Lb sentence example

lb
  • 34 in., scaled 971 lb.
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  • As one is exhausted another is in full bearing, so that by a systematic arrangement a single proprietor will send to the surface from 300 lb to 3000 lb of mushrooms per day.
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  • Tobacco is grown throughout the state; in 1909 on 12,000 acres was grown a crop of 12,000,000 lb, valued at $1,663,200.
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  • In 1636 Descartes had resolved to publish some specimens of the fruits of his method, and some general observations on its 7 lb.
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  • " I had no intention," 5 he says in the Method, " of attempting to master all 2 lb.
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  • The mud brought down by it, calculated at 7150 lb an hour at Bagdad, is not deposited in marshes to form alluvium, as in the case of the Euphrates, but although in flood time the river becomes at places an inland sea, rendering navigation extremely difficult and uncertain, the bulk of the mud is deposited in banks, shoals and islands in the bed of the river, and is finally carried out into the Persian Gulf.
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  • The steam is passed through the valve and emerges at the pressure required generally from 3 lb upwards.
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  • In 1878, 65,000,000 sheep yielded 230,000,000 lb weight of wool, or an average per sheep of about 32 lb.
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  • In the season of 1899-1900 the wool exports weighed 420,000,000 lb, and averaged more than 5 lb per sheep. The extra weight of fleece was owing to the large importation of better breeds.
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  • Of the larger kangaroos, which attain a weight of 200 lb and more, eight species are named, only one of which is found in Western Australia.
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  • A very fine freshwater fish is the Murray cod, which sometimes weighs Too lb; and the golden perch, found in the same river, has rare beauty of colour.
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  • Among the sea fish, the schnapper is of great value as an article of food, and its weight comes up to 50 lb.
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  • Victoria produced already more wool than New South Wales,the aggregate produce of Australia in 1852 being 45,000,000 lb; and South Australia, between 1842 and this date, had opened most valuable mines of copper.
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  • The total catch in 1895 was 208,139 lb, valued at $7160, and in 1902 was 528,682 lb, valued at $37,669.
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  • The wall-eyed pike taken in 1902 were valued at $16,915 (210,936 lb); white fish, $5777 (80,191 lb); pickerel, $4144 (51,711 lb); yellow perch, $ 2 575 (43,9 1 7 lb); sturgeon, $20 5 1 (1 5,59 0 lb), and suckers, $ 18 54 (37,375 lb); other varieties taken in smaller quantities included smelt, sun-fish and eels.
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  • Its weight varies from 48 to about 55lb the cubic foot, but in very hard slowly-grown trunks sometimes approaches 60 lb.
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  • The wood is very heavy and hard, weighing 70 lb the cubic foot; the colour is dark brown; it is used in Spain and Italy for furniture, and in the former country for firewood and charcoal.
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  • Cotton growing under European direction began about 1900, with the result that in 1901-1902 over 100,000 lb of cotton grown from native, American and Egyptian seed were shipped to Bremen.
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  • If we raise i lb of matter through a foot we do a certain amount of work against the earth's attraction; if we raise 2 lb through the same height we do twice this amount of work, and so on.
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  • Also, the work done in raising i lb through 2 ft.
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  • Rumford then turned up a hollow cylinder which was cast in one piece with a brass six-pounder, and having reduced the connexion between the cylinder and cannon to a narrow neck of metal, he caused a blunt borer to press against the hollow of the cylinder with a force equal to the weight of about ro,000 lb, while the casting was made to rotate in a lathe.
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  • In order to be sure that the heat was not due to the action of the air upon the newly exposed metallic surface, the cylinder and the end of the boring bar were immersed in 18-77 lb.
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  • Taking into account the heat absorbed by the box and the metal, Rumford calculated that the heat developed was sufficient to raise 26.58 lb of water from the freezing to the boiling point, and in this calculation the heat lost by radiation and conduction was neglected.
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  • With an apparatus similar to the above, but smaller, made of iron and filled with mercury, Joule obtained results varying from 772.814 foot-pounds when driving weights of about 58 lb were employed to 775.352 foot-pounds when the driving weights were only about 192 lb.
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  • The sizes of copper wire employed have weights of too, 150, 200 and 400 lb per statute mile, and have electrical resistances (at 60° F.) of 8.782, 5.8 55, 4.39 1 and 2.195 standard ohms respectively.
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  • Copper wire weighing 600 and 800 lb per mile has also been used to some extent.
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  • Gutta-percha-covered copper wires were formerly largely used for the purpose of underground lines, the copper conductor weighing 40 lb per statute mile, and the gutta-percha covering 50 lb (90 lb total).
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  • Between London and Birmingham a paper cable 116 m long and consisting of 72 copper conductors, each weighing 150 lb per statute mile, was laid in 1900.
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  • The central conductor is covered with several continuous coatings of guttapercha, the total weight of which varies between 70 and 650 lb to the mile.
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  • As subscribers' lines are invariably short, the smallest gauge of wire possessing the mechanical strength necessary to withstand the stresses to which it may be subjected can be employed, and bronze wire weighing 40 lb per mile is commonly used.
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  • The conductors used for subscribers' circuits are of copper weighing from 10 to 20 lb per mile.
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  • Junction circuits are usually made up of 20 or 40 lb conductors.
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  • Wire weighing between 150 and 400 lb per mile is generally used.
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  • These vary in weight from soo to 1000 lb, according to the variety of camel employed, for of the Arabian camel there are almost as many breeds as there are of the horse.
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  • In Sicily the so-called Modica race is of note; and in Sardinia there is a distinct stock which seldom exceeds the weight of 700 lb.
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  • The regulations provide that if there is a greater weight of correspondence (including bookpackets) than 13/4 lb for any individual by any one delivery, notice shall be given him that it is lying at the post office, he being then obliged to arrange for fetching it.
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  • Tobacco slightly diminished in weight at a little over I lb per head, while the gross receipts are considerably increasedby over 23/4 millions sterling since 1884-1885---showing that the quality consumed is much better.
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  • It attains to a weight of 15 lb.
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  • In the deltas of shoal rivers, with a strong tide or current and no land visible, a 5 lb lead is substituted for the log-ship; the lead rests on the bottom, and the speed is obtained in a manner similar to that previously described.
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  • No less than 96% of the world's supply of platinum comes from the Urals; but the total output only ranges between 10,000 and 16,000 lb annually.
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  • As used by George Stephenson on the Stockton & Darlington and Whitstable & Canterbury lines they weighed 28 lb per yard.
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  • The fishbellied rails, however, were found to break near the chairs, and from 1834 they began to be replaced with parallel rails weighing 50 lb to the yard.
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  • The fare was is., and each passenger was allowed to take baggage not exceeding 14 lb weight.
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  • - A, Section of British Bull-Headed Rail, 90 lb to the yard, showing also chair and fastenings.
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  • The chairs on the British system weigh about 45 or 50 lb each on important lines, though they may be less where the traffic is light, and are fixed to the sleepers each by two, three or four fastenings, either screw spikes, or round drift bolts entered in holes previously bored, or fang bolts or wooden trenails.
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  • The rails, which for heavy main line traffic may weigh as much as too lb per yard, or even more, are rolled in lengths of from 30 to 60 ft., and sleepers are placed under them at intervals of between 2 and 3 ft.
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  • - French Rail, 901 lb to the yard, showing rail joint and seat in the sleeper.
