Leaves sentence example

leaves
  • No one leaves his mate in a place like this.
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  • Life as it is leaves one no peace.
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  • She called to him as he hunkered down beside a rose bush with a few brown leaves clinging to it.
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  • The moon is a fickle lover, like a beautiful woman…she gives her whole heart but once a month and leaves you before dawn…why fear you the night?
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  • She brushed leaves from her clothes and slowly walked up the drive.
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  • The leaves are waiting for us.
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  • She turned the leaves and showed them the strange letters.
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  • In dry gourds, they were served a hot tea made from the ground leaves of something Bordeaux called the lip fern.
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  • When the leaves and the trees fell, the water and the soil covered them; and then more trees grew and fell also, and were buried under water and soil.
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  • They come rustling through the woods like autumn leaves, at least ten men to one loon.
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  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
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  • The wind came suddenly, and with a vengeance, bouncing leaves and small branches across the yard.
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  • He leaves no room for failure or my hope that certain things will change, she said.
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  • Frustration finally drove the couple to play the game the same way—contact no one, put your head in the sand, and hope everyone leaves you alone and forgets you exist.
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  • She said there was a woman who came to see her three days every five, with eyes like the first leaves of spring.
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  • My fingers lingered almost unconsciously on the familiar leaves and blossoms which had just come forth to greet the sweet southern spring.
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  • Leaves in an hour.
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  • Which leaves Gerald at home alone.
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  • Even ice begins with delicate crystal leaves, as if it had flowed into moulds which the fronds of waterplants have impressed on the watery mirror.
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  • He leaves no room for failure or my hope that certain things will change.
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  • Until the attack was defended and defeated, Christmas mornings, autumn leaves, spring flowers and summer picnics were no more than passing dreams.
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  • She kicked a pile of leaves from the branches where the floodwaters had deposited it a few weeks ago.
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  • From the cave we have advanced to roofs of palm leaves, of bark and boughs, of linen woven and stretched, of grass and straw, of boards and shingles, of stones and tiles.
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  • "I.ll sit outside the door to make sure no one leaves," Rhyn suggested.
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  • The leaves of the big oak tree were like silver filigree and the white cross beneath it looked iridescent.
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  • It's also a bond that folks in my position have to be careful about taking on, because it leaves me vulnerable.
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  • Inside the hedge they came upon row after row of large and handsome plants with broad leaves gracefully curving until their points nearly reached the ground.
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  • A bird sits on the next bough, life-everlasting grows under the table, and blackberry vines run round its legs; pine cones, chestnut burs, and strawberry leaves are strewn about.
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  • She cut the strings and pulled a few leaves from a new bale of alfalfa hay.
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  • They navigated the jungle as fast as they could, catching themselves against trees as they slid through slippery piles of leaves and over fallen branches.  Katie ran until she was breathless.  Deidre kept on running, and Katie pushed her body forward.
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  • Unable to sleep without knowing the truth, Toby huddled beneath the jungle leaves and stretched his senses until he found Katie.  He couldn't put her in more danger, if there was something wrong with Ully.  She was close enough for him to find when he needed to.  If he kept some distance between him and Katie, he could figure out what was wrong with Ully without endangering her more.
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  • So perfect is this instinct, that once, when I had laid them on the leaves again, and one accidentally fell on its side, it was found with the rest in exactly the same position ten minutes afterward.
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  • That leaves demons.  Maybe trees don't like demons.
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  • The whole tree itself is but one leaf, and rivers are still vaster leaves whose pulp is intervening earth, and towns and cities are the ova of insects in their axils.
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  • Which leaves Jonny, Xander mused.
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  • from the open Atlantic. A marigot, called the Ndiadier or Maringuins, leaves the river 40 m.
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  • I love the beautiful spring, because the budding trees and the blossoming flowers and the tender green leaves fill my heart with joy.
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  • That leaves your people.
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  • She inched away from a plant whose slender stalk was maneuvering through several other plants to position its leaves in direct sunlight.
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  • She pealed off a couple of leaves of hay and threw them into Ed's stall.
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  • We've got patrols around-- " "Speck doesn't understand that if even a mosquito leaves the town, there's no way we can stop the spread!"
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  • Cleary must have done something in Scranton that leaves a trail.
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  • The pages fluttered to the floor, like leaves in autumn.
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  • The leaves quickly fell to the ground, forming a thick layer everywhere.
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  • She reaches out and touches the leaves, and the world of growing things is hers, as truly as it is ours, to enjoy while she holds the leaves in her fingers and smells the blossoms, and to remember when the walk is done.
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  • He's barefoot after he leaves his shoes on the beach and needs some kind of footwear so he might as well get bike shoes; after all, he's biking.
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  • We're 'officially' given a job to do and then the brass leaves the room while we discuss how to 'unofficial­ly' get it done.
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  • He looked up instinctively, sensing something different about this thunder.  It didn't sound like the rumbling thunder he'd heard in the mortal world.  It sounded like an explosion in the sky.  The jungle canopy blocked his view, so he leapt up to catch the branch of the nearest tree.  He scaled the tree quickly, stopping only when he broke through the layers of leaves.  More tiny explosions came, and he twisted to see what they were.
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  • Instead they ask me if I want some Burmese Rain forest mixture or some leaves pressed by cloistered nuns in Nepal.
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  • I will tell you how King Frost happened to think of painting the leaves, for it is a strange story.
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  • Some were red, some white, and others were delicate pink, and they were peeping out from between the green leaves like beautiful little fairies.
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  • Like wind over leaves ran an excited whisper: They're coming!
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  • After flowing for a distance of 55 m., through the Engadine it leaves Swiss territory at Martinsbruck and enters Austria.
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  • Gabriel was at his place in the underworld, a small cottage tucked into Death.s realm, in the Everdark forest of Immortal trees whose hissing, fanlike leaves and snake-like branches moved to catch the quiet wind.
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  • Of course, she said nothing else, which leaves me in a position I don't like.
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  • And hark! here comes the cattle-train bearing the cattle of a thousand hills, sheepcots, stables, and cow-yards in the air, drovers with their sticks, and shepherd boys in the midst of their flocks, all but the mountain pastures, whirled along like leaves blown from the mountains by the September gales.
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  • Once it chanced that I stood in the very abutment of a rainbow's arch, which filled the lower stratum of the atmosphere, tinging the grass and leaves around, and dazzling me as if I looked through colored crystal.
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  • Now he rode beside Ilyin under the birch trees, occasionally plucking leaves from a branch that met his hand, sometimes touching his horse's side with his foot, or, without turning round, handing a pipe he had finished to an hussar riding behind him, with as calm and careless an air as though he were merely out for a ride.
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  • How well I remember the graceful draperies that enfolded me, the bright autumn leaves that wreathed my head, and the fruit and grain at my feet and in my hands, and beneath all the piety of the masque the oppressive sense of coming ill that made my heart heavy.
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  • Some were red, some white, and others pale pink, and they were just peeping out of the green leaves, as rosy-faced children peep out from their warm beds in wintertime before they are quite willing to get up.
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  • We were busy cutting out paper dolls; but we soon wearied of this amusement, and after cutting up our shoestrings and clipping all the leaves off the honeysuckle that were within reach, I turned my attention to Martha's corkscrews.
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  • Of course, he soon noticed the brightness of the leaves, and discovered the cause, too, when he caught sight of the broken jars and vases from which the melted treasure was still dropping.
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  • That leaves you, Ben.
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  • He leaves nothing; no DNA, no fingerprints, no witnesses.
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  • No one leaves this floor unless it.s me.
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  • The golds and reds of the leaves produced a different landscape each day.
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  • There was not a breath of wind to stir the young leaves on the trees.
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  • From our standpoint, the plant wastes all the rest of its energy on riotous living: growing roots and leaves, soaking up water, separating carbon molecules from oxygen ones.
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  • Not us, not Katie, not the demons.  That leaves other Immortals.  Looks like we're not the only ones here.
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  • molar very small, and shed before the animal leaves the mother's pouch.
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  • The leaves and leaflets of many plants, eg.
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  • The jointed leaves are fleshy or leathery; the flowers are generally large with a well-developed lip.
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  • He had soaked hemlock leaves in water and drank it, and thought that was better than water in warm weather.
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  • But now the kind October wind rises, rustling the leaves and rippling the surface of the water, so that no loon can be heard or seen, though his foes sweep the pond with spy-glasses, and make the woods resound with their discharges.
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  • The birches with their sticky green leaves were motionless, and lilac-colored flowers and the first blades of green grass were pushing up and lifting last year's leaves.
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  • Julie wants desperately to come back east but Howie wants to talk to Martha and learn the truth before he leaves.
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  • I represent my teacher as saying to me of the golden autumn leaves, "Yes, they are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer"--an idea direct from Miss Canby's story.
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  • Of course, he had not gone far when he noticed the brightness of the leaves, and he quickly guessed the cause when he saw the broken jars from which the treasure was still dropping.
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  • "The leaves are as lovely as the flowers!" cried they, in their delight.
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  • The bounty of New England's autumn surrounded them, and the sun reflected off the leaves as if it were playing with the tone, searching for the perfect combination of pigment.
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  • Elisabeth chuckled, "I swear, there is a breeze when she enters and leaves a room."
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  • That still leaves enough time to have an early dinner on Bourbon Street.
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  • Nearly all the leaves had fallen off the trees except for the huge scarlet oak in the back yard.
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  • A sudden gust of wind ruffled the leaves of the trees, creating a sound much like the surf.
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  • The oval leaves are dark-green above, and whitish with stellate hairs beneath, the margin entire and slightly recurved.
