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laurels

laurels Sentence Examples

  • By their sufferings no less than by their deeds of daring, her citizens showed themselves to be sublime, devoted and disinterested, winning the purest laurels which give lustre to Italian story.

  • He chiefly had borne the brunt and won the laurels of the unprecedented fight against deficit in which Italy had been involved since 1862.

  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.

  • Sequoia and the tulip-tree still remain; figs are abundant; laurels are represented by Sassafras and camphor; herbaceous plants (Ranunculaceae, Cruciferae, Umbelliferae) are present, though, as might be expected, only fragmentarily preserved.

  • Thus in the Mediterranean region the large groups of palms, figs, myrtles and laurels are each only represented by single surviving species.

  • In Malaya and eastward the forests are rich in arborescent figs, laurels, myrtles, nutmegs, oaks and bamboos.

  • The chief trees belong to the orders of Terebinthaceae, Sapindaceae, Meliaceae, Clusiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, Leguminosae, laurels, oaks and figs, with Dilleniaceae, Sapotaceae and nutmegs.

  • David's good fortune did not desert him; he won his wife, and in this new advancement continued to grow in the popular favour, and to gain fresh laurels in the field.

  • It is, however, highly probable that he meant to strike at London if naval affairs went well, but that he was glad to have at hand an alternative which would shroud a maritime failure under military laurels.

  • During the disastrous Swedish War of 1643-1645 Frederick was appointed generalissimo of the duchies by his father, but the laurels he won were scanty, chiefly owing to his quarrels with the Earl-Marshal Anders Bille, who commanded the Danish forces.

  • In the northern temperate zone we find forests of a single species, others of three or four species; in this great tropical forest the habit of growth is solitary and an acre of ground will contain hundreds of species - palms, myrtles, acacias, mimosas, cecropias, euphorbias, malvaceas, laurels, cedrellas, bignonias, bombaceas, apocyneas, malpigias, lecythises, swartzias, &c. The vegetation of the lower river-margins, which are periodically flooded, differs in some particulars from that of the higher ground, and the same variation is to be found between the forests of the upper and lower Amazon, and between the Amazon and its principal tributaries.

  • Christian De Wet, who had first come into prominence as the captor of Lord Roberts's convoy at Waterval, and was now operating east and south-west of Bloemfontein in order to counteract the influence of Roberts's numerous flying columns which rode hither and thither offering peace, added to his laurels by ambushing Broadwood's mounted brigade and horse artillery at Sannah's Post, just outside Bloemfontein, on the 31st of March.

  • The cavalry charges in this quarter are celebrated in the history of the mounted arm; and Kellermann, the hero of Marengo, won fresh laurels against the cavalry of Liechtenstein's command.

  • The conclusion of the treaties of Westphalia prevented him from winning the military laurels he so ardently desired, but as the Swedish plenipotentiary at the executive congress of Nuremberg, he had unrivalled opportunities of learning diplomacy, in which science he speedily became a past-master.

  • In order to justify his newly-won laurels, Luynes undertook an expedition against the Protestants, but died of a fever in the midst of the campaign, at Longueville in Guienne, on the 15th of December 1621.

  • The Southerners undeniably rested on their laurels, and enabled McClellan, who was now called to the chief military command at Washington, to raise, organize and train the famous Army of the Potomac, which, in defeat and victory, won its reputation as one of the finest armies of modern history.

  • It has been discovered that at the beginning of the Eocene the lake of Rilly occupied a vast area east of the present site of Paris; a water-course fell there in cascades, and Munier-Chalinas has reconstructed all the details of that singular locality; plants which loved moist places, such as Marchantia, Asplenium, the covered banks overshadowed by lindens, laurels, magnolias and palms; there also were found the vine and the ivy; mosses (Fontinalis) and Chara sheltered the crayfish (Astacus); insects and even flowers have left their delicate impressions in the travertine which formed the borders of this lake.

  • In the Cathedral Square (Plaza de Armas), embracing two citysquares, and shaded - like all the plazas of the island - with laurels and royal palms, are a statue of Isabel the Catholic, and two marble lions given by Queen Isabel II.; elsewhere there are statues of General Clouet and Marshal Serrano, once captaingeneral.

