victoria Hall (a concert hall, presented in 1904 to the city by Mr Barton, formerly H.B.M.'s Consul), the theatre, the Salle de la Reformation (for religious lectures and popular concerts), the Batiment Electoral, the Russian church and the new post office.

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  • Well-organized continuation schools and systematic courses of lectures aim at providing the young soldier with a complete adult education.

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  • d'Assy, receiver-general of finances; and while acting in this capacity, attended the lectures of J.

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  • Among his principal works are: - Sacred Hermeneutics Developed and Applied (1843), rewritten and republished as A 'Treatise on Biblical Criticism (1852), Lectures on Ecclesiastical Polity (1848), An Introduction to the New Testament (1848-1851), The Hebrew Text of the Old Testament Revised (1855), Introduction to the Old Testament (1862), On a Fresh Revision of the Old Testament (1873), The Canon of the Bible (1877), TheDoctrine of Last Things in the New Testament (1883), besides translations of the New Testament from Von Tischendorf's text, Gieseler's Ecclesiastical History (1846) and Fiirst's Hebrew and Chaldee Lexicon.

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  • Mill in the 'Westminster Review (reprinted in Dissertations), and from Ferrier in Blackwood (reprinted in Lectures and Remains, ii).

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  • Lectures delivered by Maine in this capacity were the groundwork of Ancient Law (1861), the book by which his reputation vas made at one stroke.

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  • During the succeeding years he published the principal matters of his lectures in a carefully revised literary form: Village Communities in the East and the West (1871); Early History of Institutions (187J); Early Law and Custom (1883).

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  • Pollock, "Sir Henry Maine and his Work," in Oxford Lectures, &c. (1890); "Sir H.

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  • The theological application and development of Hamilton's arguments in Mansel's Bampton Lectures On the Limits of Religious Thought marked a still more determined attack, in the interests of theology, upon the competency of reason.

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  • The lectures of Professor Cybulski (d.

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  • By his will he founded the Boyle lectures, for proving the Christian religion against "notorious infidels, viz.

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  • Longueville's Life of Laud, by a Romish Recusant (1894); Congregational Union Jubilee Lectures,.

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  • Collins (lectures, bibliography, catalogue of exhibits, 1895); Hook's Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury; and H.

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  • trans., 1876); First Age of Christianity (1860); Lectures on the Reunion of the Churches; The Vatican Decrees; Studies in European History (tr.

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  • Meeting with an accident while he was wandering on the Palatine, and being detained in Rome, he passed part of his enforced leisure in giving lectures (possibly on Homer, his favourite author), and thus succeeded in arousing among the Romans a taste for the scholarly study of literature.

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  • The wide popularity of his brilliant lectures in the " schools " of Paris made this city the resort of the many students who were ultimately organized as a " university " (c. 1170).

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  • John of Salisbury attended Abelard's lectures in 1136, and, after spending two years in the study of logic in Paris, passed three more in the scholarly study of Latin literature at Chartres, where a sound and healthy tradition, originally due to Bernard of Chartres (fl.

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  • At Paris, in 150o, he was fully conscious that " without Greek the amplest knowledge of Latin was imperfect"; and, during his three years in Italy (1506-1509), he worked quietly at Greek in Bologna and attended the lectures of Musurus in Padua.

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  • Sandys, Harvard Lectures on the Revival of Learning (1905); also P. de Nolhac, Pe'trarque et l'humanisme (2nd ed., 1907).

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  • C. Jebb, " Humanism in Education," Romanes Lecture of 1899, reprinted with other lectures on cognate subjects in Essays and Addresses (1907); Foster Watson, The Curriculum and Practice of the English Grammar Schools up to 1660 (1908); " Greek at Oxford," by a Resident, in The Times (December 27, 1904); Cambridge University Reporter (November i i and December 17, 1904); British Association Report on Curricula of Secondary Schools (with an independent paper by Professor Armstrong on " The Teaching of Classics "), (December 1907); W.

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  • In 1768 Rolland declared that the university, which held Greek in high honour, nevertheless had reason to lament that her students learnt little of the language, and he traced this decline to the fact that attendance at lectures had ceased to be compulsory.