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  • Ilex, usually a smaller tree, frequently of rather shrub-like appearance, with abundant glossy dark-green leaves, generally ovate in shape and more or less prickly at the margin, but sometimes with the edges entire; the under surface is hoary; the acorns are oblong on short stalks.
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  • In America several oaks exist with narrow lanceolate leaves, from which characteristic they are known as "willow oaks."
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  • The very large acorns are remarkable for their thick cups with long reflexed scales; the leaves are large, oblong, with deep serratures terminating in a bristle-like point.
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  • The western boundary was settled by Anglo-German agreements of 1890 and 1899; it leaves the coast west of the town of Lome and proceeds in a zigzag line to where the Deine river joins the Volta; thence follows the Volta to its junction with the Daka and then the Daka up to the point where 9° N.
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  • The leaves when borne on an elongated stem are arranged alternately and have no stipules.
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  • Its general connexion with death is due no doubt to the greyish colour of its leaves and its yellowish flowers, which suggest the gloom of the underworld and the pallor of death.
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  • Like that of Natal the Transvaal coal burns with a clear flame and leaves little ash.
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  • the light enters the drop and is refracted; the refracted ray is then reflected at the opposite surface of the drop, and leaves the drop at the same side at which it enters, being again refracted.
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  • At B, where the ray leaves the drop, the deviation is the same as at A, viz.
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  • There was a smell of decaying leaves and of dog.
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  • 'I thought everybody had the same thought about the leaves, but I do not know now.
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  • Be sure that you give the poor the aid they most need, though it be your example which leaves them far behind.
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  • But commonly I kindled my fire with the dry leaves of the forest, which I had stored up in my shed before the snow came.
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  • As it flows it takes the forms of sappy leaves or vines, making heaps of pulpy sprays a foot or more in depth, and resembling, as you look down on them, the laciniated, lobed, and imbricated thalluses of some lichens; or you are reminded of coral, of leopard's paws or birds' feet, of brains or lungs or bowels, and excrements of all kinds.
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  • No wonder that the earth expresses itself outwardly in leaves, it so labors with the idea inwardly.
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  • Just for a whim of his own, goodness only knows why, he leaves me and locks me up alone in the country.
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  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
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  • Warmed by the spring sunshine he sat in the caleche looking at the new grass, the first leaves on the birches, and the first puffs of white spring clouds floating across the clear blue sky.
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  • Beneath the trees grew some kind of lush, wet, bushy vegetation with silver-lit leaves and stems here and there.
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  • Even at ten o'clock, when the Rostovs got out of their carriage at the chapel, the sultry air, the shouts of hawkers, the light and gay summer clothes of the crowd, the dusty leaves of the trees on the boulevard, the sounds of the band and the white trousers of a battalion marching to parade, the rattling of wheels on the cobblestones, and the brilliant, hot sunshine were all full of that summer languor, that content and discontent with the present, which is most strongly felt on a bright, hot day in town.
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  • They gathered the fallen leaves that dropped of themselves from that withered tree--the French army--and sometimes shook that tree itself.
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  • Denisov, the esaul, and Petya rode silently, following the peasant in the knitted cap who, stepping lightly with outturned toes and moving noiselessly in his bast shoes over the roots and wet leaves, silently led them to the edge of the forest.
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  • It kind of leaves you in trouble either way, doesn't it?
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  • It leaves us with two, plus Sector HQ.
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  • Presently they came to a low plant which had broad, spreading leaves, in the center of which grew a single fruit about as large as a peach.
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  • Then looking more closely at the trees around, they saw that the treasure was all melting away, and that much of it was already spread over the leaves of the oak trees and maples, which were shining with their gorgeous dress of gold and bronze, crimson and emerald.
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  • More and more of your everyday life leaves such an echo.
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  • When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures--solitude, books and imagination--outside with the whispering pines.
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  • Clothes, saddles, reins, were all wet, slippery, and sodden, like the ground and the fallen leaves that strewed the road.
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  • There, too, after a fit of temper, I went to find comfort and to hide my hot face in the cool leaves and grass.
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  • Which leaves you here.
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  • Watch the kid, and make sure nothing-- and I mean nothing-- leaves that place alive!
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  • "He leaves tomorrow," Tim said before Brady could speak.
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  • I can't wait until he leaves.
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  • She rearranged the fuel and added some pine needles and leaves.
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  • Finally, he broke through the thatch of branches and leaves blocking most of the sun.  The day was darkening.  In the distance, he saw the massive fortress that was Death's, and he saw the Lake of Souls he'd seen in angel memories.  He saw birds but couldn't see through the jungle to where Katie might be.  The branch holding him swayed in a heavy wind that smelled of rain.
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  • Kiki gave him a fiery look but moved to the nearest tree.  Kris watched him scale the large tree and disappear beyond the canopy of leaves.
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  • Trees arched over the road, forming a canopy of leaves.
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  • The rain had refreshed the vegetation and the trunks of the trees were dark against the bright green leaves.
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  • The gigantic Victoria regia, with leaves 6 to 7 ft.
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  • The minute insects included in it, which haunt blossoms and leaves, are fairly well known to gardeners by the name Thrips, a generic term used by Linnaeus for the four species of the group which he had examined and relegated to the order Hemiptera.
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  • Thysanoptera are found on the leaves and in the blossoms of plants.
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  • They shelter in crevices of the bark of trees, in the dried stems of herbaceous plants, or among moss and fallen leaves on the ground.
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  • From certain indications in the latter and the evidence of some odd leaves discovered by David Laing, it has been concluded that there was an earlier Edinburgh edition, which has been ascribed to Thomas Davidson, printer, and dated c. 1540.
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  • In France mushroom-growers do not use the compact blocks or bricks of spawn so familiar in England, but much smaller flakes or "leaves" of dry dung in which the spawn or mycelium can be seen to exist.
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  • With this or a mixture of horse-dung, loam, old mushroom-bed dung, and half-decayed leaves, the beds are built up in successive layers of about 3 in.
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  • with broad, more or less oblong-ovate, olive-green, floating leaves.
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  • alternate or opposite leaves, often with membranous united stipules.
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  • at its upper end, where it takes the shape of a crescent, one arm of which runs towards Glen Orchy, the other to the point where the river Awe leaves the lake.
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  • The first consists of cutting up the various fabrics and materials employed into shapes suitable for forming the leaves, petals, &c.; this may be done by scissors, but more often stamps are employed which will cut through a dozen or more thicknesses at one blow.
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  • The veins of the leaves are next impressed by means of a die, and the petals are given their natural rounded forms by goffering irons of various shapes.
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  • Among Servian cities, Nish is only surpassed by Belgrade in commercial and strategic importance; for it lies at the point where several of the chief Balkan highroads converge, and where the branch railway to Salonica leaves the main line between Belgrade and Constantinople.
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  • in length, thickly crowded with forking branches and opposite leaves, which are about 2 in.
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  • B, C, D, E, enlarged.) branched rootstock from which spring slender aerial shoots which are green, ribbed, and bear at each node a whorl of leaves reduced to a toothed sheath.
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  • This usage, coupled with the existence of a distinct term in Gaelic for the wild species, leaves little doubt that the word "cat" properly denotes only the domesticated species.
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  • They are magnificent evergreen trees, with apparently whorled branches, and stiff, flattened, pointed leaves, found in Brazil and Chile, Polynesia and Australia.
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  • Before he leaves the jack to play, he must observe the situation of the bowls of both sides.
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  • They are herbaceous perennials, generally with hairy serrated leaves and handsome flowers.
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  • They are propagated by cuttings, or from the leaves, which are cut off and pricked in welldrained pots of sandy soil, or by the scales from the underground tubes, which are rubbed off and sown like seeds, or by the seeds, which are very small.
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  • The conqueror visits a cannibal kingdom and finds many marvels in the palace of Porus, among them a vine with golden branches, emerald leaves and fruit of other precious stones.
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  • The sumach is largely grown in the Mirdite district; its leaves are exported to Trieste for use in tanneries and dyeworks.
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  • high, bearing two peltate, deeplydivided leaves, which are about 5 in.
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  • It then turns south-west, and, after receiving the Noce (right) and the Avisio (left), leaves Tirol, and enters Lombardy, 13 m.
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  • It is decomposed by water, and with a solution of yellow phosphorus in carbon bisulphide it gives a red powder of composition PBI 2, which sublimes in vacuo at 210° C. to red crystals, and when heated in a current of hydrogen loses its iodine and leaves a residue of boron phosphide PB.
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  • As regards winter temperature Bourke leaves little to be desired.
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  • The eucalypts are remarkable for the oil secreted in their leaves, and the large quantity of astringent resin of their bark.
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  • The tree breaks into thin stems close to the ground, and these branch again and again, the leaves being developed umbrellafashion on the outer branches.
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  • Hardly a leaf is visible to the height of one's head; but above, a crown of thick leather-like leaves shuts out the sunlight.
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  • The order is easily distinguished by the hard, dry, woody texture of the leaves and the dehiscent fruits.
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  • It is seen as a clump of wire-like leaves, a few feet in diameter, surrounding a stem, hardly thicker than a walking-stick, rising to a height of Jo or 12 ft.
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  • With these might be associated the gigantic lily of Queensland (Nymphaea gigantea), the leaves of which float on water, and are quite 18 in.
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  • The alternate leaves are more or less deeply sinuated or cut in many species, but in some of the deciduous and many of the evergreen kinds are nearly or quite entire on the margin.
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  • Robur, one of the most valued of the genus, and the most celebrated in history and myth, may be taken as a type of the oaks with sinuated leaves.
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  • pedunculata, has the acorns, generally two or more together, on long stalks, and the leaves nearly sessile; while in the other, Q.