  • He distinguished himself in the expedition to Santo Domingo in many fights, and especially in a daring reconnaissance with few men into the heart of the enemy's lines, for which he got the cross with laurels of San Fernando.

  • Under Goethe's stimulus he won fresh laurels in that domain of philosophical lyric which he had opened with Die Kiinstler; and in Das Ideal and das Leben, Die Macht des Gesanges, Wiirde der Frauen, and Der Spaziergang, he produced masterpieces of reflective poetry which have not their equal in German literature.

  • Their relations continued to be strained, although in the campaigns of 1807 and 1809, in which Bavaria was among the allies of France, Louis won his laurels in the field.

  • and the Parque de la India (these two names are now practically abandoned) to the Parque de Colon or Campo de Marte, is the Prado, 1 a wide and handsome promenade and drive, shaded with laurels and lined with fine houses and clubs.

  • In 1907 a hurricane destroyed the greater part of the laurels of the Prado and the royal palms of the Parque de Colon.

  • But the victor's laurels were reserved for Ariosto, whose Orlando Furioso is the purest and most perfect extant example of Renaissance poetry.

  • They journeyed from city to city, attracted by promises of higher pay, and allured by ever-growing laurels of popular fame.

  • The only poet of importance who contested the laurels of Dalin was a woman.

  • He had won laurels in a public disputation at Augsburg in 1514, when he had defended the lawfulness of putting out capital at interest; again at Bologna in 1515, on the same subject and on the question of predestination; and these triumphs had been repeated at Vienna in 1516.

  • His controversial ardour was, indeed, somewhat damped by Luther's refusal to answer his arguments, and with a view to earning fresh laurels he turned his attention to Switzerland and the Zwinglians.

  • " On days of rejoicing," he says, " we do not shade our door-posts with laurels nor encroach upon the day-light with lamps " (die laeto non laureis postes obumbramus nec lucernis diem infringimus).

  • At the two corners on the western side are banks of laurels 15 or 16 ft.

  • In the tropical zone large figs abound, Terminalia, Shorea (sal), laurels, many Leguminosae, Bombax, Artocarpus, bamboos and several palms, among which species of Calamus are remarkable, climbing over the largest trees; and this is the western limit of Cycas and Myristica (nutmeg).

  • Among the many varieties of trees and plants found are the date palm, mimosa, wild olive, giant sycamores, junipers and laurels, the myrrh and other gum trees (gnarled and stunted, these flourish most on the eastern foothills), a magnificent pine (the Natal yellow pine, which resists the attacks of the white ant), the fig, orange, lime, pomegranate, peach, apricot, banana and other fruit trees; the grape vine (rare), blackberry and raspberry; the cotton and indigo plants, and occasionally the sugar cane.

  • Sir Colin Campbell, a veteran soldier whose laurels had been won in many battles from the Peninsula to the Crimea, was despatched from England to take command =of the army in India.

  • Sir Walter Scott found the Abbey garden at Celbridge still full of laurels, several of which she was accustomed to plant whenever she expected Swift, and the table at which they had been used to sit was still shown.

  • It was his resolute and energetic leading that contributed mainly to the victory of Spicheren (6th August), and won the only laurels gained on the Prussian right wing at Gravelotte (18th August).

  • Even a lady of Venice, Cassandra Fedele, in 1480, gained her laurels in defence of Averroist theses.

  • He was the son of Tellis and Argileonis, and won his first laurels by the relief of Methone, which was besieged by the Athenians (431 B.C.).

  • The art of these countries is mainly geometrical, and allows only of monograms crowned with laurels, of peacocks, of animals gambolling amid foliage, of fruit and flowers, of crosses which are either svastikas of Hindu and Mycenaean type, or so lost in enveloping arabesques as to be merely decorative.

  • 4 Later he secured a field command, through Washington, and won laurels at Yorktown, where he led the American column in the 1 These facts were first definitely determined by Mrs Gertrude Atherton from the Danish Archives in Denmark and the West Indies; see article in North American Review, Aug.

  • These hills are densely clothed to their summits with an exuberant growth of olives, figs, myrtles, laurels, oranges, aloes, vines and other sub-tropical plants.

  • Heer described from this deposit at Moletein 13 genera, of which 7 are still living, containing 18 species, viz.: 1 fern, 4 Conifers, I palm, 2 figs, 1 Credneria, 2 laurels, I Aralia, Chondrophyllum (of uncertain affinities), 2 magnolias, 2 species of Myrtaceae and a species of walnut.