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  • 1728), was never weary of attacking scholarship of the old humanistic type and everything that savoured of antiquarian pedantry, and it was mainly his influence that made German the language of university lectures and of scientific and learned literature.

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  • with " extreme self-suppression " and " willingness to concede to tradition all that could with any plausibility be conceded " (Cheyne, Origin of the Psalter, p. 15); more especially is his influence observable after 1890, when he published his Bampton Lectures, the Origin of the Psalter, a work of vast learning and keen penetration, without restraint on the freedom of his judgment - always stimulating to students and fellow-workers, though by no means always carrying large numbers with him.

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  • From 1875 onwards Smith contributed to the 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica a long series of important articles, which, together with the articles of Cheyne, Wellhausen and others, made that work an important factor in the change which was to pass over English thought in regard to the Bible; in 1878, by his pleadings in the trial for heresy brought against him on the ground of these articles, he turned a personal defeat in the immediate issue into a notable victory for the cause which led to his condemnation; and subsequently (in 1880), in two series of lectures, afterwards published 2 and widely read, he gave a brilliant, and, as it proved, to a rapidly increasing number a convincing exposition of the criticism of the literature, history and religion of Israel, which was already represented in Germany 2 The Old Testament in the Jewish Church (1881); The Prophets of Israel (1882).

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  • In 1891 Dr Driver published his Introduction to the Literature of the Old Testament (6th ed., 1897); less popular in form than Smith's lectures, it was a more systematic and comprehensive survey of the whole field of the literary criticism of the Old Testament.

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  • Blass, Acta Apostolorum (Göttingen, 1895; and an editio minor, with a valuable preface, Leipzig, 1896); Rendel Harris, Four Lectures on the Western Text (Cambridge, 1894); F.

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  • Montefiore, Hibbert Lectures (for 1892), Appendix; ibid.

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  • In 1886 he was selected by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland to deliver the Rhind lectures on archaeology, out of which grew his Handbook of Greek Archaeology (1892).

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  • In 1898 he wrote for the Portfolio a monograph on Greek bronzes, founded on lectures delivered at the Royal Academy in that year, and he contributed many articles on archaeology to standard publications.

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  • After a long visit to Spener, who was at that time a court preacher in Dresden, he returned to Leipzig in the spring of 1689, and began to give Bible lectures of an exegetical and practical kind, at the same time resuming the Collegium Philobiblicum of earlier days.

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  • Even as professor of Greek he had given great prominence in his lectures to the study of the Scriptures; but he found a much more congenial sphere when, in 1698, he was appointed to the chair of theology.

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  • Yet his first courses of lectures in that department were readings and expositions of the Old and New Testament; and to this, as also to hermeneutics, he always attached special importance, believing that for theology a sound exegesis was the one indispensable requisite.

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  • His university lectures and published works ranged over the wide fields of church history in its various branches, particularly the literature and the controversies of the church, dogmatics, ethics and pastoral theology.

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  • He was sent in 1737 to the university of Glasgow, where he attended the lectures of Dr Hutcheson; and in 1740 he went to Balliol College, Oxford, as exhibitioner on Snell's foundation.

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  • In 1748 he removed to Edinburgh, and there, under the patronage of Lord Kames, gave lectures on rhetoric and belles-lettres.

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  • His course of lectures was divided into four parts-(1) natural theology; (2) ethics; (3) a treatment of that branch of morality which relates to justice, a subject which he handled historically after the manner of Montesquieu; (4) a study of those political regulations which are founded, not upon the principle of justice, but that of expediency, and which are calculated to increase the riches, the power and the prosperity of a state.

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  • After the publication of this work his ethical doctrines occupied less space in his lectures, and a larger development was given to the subjects of jurisprudence and political economy.

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  • Among the papers destroyed were probably, as Stewart suggests, the lectures on natural religion and jurisprudence which formed part of his course at Glasgow, and also the lectures on rhetoric which he delivered at Edinburgh in 1748.