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  • sessiliflora, the fruit is without or with a very short peduncle, and the leaves are furnished with well-developed petioles.
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  • The catkins appear soon after the young leaves, usually in England towards the end of May; the acorns, oblong in form, are in shallow cups with short, scarcely projecting scales; the fruit is shed the first autumn, often before the foliage changes.
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  • The leaves are large, often irregular in form, usually with a few deep lobes dilated at the end; they are of a bright light green on the upper surface, but whitish beneath; they turn to a violet tint in autumn.
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  • obtusiloba, the post oak of the backwoodsman, a smaller tree with rough leaves and notched upper lobes, produces an abundance of acorns and good timber, said to be more durable than that of the white oak.
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  • macrocarpa, is remarkable for its large acorns, the cups bordered on the edge by a fringe of long narrow scales; the leaves are very large, sometimes from Io in.
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  • lyrata, is a large tree, chiefly found on swampy land in the southern states; the lyrate leaves are dilated at the end; the globose acorns are nearly covered by the tuberculated cups.
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  • rubra, has thin large leaves on long petioles, the lobes very long and acute, the points almost bristly; they are pink when they first expand in spring, but become of a bright glossy green when full-grown; in autumn they change to the deep purplered which gives the tree its name.
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  • coccinea, often confounded with the red oak, but with larger leaves, with long lobes ending in several acute points; they change to a brilliant scarlet with the first October frosts, giving one of the most striking of the various glowing tints that render the American forests so beautiful in autumn.
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  • The leaves are frequently irregular in outline, the lobes rather short and blunt, widening towards the end, but with setaceous points; the acorns are nearly globular.
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  • The chestnut oaks of America represent a section distinguished by the merely serrated leaves, with parallel veins running to the end of the serratures.
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  • Evergreen oaks with entire leaves are represented in North America by Q.
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  • The distortion of the spring determines the actual force which the wind is exerting on the plate, and this is either read off on a suitable gauge, or leaves a record in the ordinary way by means of a pen writing on a sheet of paper moved by clockwork.
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  • By continuing this process every unit of mass which enters B will carry with it more energy than each unit which leaves B, and hence the temperature of the gas in B will be raised and that of the gas in A lowered, while no heat is lost and no energy expended; so that by the application of intelligence alone a portion of gas of uniform pressure and temperature may be sifted into two parts, in which both the temperature and the pressure are different, and from which, therefore, work can be obtained at the expense of heat.
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  • In the latter case the overturning tendency begins as soon as the load leaves the ground, but ceases as soon as the load again touches the ground and thus relieves the crane of the extra weight, whereas overturning backwards is caused either by the reaction of a chain breaking or by excessive counterweight.
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  • This involves the introduction of machinery for measuring and controlling the speed at which it leaves the ship and for measuring the pull on the cable.
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  • PITCHER PLANTS, in botany, the name given to plants in which the leaves bear pitcher-like structures or are pitcher-like in form.
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  • - Leaves of Sarracenia purpurea.
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  • There are about seven species, herbs with clusters of radical leaves some or all of which are more or less trumpetor pitcher-shaped.
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  • - Cephalotus follicularis, showing ordinary leaves and pitchers, the right hand one cut open to show internal structure.
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  • Cephalotus follicularis, a native of south-west Australia, a small herbaceous plant, bears ordinary leaves close to the ground as well as pitchers.
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  • The food of the camel consists chiefly of the leaves of trees, shrubs and dry hard vegetables, which it is enabled to tear down and masticate by means of its powerful front teeth.
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  • Others swim with eel-like curves through the water, while one land-leech, at any rate, moves in a gliding way like a land Planarian, and leaves, also like the Planarian, a slimy trail behind it.
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  • In artistic representations, Brahma usually appears as a bearded man of red colour with four heads crowned with a pointed, tiara-like head-dress, and four hands holding his sceptre, or a sacrificial spoon, a bundle of leaves representing the Veda, a bottle of water of the Ganges, and a string of beads or his bow Parivita.
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  • Now for a short time the document leaves the great questions at issue between the king and the barons, and two chapters are devoted to protecting the people generally against the exactions of the Jews.
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  • The whole world is represented by the figure of a tree, of which the seeds and roots are the first indeterminate matter, the leaves the accidents, the twigs and branches corruptible creatures, the blossoms the rational soul, and the fruit pure spirits or angels.
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  • Thus he suggests that man has not eyes of a microscopic delicacy, because he would receive no great advantage from such acute organs, since though adding indefinitely to his speculative knowledge of the physical world they would 1 Yet he leaves open the question whether the Deity has annexed thought to matter as a faculty, or whether it rests on a distinct spiritual principle.
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  • It constructs large ball-like nests of dried leaves, lodged in a fork of the branches of a large tree, and with the opening on one side.
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  • Fragments of wood not infrequently occur, with the tissues well-preserved by impregnation with the resin; while leaves, flowers and fruits are occasionally found in marvellous perfection.
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  • The leaves are broader than in most willows, and are generally either deltoid or ovate in shape, often cordate at the base, and frequently with slender petioles vertically flattened.
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  • As in all poplars, the catkins expand in early spring, long before the leaves unfold; the ovaries bear four linear stigma lobes; the capsules ripen in May.
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  • in diameter, and with the shoots or young branches more or less angular; the glossy deltoid leaves are sharply pointed, somewhat cordate at the base, and with flattened petioles; the fertile catkins ripen about the middle of June, when their opening capsules discharge the cottony seeds which have given the tree its common western name; in New England it is sometimes called the "river poplar."
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  • In this well-known variety the young shoots are but slightly angled, and the branches in the second year become round; the deltoid short-pointed leaves are usually straight or even rounded at the base, but sometimes are slightly cordate; the capsules ripen in Britain about the middle of May.
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  • The true balsam poplar, or tacamahac, P. balsamifera, abundant in most parts of Canada and the northern States, is a tree of rather large growth, often of somewhat fastigiate habit, with round shoots and oblong-ovate sharp-pointed leaves, the base never cordate, the petioles round, and the disk deep glossy green above but somewhat downy below.
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  • This balsam gives the tree a fragrant odour when the leaves are unfolding.
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  • Its fragrant shoots and the fine yellow green of the young leaves recommend it to the ornamental planter.
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  • is a large tree remarkable for the variability in the shape of its leaves, which are linear in young trees and vigorous shoots, and broad and ovate on older branches.
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  • It is a brown powder which on heating in air loses sulphur and leaves a residue of the disulphide.
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  • It is absurd to call the larva of a newt or of a Caecilian a tadpole, nor is the free-swimming embryo of a frog as it leaves the egg a tadpole.
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  • The Mosses and Liverworts include forms with a more or less leaf-like thallus, such as many of the liverworts, and forms in which the plant shows a differentiation into a stem bearing remarkably simple leaves, as in the true mosses.
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  • The spores, as in the heterosporous Pteridophyta, are of two kindsmicrospores (pollen grains) borne in microsporangia (pollen sacs) on special leaves (sporophylls) known as stamens, and macrospores (embryo-sac) borne in macrosporangia (ovules) on sporophylls known as carpels.
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  • The fertile leaves or sporophylls are generally aggregated on special shoots to form rioweN which may contain one or both kinds The microspores are set free from the sporangiurn and carried generally by wind or insect agency to the vicinity of the macrospore, which never leaves the ovule.
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  • The leaves are generally tough-skinned and last for more than one season.
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  • In the Bryophytes water is still absorbed, not only from the soil but also largely from rain, dew, &c., through the general surface of the subaerial body (thallus), or in the more differentiated forms through the leaves.
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  • Opposed to the thalloid forms are the group of leafy Liverworts (Acrogynae), whose plant-body consists of a thin supporting stem bearing leaves.
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  • The hydrom strand has in most cases no connection with the leaves, but runs straight up the stem and spreads out below the sexual organs or the foot of the sporogonium.
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  • The leaves of most mosses are flat plates, each consisting of a single layer of square or oblong assimilating (chlorophyllous) cells.
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  • In the more highly developed series, the mosses, this last division of labor takes the form of the differentiation of special assimilative organs, the leaves, commonly with a midrib containing elongated cells for the ready removal of the products of assimilation; and in the typical forms with a localized absorptive region, a well-developed hydrom in the axis of the plant, as well as similar hydrom strands in the leaf-midribs, are constantly met with.
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  • In higher forms the conducting strands of the leaves are continued downwards into the stem, and eventually come into connection with the central hydrom cylinder, forming a complete cylindrical investment apparently distinct from the latter, and exhibiting a differentiation into hydrom, leptom and amylom which almost completely parallels that found among the true vascular plants.
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  • The leaves, again, have special histological features adapted to the performance of their special functions.
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  • In a second type they are situated at the ends of tracheal strands and consist of groups of richly protoplasmic cells belonging to the epidermis (as in the leaves of many ferns), or to the subjacent tissue (the commonest type in flowering plants); in this last case the cells in question are known as epithem.
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  • In the leafy shoot this function is mainly localized in the cortical tissue of the leaves, known as mesophyll, Mesophyli.
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  • while those which are cylindrical or of similar shape (centric leaves) have it all round.
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  • The leaves of shade plants have little or no differentiation of palisade tissue.
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  • In fleshy leaves which contain a great bulk of tissue in relation to their chlorophyll content, the central mesophyll contains little or no chlorophyll and acts as waterstorage tissue.
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  • Scattered single stereids or bundles of fibres are no imnrornmnn in the rnrtev of the root The innermost layer of the cortex, abutting on the central cylinder of the stem or on the bundles of the leaves, is called the jthloeoterma, and is often differentiated.