  • The most abundant species of this forest were the oaks and chestnuts, of which a dozen have been collected; laurels, Viburnum, ivy, several Aralias, Dewalquea, a Thuja and several Ferns may be added.

  • Other beds yield principally palms, willows, laurels, Eucalyptus or Ferns; but there are no Cycads.

  • The Laurineae were plentiful, and include various true laurels, camphor-trees, cinnamon, Persea and Sassafras.

  • Despite having won this industry accolade, I have absolutely no intention of resting on my laurels.

  • crowned with laurels, and the last of the ship's kettles had changed hands.

  • No-one could accuse Sony of resting on its laurels, and the range of consumer camcorders produced by the electronics giant continues to expand.

  • He could boast also of the higher honor of having been the first born American to win laurels in the British ring.

  • The regiment gained additional laurels in the action which followed.

  • Turin hopes she'll win fresh laurels and - fingers crossed!

  • Never one to rest on past laurels we have actively embraced the new technology that builds a better boat.

  • Howard Payne and Paul Gibson shared the victory laurels at a hot and sunny Snetterton.

  • resting on laurels.

  • Holiday Success Two of our leading females were not resting on their laurels whilst on their holidays recently.

  • When the crusading zealots have pushed through the measures Iâve mentioned above are they going to rest on their laurels.

  • By their sufferings no less than by their deeds of daring, her citizens showed themselves to be sublime, devoted and disinterested, winning the purest laurels which give lustre to Italian story.

  • He chiefly had borne the brunt and won the laurels of the unprecedented fight against deficit in which Italy had been involved since 1862.

  • There were oaks, beeches (scarcely distinguishable from existing species), birches, planes and willows (one closely related to the living Salix candida), laurels, represented by Sassafras and Cinnamomum, magnolias and tulip trees (Liriodendron), myrtles, Liquidambar, Diospyros and ivy.

  • Sequoia and the tulip-tree still remain; figs are abundant; laurels are represented by Sassafras and camphor; herbaceous plants (Ranunculaceae, Cruciferae, Umbelliferae) are present, though, as might be expected, only fragmentarily preserved.

  • Thus in the Mediterranean region the large groups of palms, figs, myrtles and laurels are each only represented by single surviving species.

  • In Malaya and eastward the forests are rich in arborescent figs, laurels, myrtles, nutmegs, oaks and bamboos.

  • The chief trees belong to the orders of Terebinthaceae, Sapindaceae, Meliaceae, Clusiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, Leguminosae, laurels, oaks and figs, with Dilleniaceae, Sapotaceae and nutmegs.

  • David's good fortune did not desert him; he won his wife, and in this new advancement continued to grow in the popular favour, and to gain fresh laurels in the field.

  • It is, however, highly probable that he meant to strike at London if naval affairs went well, but that he was glad to have at hand an alternative which would shroud a maritime failure under military laurels.

  • During the disastrous Swedish War of 1643-1645 Frederick was appointed generalissimo of the duchies by his father, but the laurels he won were scanty, chiefly owing to his quarrels with the Earl-Marshal Anders Bille, who commanded the Danish forces.

  • In the northern temperate zone we find forests of a single species, others of three or four species; in this great tropical forest the habit of growth is solitary and an acre of ground will contain hundreds of species - palms, myrtles, acacias, mimosas, cecropias, euphorbias, malvaceas, laurels, cedrellas, bignonias, bombaceas, apocyneas, malpigias, lecythises, swartzias, &c. The vegetation of the lower river-margins, which are periodically flooded, differs in some particulars from that of the higher ground, and the same variation is to be found between the forests of the upper and lower Amazon, and between the Amazon and its principal tributaries.

  • Christian De Wet, who had first come into prominence as the captor of Lord Roberts's convoy at Waterval, and was now operating east and south-west of Bloemfontein in order to counteract the influence of Roberts's numerous flying columns which rode hither and thither offering peace, added to his laurels by ambushing Broadwood's mounted brigade and horse artillery at Sannah's Post, just outside Bloemfontein, on the 31st of March.

  • The cavalry charges in this quarter are celebrated in the history of the mounted arm; and Kellermann, the hero of Marengo, won fresh laurels against the cavalry of Liechtenstein's command.

