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layman

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layman

layman Sentence Examples

  • Abbot, though a layman, received the degree of S.

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  • Why the layman was forbidden a mixture of wool and linen (sha'atnez, Deut.

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  • The king's son Louis, a layman of twenty-one, was made archbishop of Lyons.

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  • He further tells us that in the ninth year of his reign he formally joined the Buddhist community as a layman, in the eleventh year he became a member of the order, and in the thirteenth he "set out for the Great Wisdom" (the Sambodhi), which is the Buddhist technical term for entering upon the well-known, eightfold path to Nirvana.

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  • As chivalry directed the layman to defend what was right, so the preaching of the Crusades directed him to attack what was wrong - the possession by "infidels" of the Sepulchre of Christ.

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  • But even the entrance upon the very first stage implies something more than, and something fundamentally different from, the life of an ordinary layman, however morally excellent this life may be.

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  • It was considered an act of blasphemy for a layman to pronounce the Tetragrammaton.

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  • It is, he says, the " authority of the church " which has constituted the difference between the governing body and the laity, and in an emergency a layman may baptize and celebrate (Exhort.

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  • Writers, savants, poets, artists, noble and plebeian, layman and cleric, without any previous concert, or obvious connexion, were working towards that ideal of political liberty which was to unite all the Magyars.

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  • Thus "the great unknown" from the Oberland is the ideal character, "who illustrates how God does his work for the world and for the church through a divinely trained and spiritually illuminated layman," just as William Langland in England about the same time drew the figure of Piers Plowman.

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  • Jesus in the painted window of Mansfeld church, stern of face, sword in hand, sitting on a rainbow, coming to judge; an altarpiece at Magdeburg, in which a ship with its crew was sailing on to heaven, carrying no layman on board; the deeds of St Elizabeth emblazoned on the window of St George's parish church at Eisenach; the living pictures of a young nobleman who had turned monk to save his soul, of a monk, the holiest man Luther had ever known, who was aged far beyond his years by his maceration; and many others of the same kind.

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  • 858), and upon refusing to resign his office was illegally deposed, while Photius, although a layman, received all the necessary sacerdotal orders within six days, and was installed as patriarch in his place.

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  • Meanwhile the writings and personal example of the pious rector of Llanddowror were stirring other Welshmen in the work of revival, chief amongst them being Howell Harris of Trevecca (1713-1773), a layman of brilliant abilities but erratic temperament; and Daniel Rowland (1713-1790), curate of Llangeitho in Mid-Cardiganshire, who became in time the most eloquent and popular preacher throughout all Wales.

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  • It consists of a small number of bishops and priests nominated by the tsar, and is assisted by a " procurator," who is a layman, who explains to it the limits of its jurisdiction and serves as the medium of communication between it and the autocrat and secular authorities.

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  • The general result of the law previous to the Benefices Act 1898, as gathered from the statutes and decisions, may be exhibited as follows: (1) it was not simony for a layman or spiritual person not purchasing for himself to purchase, while the church was full, as advowson or next presentation, however immediate the prospect of a vacancy; (2) it was not simony for a spiritual person to purchase for himself a life or any greater estate in an advowson, and to present himself thereto; (3) it was not simony to exchange benefices under an agreement that no payment was to be made for dilapidations on either side; (4) it was not simony to make certain assignments of patronage under the Church Building and New Parishes Acts (9 & 10 Vict.

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  • He was at a disadvantage because, being a layman, he could not directly take part in the discussions of the council.

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  • To his mind the convent is not far removed from the church, and as a layman he is not at all inclined to accept the principles of monachism as applying to himself or to square his views of history in accordance with them.

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  • The non-charismatic conception of healing, no longer the "gift" of some layman in the community (1 Cor.

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  • The right of every layman to the offices of the church is established by statute without reference to opinions, and it is not possible to say what opinions, if any, would operate to disqualify him.

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  • As a layman his name was Pierre Guibours.

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  • Coleridge (1772-1834), probably the most typical figure of his period - another layman.

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  • No formal excommunication of Origen appears to have been decreed; it was considered sufficient to have him degraded to the position of a layman.

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  • (1903) p. 603, is the work of a Puritan-minded, cultured Broad Church layman.

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  • His was essentially a layman's view of the situation.

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  • The knowledge of law shown in the plays is very much what a universal observer must have picked up. Lawyers always underestimate the legal knowledge of an intelligent layman.

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  • 32) allow a layman to preach, if he be skilful and reverent, and the language of St Ignatius (Ad Smyrn.