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  • The vascular supply of the leaf (leaf-trace) consists of a single strand only in the haplostelic and some of the more primitive siphonostelic forms. In the microphyllous groups Leaf.trace of Pteridophytes (Lycopodiales and Equisetales) in and Petlolar which the leaves are small relatively to the stem, the Strands, single bundle destined for each leaf is a small strand whose departure causes no disturbance in the cauline stele.
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  • In the megaphyllous forms, on the other hand, (Ferns) whose leaves are large relatively to the stem, the departure of the correspondingly large trace causes a gap (leaf-gap) in the vascular cylinder, as already described.
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  • The remaining bundles (compensation bundles) which go to make up the cylinder are such as have branched off from the leaf-traces, and will, after joining with others similarly given off, themselves form the traces of leaves situated at a higher level on the stem.
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  • The median bundles of the trace are typically the largest, and at any given level of the stem the bundles destined for the next leaf above are as a whole larger than the others which are destined to supply higher leaves.
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  • The monocotyledons, one of the primary divisions of angiosperms, typically possess large Monocoty- leaves with broad Iedonous sheathing bases containType.
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  • This i correlated with the comparatively late formation and small development of the first leaves.
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  • In the seed-forming plants (Phanerogams) one or more primary leaves (cotyledons) are already formed in the resting embryo.
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  • When the leaves are developed early, they often quite overshadow thi actual apex of the stem, and the rapid formation of leaf-tissui disturbs the obviousness of, and perhaps actually destroys, th~ stratified arrangement of the shoot initials.
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  • The abundance of waterconducting channels is in relation to the need for a large and rapid supply of water to the unfolding leaves in the spring and early summer.
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  • We have the formation of numerous mechanisms which have arisen in connection with the question of food supply, which may not only involve particular cells, but also lead to differentiation in the protoplasm of those cells, as in the development of the chloroplastids of the leaves and other green parts.
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  • We see herein the reason for the great subdivision of the body, with its finely cut twigs and their ultimate expansions, the leaves, and we recognize that this subdivision is only an expression of the need to place the living substance in direct relationship with the environment.
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  • The increasing development of the wood as the tree grows older is largely due to the demands for the conduction of water and mineral matters dissolved in it, which are made by the increased number of leaves which from year to year it bears, and which must each be put into communication with the central mass by the formation of new vascular bundles.
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  • This system of channels is in communication with the outer atmosphere through numerous small apertures, known as stomata, which are abundant upon the leaves and young twigs, and gaseous interchange between the plant and the air is by their assistance rendered constant and safe.
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  • This pressure leads to the filling of the vessels of the wood of both root and stem in the early part of the year, before the leaves have expanded, and gives rise to the exudation of fluid known as bleeding when young stems are cut in early spring.
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  • They have shown that columns of water of very small diameter can so resist tensile strain that they can be lifted bodily instead of flowing along the channel, They suggest that the forces causing the movement are complex, and draw particular attention to the pull upwards in consequence of disturbances in the leaves.
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  • These bodies, known technically as chioroplaIts, are found embedded in the protoplasm of the cells of the mesophyll of foliage leaves, of certain of the cells of some of the leaves of the flower, and of the cortex of the young twigs and petioles.
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  • The formation of formaldehyde has till recently not been satisfactorily proved, though it has been obtained from certain leaves by distillation.
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  • Bonnier has drawn attention to the fact that the mistletoe in its turn, remaining green in the winter, contributes food material to its host when the latter has lost its leaves.
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  • Even the oldest trees put out continually new leaves and twigs.
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  • This is not perhaps so evident in the case of axial organs as it is in that of leaves and their modifications, but even in them it can be detected to a certain extent.
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  • The stem, by pointing directly to the light source, secures the best illumination possible for all of its leaves, the latter being distributed symmetrically around it.
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  • Leaves respond in another way to the same influence, placing themselves across the path of the beam of light.
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  • The extent to which the disturbance spreads depends on the violence of the stimulationit may be confined to a few leaflets or it may extend to all the leaves of the plant.
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  • A peculiar sensitiveness is manifested by the leaves of the socalled insectivorous plants.
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  • Droscra, another of this insectivorous group, has leaves which are furnished with long glandular tentacles.
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  • The yellowing and subsequent casting of leaves, for instance, is a very general symptom of disease in plants, and may be induced by drought, extremes of temperature, insufficient or excessive illumination, excess of water at the roots, the action of parasitic Fungi, insects, worms, &c., or of poisonous gases, and so forth; and extreme caution is necessary in.
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  • Many aphides, &c., puncture the leaves, suck out the sap, and induce va:ious local deformations, arrest of growth, pustular swellings, &c., and if numerous all the evils of defoliation may follow.
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  • They may occur on all parts, buds, leaves, stems or roots, as shown by the numerous species of Cynips on oak, Phylloxera on vines, &c. The local damage is small, - but the general injury to assimilation, absorption and other functions, may be important if the numbers increase.
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  • Schinzia, which forms galllike swellings on the roots of rushes; Gymnosporangium, causing excrescences on juniper stems; numerous leaf Fungi such as Puccinia, Aecidium, Sep/one, &c., causing yellow, brown or black spots on leaves; or Ustilago in the anthers of certain flowers.
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  • Some very curious details are observable in these cases of malformation, For instance, the Aecidium eta/mum first referred to causes the new shoots to differ in direction, duration and arrangement, and even shape of foliage leaves from the normal; and the shoots of Euphorbia infected with the aecidia of Uromyces Pisi depart so much from the normal in appearance that the attacked plants have been taken for a different species.
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  • They are concerned in the orrliision of broken twies and of falline leaves.
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  • The poison must not be strong enough to injure the roots, leaves, &c., of the host-plant, or allowed to act long enough to bring about such injury.
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  • the application of ordinary antiseptic powders to leaves inside which a Fungus, such as a Uredo or Ustilago, is growing can only result in failtire, and similarly if tobacco fumes, for instance, are applied when the insects concerned are hibernating in the ground beneath.
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  • Such applications at the momelit when spores are germinating on the leaves, e.g.
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  • It may be due to insufficient illumination (Etiolation), as seen in geraniums kept in too shaded a situation, and is then accompanied by soft tissues, elongation of internodes, leaves usually reduced in size, &c. The laying of wheat is a particular case.
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  • Spotted Leaves, &c.Discoloured spots or patches on leaves and other herbaceous parts are common symptoms of disease, and often furnish clues to identification of causes, though it must be remembered that no sharp line divides this class of symptoms from the preceding.
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  • Brilliantly colored spots and patches follow the action of acid fumes on the vegetation near towns and factories, and such particoloured leaves often present striking resemblance to autumn foliage.
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  • Erosions 01 leaves and herbaceous parts by caterpillars, slugs, earwmgs and sc forth.
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  • Fungus-galls on leaves and stems are exemplified by the pocket-plums caused by the Exoasceae, the black blistering swellings of Ustilago Maydis, the yellow swellings on nettles due to Aecidium, &c.
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  • In many cases the swellings on leaves are minute, and may be termed puslulese.g.
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  • Honey-dew.----The sticky condition of leaves of treese.g.
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  • But it also appears that honeydew may be excreted by ordinary processes of over-turgescence pressing the liquid through water-pores, as in the tropical Caesalpinia, Calliandra, &c. That these exudations on leaves should afterwards serve as pabulum for Fungie.g.
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  • Fumago, Antennaria is not surprising, and the leaves of limes are often black with them.
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  • double flowers, phyllody of floral parts, contortions and fascinations, dwarfing, malformed leaves, &c.can not only be transmitted in cultivation, but occur ii.
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  • Under the head of malformations we place cases of atrophy of parts or general dwarfing, due to starvation, the attacks of Fungi or minute insects, the presence of unsuitable food-materials and so on, as well as cases of transformation of stamens into petals, carpels into leaves, and so forth.
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  • For instance, the difference between the long-stalked and finely-cut leaves of Anemone attacked with rust and the normal leaves with broad segments, or between the urceolate leaves occasionally found on cabbages and the ordinary formin these cases undoubtedly pathological and teratological respectivelyis nothing like so great as between the upper and lower normalleaves of many Umhelliferae or the submerged and floating leaves of an aquatic Ranunculus or Cabomba.
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  • For example, the difference between aquatic ants with floating leaves, such as the yellow water-lily (Nymphaea l~
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  • tea) and those with erect leaves, such as Typlia angustifolia, is bi obably more apparent than real.
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  • Sclerophyllous leaves are ually characterized by entire or sub-entire margins, a thick cuticle, riall but rarely sunken stomata, a we1l-developed and close-set ilisade tissue and a feeble system of air-spaces.
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  • Hydro-xerophytes (bog xerophytes) .Plants which live in ~t, peaty soils, and which possess aeration channels and xeroiilous leaves; e.g., Cladium Mariscus, Eriophorum angustifohium, if bus Chamaemorus, and Vaccinium Vitis-Idaea.
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  • Aquatic plants with submerged and floating leaves: Glyceria fluitans, Ranunculus peltatus, Nymphaea (Nuphar) - lutea, Callitriche stagnalis, Potamogeton polygonifolius.
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  • Aquatic plants with submerged leaves and erect leaves or stems:
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  • Submerged leaves are usually filamentous or narrowly ribbonshaped, thus exposing a large amount of surface to the water, some of the dissolved gases of which they must absorb, and into which they must also excrete certain gases.
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  • Switch plants, such as Retama Retam and broom (Cytisus scoparius), have reduced leaves and some assimilating tissue in their stems; and stomata occur in grooves on the stem.
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  • The ordinary leaves may be small, absent, or spinous.
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  • In cushion plants the leaves are very small, very close together, and the low habit is protective against winds.
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  • A cushion plant (Anabasis aretioides) of the north-western Sahara, frequently shows dead leaves on the exposed side whilst the plant is in full vigour on the sheltered side.