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  • The standard specification adopted by the Pennsylvania railway in 1908 provided that in rails weighing Ioo lb to the yard 41% of the metal should be in the head, 18-6% in the web, and 40-4% in the base, while for 85 lb rails 42.2% was to be in the head, 17-8% in the web and 40.0% in the base.
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  • According to the specification for 85 lb rails adopted by the Canadian Pacific railway about the same time, 36-77% of the metal was to be in the head, 22'21% in the web and 41 02% in the base.
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  • - American Rail, 90 lb to the yard, showing rail joint.
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  • Thus if R is equal to 10,000 lb when the velocity is 44 ft.
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  • From Aspinall's experiments it appears to be about 17 lb per ton, and this value is plotted on the diagram.
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  • Hence Engine resistance, R e = 80 X20 = 1600 lb Vehicle resistance, R v =200 X8.5 = 1700 „ Train resistance, R = 3300 „ The speed, 40 m.
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  • The maximum rate of combustion may be as much as so lb of coal per square foot of grate per hour, and in exceptional cases even a greater rate than this has been maintained.
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  • A few experimental results are set forth in Table XX., from which it will be seen that with a relatively low rate of combustion, a rate which denotes very light service, namely lb of coal per square foot of grate per hour, the efficiency of the boiler is %, which is as good a result as can be obtained with the best class of stationary boiler or marine boiler even when using economizers.
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  • - One pound of coal requires about 20 lb of air for its proper combustion in the fire-box of a locomotive, though this quantity of air diminishes as the rate of combustion increases.
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  • Let the boiler pressure be 175 lb per square inch.
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  • Taking 85% of this, the maximum mean effective pressure would be 149 lb per square inch.
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  • The engine can only exert this large tractive force so long as the mean pressure is maintained at 149 lb per square inch.
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  • Thus although at a slow speed the engine can exert a tractive force of 18,600 lb, at 60 m.
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  • It will be seen at once that with a tractive force of 7400 lb a weight of 37,000 lb (=16.5 tons) would be enough to secure sufficient adhesion, and this could be easily carried on one axle.
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  • 21 shows the pressure-volume diagram of the Rankine cycle for one pound of steam where the initial pressure is 175 lb per square inch by the 19t, gauge, equivalent to 190 lb per square inch absolute.
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  • This would be an ideal performance for an engine receiving steam at 190 lb initial pressure absolute, and rejecting steam at the back pressure assumed above, and could never be attained in practice.
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  • When the initial pressure is 100 lb per square inch by the gauge the thermal efficiency drops to about nearly 15% with the same back pressure.
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  • 22 represents the thermal efficiency actually obtained in one of Adams and Pettigrew's experiments, namely, 0-I I, the pressure in the steam-pipe being 167 lb per square inch.
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  • In a particular case where the boiler pressure was maintained constant at 130 lb per square inch, and the cut-off was approximately 20% of the stroke, the values c =55 and b=o 031 were deduced, from which it will be found that the value of the piston speed corresponding to the maximum horsepower is 887 ft.
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  • Indicator diagram corresponding to 1 lb.
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  • In Great Britain the mineral trucks can ordinarily hold from 8 to io tons (long tons, 2240 lb), and the goods trucks rather less, though there are wagons in use holding 12 or 15 tons, and the specifications agreed to by the railway companies associated in the Railway Clearing House permit private wagon owners (who own about 45% of the wagon stock run on the railways of the United Kingdom) to build also wagons holding 20, 30, 40 and 56 tons.
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  • For years the standard freight cars have held 60,000 lb and now many carry 80,000 lb or 100,000 lb; a few coal cars have even been built to contain 200,000 lb.
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  • But an American car with a capacity of 10o,000 lb may weigh only 40,000 lb, and thus the ratio of its capacity to its tare weight is only about 5 to 2.
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  • The orders actually granted have allowed 50 lb, 56 lb, 60 lb and 70 lb rails, with corresponding axle loads of 10, 12, 14 and 16 tons.
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  • The line is of m metre gauge, with steel rails weighing 212 kilos (42 lb) per yard.
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  • In the towns a deeper rail is used, weighing about 60 lb per yard.
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  • A portable line of this kind will have 20 lb steel rails and 2112 steel sleepers-4 ft.
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  • In common with the others, it weighs 120,000 lb, is 14 ft.
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  • In 1907 the production of copper was 1,782,571 lb, valued at $356,514.
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  • The output of lead in 1907 was 6,271,341 lb (valued at $322,381).
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  • The output of zinc was 2,168,783 lb (valued at $127,958).
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  • Tench if kept in suitable waters are extremely prolific, and as they grow within a few years to a weight of 3 or 4 lb, and are then fit for the table, they may be profitably introduced into ponds which are already stocked with other fishes, such as carp and pike.
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  • This variety, which seems to have been originally bred in Silesia, is not less well-flavoured than the normally coloured tench, and grows to the same size, viz., to 6 and even 8 lb.
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  • The production of other cereals decreased during the latter half of the 19th century: oats, from 1,959,620 bushels in 1879 to 1,611,000 bushels in 1907; wheat, from 587,925 bushels in 1859 to 22,000 in 1907; rye, from 39,474 bushels in 1859 to 963 bushels in 1899, after which year the crop has been negligible; and rice, from 2,719,856 lb in 1849 to about 1,080,000 lb in 1907.
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  • The yield of cotton increased from 62,901,790 lb in 1869 to 307,500,000 lb in 1909.
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  • In 1879 the state's crop amounted to 26,986,213 lb, in 1889 to 36,375,258 lb, in 1899 to 127,503,400 lb, and in 1909 to 144,000,000 lb.
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  • It is next to be well ploughed and harrowed; and about 10 lb of clover seed must be sown on an acre in April or the end of March.
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  • These prices are per imperial quarter, - that is, 480 lb of wheat, 400 lb of barley and 312 lb of oats, representing 60 lb, 50 lb and 39 lb per bushel respectively.
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  • This, indeed, is the practice in Ireland, and in order to incorporate the Irish figures with those for Great Britain so as to obtain average values for the United Kingdom, the Irish yields are calculated into bushels at the rate of 60 lb to the bushel of wheat, of beans and of peas, 50 lb to the bushel of barley and 39 lb to the bushel of oats.
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  • The following figures show the average yields per acre of the selected plots at Rothamsted over six 8-yearly periods from 1852 to 1899, and afford evidence that the higher yield of later years is due to the seasons: Bushels (of 60 lb) Average of - per acre.
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  • In one case, indeed, the average produce by mixed minerals and nitrogenous manure was more than that by the annual application of farmyard manure; and in seven out of the ten cases in which such mixtures were used the average yield per acre was from over two to over eight bushels more than the average yield of the United Kingdom (assuming this to be about twenty-eight bushels of 60 lb per bushel) under ordinary rotation.
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  • The quantity of digestible nutritive matter in 1000 lb of ordinary feeding-stuffs when supplied to sheep or oxen is shown in Table XIX.
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  • 4 lb, and the others Shorthorns weighing respectively 20 cwt.
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  • At the centenary show of the Smithfield Club in 1898 the highest average daily gains in weight amongst prize-winning cattle were provided by a Shorthorn-Aberdeen cross-bred steer (age, one year seven months; daily gain 2.4 7 lb); a Shorthorn steer (age, one year seven months; daily gain, 2.44 lb); and an Aberdeen-Shorthorn cross-bred steer (age, one year ten months; daily gain, 2� 33 lb).