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  • the regular duty of the bishop, but he could devolve it, if he thought fit, on a presbyter or deacon, or even on a layman.

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  • 1616), rector of Babworth, and Brewster, a layman of Scrooby in Nottinghamshire.

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  • This position, we see, can be reached by various paths: the priest may become indispensable through the growth of ritual observances and precautions too complicated for a layman to master, or he may lay claim to special nearness to the gods on the ground, it may be, of his race, or, it may be, of habitual practices of purity and asceticism which cannot be combined with the duties of ordinary life, as, for example, celibacy was required of priestesses of Vesta at Rome.

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  • At the Restoration he was favourably received at court, and in 1665 would have received the provostship of Eton, if he would have taken orders; but this he refused to do, on the ground that his writings on religious subjects would have greater weight coming from a layman than a paid minister of the Church.

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  • Beginning with a class gathered from the streets, he opened (1858) a Sunday school in North Market Hall, which was organized in 1863 as the Illinois Street Church, and afterwards became the Chicago Avenue Church, of which he was layman pastor.

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  • When a layman found himself in doubt, his duty was not to consult his conscience, but to take the advice of his confessor; while the confessor himself was bound to follow the rules laid down by the casuistical experts, who delivered themselves of a kind of "counsel's opinion" on all knotty points of practical morality.

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  • by Thonmi, a Tibetan layman.

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  • The administrative subdivisions of the Lhasa country, of which there are fifty-four, are called jong, or " prefecture," each of which is under the rule of two jong-pon, the one a lama, the other a layman.

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  • The confession of a dying man might be taken by any layman present, and written down in order to be shown to the priest when he arrived.

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  • The general rule was said to be that all lands within a parish are subject to tithes, and a layman was not allowed to prescribe generally that his lands were exempt; but he had to show a special exemption, and no length of possession was regarded in law in view of the maxim nullum tempos occurrit ecclesiae, although equity did take account of it.

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  • The Chronicle still survived as a medium of conveying information, though more often than not this was now written by a layman; but new stores of information were coming into existence, or rather the old stores were expanding and taking a different form.

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  • They were sent out in twos, an ecclesiastic and a layman, and were generally complete strangers to the district which they administered.

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  • Thus in the story of the good layman Citta, it is an aspiration expressed on the deathbed; 2 in the dialogue on the subject, it is a thought dwelt on during life, 3 in the numerous stories in the Peta and Vimana V atthus it is usually some isolated act, in the discussions in the Dhamma Sangani it is some mental disposition, which is the Karma (doing or action) in the one life determining the position of the individual in the next.

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  • The priestly office is hereditary, and no one can become a priest who was not born such; but the son of a priest may become a layman.

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  • The Franciscans had no sympathy for profane knowledge, even among the Mexicans, - sometimes publicly burning quantities of books of a scientific or miscellaneous nature; and the reading of Fenelon's Telemaque brought excommunications on a layman.

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  • In 1410 Jerome, who had incurred the hostility of the archbishop of Prague by his speeches in favour of Wycliffe's teaching, went to Ofen, where King Sigismund of Hungary resided, and, though a layman, preached before the king denouncing strongly the rapacity and immorality of the clergy.

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  • Thus he may grant indulgences, issue censures, give dispensations, canonize saints, institute bishops, create cardinals - in short, perform all the acts of his jurisdiction, even though he be no more than a layman; but by custom certain of his more solemn acts are postponed till after the ceremony of his coronation, from which his pontificate is officially dated.

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  • Invested, as society grows more complex, with a sanctity increasingly superior to that of the layman, the priest-king becomes the representative of the community as repository of its luck, whilst, as controller of all sacred forces that bear thereon, he is, as Dr Frazer puts it, " dynamical centre of the universe" (The Golden Bough (2nd ed.), i.

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  • He was associate professor of history and political economy at Bryn Mawr in1885-1888and at Wesleyan University in 1888-1890; professor of jurisprudence and political economy at Princeton in 1890-1895, of jurisprudence in 1895-1897, and subsequently of jurisprudence and politics; and in 1902 he became president of Princeton University, being the first layman to hold that office.

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  • This revised code enabled the bishop to appoint a learned and discreet layman to act as his chancellor, to advise him in legal matters and be his assessor at diocesan synods.

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  • In cases of imminent death a layman or a woman could baptize, and in the case of new-born children it is often necessary.

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  • The Old Catholic separation followed, but Acton did not personally join the seceders, and the authorities prudently refrained from forcing the hands of so competent and influential an English layman.