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  • the stomata are frequently in grooves: the leaves are frequently rolledsometimes permanently so, whilst sometimes the leaves roll up only during unfavourable weather.
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  • In species of Eucalyptus, the leaves are placed edge-wise to the incident rays of light and heat.
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  • The coriaceous leaves of sclerophyllous plants also, to some extent, are similarly protective.
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  • In such leaves, there are a well-marked cuticle, a thick epidermis, a thick hypodermis at least on the upper side of the leaf, well-developed palisade tissue, and a poorly developed system of air-spaces.
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  • their leaves and, to some extent, their stems have much water-storing tissue and few intercellular spaces.
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  • Lesagef has shown that the height of certain plants is decreased by cultivation in a saline soil, and that the leaves of iLesage, Recherches exphrimentales sur les modifications de, feuilles chez les plantes maritimes, in Rev. gen.
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  • Their stomata are frequently not limited to the underside of the leaves, but may occur scattered all over the epidermal surface.
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  • These occur on the tips of tendrils and on the tentacles of Drosera; (2) sensitive papillae found on the irritable filaments of certain stamens; and (3) sensitive hairs or bristles on the leaves of Dionaea muscipula and Mimosa pudicaall of which are so constructed that any pressure exerted on them at once reacts on the protoplasm.
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  • These tubes penetrate to all parts of the plant and occur in all parts of the root, stem and leaves.
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  • He observed that the appendicular organs, as he called the leaves, are developed in the same way, whether they be foliageleaves, or parts of the flower, and stated his conclusions thus:
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  • Consequently all parts of the plant, except the stem, are modified leaves.
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  • In a differentiated body the stem (caulome) is an axis capable of bearing leaves and (directly or indirectly) the proper reproductive organs.
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  • The root is an axis which never bears either leaves or the proper reproductive organs (whether sexual or asexual) of the plant.
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  • The leaves of the true mosses and those of the club-mosses (Lycopodium, Selaginella) being somewhat alike in general appearance and in ontogeny, might be, and indeed have been, regarded as homologous on that ground.
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  • However, they belong respectively to two different forms in the life-history of the plants; the leaves of the mosses are borne by the gametophyte, those of the club-mosses by the sporophyte.
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  • For instance, all the leaves of the Bryophyta are generally homologous inasmuch as they are all developments of the gametophyte.
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  • The phylogeny of the various floral leaves, for instance, was generally traced as follows: foliage-leaf, bract, sepal, petal, stamen and carpel (sporophylls)in accordance with what Goethe termed ascending metamorphosis.
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  • Accepting this view of the phylogeny of the leaf, the perianthleaves (sepals and petals) and the foliage-leaves may be regarded as modified or metamorphosed sporophylls; that is, as leaves which are adapted to functions other than the bearing of spores.
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  • He considered, for instance, that stems, leaves, roots and flowers differ as they do because the plastic substances entering into their structure are diverse.
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  • The extent of the origin of this muscle from the sternum, on which it leaves converging, parallel or diverging impressions, is of some taxonomic value.
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  • The last nerve which contributes to the ischiadic plexus leaves the spinal column in most birds either between the two primary sacral vertebrae, or just below the hindmost of them, and sends a branch to the pubic portion which is composed of post-ischiadic nerves, partly imbedded in the kidneys, and innervates the ventral muscles between the tail and pubis, together with those of the cloaca and copulatory organs.
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  • The blood leaves the heart past three semi-lunar valves, by the right aorta, this being alone functional, a feature characteristic of, and peculiar to, birds.
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  • The hoactzin, Opisthocomus, feeds to a great extent upon the leaves of the aroid Montrichardia or Caladium arborescens.
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  • The leaves are three or four in number, flat, lanceolate, erect and sheathing; and there is no stem.
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  • In the succeeding January or February it sends up its leaves, together with the ovary, which perfects its seeds during the summer.
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  • We see in them the thought of the ancient Church taking shape in the minds of her bishops and doctors; and in many cases they express the results of the great doctrinal controversies of their age in language which leaves little to be desired.6 Authorities.
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  • Amaryllidaceae) of bulbous plants with rather broad leaves and a solid leafless stem, bearing a cluster of handsome white or red funnel-shaped regular flowers.
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  • They are of small size and live entirely on the ground, making nests of dried leaves, grass and sticks in holiow places and forming burrows in which they pass a great part of the day.
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  • After running south-east through the grandest scenery, and closely approaching the source of the western Tigris, it turns south-west and leaves the mountains a few miles above Samsat (Samosata; altitude, 1500 ft.).
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  • Sarsar, the modern Abu-Ghurayb, leaves the Euphrates three leagues lower down and enters the Tigris between Bagdad and Ctesiphon.
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  • The Nahr Malk or royal river, modern Radhwaniya, leaves the Euphrates five leagues below this and joins the Tigris three leagues below Ctesiphon; while the Kutha, modern Habl-Ibrahim, leaving the Euphrates three leagues below the Malk joins the Tigris ten leagues below Ctesiphon.
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  • In germination of the seed the root of the embryo (radicle) grows out to get a holdfast for the plant; this is generally followed by the growth of the short stem immediately above the root, the so-called "hypocotyl," which carries up the cotyledons above the ground, where they spread to the light and become the first green leaves of the plant.
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  • BUCHU, or Buka Leaves, the produce of several shrubby plants belonging to the genus Barosma (nat.
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  • crenulata, has leaves of a smooth leathery texture, oblongovate in shape, from an inch to an inch and a half in length, with serrulate or crenulate margins, on which as well as on the under side are conspicuous oil-glands.
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  • serratifolia, having linear-lanceolate sharply serrulate leaves, and B.
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  • betulina, the leaves of which are cuneateobovate, with denticulate margins.
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  • Buchu leaves contain a volatile oil, which is of a dark yellow colour, and deposits a form of camphor on exposure to air, a liquid hydro-carbon being the solvent of the camphor within the oil-glands.
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  • The leaves of a closely allied plant, Empleurum serratulum, are employed as a substitute or adulterant for buchu.
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  • The vegetable-feeders attack leaves, herbaceous or woody stems and roots; frequently different parts of a plant are attacked in the two active stages of the life-history; the cockchafers, for example, eating leaves, and their grubs gnawing roots.
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  • Some climb trees and feed on leaves, while others tunnel between bark and wood.
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  • Among the vegetable-feeding chafers we usually find that while the perfect insect devours leaves, the larva lives underground and feeds on roots.
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  • 3) of some weevils live in seeds; others devour roots, while the parentbeetles eat leaves; others, again, are found in wood or under bark.
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  • The state of secondary education still leaves much to be desired..
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  • of Minsk, leaves Russia at Yurburg, and enters the Kurisches Haff; rafts are floated upon it almost from its.
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  • An engine coupled to a batch of wagons runs one or more of them down one siding, leaves them there, then returns back with the remainder clear of the points where the sidings diverge, runs one or more others down another siding, and so on till they are all disposed of.
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  • Just as the German reaper leaves the last ears of corn as an offering to Wodan, so the Australian black offers a portion of a find of honey; in New South Wales a pebble is said to have been offered or a number of spears, in Queensland the skin removed in forming the body-scars.
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  • The peat is different in character from that of northern Europe: cellular plants enter but little into its composition, and it is formed almost entirely of the roots and stems of Empetrum rubrum, a variety of the common crowberry of the Scottish hills with red berries, called by the Falklanders the " diddle-dee " berry; of Myrtus nummularia, a little creeping myrtle whose leaves are used by the shepherds as a substitute for tea; of Caltha appendiculata, a dwarf species of marsh-marigold; and of some sedges and sedge-like plants, such as Astelia pumila, Gaimardia australis and Bostkovia grandif ora.
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  • The trunk is usually flattened, and twisted as though composed of several stems united; the bark is smooth and light grey; and the leaves are in two rows, 2 to 3 in.
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  • The stipules of the leaves act as protecting scale-leaves in the winter-bud and fall when the bud opens in spring.
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  • The flowers appear with the leaves in April and May.
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  • "In the single row," says Evelyn (Sylva, p. 29, 1664), "it makes the noblest and the stateliest hedges for long Walks in Gardens or Parks, of any Tree whatsoever whose leaves are deciduous."
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  • In France the leaves serve as fodder.
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  • The leaves of the cypresses are scale-like, overlapping and generally in four rows; the female catkins are roundish, and fewer than the male; the cones consist of from six to ten peltate woody scales, which end in a curved point, and open when the seeds are ripe; the seeds are numerous and winged.
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  • The stout horizontally spreading branches give a cedar-like appearance; the foliage is light and feathery; the leaves and the slender shoots which bear them fall in the autumn.
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  • It has twenty-four columns of Carystian (cipollino) marble, with capitals probably of Byzantine work with swelling acanthus leaves; but the rest of the church is due to native architects.
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  • There are several species in Britain found on the ground or on decaying leaves.
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  • Worship is simpler at the smaller shrines than at the more famous temples; and, as the rulers are the patrons of the religion and are brought into contact with the religious personnel, the character of the social organization leaves its mark upon those who hold religious and judicial functions alike.
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  • The chief cultivated plants are maize, the sugar-cane, tobacco, cotton, coffee and especially henequen, the so-called "Sisal hemp," which is a strong, coarse fibre obtained from the leaves of the Agave rigida, var.
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  • I) piles up a heap of leaves, twigs and other vegetable refuse, so arranged as to form an orderly series of galleries, though the structure appears at first sight a chaotic heap. Species of Camponotus and many other ants tunnel in wood.
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  • In tropical countries ants sometimes make their nests in the hollow thorns of trees or on leaves; species with this habit are believed to make a return to the tree for the shelter that it affords by protecting it from the ravages of other insects, including their own leaf-cutting relations.