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  • Amongst prize steers of two and a half to three years old, on the same occasion, the three highest daily average gains in live weight were 2.07 lb for an Aberdeen-Angus, 1.99 lb for a Shorthorn-Aberdeen cross-bred and 1.97 lb for a Sussex.
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  • 77 lb per head given by Oxford-Hampshire cross-bred wether lambs, aged nine months two weeks.
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  • In the case of wether sheep, twelve to twenty-four months old, the highest daily increase was o� 56 lb per head as yielded by Lincolns, aged twenty-one months.
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  • A familiar practical method of estimating carcase weight from live weight is to reckon one Smithfield stone (8 lb) of carcase for each imperial stone (14 lb) of live weight.
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  • For piercing-mouthed pests like Aphides no wash is of use unless it contains a basis of soft soap. This softsoap wash kills by contact, and may be prepared in the following way: - Dissolve 6 to 8 lb of the best soft soap in boiling soft water and while still hot (but of course taken off the fire) add 1 gallon of questions involved, under their own headings.
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  • The cultivation of tobacco was of little importance in the state until about 1840; but the product increased from 10,454,449 lb in 1850 to 34,735,235 lb in 1880, and to 65,957,100 lb in 1899, when the crop was grown on 71,422 acres; in 1909 the crop was 83,250,000 lb, grown on 90,000 acres.
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  • In 1903 the total catch there amounted to 10,748,986 lb, valued at $317,027.
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  • It is difficult to get the hands to work until the cotton is fully opened, and it is hard to induce them to pick over ioo lb a day, though some expert hands are found in every cotton plantation who can pick twice as much.
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  • There is in the cotton states a rural population of over 7,000,000, more or less occupied in cottongrowing, and capable, at the low average of ioo lb a day, of picking daily nearly 50o,000 bales.
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  • When this has been accomplished the weight of the crop is reduced to about one-third, each 100 lb of seed cotton as picked yielding after ginning some 33 lb of lint and 66 lb of cotton seed.
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  • With this primitive machine, worked by hand, about 5 lb of lint is the daily output.
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  • A hand Macarthy roller gin worked by two men will clean about 4 to 6 lb of lint per hour.
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  • A similar, but larger machine, requiring about horse-power to run it, will turn out 50 to 60 lb of Egyptian or 60 to 80 lb of Sea Island cleaned cotton per hour.
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  • The average yield of lint per " saw " in the United States, when working under perfect conditions, is about 6 lb per hour.
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  • Experience shows that 1000 lb of seed are produced for every 50o lb of cotton brought to market.
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  • On the basis, therefore, of a cotton crop of io,000,000 bales of 500 lb each, there are produced 5,000,000 tons of cotton seed.
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  • The actual figures for the chief countries for 1904-1906, taken from the same source, are as follows: The World's Commercial Cotton Crop. (In 500 lb Bales.) This title serves to ind'cate the principal countries contributing to the world's supply of cotton.
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  • The low yield per acre in this island, and also the low value of the lint per lb compared with the Sea Island cotton, is clearly apparent.
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  • The exports were equivalent to 2 bales of 50o lb in 1902-1903, 114 bales in 1903 - 1904, 570 bales in '904 - 1905, 1 553 bales in 1905-1906 and 1052 bales in 1906-1907.
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  • The production of cotton in Russia in 1906 was estimated at 675,000 bales of Soo lb each.
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  • Up to the year 1885 there was an average yearly export equivalent to about 2140 bales of 500 lb, after which date the export practically ceased.
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  • (In Thousand Statistical Bales of 500 lb each.) 1 Cotton Culture and the Cotton Trade, p. 298.
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  • (In Thousand Statistical Bales of 500 lb each.) Galveston and Savannah have risen considerably in relative importance of late years.
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  • A cantar is 99.05 lb avoirdupois.
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  • Approximately the supplies were as follows in million lb: British West Indies.
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  • About 20 gallons of lemon juice should yield about 1 0 lb of crystallized citric acid.
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  • The closed pressure in the Trenton limestone in Ohio and Indiana is about 200-300 lb.
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  • The gas wells of Pennsylvania indicate about double the pressure of those drilled in the Trenton limestone, 600-800 lb.
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  • The principle of this system consists essentially in the use of rotating hollow drilling rods or casing, to which is attached the drilling-bit and through which a continuous stream of water, under a pressure of 40 to loo lb.
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  • The initial pressure is sometimes as high as 400 lb to the sq.
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  • Tobacco culture, which declined after 1860 on account of the competition of Cuba and Sumatra, has revived since 1885 through the introduction of Cuban and Sumatran seed; the product of 1907 (6,937,500 lb) was more than six times that of 1899, the product in 1899 (1,125,600 lb) being more than twice that of 1889 (470,443 lb), which in turn was more than twenty times that for 1880 (21,182 lb)-the smallest production recorded for many decades.
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  • In 1907 the average farm prices of tobacco was 45 cents per lb higher than that of any other state.
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  • The principal crop is Bermuda onions; in 1909 it was estimated that 150o acres in the vicinity were devoted to this crop, the average yield per acre being about 20,000 lb.
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  • The coffee plantations were greatly injured by a severe hurricane which visited the island on the 8th of August 1899, but the yield for export increased from 12,157,240 lb in 1901 to 38,756,750 lh, valued at $4,693,004, in 1907.
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  • The acreage, however, decreased from 178,155 acres in 1906 to 155,778 acres in 1909, and in the latter year the crop fell to 28,489,263 lb.
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  • The weight of the rabbit is from 22 to 3 lb, although wild individuals have been recorded up to more than 5 lb.
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  • On the 4th of May 1898 a sub-committee of the Kennel Club decided that the following breeds should be classified as "toy dogs": - Black and tan terriers (under 7 lb), bull terriers (under 8 lb), griffons, Italian greyhounds, Japanese, Maltese, Pekingese, poodles (under 15 in.), pugs, toy spaniels, Yorkshire terriers and Pomeranians.
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  • To preserve from insects, the plants, after mounting, are often brushed over with a liquid formed by the solution of lb.
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  • In 1904 and 1906 the Louisiana crop, about one-half of the total yield of the country, was larger than that of any other state; but in 1905 and in 1907 (6, 1 9 2, 955 ib and 7,378,000 lb respectively) the Louisiana crop was second in size to that of Texas.
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  • Among nuts the native pecan is exceptionally abundant, the product (637,470 lb in 1899) being much greater than that of any other state save Texas.
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  • The hammer-head attains a weight at times of 600 lb.
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  • The crop of 1907 was 201,512 bales (109,562,400 lb Sp.).
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  • ' In 1907 the crop was 6,595, 700 lb.
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  • In 1904-1906 the yearly average sent to the United States was 234,063,652 cigars, 29,776,429 lb of leaf and 14,203,571 packages of cigarettes.
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  • Each layer of rubber is allowed to become firm before forming another; a practised hand can make 5 or 6 lb in an hour.
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  • The yield of rubber varies, but it is stated on an average to be Io lb of rubber per tree, and if carefully tapped one tree will yield this amount for many years in succession.
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  • The annual yield of rubber is rather more than 1 lb per tree.
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  • The coagulum is next flattened out by a wooden or iron roller to get rid of the cavities containing watery liquid, and the sheets are then hung up for fourteen days to dry, when they weigh about 2 lb, the sheets being usually z to a in.