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  • It is to be noticed that the clergy were never admitted to this public discipline; but a cleric might be deposed and then admitted as a layman.

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  • So also a layman."

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  • C. Hippeau, 1868), and other poems, containing less historical 1 An "advocate" was a layman who had been invested with part of an ecclesiastic estate, on condition that he defended the rest, and exercised the blood-ban in lieu of the ecclesiastical owner (see Advocate, sec. Advocatus ecclesiae).

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  • He was a layman (Paul Wernle), without technical Jewish lore.

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  • The theory proceeded thus: A layman could not be expected to examine minutely into a point on which 1 The refusal of the council of Constance to condemn Jean Petit's advocacy of assassination is a striking example of this weakness.

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  • He was a wealthy layman who had devoted his life to a study of the occult sciences and the deeper problems of philosophy.

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  • In 1600 he was appointed proctor of his college and catechetical lecturer in the university, though still a layman, and was ordained deacon and priest on the same day, in 1601, while still under the canonical age, by his uncle the primate.

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  • The sixth decree of the Lateran synod of 10J9 forbade any cleric to accept Church office from a layman.

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  • To Gregory it was intolerable that a layman, whether emperor, king or baron, should invest a churchman with the emblems of spiritual office; ecclesiastical investiture should come only from ecclesiastics.

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  • At the celebrated council of Clermont (1095), at which the first crusade was preached, Urban strengthened the former prohibitions by declaring that no one might accept any spiritual office from a layman, or take an oath of fealty to any layman.

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  • But on the night of the 20th-21st of March, having donned the garments of a layman, with a cross-bow slung at his side, he succeeded in making his escape from Constance, accompanied only by a single servant, and took refuge first in the castle of Schaffhausen, then in that of Laufenburg, then at Freiburg-im-Breisgau, and finally at Brisach, whence he hoped to reach Alsace, and doubtless ultimately Avignon, under the protection of an escort sent by the duke of Burgundy.

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  • avulsion fracture - in layman's terms part of the bone has come away.

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  • The article contains a couple of simple diagrams and some straightforward help for the layman as well as advice for the experienced farrier.

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  • All this diversity in size and type of plants should produce what will appear to the layman as a chaotic jumble.

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  • layman's terms, is taper relief?

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  • layman's language the lessons we are taught in our Lodges.

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  • layman's understanding.

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  • layman's interpretation of the relevant law.

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  • layman's point of view, a few queries arise.

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  • Create a clear picture that can be easily understood by the common layman.

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  • Yet he knows how to present the breathtaking discoveries to the educated layman in a grand overview from the quarks to the Universe.

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  • Very rarely did any layman open his mouth to speak or exhort except in the Sabbath school.

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  • gives a very layman 's view of academic and corporate research on some of the potential " big stories " of tomorrow.

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  • Lets have a layman 's option: scrap the road fund license.

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  • He was clearly not a priest, but what we would now call a layman.

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  • layman interested in the subject.

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  • The writing is clear and aimed at the intelligent layman.

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  • He wanted the average layman to have access to the word of God.

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  • This setup process will explain in simple layman 's terms how to get the best results from your Pro Cinema I satellites.

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  • He was the first layman to hold the post.

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  • layman are an Order of Catholic laymen who band together to serve the Church, the Priests, the Community and their families.

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  • To the Layman, this argument seems of dubious veracity because there have not been any cases of bits falling off.

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  • Thomas Cromwell, a layman, was appointed vicar-general to rule the English Church in the King's name.

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  • Scientific discoveries often seem rather whimsical to the layman.

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  • A second theory is contended for by Principal Campbell in his treatise on the eldership, and by others also, that there is no warrant in Scripture for the eldership as it exists in the Presbyterian Church; that the ruling elder is not, and is not designed to be, a counterpart of the New Testament elder; in other words, that he is not a presbyter, but only a layman chosen to represent the laity in the church courts and permitted to assist in the government of the church.

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  • Censures were as follows: (i) Suspension from attending divine offices or ab ingressu ecclesiae, more appropriate for a layman.

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  • The earlier apologists dispute the natural immortality of the soul; Athanasius himself, in De Incarnatione Dei, §§ 4, 5, tones down the teaching of Wisdom; and the somewhat eccentric writer Arnobius, a layman - from Justin Martyr downwards apologetics has always been largely in the hands of laymen - stands for what has recently been called " conditional immortality " - eternal life for the righteous, the children of God, alone.

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  • A layman's work may have the advantage of originality or the drawback of imperfect knowledge.