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  • Sharp to hold the maggots between their mandibles and induce them to spin together the leaves of trees from which they form their shelters, as the adult ants have no silk-producing organs.
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  • The tracks along which the ants carry the leaves to their nests are often in part subterranean.
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  • Within the nest, the leaves are cut into very minute fragments.
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  • The leaves are generally long and narrow.
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  • The order is well represented in Britain by 18 genera, which include several species of Orchis: Gymnadenia (fragrant orchis), Habenaria (butterfly and frog orchis), Aceras (man orchis), Hermin- ium (musk orchis), Ophrys (bee, spider and fly orchis), Epipactis (Helleborine), Cephalanthera, Neottia (bird's-nest orchis), one of the few saprophytic genera, which have no green leaves, but derive their nourishment from decaying organic matter in the soil, Listens (Tway blade), Spiranthes (lady's tresses), Malaxis (bog-orchis), Liparis (fen-orchis), Corallorhiza (coral root), also a saprophyte, and Cypripedium (lady's slipper), represented by a single species now very rare in limestone districts in the north of England.
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  • Zulfikar, where the boundary leaves the Hari Rud, is about 70 m.
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  • It leaves the Hindu Kush near the Dorah Pass at the head of one of the minor Chitral affluents, and passing south-west divides Kafiristan from Chitral and Bajour, separates the sections of the Mohmands who are within the respective spheres of Afghan and British sovereignty, and crosses the Peshawar-Kabul route at Lundi-Khana.
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  • the Burmese boundary leaves the Mekong to run westwards towards the Salween, and thereafter following the eastern watershed of the Salween basin it divides the Lower Burma provinces from Siam.
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  • In the dedication of the Enquiry, he says: "The ingenious author of that treatise upon the principles of Locke - who was no sceptic - hath built a system of scepticism which leaves no ground to believe any one thing rather than its contrary.
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  • Gymnosporangium sabinae, one of the rusts (Uredineae) passes one stage of its life-history on living pear leaves, forming large raised spots or patches which are at first yellow but soon become red and are visible on both faces; on the lower face of each patch is a group of cluster-cups or aecidia containing spores which escape when ripe.
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  • This stage in the life-history was formerly regarded as a distinct fungus with the name Roestelia cancellata; it is now known, however, that the spores germinate on young juniper leaves, in which they give rise to this other stage in the plant's history known as Gymnosporangium.
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  • As in .` the case of the apple disease it forms large irregular blackish blotches on the fruit and leaves, the injury being often very severe especially in a cool, damp season.
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  • the leaves.
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  • A number of larvae of Lepidoptera feed on the leaves - the remedy is to capture the mature insects when possible.
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  • The fact that the growth of a leguminous crop, such as red clover, leaves the soil in a higher condition for the subsequent growth of a grain crop - that, indeed, the growth of such a leguminous crop is to a great extent equivalent to the application of a nitrogenous manure for the cereal crop - was in effect known ages ago.
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  • The conclusion arrived at was that our agricultural plants do not themselves directly assimilate the free nitrogen of the air by their leaves.
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  • One species, the slugworm (Eriocampa liynacina), is common to Europe and America; the larva is a curious slug-like creature, found on the upper surface of the leaves of the pear and cherry, which secretes a slimy coating from its skin.
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  • Their food consists mainly of the sap obtained from the leaves and blossom of plants, but some also live on the roots of plants (Phylloxera vastatrix and Schizoneura lanigera).
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  • But after all the misinterpretation, the book as a whole leaves upon us an impression of peculiar strength and charm.
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  • The firs are distinguished from the pines and larches by having their needle-like leaves placed singly on the shoots, instead of growing in clusters from a sheath on a dwarf branch.
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  • In the spruce firs (Picea), the cones are pendent when mature and their scales persistent; the leaves are arranged all round the shoots, though the lower ones are sometimes directed laterally.
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  • In the genus Abies, the silver firs, the cones are erect, and their scales drop off when the seed ripens; the leaves spread in distinct rows on each side of the shoot.
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  • The slender, sharp, slightly curved leaves are scattered thickly around the shoots; the upper one pressed towards the stem, and the lower directed sideways, so as to give a somewhat flattened appearance to the individual sprays.
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  • This kind is sometimes seen in plantations, where it may be recognized by its shorter, darker leaves and longer cones.
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  • The leaves, which grow very thickly all round the stem, are short, nearly quadrangular, and of a dark greyishgreen.
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  • The short leaves are flat, those above pressed close to the stem, and the others forming two rows; they are of a rather light green tint above, whitish beneath.
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  • The yew-like leaves spread laterally, and are of a deep green tint; the cones are furnished with tridentate bracts that project far beyond the scales.
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  • The flat leaves are arranged in two regular, distinct rows; they are deep green above, but beneath have two broad white lines, which, as the foliage in large trees has a tendency to curl upwards, give it a silvery appearance from below.
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  • But this hypothesis leaves the elevation of the visceral mass and the exogastric coiling of the shell in the ancestral form unexplained.
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  • His character was as transparent as his life was blameless; there are few church fathers whose biography leaves so pure an impression on the reader.
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  • The baptismal register of Ajaccio leaves no doubt as to the date of his birth as given above.
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  • After enduring great hardships he goes through the course and leaves a son Connlaech behind in Scotland by another amazon, Aife.
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  • It may eat roots or refuse, while the imago lives on leaves and flowers.
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  • Their usual food consists of leaves and fruits.
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  • Leland said that it is easier to collect the leaves of the Sibyl than the titles of the works written by Roger Bacon; and though the labour has been somewhat lightened by the publications of Brewer and Charles, referred to below, it is no easy matter even now to form an accurate idea of his actual productions.
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  • It has important fisheries, and manufactures salt, pottery, roofing (made of nipa leaves), and nipa wine.
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  • 69-79) the distinctive 2 " The soil of this marsh [east of Palmyra] is so impregnated with salt that a trench or pit sunk in it becomes filled in a short time with concentrated brine, the water of which evaporates in the intense sunshine and leaves an incrustation of excellent salt."
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  • These webs, which are typically subcircular in form, consist of a system of threads radiating from a common centre and crossed at intervals, and approximately at right angles, by a series of concentric lines, the whole being suspended in a triangular, quadrangular or polygonal framework formed of so-called foundation lines, attached to the branches or leaves of trees or other firm objects in the neighbourhood.
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  • Species of other families (Lycosidae, Clubionidae) may live for a few seasons, hibernating in the soil or amongst dead leaves; and examples of the larger spiders (Aviculariidae) have been kept alive in captivity for several years.
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  • When concealment is no longer possible terrestrial species, like the Lycosidae, dart swiftly to the nearest shelter afforded by crevices in the soil, stones, fallen leaves or logs of wood, while those that live in bushes, like the Argyopidae, drop straight to the ground and lie hidden in the earth or in the fallen vegetation beneath.
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  • Some species of Dolomedes, indeed, habitually construct a raft by spinning dead leaves together and float over the water upon it watching for an opportunity to dash upon any insect that alights upon its surface.
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  • Jaghjagha) leaves the mountains by a narrow defile.
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  • Leaves 3 to 5 lobed, often large.
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  • Leaves 3 to 5, seldom lobed.
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  • Leaves 3 to 7 lobed.
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  • The careless gathering of dead leaves and twigs, and the soiling of the cotton by earth or by the natural colouring matter from the bolls, injure the quality.
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  • The cotton leaves the ginning machine in a very loose condition, and has to be compressed into bales for convenience of transport.
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  • They can be killed by spreading about cabbage leaves, &c., poisoned with Paris green.
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  • Young plants a few inches high are usually attacked; the leaves, beginning with the lower ones, turn yellow, and afterwards become brown and drop. The plants remain very dwarf and generally unhealthy, or die.
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  • The roots are prevented from fulfilling their function of taking up water and salts from the soil; the leaves accordingly droop, and the whole plant wilts and in bad attacks dies.
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  • There are manufactures of paper, hats, leather, ropes, porcelain, majolica, soap, spirits, and ornaments made of palm leaves and grasses.
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  • It is only the theistic view of God as personal power - that is as free-wild ever present and ever active in the world, which leaves room for miracles.
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  • They are bulbous plants, the slender stems of which support themselves by tendril-like prolongations of the tips of some of the narrow generally lanceolate leaves.
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  • The southern boundary of both basins is a low chain which leaves the Euphrates near the mouth of the Sajur tributary, and runs west towards Mt Amanus, to which it is linked by a sill whereon stood the ancient fortified palace of Samal (Sinjerli; see Hittites).
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  • The first, to be seen on the coast and the western slopes of the highlands, is characterized by a number of evergreen shrubs with small leathery leaves, and by quickly-flowering spring plants.
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  • The traffic with Arabia has ceased to be important, being limited to the time of the going and returning of the great pilgrimage to Mecca, which continues to have its musteringplace at Damascus, but leaves mainly by rail.
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  • It lives on the shores of lakes and rivers, swimming and diving with facility, feeding on the roots, stems and leaves of water-plants, or on fruits and vegetables which grow near the margin of the streams it inhabits.
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  • Being costly, it is much subject to adulteration; but the fraudulent additions may easily be detected by volatilization, which in the case of pure vermilion leaves no residue.
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  • formed in the urine of cows fed on mango leaves.
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  • If we wish to know what Wagner means, we must fight our way through his drama to his music; and we must not expect to find that each phrase in the mouth of the actor corresponds word for note with the music. That sort of correspondence Wagner leaves to his imitators; and his views on " Leit-motifhunting," as expressed in his prose writings and conversation, are contemptuously tolerant.