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  • The trees are tapped when about ten years old, and as a rule annually furnish from 5-10 lb of rubber per tree.
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  • The distillation of 1000 lb charge lasts 5-6 hours, requires 500-600 lb coke or 30 gallons reduced oil, and yields about to% metallic zinc and I% blue powder - a mixture of finely-divided metallic zinc and zinc oxide.
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  • The standard induction in reference to determinations of hysteresis is generally taken as 2500, while the loss is expressed in watts per lb at a frequency of ioo double reversals, or cycles, per second.
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  • Since t horse-power= 746 watts, and r ton = 2 240 lb, the factor for reducing horse-power per ton to watts per lb is 746/2240, or just 1/3.
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  • The export in 1905 was 10,820,604 bags of 132 lb each, with an official valuation of £21,420,330.
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  • The exportation for 1906 was 69,761,123 lb of Hevea, 5,871,968 lb of manicoba, and 1,440,131 lb of mangabeira rubber, the whole valued at 12 4,9 1,433 milreis gold.
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  • The export in 1906 amounted to 127,417,950 lb, officially valued at 16,502,881 milreis gold.
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  • In the same year the production of tea was 1,633,178 lb; of coffee, 24,8591b; of maize, 2,101,470 bushels; of potatoes, 419,946 bushels; and of sweet potatoes, 181,195 bushels.
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  • Thus 3 lb + 5 lb - 7 lb + 2 lb means that 5 lb is to be added to 3 lb, 7 lb subtracted from the result, and 2 lb added to the new result.
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  • (ii.) The above operation is performed with i lb as the unit of counting, and the process would be the same with any other unit; e.g.
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  • Hence we can separate the numbers from the common unit, and replace 3 lb - I - 5 lb - 7 lb +2 lb by (3+5-7+2) lb, the additions and subtractions being then performed by means of an addition-table.
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  • Thus 5 X 3 X 7 X r lb means 5 times 3 times 7 times lb; i.e.
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  • We may regard this as meaning the same as 5 X3 X7 lb, since 7 lb itself means 7 X 1 lb, and the lb is the unit in each case.
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  • But it does not mean the same as 5 X 21 lb, though the two are equal, i.e.
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  • I buy 2 lb of tea, and have 6s.
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  • Therefore 1 lb of tea cost is.
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  • Thus we say: Cost of 2 lb tea+6s.
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  • Cost of i lb tea = is.
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  • We write: (2 Xcost of 1 lb tea) +6s.
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  • 2 Xcost of I lb tea =Ios.
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  • Cost of 1 lb tea= Is.
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  • This states that the result of the operation of multiplying 3/b by 4 is 12 lb.
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  • On the 27th of January 1905, the largest diamond in the world, weighing 30254 carats, over 12 lb avoirdupois, was found in the mine and named the Cullinan.
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  • Of the 3,032,000 lb of tobacco grown in 1904, Rustenburg produced 884,000 lb.
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  • The alluvial extracted, which in the Malay Peninsula and Archipelago carries from 5 to 60 lb of tinstone (or "black tin," as it is termed by Cornish miners) to the cubic yard of gravel, is washed in various simple sluicing appliances, by which the lighter clay, sand and stones are removed and tinstone is left behind comparatively pure, containing usually 65 to 75% of metallic tin (chemically pure tinstone contains 78.7%).
    0
    0
  • The veinstuff is broken small either by hand or in rock-breakers, and stamped to fine powder in stamp mills, which are practically large mechanically-worked pestles and mortars, the stamp proper weighing from 500 to moo lb.
    0
    0
  • It is grown at elevations of 1600 to 3000 ft., and the yield is reported to be a to 2 lb per tree, which is much less than the yield in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    0
    0
  • The tree has an average height of 12-13 ft., begins bearing five years after planting, requires little attention beyond occasional irrigation, bears two crops a year (June and December), and produces well until it is forty years of age - the yield being from 490 to 600 lb per acre of 100 trees.
    0
    0
  • Its principal product is " papelon," or brown sugar, which is put on the market in the shape of small cylindrical and cubical masses of 14 to 31 lb weight.
    0
    0
  • In Europe the capacity ranges from 1000 to Isoo lb, though the tendency is to increase the size of the cars used.
    0
    0
  • In mines of copper, lead and the precious metals, in which the cars are moved by hand, the usual load is from 1200 to 3000 lb.
    0
    0
  • For hand tramming, animal and rope haulage, the rails weigh from 8 to 24 lb per yard, for locomotive haulage 30 to 40 lb.
    0
    0
  • Y g g The air passes through a reducing valve from the main to an auxiliary tank, in which the pressure is, say, 125 lb, and thence to the driving cylinders.
    0
    0
  • If the cooling is very gradual - occupying several weeks - it sometimes happens that the entire contents of a large crucible, weighing perhaps 1000 lb, are found intact as a single mass of glass, but more frequently the mass is found broken up into a number of fragments of various sizes.
    0
    0
  • Thus, if a thrust OP lb acts on a small plane area DA ft.
    0
    0
  • If a thrust P lb is applied to one piston of area A ft.
    0
    0
  • 2, it will be balanced by a thrust W lb applied to the other piston of area B ft.', where p = P/A=W/B, (I) the pressure p of the liquid being supposed uniform; and, by making the ratio B/A sufficiently large, the mechanical advantage can be increased to any desired amount, and in the simplest manner possible, without the intervention of levers and machinery.
    0
    0
  • For the body alone the resultant of the components of momentum W V -cos andW V sin 0 is W V -sec. lb, acting along 00', and so is unaltered.
    0
    0
  • The Guanches embalmed their dead; many mummies have been found in an extreme state of desiccation, each weighing not more than 6 or 7 lb.
    0
    0
  • A tree may yield 3 gallons of juice a day and continue flowing for six weeks; but on an average only about 4 lb of sugar are obtained from each tree, 4 to 6 gallons of sap giving 1 lb of sugar.
    0
    0
  • The sap is drawn off from the upper growing portion of the stem, and altogether an average tree will run in a season 350 lb of toddy, from which about 35 lb of raw sugar - jaggery - is made by simple and rude processes.
    0
    0
  • Thus, supposing that moo lb of coal were required to work a single vacuum pan, evaporating, say, 6000 lb of water in a given time, then 500 lb of coal would be required for a double-effect apparatus to do the same work, 333 lb for a triple effect, 250 for a quadruple effect, and 200 lb for a quintuple effect.
    0
    0
  • The value of fresh bagasse, or as it is often called " green " bagasse, as fuel varies with the kind of canes from which it comes, with their treatment in the mill, and with the skill used in firing; but it may be stated broadly that I lb of fresh bagasse will produce from I a lb to 24 lb of steam, according to the conditions.
    0
    0
  • One of the earliest references to sugar in Great Britain is that of 100,000 lb of sugar being shipped to London in 1319 by Tomasso Loredano, merchant of Venice, to be exchanged for wool.
    0
    0
  • It used to pay 50,000 lb of sugar to the sultan in annual tribute (Lataif, p. 107).
    0
    0
  • Quantities of raw and refined cane and beet sugar in tons avoirdupois imported into the United Kingdom in 1870 and in 1875, and yearly from 1880 to 1901 inclusive, with the consumption per head of the population in lb and the price per cwt.
    0
    0
  • The following table shows the amounts of the chief constituents removed by certain crops in lb per acre: - Plants also remove from the soil silicon, sodium, chlorine, and other elements which are, nevertheless, found to be unessential for the growth and may therefore be neglected here.