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  • Smith conceived the entire subject he had to treat in his public lectures as divisible into four heads, the first of which was natural theology, the second ethics, the third jurisprudence; whilst in the fourth "he examined those political regulations which are founded upon expediency, and which are calculated to increase the riches, the power, and the prosperity of a state."

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  • Ashley's essay in Compatriots Club Lectures (1905) on "Political Economy and the Tariff Problem."

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  • In May 1803, after attending further courses of lectures in Edinburgh, and acting as assistant to the professor of mathematics at St Andrews, he was ordained as minister of Kilmany in Fifeshire, about 9 m.

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  • His mathematical lectures roused so much enthusiasm that they were discontinued by order of the authorities, who disliked the disturbance of the university routine which they involved.

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  • Chalmers then opened mathematical classes on his own account which attracted many students; at the same time he delivered a course of lectures on chemistry, and ministered to his parish at Kilmany.

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  • In his lectures he excluded mental philosophy and included the whole sphere of moral obligation, dealing with man's duty to God and to his fellow-men in the light of Christian teaching.

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  • Many of his lectures are printed in the first and second volumes of his published works.

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  • His lectures kindled the religious spirit among his students, and led some of them to devote themselves to missionary effort.

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  • calculations he had made, and suggested to Napier the advantages) that would result from the choice of io as a base, an improvement which he had explained in his lectures at Gresham College, and on which he had written to Napier.

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  • Briggs pointed out in his lectures at Gresham College that it would be more convenient that o should stand for the logarithm of the whole sine as in the Descriptio, but that the logarithm of the tenth part of the whole sine should be Io,000,000,000.

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  • In the main they are expositions of the Creed, the Lord's Prayer and the Decalogue, and thus follow a tradition that has come down from the days when Cyril of Jerusalem delivered his catechetical Lectures.

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  • He was appointed teacher of the principles of decoration; his lectures in manuscript are preserved in the art library, South Kensington.

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  • His Notes of Lectures on Practical Art in Metals and Hard Materials: its Technology, History and Style, were left in MS.

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  • 1891); Westcott, Some Lessons of the Revised Version (London, 1897); Kennedy, Ely Lectures on the Revised Version (London, 1882).

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  • His lectures enjoyed great popularity, and enthusiasm felt for him by the students is shown in the beautiful lines addressed to him by Mickiewicz.

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  • The "Aphorisms on Naturphilosophie" contained in the Jahrbiicher der Medicin als Wissenschaft (1806-1808) are for the most part extracts from the Wiirzburg lectures; and the Denkmal der Schrift von den gottlichen Dingen des Herrn Jacobi wasdrawn forth by the special incident of Jacobi's work.

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  • The antagonism certainly was not then a new fact; the Erlangen lectures on the history of philosophy (SÃmmt.

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  • No authentic information as to the nature of the new positive philosophy was obtained till after his death (at Bad Rogaz, on the 20th of August 1854), when his sons began the issue of his collected writings with the four volumes of Berlin lectures: vol.

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  • the thought of the identical, indifferent, absolute substratum of both nature and spirit, the advance to Identitdtsphilosophie; (3) the opposition of negative and positive philosophy, an opposition which is the theme of the Berlin lectures, though its germs ma y be traced back to 1804.

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  • This conception of a difference, of an internal structure in the absolute, finds other and not less obscure expressions in the mystical contributions of the Menschliche Freiheit and in the scholastic speculations of the Berlin lectures on mythology.

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  • Not much satisfaction can be felt with the exposition of either as it appears in the volumes of Berlin lectures.

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  • His Munich lectures were published by A.

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  • The FrancoGerman War inspired him with the idea for some courses of lectures which developed into books: La domination franQaise en Allemagne; les Frangais sur le Rhin, 1792-1804 (1873) and L' Allemagne sous Napoleon I.

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  • He commenced his lectures with a course on the history of Rome, which formed the basis of his great work Romische Geschichte.

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  • The first two volumes, based upon his lectures, were published in 1812, but attracted little attention at the time owing to the absorbing interest of political events.