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  • The embryo thus passes from the body of the female into the alimentary canal of the host and leaves this with the faeces.
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  • This interpretation of the popular tales, according to which the career of the hero can be followed in its entirety and in detail in the movements in the heavens, in time, with the growing predominance of the astral-mythological system, overshadowed the other factors involved, and it is in this form, as an astral myth, that it passes through the ancient world and leaves its traces in the folk-tales and myths of Hebrews, Phoenicians, Syrians, Greeks and Romans throughout Asia Minor and even in India.
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  • 556) are found does not prove anything, since it leaves open the question of their being subordinate to the governor.
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  • In botany, the word is applied to leaves divided into two parts near the base.
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  • Again, on the map illustrating Livingstone's " Last Journals " the Luapula is shown as issuing from the Bangweulu in the north-west, when an examination of the account of the natives who carried the great explorer's remains to the coast would have shown that it leaves that lake on the south.
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  • Pissis (1: 250,000, 1870-1877), leaves much to be desired.
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  • The leaves, which - are generally alternate, are usually entire and narrow: the radical leaves in some genera, as Pulmonaria (lungwort) and Cynoglossum, differ in form from the stem-leaves, being generally broader and sometimes heart-shaped.
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  • It is silent when hunting, and has long ears shaped like vine leaves.
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  • Broadly speaking, the " smaller body" is characterized by a rigid adherence to old forms of dress and speech, to a disapproval of music and art, and to an insistence on the " Inward Light " which, at times, leaves but little room for the Scriptures or the historic Christ, although with no definite or intended repudiation of them.
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  • It is a vivid green and has large, fleshy, heart-shaped leaves.
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  • This mullah, Mahommed bin Abdullah by name, had made several pilgrimages to Mecca, where he had attached himself to a sect which enjoined strict observance of the tenets of Islam and placed an interdiction on the use of the leaves of the kat plant - much sought after by the coast Arabs and Somali for their stimulating and intoxicating properties.
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  • The leaves are opposite, simple as in honeysuckle, or compound as in elder; they have usually no stipules.
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  • Rigid leathery leaves are fixed by means of glue, or, if they present too smooth a surface, by stitching at their edges.
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  • It is convenient to place in a small envelope gummed to an upper corner of the sheet any flowers, seeds or leaves needed for dissection or microscopical examination, especially where from the fixation of the specimen it is impossible to examine the leaves for oilreceptacles and where seed is apt to escape from ripe capsules and be lost.
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  • When, as with some plants like Verbascum, the thick hard stems are liable to cause the leaves to wrinkle in drying by removing the pressure from them, small pieces of bibulous paper or cotton wool may be placed upon the leaves near their point of attachment to the stem.
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  • When the leaves are finely divided, as in Conium, much trouble will be experienced in lifting a half-dried specimen from one paper to another; but the plant may be placed in a sheet of thin blotting paper, and the sheet containing the plant, instead of the plant itself, can then be moved.
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  • The lieutenant governor (and then the secretary of state) succeeds to the office of governor if the governor is removed, dies or leaves the state.
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  • Every portion, from its roots to its leaves, serves some useful purpose.
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  • In recent years the growth of the leaf under cloth tents has greatly increased, as it has been abundantly proved that the product thus secured is much more valuable - lighter in colour and weight, finer in texture, with an increased proportion of wrapper leaves, and more uniform qualities, and with lesser amounts of cellulose, nicotine, gums and resins.
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  • The bridle road up the mountain leaves Glen Nevis at Achintee; it has a gradient nowhere exceeding 1 in 5, and the ascent is commonly effected in two to three hours.
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  • The regie did badly during the first four years of its existence, owing principally to two causes: (1) its ineffectual power to deal with contraband to which the system described above leaves the door wide open; (2) the admission of other than Turkish tobaccos into Egypt, which deprived it at once of about fTioo,000 per annum.
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  • This canal, the Sakhlawieh (formerly Isa), leaves the Euphrates a few miles above Feluja and the bridge of boats, near the ruins of the ancient Anbar.
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  • At such times a large part of the population leaves the city and encamps in the desert northward.
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  • Several of the bazaars are vaulted over with brickwork, but the greater number are merely covered with flat beams which support roofs of dried leaves or branches of trees and grass.
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  • Since the 13th century the snake, under Gothic influence, developed into a boldly designed tendril set with leaves, which usually encircled a figure or group of figures, and the knob dividing shaft and crook into an elegant chapel (6 and 7).
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  • They differ greatly from all other members of the family (Macropodidae), being chiefly arboreal in their habits, and feeding on bark, leaves and fruit.
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  • Still, the presence of dicotyledonous leaves, such as Magnolia alternans, in the Atanakerdluk strata, proves their close alliance with the Dakota series of the United States.
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  • It is limited to Disco Island, and perhaps to a small part of the Noursoak Peninsula, and the neighbouring country, and consists of numerous thin beds of sandstone, shale and coal - the sideritic shale containing immense quantities of leaves, stems, fruit, &c., as well as some insects, and the coal pieces of retinite.
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  • As to their present name, signifying in its present Russian spelling "self-eaters," many ingenious theories have been advanced, but that proposed by Schrenk, who derived the name "Samo-yedes" from "Syroyadtsy," or "raw-eaters," leaves much to be desired.
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  • In general terms the peach may be said to be a medium-sized tree, with lanceolate, stipulate leaves, borne on long, slender, relatively unbranched shoots, and with the flowers arranged singly, or in groups of two or more, at intervals along the shoots of the previous year's growth.
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  • If these be too luxuriant, they yield nothing but leaves; and if too weak, they are incapable of developing flower buds.
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  • If the leaves should happen to shade the fruit, not only during the ripening process but at any time after the stoning period, they should be gently turned aside, for, in order that the fruit may acquire good colour and flavour, it should be freely exposed to light and air when ripening; it will bear the direct rays of the sun, even if they should rise to loo°, but nectarines are much more liable to damage than peaches.
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  • He who leaves his land to enter another, leaves his god and is influenced by the religion of his new home (1 Sam.
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  • The tree has also been introduced along the Mediterranean shores of Europe; but as its fruit does not ripen so far north, the European plants are only used to supply leaves for the festival of Palm Sunday among Christians, and for the celebration of the Passover by Jews.
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  • The date palm is a beautiful tree, growing to a height of from 60 to 80 ft., and its stem, which is strongly marked with old leaf-scars, terminates in a crown of graceful shining pinnate leaves.
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  • The flowers spring in branching spadices from the axils of the leaves, and as the trees are unisexual it is necessary in cultivation to fertilize the female flowers by artificial means.
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  • Its trunk furnishes timber for house-building and furniture; the leaves supply thatch; their footstalks are used as fuel, and also yield a fibre from which cordage is spun.
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  • Often this felsitic devitrified glass is so fine-grained that its constituents cannot be directly determined even with the aid of the microscope, but chemical analysis leaves little doubt as to the real nature cf the minerals which have been formed.
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  • In the case we have chosen, the solution becomes stronger near the anode, or electrode at which the current enters, and weaker near the cathode, or electrode at which it leaves the solution.
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  • Latex, though chiefly secreted in vessels or small sacs which reside in the cortical tissue between the outer bark and the wood is also found in the leaves and sometimes in the roots or bulbs.
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  • high, with a rounded head of foliage, and greyish-green 3 to 7-lobed palmate leaves, somewhat resembling the leaves of the castor-oil plant in shape and size.
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  • After brushing away the loose stones and dirt from the root of the tree by means of a handful of twigs, the collector lays down large leaves for the latex to drop upon.
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  • or more in diameter, and large hairy oblong lanceolate leaves often 18 in.
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  • In Nicaragua the latex is collected in April, when the old leaves begin to fall and the new ones are appearing, during which time the latex is richest.
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  • The bright green, glabrous leaves are broad and oblong, about 6 in.
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  • This is then poured into the hollowed-out trunk of a tree, where it is allowed to stand covered with palm leaves for about a fortnight.
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  • The Funtumia latex can also be coagulated by the astringent infusion of Bauhinia leaves or by exposing it in shallow dishes, when the liquid " creams."
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  • It is about the size of an ordinary apple tree, with small leaves like the willow, and a drooping habit like a weeping birch, and has an edible fruit like a yellow plum called " mangaba," for which, rather than for the rubber, the tree is cultivated in some districts.
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  • Others are biennials producing a number of leaves on a very short stem in the first year, and in the second sending up a flowering shoot at the expense of the nourishment stored in the thick tap-root during the previous season.
    0
    0
  • In germination the cotyledons come above ground and form the first green leaves of the plant.
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    0
  • Beecher's division of the Brachiopoda into four orders is based largely on the character of the aperture through which the stalk or pedicle leaves the shell.
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  • The days on which the Pithoigia and Chas were celebrated were both regarded as Corotpbses (nefasti) and µcapai ("defiled"), necessitating expiatory libations; on them the souls of the dead came up from the underworld and walked abroad; people chewed leaves of whitethorn and besmeared their doors with tar to protect themselves from evil.
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  • We will choose from the forms in such manner that the product of letters A is either a power of A i, or does not contain A i; this rule leaves us with A2B 1 B 2 and A 2 B,Bs; of these forms we will choose that one which in letters B is earliest in ascending dictionary order; this is A2B 1 B 21 and our earliest perpetuant is (22)a(21)b - (221)a(2)b, and thence the general form enumerated by the generating function Z7 is (1-z)(1 - z2)2 (2 A2+2) a (2�2 +1 1�1 +1) b - (2 A2+2 1)a (2 M2+1 1, ai)b ...
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  • and is divided into two parts by the Danube, which enters at its most westerly point, and leaves it at its eastern extremity, near Pressburg.