    0
    0
  • Below are given examples of the analyses of a poor sandy soil and an ordinary loam: - Since the dry weight of the first foot of soil over an acre is about 4,000,000 lb the poor sandy soil contains within it: Nitrogen.
    0
    0
  • The average yield per acre in the States as a whole in 1906 was 857.2 lb.
    0
    0
  • New Hampshire had the highest average, 1785 lb per acre, and Mississippi the lowest, 440 Ib.
    0
    0
  • In 1905, 53,750 planters cultivated 39,439 acres, and the total crop amounted to 61,614,900 lb, of the approximate value of £2,000,000.
    0
    0
  • Thus in 1906 from Cavalla and Xanthi 11,000 tons were exported of a value of about £1,101,000, the range of the various qualities per kilo (2·1 lb) being Ghienbek.
    0
    0
  • The leaves are graded with the most scrupulous care and finally packed in bales of about 176 lb each.
    0
    0
  • In 1900 there were 69 acres under this crop, the yield being 44 80 lb of the value of £113.
    0
    0
  • The comparative consumption of tobacco in various countries is best appreciated by expressing it in pounds per head, and the following figures are taken from Bartholomew's Atlas of the World's Commerce: Belgium 6.21 lb, United States 5.4 0 lb, Germany 3.44 Ib, Austria 3.02 lb, Australasia 2.20 lb, Canada 2.54 lb, Hungary 2.42 lb, France 2.16 lb, United Kingdom 1.95 lb, Russia 1 10 lb.
    0
    0
  • The charge of the retorts consists of a mixture of 1100 lb of roasted calamine and 550 lb of dry powdered coal per furnace.
    0
    0
  • The former contains a mixture of semi-solid and molten metal, which is raked out into iron ladles and cast into plates of 66 to 77 lb weight, to be sold as "spelter."
    0
    0
  • When hydraulic pressure to the amount of 2000 to 3000 lb per square inch is applied, the saving is unquestioned, since less time is required to dry the pressed retort, its life in the furnaces is longer, its absorption of zinc is less, and the loss of zinc by passage through its walls in the form of vapour is reduced.
    0
    0
  • They yield yearly an average of 80,000 lb of silver and 1900 tons of lead.
    0
    0
  • The ordinary load for a pack camel is about 400 lb, and in hot weather good camels will march 20 to 25 m.
    0
    0
  • Moissan succeeded in fusing about 4 lb of either of these metals in 5 or 6 minutes in a furnace similar to that last described.
    0
    0
  • Jalap has been cultivated for many years in India, chiefly at Ootacamund, and grows there as easily as a yam, often producing clusters of tubers weighing over 9 lb; but these, as they differ in appearance from the commercial article, have not as yet obtained a place in the English market.
    0
    0
  • With the cinchona trees grow many kinds of melastomaceae, especially the Lasiandra, with masses of purple flowers, tree-ferns and palms. In the warm valleys there are large plantations of coca (Erythroxylon Coca), the annual produce of which is stated at 15,000,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • The export of wool in 1905 exceeded 3,300,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.
    0
    0
  • In the mills of the Californian type the stamp is a cylindrical iron pestle faced with a chilled cast iron shoe, removable so that it can be renewed when necessary, attached to a round iron rod or lifter, the whole weighing from 600 to 900 lb; stamps weighing 1320 lb are in use in the Transvaal.
    0
    0
  • In the Transvaal the operation occupies 32 to 4 days for fine sands, and up to 14 days for coarse sands; the quantity of cyanide per ton of tailings varies from 0.26 to 0.28 lb, for electrolytic precipitation, and o 5 lb for zinc precipitation.
    0
    0
  • Local weights and measures include the cantar, 175 lb; salm, one imperial quarter; cafiso, 42 gallons; canna, 6 ft.
    0
    0
  • (16.6 C.); a reason for this is that the gallon of water is defined by statute as weighing Io lb at 62° F., and hence the densities so expressed admit of the ready conversion of volumes to weights.
    0
    0
  • Thus if d be the relative density, then Iod represents the weight of a gallon in lb.
    0
    0
  • Modern surveying ships no longer make use of hempen lines with enormously heavy sinkers, such as were employed on the " Challenger," but they sound instead with steel piano wire not more than 310 to 215 of an inch in diameter and a detachable lead seldom weighing more than 70 lb.
    0
    0
  • The rails used are of flat bottomed or bridge section varying in weight from 15 to 25 lb to the yd.; they are laid upon cross sleepers in a temporary manner, so that they can be easily shifted along the working faces, but are carefully secured along main roads intended to carry traffic continuously for some time.
    0
    0
  • Denayrouze by which the air, contained in cylinders at a pressure of 300 to 350 lb per sq.
    0
    0
  • These pressures varied from 71,000 to ioo,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • Continuing these experiments, they found that in acetylene gas under ordinary pressures the decomposition brought about in one portion of the gas, either by heat or the firing in it of a small detonator, did not spread far beyond the point at which the decomposition started, while if the acetylene was compressed to a pressure of more than 30 lb on the square inch, the decomposition travelled throughout the mass and became in reality detonation.
    0
    0
  • About 1.8 lb of this is used up for each pound of carbide produced.
    0
    0
  • For instance, in practical working it has been found that a furnace return of o� 504 lb per kilowatt hour is brought down to 0.406 lb per kilowatt hour when the material has been broken up, sorted and packed in air-tight drums. In the tapping process a fixed crucible is used, lined with carbon, the electrode is nearly as big as the crucible and a much higher current density is used.
    0
    0
  • When a belt, in which the maximum and minimum tensions are respectively P and p lb, drives a pulley, the torque exerted FIG.
    0
    0
  • The wool product of the state in 1900 was 9,638,002 lb, and in 1910 was 8,943,750 lb washed and unwashed and 3,040,875 lb scoured.
    0
    0
  • Fisheries.-The value of the fisheries product of Texas increased from $286,610 (7,174,550 lb) in 18 97 to $353, 81 4 (8, 0 44,4 0 4 lb) in 1902; and the amount of capital invested in the industry from $ 2 37,49 6 in 18 97 to $373,7 2 4 in 1902, but the number of wageearners employed decreased slightly-from 1199 in 1897 to 1144 in 1902.
    0
    0
  • In 1905, according to railway reports, 91,051,551 lb of butter were carried to points outside the state.
    0
    0
  • The principal granite quarries are in Milford, ' The yield of cereals and of such other crops in 1907 as are recorded in the Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture was as follows: Indian corn, 1,584,000 bushels; oats, 245,000 bushels; barley, 64,000 bushels; buckwheat, 42,000 bushels; potatoes, 3,600,000 bushels; hay, 760,000 tons; tobacco, 7,167,500 lb.
    0
    0
  • Let KA and LB be the positions of NP corresponding to the extreme values of x.
    0
    0
  • If, on the other hand, we were to take them very close to KA and LB respectively, the area of K 0 M B Z the trapezette would be the greater.
    0
    0
  • Tobacco culture was introduced in 1845, and in 1860 the crop was 5,764,582 lb.
    0
    0
  • During1860-1880the increase was slight, but in 1899 the crop was 1 3,95 8, 37 0 lb; in 1909 the crop was only 7,050,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • Maple sugar is an important by-product of the forests, and in the production of this commodity New York ranks second only to Vermont; 3,623,540 lb were made in 1900.