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  • He also assisted in August Bekker's edition of the Byzantine historians, and delivered courses of lectures on ancient history, ethnography, geography, and on the French Revolution.

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  • Macquer (1718-1784) as lecturer in chemistry at the college of the Jardin du Roi, where his lectures attained great popularity.

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  • He migrated to Syria, attracted by the lectures of Iamblichus, whose follower he became.

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  • The school was never incorporated, it had no buildings, and the lectures were delivered in the law offices of its instructors, but among its 1000 or more students were many who afterwards became famous, including John C. Calhoun; Levi Woodbury (1789-1851), United States senator from New Hampshire in1825-1831and in 1841-1845, secretary of the navy in 1831-1834 and of the treasury in 1834-1841, and a justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1845; John Y.

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  • The Cycle of Spring (1917), Sacrifice (1917), and other plays; the novels, The Home and the World (1919), The Wreck (1921); as well as a volume of letters, Glimpses of Bengal (1921), and the short stories Hungry Stones German East Africa Tanganyika Territory) Scale.]: 7.500,000 0 50 100, 50 Boundary 19141Le r ial921 Railways - - - Roads - - - - - (1916) and Mashi (1918); and republished lectures, Sadhana, or the Realization of Life (1913), Nationalism (1917), Personality (1917).

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  • It was enlarged and improved, the sale of drink was forbidden, and miscellaneous programmes of music, drama, and lectures were embarked upon.

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  • His death in 1886 was a great blow to the work, but his name has been perpetuated in the foundation of the Morley College for working men and women, which developed from the lectures given at the " Old Vic."

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  • This appointment was inaugurated by two events, - a course of eight lectures on sound, which proved no success and was not repeated, and the determination by means of a revolving mirror of the speed of electric discharge in conductors, a piece of work leading to enormously important results.

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  • Aristotle also formed his Peripatetic school into a kind of college with common meals under a president (6tpxcov) changing every ten days; while the philosopher himself delivered lectures, in which his practice, as his pupil Aristoxenus tells us (Harmonics, ii.

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  • But Aristotle was an author as well as a lecturer; for the hypothesis that the Aristotelian writings are notes of his lectures taken down by his pupils is contradicted by the tradition of their learning while walking, and disproved by the impossibility of taking down such complicated discourses from dictation.

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  • When Aristotle at the age of eighteen came to Athens, Plato, at the age of sixty-two, had probably written all his dialogues except the Laws; and in the course of the remaining twenty years of his life and teaching, he expounded " the socalled unwritten dogmas " in his lectures on the Good.

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  • In the unwritten lectures of his old age, he developed this formal into a mathematical metaphysics.

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  • Aristotle knew Plato, was present at his lectures on the Good, wrote a report of them (7rEpi Ta yaBoii), and described this latter philosophy of Plato in his Metaphysics.

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  • Among the didactic writings, the 7rEpi TayaOoii would probably belong to the same time, because it was Aristotle's report of Plato's lectures.

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  • containing his report of Plato's lectures on the Good, he was dealing: with the same mathematical metaphysics which in his dialogue on.

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  • Aristoxenus, at the beginning of the second book of the Harmonics,, gives a graphic account of the astonishment caused by these lectures, of Plato, and of their effect on the lectures of Aristotle.

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  • There is a further hypothesis that the Aristotelian works were not originally treatises, but notes of lectures either for or by his pupils.

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  • They are not mere lectures; but he used them for lectures: he allowed his pupils to read them in his library, and probably to take copies from them.

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  • He studied at Wittenberg where he heard the lectures of Luther, and afterwards became tutor to Count Mansfeldt.

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  • He succeeded Creighton as Dixie professor of ecclesiastical history at Cambridge (1891) and in 1903 gave the Gifford lectures at Edinburgh.

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  • His chief works were Studies of Arianism (1882); The Knowledge of God (1906, the published version of his Gifford lectures) and Early Church History (1909).

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  • Duruy to give lectures on history, following the method used in German seminaries, at the ecole des hautes etudes.

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  • His lectures were generally on Biblical subjects.