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    0
  • Of these the Pattinson process has become subordinate to the Parkes process, as it is more expensive and leaves more silver and impurities in the market lead.
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  • The proboscis, passing down this groove to the spur, becomes dusted with pollen; as it is drawn back, it presses up the lip-like valve of the stigma so that no pollen can enter the stigmatic chamber; but as it enters the next flower it leaves some pollen on the upper surface of the valve, and thus cross-fertilization is effected.
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  • sulphurea has shining deep green leaves and lemon-yellow flowers, deeper yellow in the centre, and with a pale-violet spur.
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  • pedata, the bird's-foot violet, with pedately divided leaves and usually bright blue flowers; V.
    0
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  • The application of an infusion of violet leaves was at one time believed to have the power of reducing the size of cancerous growths, but its use is now discredited.
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  • The horse-radish root, which belongs to the natural order Cruciferae, is much longer than that of the aconite, and it is not tapering; its colour is yellowish, and the top of the root has the remains of the leaves on it.
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  • When the magnetic induction flows through a piece of iron or other magnetizable substance placed near the magnet, a south pole is developed where the flux enters and a north pole where it leaves the substance.
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  • (25) Unless the path of the induction is entirely inside the metal, free magnetic poles are developed at those parts of the metal where induction enters and leaves, the polarity being south at the entry and north at the exit of the flux.
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  • The next four pairs of appendages (completing the mesosomatic series of six) consist, in both Scorpio and Limulus, of a base carrying each 130 to 150 blood-holding, leaf-like plates, lying on one another like the leaves of a book.
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  • The elongated axis which opens at the stigma in Scorpio and which can be cleared of soft, surrounding tissues and co agulated blood so as to present the appearance of a limb axis carrying the book-like leaves of the lung is not really, as it would seem to be at first sight, the limb axis.
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  • It affects many or nearly all the structures of the body, but leaves some, it may be only one, at a high level of elaboration and complexity.
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    0
  • In primitive forms the respiratory lamellae of the appendages of the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th, or of the 1st and 2nd mesosomatic somites are sunk beneath the surface of the body, and become adapted to breathe atmospheric oxygen, forming the leaves of the so-called lung-books.
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  • Tofieldia, an arctic and alpine genus of small herbs with a slender scape springing from a tuft of narrow ensiform leaves and bearing a raceme of small green flowers; Narthecium (bog-asphodel), herbs with a habit similar to Tofieldia, but with larger golden-yellow flowers; and Colchicum, a genus with about 30 species including b the meadow saffron or autumn crocus (C. autumnale).
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  • 3, 4: and persists after the flowers and leaves, bearing next season's plant as a lateral shoot in the axil of a scale-leaf at its base.
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    0
  • The plants generally have a rhizome bearing radical leaves, as in asphodel, rarely a stem with a tuft of leaves as in Aloe, very rarely a tuber (Eriospermum) or bulb (Bowiea).
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  • Asphodelus (asphodel) is a Mediterranean genus; Simethis, a slender herb with grassy radical leaves, is a native of west and southern Europe extending into south Ireland.
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  • Anthericum and Chlorophytum, herbs with radical often grass-like leaves and scapes bearing a more or less branched inflorescence of small generally white flowers, are widely spread in the tropics.
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  • A small group of Australian genera closely approach the order Juncaceae in having small crowded flowers with a scarious or membranous perianth; they include Xanthorrhoea (grass-tree or blackboy) and Kingia, arborescent plants with an erect woody stem crowned with a tuft of long stiff narrow leaves, from the centre of which rises a tall dense flower spike or a number of stalked flower-heads; this group has been included in Juncaceae, from which it is doubtfully distinguished only by the absence of the long twisted stigmas which characterize the true rushes.
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  • The plants generally have an erect stem with a crown of leaves which are often leathery; the anthers open introrsely and the fruit is a berry or capsule.
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  • s, s', s", Sheathing leaves.
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  • l', 1", Foliage leaves.
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  • of the Old World; it has a short creeping rhizome, from which springs a slender, herbaceous or woody, often very much branched, erect or climbing stem, the ultimate branches of which are flattened or needle-like leaf-like structures (cladodes), the true leaves being reduced to scales or, in the climbers, forming short, hard more or less recurved spines.
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  • terminating the short annual shoot which bears a whorl of four or more leaves below the flower; in this and in some species of the nearly allied genus Trillium (chiefly temperate North America) the flowers have a fetid smell, which together with the dark purple of the ovary and stigmas and frequently also of the stamens and petals, attracts carrion-loving flies, which alight on the stigma and then climb the anthers and become dusted with pollen; the pollen is then carried to the stigmas of another flower.
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  • Smilacoideae are climbing shrubs with broad net-veined leaves and small dioecious flowers in umbels springing from the leaf-axils; the fruit is a berry.
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    0
  • The plants have a short rhizome and narrow or lanceolate basal leaves; and they are characterized by the ovary being often half-inferior.
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  • The leaves of species of Sansevieria yield a valuable fibre.
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  • The tribe Smilacoideae, shrubby climbers with net-veined leaves and small unisexual flowers, bears much the same relationship to the order as a whole as does the order Dioscoreaceae, which have a similar habit, but flowers with am inferior ovary, to the Amaryllidaceae.
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  • the nine points and strawberry leaves of the English earl).
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  • The second group represents, first, the birth of Mithras; then the god nude, cutting fruit and leaves from a fig-tree in which is the bust of a deity, and before which one of the winds is blowing upon Mithras; the god discharging an arrow against a rock from which springs a fountain whose water a figure is kneeling to receive in his palms; the bull in a small boat, near which again occurs the figure of the animal under a roof about to be set on fire by two figures; the bull in flight, with Mithras in pursuit; Mithras bearing the bull on his shoulders; Helios kneeling before Mithras; Helios and Mithras clasping hands over an altar; Mithras with drawn bow on a running horse; Mithras and Helios banqueting; Mithras and Helios mounting the chariot of the latter and rising in full course over the ocean.
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  • Chilled by the wind, the new-born god went to a fig-tree, partook of its fruit, and clothed himself in its leaves.
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  • North of the Sao Francisco the watershed projecting from the plateau eastward toward Cape St Roque, known as the Serra da Borborema in Parahyba and Rio Grande do Norte where its direction becomes north-east, leaves a triangular section of the easterly slope in which the river courses are short and much broken by rapids.
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  • It lies in the north-east trade winds belt, but the mountain chain on its northern frontier robs these winds of their moisture and leaves the greater part of the Brazilian plateau rainless.
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  • The exports cover a wide range of agricultural, pastoral and natural productions, including coffee, rubber, sugar, cotton, cocoa, Brazil nuts, mate (Paraguay tea), hides, skins, fruits, gold, diamonds, manganese ore, cabinet woods and medicinal leaves, roots and resins.
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  • The dried leaves and smaller twigs of mate (Paraguayan tea-hlex paraguayensis) are exported to the southern Spanish American republics, where (as in Rio Grande do Sul) the beverage is exceedingly popular.
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  • The crude methods of preparing jerked beef were also modified to some extent by better equipped abattoirs and establishments for preparing beef extract, preserved meats, &c. There were also mills for crushing the dried mate leaves, cigar and 1 The " bran " exported is from imported wheat and cannot be considered a national product.
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  • Its vast scope leaves it still unique and valuable, where other editions of special works do not exist.
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  • The climate is cold, dry and healthy, despite the prevalence of the famous "Aleppo button," a swelling which appears either on the face or on the hands, and breaks into an ulcer which lasts a year and leaves a permanent scar.
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  • Its leaves are of a glossy dark green, its1 flower white and star-shaped, and its fruit resembles the plum.
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  • gauge railway (102 m.), which leaves the south coast line at Alexandra Junction (44 m.
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  • The famous Panama hats, fine qualities of which were at one time worth £20 to £30 each, are made from the leaves of the screw pine, Carludovica palmata.
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  • The capitals are remarkable, inasmuch as the necking immediately below the echinus is decorated with a band of leaves, the arrangement of which varies in different cases.
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  • leaves it at Orsova by another narrow defile, the Iron Gate.
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  • The most characteristic members of the order are twining plants with generally smooth heart-shaped leaves and large showy white or purple flowers, as, for instance, the greater bindweed of English hedges, Calystegia sepium, and many species of the genus Ipomaea, the largest of the order, including the "convolvulus major" of gardens, and morning glory.
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  • One of the commonest tropical weeds, Evolvulus alsinoides, has slender, long-trailing stems with small leaves and flowers.
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  • In hot dry districts such as Arabia and north-east tropical Africa, genera have been developed with a low, much-branched, dense, shrubby habit, with small hairy leaves and very small flowers.
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  • In either case (as also with a prism) the position of minimum deviation leaves the width of the beam unaltered, i.e.
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  • Such a conclusion would be in the face of the principle of energy, which teaches plainly that the retardation in question leaves the aggregate brightness unaltered.
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  • The greater part of its body is covered by a pattern of acanthus leaves, but on the shoulder is a frieze showing nomads breaking in wild mares, our chief authority for Scythian costume.
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  • during the latter they remain dormant beneath the ground in the form of a short thickened stem protected by the scaly remains of the bases of last season's leaves (known botanically as a.
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  • This uranate when ignited in a platinum crucible leaves a green oxide of the composition U308, i.e.
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  • The plants are hardy herbaceous perennials with narrow tufted radical leaves and an elongated stem bearing a handsome spike of white or yellow flowers.
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  • Bog-asphodel (Narthecium ossifragum), a member of the same family, is a small herb common in boggy places in Britain, with rigid narrow radical leaves and a stem bearing a raceme of small golden yellow flowers.
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