    0
    0
  • Graphite is widely distributed in the Adirondack region, but the mining of it is confined for the most part to Essex and Warren counties; in 1908 the output was 1,932,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • A fair crop of barley yields about 36 bushels, (56 lb to the bushel) per acre, but under the best conditions 40 and 50 bushels may be obtained.
    0
    0
  • The principal tobacco-growing regions are Vredefort, which produced 258,645 lb in 1904, and Kroonstad (80,385 lb), the districts of Bethlehem, Ladybrand and Winburg also producing considerable quantities.
    0
    0
  • During 1905 over 12,300,000 lb of salt were obtained from the salt springs at Zoutpan, near Jacobsdal, and Haagenstad, to the west of Brandfort.
    0
    0
  • In 1907 the output had increased to nearly 23,000,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • They fired a shell weighing 485 lb, with a bursting charge of 17 lb.
    0
    0
  • The Japanese hand grenades consisted of about 1 lb of high explosive in a tin case; the Russian cases were of all sorts, including old Chinese shell.
    0
    0
  • Its value is generally taken at 1,500,000 to 3,000,000 lb per sq.
    0
    0
  • The pressure on the rollers is limited to about p= 600 d in lb per in.
    0
    0
  • The mooring chains, weighing 22 lb per ft., are taken from the upstream end of each pontoon to a downstream screw pile mooring and from the downstream end to an upstream screw pile.
    0
    0
  • - A dense crowd of people may be taken as a uniform load of 80 to 120 lb per sq.
    0
    0
  • Thus at Bidstone, Liverpool, where the gauge has an exceptional exposure, a pressure of 80 lb per sq.
    0
    0
  • C. Shaler Smith allows 300 lb per ft.
    0
    0
  • The artesian basin of the east part of the state is fairly well developed, several wells having a flow of from 2000 to 435 0 gallons per minute and a pressure of 150 lb to the square inch.
    0
    0
  • The average annual yield of coffee during the same period was 101,971,132 lb; it fluctuates greatly.
    0
    0
  • Stories were told of its attacking the bison, and it has been reported to carry off the carcase of a wapiti, weighing nearly 1000 lb, for a considerable distance to its den, there to devour it at leisure.
    0
    0
  • We first determine the time t in seconds required for the velocity of a shot, d inches in diameter and weighing w lb, to fall from any initial velocity V(f/s) to any final velocity v(f/s).
    0
    0
  • 8 and 9, in a curve showing the relation between p and D the gravimetric density, which is the specific gravity of the P lb of powder when filling the volume C, cub.
    0
    0
  • Thus if a charge of P lb of powder is placed in a chamber of volume C cub.
    0
    0
  • Sometimes the factor 27.68 is employed, corresponding to a density of water of about 62-4 lb per cub.
    0
    0
  • =0.504, the upper figure 55.01 denoting the specific volume of the charge measured in cubic inches per lb, filling the chamber in a state of gas, the product of the two numbers 55.01 and 0.504 being 2 7.73; and the chamber capacity C =1 3' 2 5 X 55.01 =730 cub.
    0
    0
  • Until after the middle of the 18th century tobacco was the staple crop of Maryland, and the total yield did not reach its maximum until 1860 when the crop amounted to 51,000 hhds.; from this it decreased to 14,000 hhds., or 12,356,838 lb in 1889; in 1899 it rose again to 24,589,480 lb, in 1907 the crop was only 56,962,000 lb, less than that of nine other states.
    0
    0
  • 27, Gideon made an ephod of gold, about 70 lb in weight, and "put" it in Ophrah.
    0
    0
  • The culture of tobacco, which is the second most valuable crop in the state, was begun in the north part about 1780 and in the west and south early in the 19th century, but it was late in that century before it was introduced to any considerable extent in the Blue Grass Region, where it was then in a measure substituted for the culture of hemp. By 1849 Kentucky ranked second only to Virginia in the production of tobacco, and in 1899 it was far ahead of any other state in both acreage and yield, there being in that year 384,805 acres, which was 34'9% of the total acreage in the continental United States, yielding 314,288,050 lb.
    0
    0
  • In 1909 the tobacco acreage in Kentucky was 420,000, the crop was 350,700,000 lb, valued at $37, 1 74, 200; the average price per pound had increased from 5'9 cents in 1899 to 10'6 cents in 1909.
    0
    0
  • The high price received by the hill growers of the Burley induced farmers in the Blue Grass to plant Burley tobacco there, where the crop proved a great success, more than twice as much (sometimes 2000 lb) being grown to the acre in the Blue Grass as in the hills and twice as large patches being easily managed.
    0
    0
  • Kentucky is the principal hemp-growing state of the Union; the crop of 1899, which was grown on 14,107 acres and amounted to 10,303,560 lb, valued at $468,454, was 87'7% of the hemp crop of the whole country.
    0
    0
  • But the competition of cheaper labour in other countries reduced the profits on this plant and the product of 1899 was a decrease from 78,818,000 lb in 1859.
    0
    0
  • (c) the standard gallon (and multiples and fractions of it), declared to contain 10 lb of water at 62° F., being in volume 277.274 cub.
    0
    0
  • Hence a cubic foot of water would weigh 62.281 lb avoir., and not 62.321 lb as at present legally taken.
    0
    0
  • The injured standard was then lost sight of, but it was in 1891 brought to light by the Clerk of the Journals, and has now been placed in the lobby of the residence of the Clerk of the House, together with a standard "stone" of 14 lb.
    0
    0
  • Pl is the weight of the brass weights (10 lb) Δ=8.143.
    0
    0
  • The average yearly product is about 70,000,000 lb, worth approximately £1,300,000, and subject to an export duty of one gold dollar (4s.) per quintal (101 lb).
    0
    0
  • The existence ~of gold in that region had been long known to the aboriginal inhabitants, but no attention was paid to this by the whites, until about the beginning of the soth renf,irv, when n,ipvpts were found, one of which weighed 28 lb.
    0
    0
  • The ore of mercury had been discovered in California before the epoch of the gold excitement, and was being extensively worked, the yield in the year1850-1851being nearly 2,000,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • The quantity produced from 1845 Cop er the year in which the Lake Superior district became a producer, and in which the total product was only 224,000 lbup to 1908 was 13,106,205,634 lb.
    0
    0
  • The total product passed 10,000,000 lb in 1857, 20,000,000 lb in 1867, 30,000,000 lb in 1873, 40,000,000 lb in 1875, 50,000,000 lb in 1879 and 100,000,000 lb in 1883.
    0
    0
  • Comparing the product of the United States with that of the world, the figures for the two respectively were 23,350 and I51,936 long tons in 1879, when the United States was second to both Spain (and Portugal) and Chile as a producer; 51,570 and 199,406 long tons in 1883, when the Unites States first took leading rank; 172,300 and 334,565 long tons in 1895, when the yield of the United States first exceeded that of all other parts of the world combined; and 942,570,000 and 1,667,098,000 lb in 1908.
    0
    0
  • During the decade ending with that year the average yearly output of the three first-named was 197,706,968 Ib, 267,172,951 lb and 192,187,488 lb respectively.
    0
    0
  • From 1850 to 1908 California produced a total of 2,052,000 flasks of metal, of 76.5 lb (since June I, 1904, 750 lb net) each.