  • The conclusion of the treaties of Westphalia prevented him from winning the military laurels he so ardently desired, but as the Swedish plenipotentiary at the executive congress of Nuremberg, he had unrivalled opportunities of learning diplomacy, in which science he speedily became a past-master.

  • In order to justify his newly-won laurels, Luynes undertook an expedition against the Protestants, but died of a fever in the midst of the campaign, at Longueville in Guienne, on the 15th of December 1621.

  • The Southerners undeniably rested on their laurels, and enabled McClellan, who was now called to the chief military command at Washington, to raise, organize and train the famous Army of the Potomac, which, in defeat and victory, won its reputation as one of the finest armies of modern history.

  • It has been discovered that at the beginning of the Eocene the lake of Rilly occupied a vast area east of the present site of Paris; a water-course fell there in cascades, and Munier-Chalinas has reconstructed all the details of that singular locality; plants which loved moist places, such as Marchantia, Asplenium, the covered banks overshadowed by lindens, laurels, magnolias and palms; there also were found the vine and the ivy; mosses (Fontinalis) and Chara sheltered the crayfish (Astacus); insects and even flowers have left their delicate impressions in the travertine which formed the borders of this lake.

  • In the Cathedral Square (Plaza de Armas), embracing two citysquares, and shaded - like all the plazas of the island - with laurels and royal palms, are a statue of Isabel the Catholic, and two marble lions given by Queen Isabel II.; elsewhere there are statues of General Clouet and Marshal Serrano, once captaingeneral.

  • He distinguished himself in the expedition to Santo Domingo in many fights, and especially in a daring reconnaissance with few men into the heart of the enemy's lines, for which he got the cross with laurels of San Fernando.

  • Under Goethe's stimulus he won fresh laurels in that domain of philosophical lyric which he had opened with Die Kiinstler; and in Das Ideal and das Leben, Die Macht des Gesanges, Wiirde der Frauen, and Der Spaziergang, he produced masterpieces of reflective poetry which have not their equal in German literature.

  • Their relations continued to be strained, although in the campaigns of 1807 and 1809, in which Bavaria was among the allies of France, Louis won his laurels in the field.

  • and the Parque de la India (these two names are now practically abandoned) to the Parque de Colon or Campo de Marte, is the Prado, 1 a wide and handsome promenade and drive, shaded with laurels and lined with fine houses and clubs.

  • In 1907 a hurricane destroyed the greater part of the laurels of the Prado and the royal palms of the Parque de Colon.

  • But the victor's laurels were reserved for Ariosto, whose Orlando Furioso is the purest and most perfect extant example of Renaissance poetry.

  • They journeyed from city to city, attracted by promises of higher pay, and allured by ever-growing laurels of popular fame.

  • The only poet of importance who contested the laurels of Dalin was a woman.

  • He had won laurels in a public disputation at Augsburg in 1514, when he had defended the lawfulness of putting out capital at interest; again at Bologna in 1515, on the same subject and on the question of predestination; and these triumphs had been repeated at Vienna in 1516.

  • His controversial ardour was, indeed, somewhat damped by Luther's refusal to answer his arguments, and with a view to earning fresh laurels he turned his attention to Switzerland and the Zwinglians.

  • " On days of rejoicing," he says, " we do not shade our door-posts with laurels nor encroach upon the day-light with lamps " (die laeto non laureis postes obumbramus nec lucernis diem infringimus).

  • At the two corners on the western side are banks of laurels 15 or 16 ft.

  • In the tropical zone large figs abound, Terminalia, Shorea (sal), laurels, many Leguminosae, Bombax, Artocarpus, bamboos and several palms, among which species of Calamus are remarkable, climbing over the largest trees; and this is the western limit of Cycas and Myristica (nutmeg).

  • Among the many varieties of trees and plants found are the date palm, mimosa, wild olive, giant sycamores, junipers and laurels, the myrrh and other gum trees (gnarled and stunted, these flourish most on the eastern foothills), a magnificent pine (the Natal yellow pine, which resists the attacks of the white ant), the fig, orange, lime, pomegranate, peach, apricot, banana and other fruit trees; the grape vine (rare), blackberry and raspberry; the cotton and indigo plants, and occasionally the sugar cane.