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  • His Commentaries on St John's Gospel (1881), on the Epistle to the Hebrews (1889) and the Epistles of St John (1883) resulted from his public lectures.

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  • The work of lecturing was an intense strain to him, but its influence was immense: to attend one of Westcott's lectures - even to watch him lecturing - was an experience which lifted and solemnized many a man to whom the references to Origen or Rupert of Deutz were almost ludicrously unintelligible.

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  • His little edition of the Paragraph Psalter (1879), arranged for the use of choirs, and his admirable lectures on the Apostles' Creed, entitled Historic Faith (1883), are reminiscences of his vacations spent at Peterborough.

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  • Among his writings are Lectures on the Criticism and Interpretation of the Bible (1828), A Comparative View of the Churches of England and Rome (1814), and Horae Pelasgicae (1815).

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  • He was appointed professor of chemistry at Cambridge in 1813, but lived to deliver only one course of lectures, being killed near Boulogne on the 22nd of February 1815 by the fall of a bridge over which he was riding.

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  • He went first to the university of Louvain, where he resided about two years, and then to the college of Rheims, where he had extraordinary success in his public lectures on Euclid's Elements.

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  • 34) he opened the long series of public lectures wherein he came forward as an oral teacher and preacher, not a little to the alarm of his parents and amidst a storm of controversy.

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  • The Edinburgh Lectures (November 1853) treated Architecture, Turner, and Pre-Raphaelitism.

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  • The Manchester Lectures (July 1857) treated the moral and social uses of art, now embodied in A Joy for Ever.

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  • Some other lectures are reprinted in On the Old Road and The Two Paths (1859).

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  • And his teaching was embodied in an enormous series of Lectures, Letters, Articles, Selections and serial pamphlets.

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  • His lectures on art had dealt bitterly with the mode in which buildings and other works were produced.

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  • Four lectures on this topic appeared in the Cornhill Magazine until the public disapproval led the editor, then W.

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  • At the end of the year 1864 Ruskin delivered at Manchester a new series of lectures - not on art, but on reading, education, woman's work and social morals - the expansion of his earlier treatises on economic sophisms. This afterwards was included with a Dublin lecture of 1868 under the fantastic title of Sesame and Lilies (perhaps the most popular of his social essays), of which 44,000 copies were issued down to 1900.

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  • He made this, in 1871, the first volume of his collected lectures and essays, the more popular and didactic form of his new Utopia of human life.

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  • This in its ultimate form contained lectures on "Work," "Traffic," "War," and the "Future of England."

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  • In 1869 he issued the Queen of the Air, lectures on Greek myths, a subject he now took up, with some aid from the late Sir C. Newton.

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  • His lectures began in February 1870, and were so crowded that they had to be given in the Sheldonian Theatre, and frequently were repeated to a second audience.

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  • Cook's Studies in Ruskin (1890), which contains the particulars of his university lectures and of his economic and social experiments.

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  • His lectures were published at intervals from 1870 to 1885 in Aratra Pentelici, The Eagle's Nest, Love's Heinle, Ariadne Florentina, Val d'Arno, Proserpina, Deucalion, The Laws of Fesole, The Bible of Amiens, The Art of England and The Pleasures of England, together with a series of pamphlets, letters, articles, notes, catalogues and circulars.

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  • 52 to 66) he was again drawn back largely to art by his lectures as professor, whilst prosecuting his social Utopia by speech, pen, example and purse.

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  • From the first his professorial lectures were conspicuous for the unconventional enthusiasm with which he endeavoured to revivify the study of the classics; and his growing reputation, added to the attention excited by a translation of Aeschylus which he published in 1850, led to his appointment in 1852 to the professorship of Greek at Edinburgh University, in succession to George Dunbar, a post which he continued to hold for thirty years.

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  • He was somewhat erratic in his methods, but his lectures were a triumph of influential personality.

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  • The first stage of his later development, which resulted in the establishment of the "Irvingite" or "Holy Catholic Apostolic Church," in 1832, was associated with conferences at his friend Henry Drummond's seat at Albury concerning unfulfilled prophecy, followed by an almost exclusive study of the prophetical books and especially of the Apocalypse, and by several series of sermons on prophecy both in London and the provinces, his apocalyptic lectures in 1828 more than crowding the largest churches of Edinburgh in the early summer mornings.