    0
    0
  • The production of aluminium rose from 83 lb in 1883 to 7,500,000 lb in 1903, and a consumption (the Geological Survey not reporting the production) of 17,211,000 lb in 1907.
    0
    0
  • Shutt have proved that soils from the NorthWest Provinces contain an average of 18,000 lb of nitrogen, 15,580 lb of potash and 6,700 lb of phosphoric acid per acre, these important elements of plant food being therefore present in much greater abundance than they are in ordinary cultivated European soils of good quality.
    0
    0
  • For export it is put up in bales of about 150 lb each.
    0
    0
  • It is essentially a food cheese rather than a mere condiment, and 1 lb of it will furnish as much nourishing material as 24 lb cf the best beefsteak.
    0
    0
  • In 1906 the total exports of cheese to all countries from Canada reached 215,834,543 lb of the value of $24,433,169.
    0
    0
  • These are lined with parchment paper, and contain each 56 lb net of butter.
    0
    0
  • The total export of butter from Canada in 1906 was 3 4, 031,525 lb, of the value of $7,075,539.
    0
    0
  • These in their quinquennial periods are given for the season as follows: In Cents per Bushel of 60 lb.
    0
    0
  • The quantity of brick tea thus exported in 1904 was upwards of 10 million lb.
    0
    0
  • It is the practice of the officers of the inland revenue to adjust Sikes's hydrometer at 62° F., that being the temperature at which the imperial gallon is defined as containing 10 lb avoirdupois of distilled water.
    0
    0
  • The sugar-cane crop declined in value after 1890, and each year more of it was made into syrup. In 1908 the tobacco crop was 2,705,625 lb, and the average farm price was 35 cents, being nearly as high as that of the Florida crop; Sumatra leaf for wrappers is grown successfully..
    0
    0
  • Consequently there were large tracts of untilled " waste " land; but these rapidly responded to fertilization and rotation of crops, often yielding Boo to 1200 lb of cotton per acre, and Georgia in 1899 used more fertilizers than any other state in the Union.
    0
    0
  • In Tirol, a single hole is made near the root of the tree in the spring; this is stopped with a plug, and the turpentine is removed by a scoop in the autumn; but each tree yields only from a few ounces to z lb by this process.
    0
    0
  • The quality varies much, as well as the =colour and density; an Italian sample in the museum at Kew (of a very dark red tint) weighs about 241 lb to the cub.
    0
    0
  • Common cocoons enclosing chrysalides weigh each from 16 to 50 grains, or say from 300 to 600 of small breeds and from 270 to 300 of large breeds to the lb.
    0
    0
  • To boil off say 300 lb of thrown silk, about 60 lb of fine white soap is shred, and dissolved in about 200 gallons of pure water.
    0
    0
  • In 1867 the import of raw material amounted to 491,983 lb.
    0
    0
  • In 1905 a record was reached of 17,812,133 lb.
    0
    0
  • During the decade of 1898 to 1908 the consumption has gone on steadily from about 10 million lb in the first five years to an average of 15 million lb in the second half of the decade.
    0
    0
  • France comes a good second in importance with a consumption of 9 to 10 million lb annually.
    0
    0
  • Germany follows France with a consumption for the various fabrics of over six million lb annually.
    0
    0
  • Russia, by a prohibitive tariff on manufactured silks of other countries, has since 1890 developed and fostered a trade which consumes annually about 3 million lb of raw material for its home industry.
    0
    0
  • In 1885 the production of raw silk was about 300,000 111, while in 1905 it reached 750,000 lb, an annual production which is still maintained.
    0
    0
  • In this process the silk waste is put into strong, open-meshed cotton bags, made to hold (in accordance with the wish of individual spinners) from i lb to 5 lb in weight.
    0
    0
  • When about too lb of silk has been bagged, the whole is placed in a large wooden tub and covered with boiling water in which 12 to 20 lb of white curd soap has previously been dissolved.
    0
    0
  • There are various peculiar species of frogs, lizards and snakes, including the great frog Rana Guppyi, from 2 to 3 lb in weight.
    0
    0
  • The product increased from 26,072,429 lb in 1876 to 259,789,462 lb in 1890, 542,098,500 lb in 1899 and about 1,060,000,000 lb (valued at more than $40,000,000) in 1909.
    0
    0
  • In 1899 the product amounted to 33,442.400 lb; in 1907 about 12,000 acres were planted, and the crop was estimated to be worth $2,500,000.
    0
    0
  • In 1909 about 4500 acres were in coffee, the value of the crop was $350,000; and 1,763,119 lb of coffee, valued at $206,460, were exported from Hawaii to the mainland of the United States.
    0
    0
  • In the fiscal year 1908, 359,4 1 3 lb of wodl (valued at $58,133) and 928,599 lb of raw hides (valued at $87,599) were shipped from the Territory to the United States.
    0
    0
  • But, at least in the south, market centres had sprung up, town life was beginning, houses of a better type were perhaps coming into use, and the southern tribes employed a gold coinage and also a currency of iron bars or ingots, attested by Caesar and by surviving examples, which weigh roughly, some two-thirds of a pound, some 21 lb, but mostly I g lb.
    0
    0
  • The following table, taken from the Manchester Guardian, gives in thousands of lb the amounts of cotton yarns exported from Great Britain during 1903, 1904 and 1905 respectively, according to the Board of Trade returns, together with the average value per lb for each of the countries: It should be understood, however, that in some cases the Board of Trade figures represent only an approximation to the ultimate distribution, as the exports are sometimes assigned to the intermediate country, and in particular it is understood that a considerable part of the yarn sent to the Netherlands is destined for Germany or Austria.
    0
    0
  • In 1909 the crop was 30,732,000 lb.
    0
    0
  • Efforts have been made by the planters of the Duars to prepare Indian brick-tea for the Tibetan market, which is calculated to consume some 11,000,000 lb yearly.
    0
    0
  • In 1858 it became the headquarters of a great freighting-firm that distributed supplies for the United States government among the army posts between the Missouri river and the Rocky Mountains; in seven months in 1859 this one firm employed 602 men, used 517 wagons, 5682 oxen, and 75 mules, and shipped 2,782,258 lb.
    0
    0
  • The vineyards (in the west especially) yield much red wine (bought "mainly by Rouen, Cette, Trieste and Venice); the currant, introduced about 1859, has gradually come to be the principal source of wealth (the crop averaging 2,500,000 lb); and small quantities of cotton, flax, tobacco, valonia, &c., are also grown.
    0
    0
  • Both schemes appeared practically impossible; potassium cost about L 1 7 per lb, gave a very small yield and was dangerous to manipulate, while on the other hand, the only source of electric current then available was the primary battery, and zinc as a store of industrial energy was utterly out of the question.
    0
    0
  • About ioo lb of bronze, containing from 15 to 20 lb of aluminium, were obtained from each run, the yield of the alloy being reported at about 1 lb per 18 e.h.p.-hours.
    0
    0
  • In 1890 also the Hall process operated by steam power was installed at Patricroft, Lancashire, where the plant had a capacity of 300 lb per day, but by 1894 the turbines of the Swiss and French works ruined the enterprise.
    0
    0
  • The working temperature lies between 750° and 850° C., and the actual yield is i lb of metal per i 2 e.h.p. hours.
    0
    0
  • Hyacinths and other bulbs derive benefit from slight doses, while to asparagus as much as 20 lb to the rood has been used with beneficial effect.