  • Sir Colin Campbell, a veteran soldier whose laurels had been won in many battles from the Peninsula to the Crimea, was despatched from England to take command =of the army in India.

  • Sir Walter Scott found the Abbey garden at Celbridge still full of laurels, several of which she was accustomed to plant whenever she expected Swift, and the table at which they had been used to sit was still shown.

  • It was his resolute and energetic leading that contributed mainly to the victory of Spicheren (6th August), and won the only laurels gained on the Prussian right wing at Gravelotte (18th August).

  • Even a lady of Venice, Cassandra Fedele, in 1480, gained her laurels in defence of Averroist theses.

  • He was the son of Tellis and Argileonis, and won his first laurels by the relief of Methone, which was besieged by the Athenians (431 B.C.).

  • The art of these countries is mainly geometrical, and allows only of monograms crowned with laurels, of peacocks, of animals gambolling amid foliage, of fruit and flowers, of crosses which are either svastikas of Hindu and Mycenaean type, or so lost in enveloping arabesques as to be merely decorative.

  • 4 Later he secured a field command, through Washington, and won laurels at Yorktown, where he led the American column in the 1 These facts were first definitely determined by Mrs Gertrude Atherton from the Danish Archives in Denmark and the West Indies; see article in North American Review, Aug.

  • These hills are densely clothed to their summits with an exuberant growth of olives, figs, myrtles, laurels, oranges, aloes, vines and other sub-tropical plants.

  • Heer described from this deposit at Moletein 13 genera, of which 7 are still living, containing 18 species, viz.: 1 fern, 4 Conifers, I palm, 2 figs, 1 Credneria, 2 laurels, I Aralia, Chondrophyllum (of uncertain affinities), 2 magnolias, 2 species of Myrtaceae and a species of walnut.

  • The most abundant species of this forest were the oaks and chestnuts, of which a dozen have been collected; laurels, Viburnum, ivy, several Aralias, Dewalquea, a Thuja and several Ferns may be added.

  • Other beds yield principally palms, willows, laurels, Eucalyptus or Ferns; but there are no Cycads.

  • The Laurineae were plentiful, and include various true laurels, camphor-trees, cinnamon, Persea and Sassafras.

  • When I understood what he wanted--when I saw that he was preparing a bed of laurels for us, you know, I said to myself: 'That is a monarch,' and I devoted myself to him!

  • But there was to be no resting on laurels.

  • Holiday Success Two of our leading females were not resting on their laurels whilst on their holidays recently.

  • When the crusading zealots have pushed through the measures Iâve mentioned above are they going to rest on their laurels.

  • Not one to rest on its laurels, EK Success is constantly producing new designs for avid scrappers.

  • Even at such a young age, Brad Coleman is not one to rest on his laurels.

  • Leonardo DiCaprio - After the massive success of Titanic, Leonardo DiCaprio could have rested on his laurels and ridden the wave of success that came with it, but instead the dedicated actor pursued tough roles in high quality films.

  • Never content to rest upon its laurels, Royal Caribbean International is already building its next greatest luxury liner title-holder, scheduled to be unveiled in 2010.

  • The Madame Alexander Company hasn't rested on its laurels, however.

  • Not one to rest on his laurels, he formed the Foundation for Hispanic Dance as well as another dance company featuring his children, four of whom are dancers, and two of whom are composers.

  • Don't expect to rest on your laurels to become a top-level athlete.

  • They have been part of the Olympics since 1932 and make it a point to never rest on their laurels or medals.

  • Neither swimmer nor designer are content to rest on their laurels.

  • Never stop growing, and don't rest on your laurels.

  • Not one to rest on her laurels, Amanda continues to race, pursue an education at University of Arizona, and appear as a swimsuit model in Sports Illustrated Magazine.

  • Lucky for the world, Veronique de la Cruz didn't rest on her hard-won laurels, but instead, took the determination and beautiful spirit the country of France so aptly rewarded, and channeled it into the Aquarella swimwear collection.

  • Wolverine's most recent improvement to their already comfortable footwear is Multishox, and they have no intention of resting on laurels as they continue to develop boots that will get wearers through even the most arduous day in ease.

  • Never one to rest on his laurels, he started a new project with Tony James, and started working as a producer.

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