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  • These consisted of the essay on habit (Sur l'influence de l'habitude, 1803), a critical review of P. Laromiguiere's lectures (1817), and the philosophical portion of the article "Leibnitz" in the Biographie universelle (1819).

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  • Ferrier was aware that in Kant's system " there is no common nature in all intelligence " (Lectures, ii.

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  • PANAETIUS (c. 185-180 to 110 - 108 B.C.), Greek Stoic philosopher, belonged to a Rhodian family, but was probably educated partly in Pergamum under Crates of Mallus and afterwards in Athens, where he attended the lectures of Diogenes the Babylonian, Critolaus and Carneades.

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  • He there applied himself to Oriental languages, but also attended the last course of lectures delivered by Turnebus in the Greek chair, as well as those of Peter Ramus, whose philosophical method and plan of teaching he afterwards introduced into the universities of Scotland.

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  • The ability of his lectures was universally acknowledged, and he created a taste for the study of Greek literature.

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  • After an absence of twenty months he returned to Scotland in November 1585, and in March 1586 resumed his lectures in St Andrews, where he continued for twenty years; he became rector of the university in 1590.

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  • In 1812 Mr Dance, a customer of his master, took him to hear four lectures by Sir Humphry Davy.

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  • Faraday took notes of these lectures, and afterwards wrote them out in a fuller form.

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  • He was appointed director of the laboratory in 1825; and in 1833 he was appointed Fullerian professor of chemistry in the institution for life, without the obligation to deliver lectures.

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  • Richard Taylor and William Francis (1855); Experimental Researches in Chemistry and Physics, Taylor and Francis (1859); Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (edited by W.

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  • He soon abandoned law for theology; took his degree in 1726, and began to give free lectures on theology.

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  • Meanwhile his free lectures in Jena met with much acceptance, and led to an invitation from Gotthilf Francke to the post of assistant professor of theology and superintendent of schools connected with his orphanage at Halle.

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  • A reputation acquired through certain contributions to the Dictionary of Christian Antiquities was confirmed by his treatises On the Organization of the Early Christian Churches (1881, his Bampton lectures), and on The Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages on the Christian Church (the Hibbert lectures for 1888).

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  • The Bampton lectures were translated into German by Harnack.

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  • Carlow to a minor post (1839) in the Irish ordnance survey, thence (1842) to the English survey, attending mechanics' institute lectures at Preston in Lancashire.

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  • For the substantial publication of these researches reference must be made to the Transactions of the Royal Society; but an account of many of them was incorporated in his best-known books, namely, the famous Heat as a Mode of Motion (1863; and later editions to 1880), the first popular exposition of the mechanical theory of heat, which in 1862 had not reached the textbooks; The Forms of Water, &c. (1872); Lectures on Light (1873); Floating Matter in the Air (188x); On Sound (1867; revised 1875, 1883, 1893).

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  • After two years he returned to Copenhagen, but his lectures excited so much disapproval that he took a professorship at Halle in 1804.

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  • His lectures in Copenhagen in 1802 were attended by many leading Danish thinkers, such as Oehlenschlager and Grundtvig.

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  • Chouet (1642-1731) the Cartesian, and attended the theological lectures of P. Mestrezat, Franz Turretin and Louis Tronchin (1629-1705).

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  • In 1874 he delivered his Cunningham Lectures, afterwards published as The Humiliation of Christ, and in the following year was appointed to the chair of Apologetics and New Testament exegesis at the Free Church College, Glasgow.

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  • With Open Face (Lond., 1896); The Epistle to the Hebrews (Edin., 1899); The Providential Order of the World, and the Moral Order of the World in Ancient and Modern Thought (Gifford Lectures, 1896-1897; Lond., 18 97, 1899).

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  • In 1335 Pietro d'Abano of Padua delivered in Paris a course of lectures on this subject (afterwards edited by Blondus, 1544), a few years before he was burned for heresy.