    0
    0
  • 18 lb Poa nemoralis sempervirens - Evergreen Meadow-grass.
    0
    0
  • 3 lb Trisetum flavescens - Yellow Oat-grass.
    0
    0
  • 2 lb Trifolium repens - Dutch Clover.
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  • 6 lb The seeds should be thoroughly mixed, and very evenly sown, after which the surface should be raked over to bury them, and then rolled down while dry so as to finish it off smooth and level.
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  • By this method loo lb of good seeds yield about 5 gallons of pure oil.
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  • The power of the pumping-engines is taken on the basis of 12 h.p. per moo hectares for every metre that the water has to be raised, or stated in another form, the engines must be capable of raising nearly 9 lb of water through I yd.
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  • Such aggregations of hyphae frequently become knotted up into dense masses of interwoven and closely packed hyphae, varying in size from that of a pin's head or a pea (Peziza, Coprinus) to that of a man's fist or head, and weighing io to 25 lb or more (Polyporus Mylittae, P. tumulosus, Lentinus Woermanni, P. Sapurema, &c.).
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  • At Hourpes, in order to save the expense of this remelting, the molten cast iron as it comes from the blast-furnace is poured directly into the puddling furnace, in large charges of about 2200 lb, which are thus about four times as large as those of common puddling furnaces.
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  • The per capita consumption of iron in Great Britain, excluding exports, has been calculated as 144 lb in 1855 and 250 lb in 1890, that of the United States as 117 lb for 1855, 300 lb for 1890 and some 378 lb for 1899, and that of the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany for 1906 as about a quarter of a ton, so that the British per capita consumption is about four-fold and the American about five-fold that of 1855.
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  • 4 gives an outside view of a 30-H.P. engine capable of using water at a pressure of 700 lb per sq.
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  • The total upward pressure on this piston is calculated to be equal to 150,000 lb; hence the shaft-bearings are practically relieved from pressure when the wheels are running.
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  • In spite of this, however, the average yield in the profitable mines is only from 0.2 carat to o 6 carat per load of 1600 lb, or on an average about IIgrs.
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  • This extraordinary diamond weighed 30254 carats (13 lb) and was clear and water white; the largest of its surfaces appeared to be a cleavage plane, so that it might be only a portion of a much larger stone.
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  • At first the price of tea in England ranged from £6 to £10 per lb.
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  • In 1664 we find that the East India Company presented the king with 2 lb and 2 oz.
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  • But their instructions were considerably exceeded, for the quantity imported in 1678 was 4713 lb, a quantity which seems to have glutted the market for several years.
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  • During the closing years of the century the amount brought over seems to have been, on the average, about 20,000 lb a year.
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  • In 1703 orders were given for "75, 000 lb Singlo (green), 10,000 lb imperial, and 20,000 lb bohea."
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  • As the 18th century progressed the use of tea in England rapidly increased, and by the close of the century the rate of consumption exceeded an average of 2 lb per person per annum, a rate in excess of that of to-day of all people except those of Mongol and Anglo-Saxon origin.
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  • In 1836 there was sent to London i lb of tea made from indigenous leaves; in 1837 5 lb of Assam tea were sent; in 1838 the quantity sent was 12 small boxes, and 95 boxes reached London in 1839.
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  • This auction is most interesting as being the first of British-grown tea, and it included about 6000 lb.
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  • In January 1840 the Assam Company was formed to take over the early tea garden of the East India Company, and this, the premier company, is still in existence, having produced up to 1907 no less than 117,000,000 lb of tea and paid in dividends X1,360,000 or 730 per cent.
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  • It is no longer the first company in extent of yield, as the Consolidated Tea and Lands Company produced in 1907 about 15,000,000 lb of tea, besides other products.
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  • Excluding therefore from any record the quantities produced for internal consumption in China and Japan (that from the former alone has been estimated at a total of 2,000,000,000 lb), the following are the acreage and production of the world as taken from the latest recorded statistics available in 1908: - 726, 601,000 The quantity from China includes about 16,000,000 lb imported from India, Ceylon and Java, and worked up with China teas into bricks and tablets.
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  • Out of that total, Great Britain consumed only about 5,000,000 Ib, against a consumption of 126,000,000 lb of China tea in 1879.
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  • Green tea is represented by 28,000,000 lb, and this went chiefly to the United States of America, to Central Asia and to North Africa.
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  • The remainder, 80,000,000 lb, is brick China and tablet tea sent entirely to Asiatic and European green tea, Russia.
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  • For transit they are packed twelve together in hides sewn up while moist, which contract to make a strong tight package of 60 to 70 lb weight.
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  • At 7 to 10 years old, when in full Individual estates of large area gave as much as 1280 lb per acre.
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  • In Ceylon the average yield per acre was 440 Ib, but there are verified records of 996 lb per acre within the year from an estate of 458 acres.
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  • On the same property an area of loo acres gave 1100 lb per acre on the average over a period of 18 years.
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  • China Unknown Japan The countries of smallerconsumption absorbed about 25,000,000 lb but there is a considerable excess in the returns of production over those of consumption.
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  • The rate per head of population within the United Kingdom has not increased much during recent years, and in the Australasian colonies it has apparently fallen greatly as compared with recorded averages of 12 lb per head in Victoria and 9 lb in New South Wales in 1884.
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  • The following table gives the approximate rates of duty per English lb during 1907 in places not referred to above:- Austria and91d.
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  • The diagonal line shows the average price per lb of all Indian tea sold in the London public auctions.
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  • France, considering that it is England's nearest neighbour, has a remarkably small tea consumption: 06 lb per person per annum, or about i hth only of the English rate.
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  • Impure teas are not permitted to pass into consumption, but the quantity condemned after analysis as unfit for food in the year 1906 was 41 packages, out of a total of 317,000,000 lb.
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  • If but 3000 gallons hourly trickle over and through an acre, and if we assume each gallon to contain no more than onetenth of a grain of plant food of the three sorts just named taken together, still the total, during a season including ninety days of actual irrigation, will not be less than 9 lb per acre.
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  • It is a large prolific lard-hog, easily making 300 lb in eight months.
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  • The sow is a prolific breeder and good mother, weighing, when mature but not fat, 450 lb - the boar averaging 600 lb, and barrows at six to eight months 350 lb.
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  • At Vermont Station, in a 127 days' test, Chester Whites made an average gain of 1.36 lb and dressed 84.5% carcase, and they can gain fully 1 lb of live weight for 3 lb of grain consumed.
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  • Of the fatted live weight of a pig 83% is butcher's carcase, and 91% of the increase from 100 to 200 lb is carcase.
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  • From 3 to 5 lb of meal consumed results in an increase of i lb of live weight in a pig, which is the most economical meat producer on a farm.
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  • Fjord's Danish experiments show that for fattening pigs i lb of ryeor barley-meal is equivalent to 6 lb of skim-milk or 12 lb of whey, and i lb of meal equivalent to 8 lb of mangolds or 4 lb of potatoes.
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  • Specimens of 12 lb are common, but the species is said to attain occasionally as much as 24 lb in weight.
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  • Weights of to lb each are carried at a distance of to in.
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  • Wiechert has also constructed a seismometer on the same principle, but in which the stationary mass is smaller, being adjustable between 80 and 200 kilos (180 and 440 lb).
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  • If of fair size, twenty of them weigh about 1 lb.
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  • The okieh equals 1.32 oz., the rotl .99 Iii, the oke 2~75 lb.
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