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  • criticism; and a layman, the great Lessing) took the form of " rationalism " within the church - interpreting Bible texts by main force in a way which the age thought " enlightened " (H.

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  • At their head was Gregory, the Patriarch; a layman, said later to be Rockycana's nephew; in Michael Bradacius, the priest of Senftenberg, they found a spiritual teacher; and fresh recruits came streaming in, not only from the other little societies at Kremsir, Meseritsch, Chelcic, Wilenow and Diwischau, but also from the Waldenses, the Adamites, the Utraquist Church at KOniggratz, and the university of Prague They called themselves Jednota Bratrska, i.e.

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  • No heathen may tread the outer court, no layman the inner court, while the holiest of all may not be trodden even by the priest Ezekiel but only by the angel who accompanies him.

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  • While the papacy thus bent its energies to the destruction of the Crusades in their genuine sense, and preferred to use for its own political objects what was meant for Jerusalem, a layman took up the derelict cause with all the religious zeal which any pope had ever displayed.

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  • 8), " Let that be esteemed a valid Eucharist which is celebrated in the presence of the bishop or of some one commissioned by him," is really inconsistent with any firmly established principle that celebration by a layman was in itself absolutely null (see also Eucharist).

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  • declared that to lead a solitary life, to refuse to accommodate oneself to the prevailing manners of society, and to frequent unauthorized religious meetings were abundant grounds of suspicion; while later canonists were accustomed to give lists of deeds which made the doers suspect: a priest who did not celebrate mass, a layman who was seen in clerical robes, those who favoured heretics, received them as guests, gave them safe conduct, tolerated them, trusted them, defended them, fought under them or read their books were all to be suspect" (T.M.

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  • The great wealth of the old monastic orders exposed them, especially in France and Italy, to the vicious system of commendation, whereby a bishop, an ecclesiastic, or even a layman was appointed " commendatory abbot " of a monastery, merely for the purpose of drawing the revenues (see Abbot); the monasteries were often deprived even of necessary maintenance, the communities dwindled, and regular observance became impossible.

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  • [as layman] (d.

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  • A benefice was held in commendam when granted either temporarily until a vacancy was filled up, or to a layman, or, in case of a monastery or abbey, to a secular cleric to enjoy the revenues and privileges for life (see Abbot), or to a bishop to hold together with his see.

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  • The life of a recluse is held to be the most conducive to that state of sweet serenity at which the more ardent disciples aim; but that of a layman, of a believing householder, is held in high honour; and a believer who does not as yet feel himself able or willing to cast off the ties of home or of business, may yet "enter the paths," and by a life of rectitude and kindness ensure for himself a rebirth under more favourable conditions for his growth in holiness.

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  • The discussion is written to interest the hypothetical layman, so read on !

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  • Thomas Cromwell, a layman, was appointed vicar-general to rule the English Church in the King 's name.

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  • The modern term, IVF (in vitro fertilization), has replaced the colloquial "test tube baby" in both scientific and layman vocabularies.

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  • Nolo is an encyclopedia referencing legal subjects, in layman's terms.

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  • That having been said, here is my layman's opinion.

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  • Quite literally, these were clothes worn by athletes that grew in popularity and unexpectedly transitioned to the layman's wardrobe.

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  • So, in layman terms, you throw a batarang and knock over some barrels and then go in for the fight.

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  • They give you the layman's explanation when it comes to ovulation timing and visiting the doctor for the first time after you suspect you have issues.

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  • Their website contains a wealth of information for both the layman and the health professional.

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  • In 1959, Philips introduced the floating shaving head that, in layman's terms, is a structure that provides a wide range of movement to the shaver head to closely follow the contours of the skin.

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  • In layman's terms, this technology wicks away annoying, and unsightly moisture, but at the same time, adds strength to the bottom of the shoe.

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  • Despite their trendy reputation, atomic clock radios represent cutting edge engineering technology deftly placed under the layman's control.

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  • The word comes from the Latin idiota, meaning "ordinary person or layman".

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  • The South Beach Diet book explains the difference between good fats and bad fats, making it clear to the layman.

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  • A blogger for a stock trading company, for example, would blog on market trades, how to trade and provide their expertise so that the layman can understand and benefit from the blogger's expertise.

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  • The time had now come for Gregory, who was still a layman and father of two sons, to receive ordination; so he went to Caesarea, where Leontius ordained and consecrated him catholicos or vicar-general of Armenia.

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  • He at once felt that this was his vocation, and the next day, layman as he was, he went up to Assisi and began to preach to the poor 0209).