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  • In 1877 he published a course of lectures upon preaching, which he had delivered at the theological school of Yale University, and which are an expression of his own experience.

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  • In 1879 appeared the Bohlen Lectures on "The Influence of Jesus."

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  • - Wright, Lectures on the Comp. Grammar of the Sem.

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  • (Oxford, 1893), Lectures on Medieval and Modern History (Oxford, 1886) and Early Plantagenets (London, 1876); the same author's introduction to the Rolls editions of "Benedict," Gervase, Diceto, Hoveden; Mrs J.

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  • pp. 217-224) added some of the results of later research, and Renouf in his Hibbert Lectures explains the origin of the myth.

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  • In 1804 he was chosen to give a course of lectures on natural philosophy at the Royal Institution in London, where he delivered another course in 1809-1810.

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  • A volume containing Robertson's lectures on Martin Luther and other subjects was published in 1892.

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  • His lectures on political economy, which are based on strict utilitarian principles, are in marked accordance with the theories of the English school of economists.

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  • Grant, Bampton Lectures (1843), p. 190.

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  • Work of this kind is followed up in some centres by lectures and conversations with educated Hindus.

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  • His plea for the teaching of the science of fortification in universities, and the existence of such lectures in Leiden, have led to the impression that he himself filled this chair; but the belief is erroneous, as Stevinus, though living at Leiden, never had direct relations with its university.

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  • 1837), son of the last named, was rector of the Church of the Annunciation from 1868 to 1898, professor of ecclesiastical polity and law in the General Theological Seminary from 1873, and published a Manual for Choristers (1878), Lectures on Apostolic Succession (1893) and An Introduction to the Study of Ecclesiastical Polity (1894).

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  • The philological lectures of Johann Friedrich Christ (1700-1756) and Johann August Ernesti (1707-1781) proved, however, more attractive than those on theology, and he attended the philosophical disputations presided over by his friend A.

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  • Some medical lectures he did attend, but as long as Frau Neuber's company kept together the theatre had an irresistible fascination for him.

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  • When he entered upon this office he intended to have prelected upon the tragedies of Sophocles; but he altered his intention and made choice of Aristotle's rhetoric. His lectures on this subject, having been lent to a friend who never returned them, are irrecoverably lost.

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  • He was undoubtedly a clear-sighted and able mathematician, who handled admirably the severe geometrical method, and who in his Method of Tangents approximated to the course of reasoning by which Newton was afterwards led to the doctrine of ultimate ratios; but his substantial contributions to the science are of no great importance, and his lectures upon elementary principles do not throw much light on the difficulties surrounding the border-land between mathematics and philosophy.

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  • The most important are :- Euclid's Elements; Euclid's Data; Optical Lectures, read in the public school of Cambridge; Thirteen Geometrical Lectures; The Works of Archimedes, the Four Books of Apollonius's Conic Sections, and Theodosius's Spherics, explained in a New Method; A Lecture, in which Archimedes' Theorems of the Sphere and Cylinder are investigated and briefly demonstrated; Mathematical Lectures, read in the public schools of the university of Cambridge.

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  • He was largely instrumental in the foundation of ecoles normales in provincial towns, and himself gave courses of lectures on psychology and practical ethics in their early days.

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  • His lectures at Fontenoy have been published in two volumes entitled Lecons de psychologie appliquee a l'education, and Lecons de morale; those delivered at the Sorbonne are collected in L'Education dans l'universite (1892).

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  • About this time Gregory completed and published his well-known exposition of the book of Job, commenced in Constantinople: he also delivered lectures on the Heptateuch, the books of Kings, the Prophets, the book of Proverbs and the Song of Songs..

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  • His works include The Campaign of Chancellorsville (1881), A Bird's Eye View of our Civil War (1882, later edition 1897), a complete, accurate and remarkably concise account of the whole war, Patroclus and Penelope, a Chat in the Saddle (1883), Great Captains (1886), a series of lectures, Riders of Many Lands (1893), and a series of large illustrated volumes entitled A History of the Art of War, being lives of "Great Captains," including Alexander (2(2 vols., 1888), Hannibal (2(2 vols., 1889), Caesar (2 vols., 1892), Gustavus Adolphus (2 vols., 1896) and Napoleon (4(4 vols., 1904-1907).

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  • His principal works are, The Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul (1745), which best illustrates his religious genius, and has been widely translated; The Family Expositor (6 vols., 1739-1756), Life of Colonel Gardiner (1747); and a Course of Lectures on Pneumatology, Ethics and Divinity (1763).

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  • Weith (1844-1881), professor of chemistry at Zurich University, he undertook to continue the lectures on benzene derivatives, and this led him to the discovery of thiophen.

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  • All the professors are bound to give a series of lectures open to the public free of charge.

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  • Among her publications are: Kindergarten in Italy (1872); Reminiscences of William Ellery Channing (1880); Lectures in the Training Schools for Kindergartners (1888); and Last Evening with Allston, and other Papers (1886).

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  • Besides editions of English classics his works include a Life of Queen Victoria (1902),(1902), Great Englishmen of the Sixteenth Century (1904), based on his Lowell Institute lectures at Boston, Mass., in 1903, and Shakespeare and the Modern Stage (1906).

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  • So in 1526 or 1527, on his return to Basel, he was appointed town physician, and shortly afterwards he gave a course of lectures on medicine in the university.

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  • Unfortunately for him, the lectures broke away from tradition.

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  • Prior to this, in 1526-1527, appeared a programme of the lectures he intended to deliver at Basel, but this can hardly be reckoned a specific work.

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  • - Wood, Theory of Turbines; Bovey, Hydraulics; BjOrling, Hydraulic Motors; Blaine, Hydraulic Machinery; Bodmer, Hydraulic Motors; Unwin, " Water Motors " (Lectures on Hydro-Mechanics, Inst.

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  • On the completion of his education, he joined his father in business as a chemist in Oxford Street, and at the same time attended the chemistry lectures at the Royal Institution, and those on medicine at King's College.

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  • Kellett, 1901; also the lectures on Greek and Roman Catholicism in Das Wesen des Christentums, translated by Bailey Saunders, 1902; the first-named work is the most suggestive general apercu of the whole subject - though written from a.

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  • In 1563 he was appointed Lady Margaret professor of divinity at Cambridge, and his lectures gave such satisfaction to the authorities that on the 5th of July 1566 they considerably augmented his stipend.

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  • In 1693 he published four lectures on the Socinian controversy.

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  • at Cambridge, and delivered at Lincoln's Inn the first Warburton lectures, which were published later (1772) as An Introduction to the Study of the Prophecies concerning the Christian Church.

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  • The following is a list of Kingsley's writings: - Saint's Tragedy, a drama (1848); Alton Locke, a novel (1849); Yeast, a novel (1849) Twenty-five Village Sermons (1849); Phaeton, or Loose Thoughts for Loose Thinkers (1852); Sermons on National Subjects (1st series,1852); Hypatia, a novel (1853); Glaucus, or the Wonders of the Shore (1855); Sermons on National Subjects (2nd series, 1854); Alexandria and her Schools (1854); Westward Ho I a novel (1855); Sermons for the Times (1855); The Heroes, Greek fairy tales (1856); Two Years Ago, a novel (1857); Andromeda and other Poems (1858); The Good News of God, sermons (1859); Miscellanies (1859); Limits of Exact Science applied to History (Inaugural Lectures, 1860); Town and Country Sermons 0860; Sermons on the Pentateuch (1863); Water-babies (1863); The Roman and the Teuton (1864); David and other Sermons (1866); Hereward the Wake, a novel (1866); The Ancient Regime (Lectures at the Royal Institution, 1867); Water of Life and other Sermons (1867); The Hermits (1869); Madam How and Lady Why (1869); At last (1871); Town Geology (1872); Discipline and other Sermons 1872); Prose Idylls (1873); Plays and Puritans (1873); Health and Education (1874); Westminster Sermons (1874); Lectures delivered in America (1875).

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