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  • Nicolas of Basel, the mysterious layman from whose visit Tauler dates his true religious life, seems to have been the chief organizing force among the Gottesfreunde.

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  • St Louis, the true type of the religious crusader, once said that a layman ought only to argue with a blasphemer against Christian law by running his sword into the bowels of the blasphemer as far as it would go: 1 Frederick II.

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  • In part they had provided a field in which the layman could prove that he too was a priest; in part they had brought the West into a living and continuous contact with a new faith and a new civilization.

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  • He was a layman, marching and fighting in the ranks; and thus he is additionally valuable as representing the opinion of the ordinary crusader.

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  • His functions were those of a secretary; and, though he profited by benefices conferred on him in lieu of salary, he remained a layman to the end of his life.

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  • Lavicount Anderdon (The Life of Thomas Ken, Bishop of Bath and Wells, by a Layman, 1851; 2nd ed., 1854) and of Dean Plumptre (2 vols., 1888; revised, 1890).

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  • These chaplains are classified as follows: - Ecclesiastical, if the foundation has been recognized officially as a benefice; Lay, if this recognition has not been obtained; Mercenary, if the person who has been entrusted with the duty of performing or procuring the desired celebration is a layman (such persons also are sometimes called "Lay Chaplains"); Collative, if it is provided that a bishop shall collate or confer the right to act upon the accepted candidate, who otherwise could not be recognized as an ecclesiastical chaplain.

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  • - In Turkey these consist of the Dominican mission, established at Mosul during the 18th century, and in Persia of the French Lazarist mission, which sprang out of some schools established by a French layman and scientific traveller, Eugene Bore, in 1838.

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  • It includes Dr Andrewes, afterwards bishop of Winchester, who was familiar with Hebrew, Chaldee, Syriac, Greek, Latin and at least ten other languages, while his knowledge of patristic literature was unrivalled; Dr Overall, regius professor of theology and afterwards bishop of Norwich; Bedwell, the greatest Arabic scholar of Europe; Sir Henry Savile, the most learned layman of his time; and, to say nothing of others well known to later generations, nine who were then or afterwards professors of Hebrew or of Greek at Oxford or Cambridge.

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  • was compelled to decide that priests who had kept two or more concubines, successively or simultaneously, did not thereby incur the disabilities which attended digamists; or, in other words, that a layman who had contracted two lawful marriages and then proceeded to ordination on the death of his second wife, could be absolved only by the pope; whereas the concubinary priest, "as a man branded with simple fornication," might receive a valid dispensation from his own bishop (Letter to archbishop of Lund in 1212.

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  • Although a layman he was granted the prebend of Ilfracombe in 1589, and in 15 9 7 he resigned his position at Westminster on being made Clarencieux king-at-arms, an appointment which caused some ill-feeling, and the York herald, Ralph Brooke, led an attack on the genealogical accuracy of the Britannia, and accused its author of plagiarism.

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  • Two most interesting provisions, to which the clergy offered no opposition, were: (I) if a dispute arose between a clerk and a layman concerning a tenement which the clerk claimed as free-alms (frankalmoign) and the layman as a lay-fee, it should be determined by the recognition of twelve lawful men before the king's justice whether it belonged to free-alms or lay-fee, and if it were found to belong to free-alms then the plea was to be held in the ecclesiastical court, but if to lay-fee, in the court of the king or of one of his magnates; (2) a declaration of the procedure for election to bishoprics and royal abbeys, generally considered to state the terms of the settlement made between Henry I.

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  • He writes on theological subjects with the detachment of a thoughtful layman, and is witty without being flippant.

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  • layman's guide, I found particularly valuable.

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  • As an ecclesiastical offence it would at this moment be almost impossible to say what opinion, in the case of a layman at least, would be deemed heretical.

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  • Apparently, if a proper case could be made out, an ecclesiastical court might still sentence a layman to excommunication for heresy, but by no other means could his opinions be brought under censure.

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  • In 1907 he published The Creed of a Layman, Apologia pro fide mea, in explanation of his religious position.

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  • Thus it is applied in connexion with casuistry for the view that the layman in difficult matters of conscience may safely follow a doctrine inculcated by a recognized doctor of the church.

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  • Prosper was a layman, but he threw himself with ardour into the religious controversies of his day, defending Augustine and propagating orthodoxy.

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  • The first class hold (1) that oaths are forbidden by the gospel, (2) that capital punishment is not allowed to the civil power, (3) that any layman may consecrate the sacrament of the altar, and (4) that the Roman Church is not the Church of Christ.

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