Latin-alphabet sentence example

latin-alphabet
  • Thus, to take an example, he will not print a critical text of Plautus with two letters (Y and Z) which were no part of the Latin alphabet in the age of that comedian; still less will he introduce into Latin texts distinctions, such as i,j and u, v, which were not used till long after the middle ages.
    1
    0
  • are in Umbrian character; the Latin alphabet is used in the Claverniur paragraph (V.
    0
    0
  • Soon after the dialect had reached its latest form, the Latin alphabet was adopted.
    0
    0
  • But conversion, after all, was the chief aim of these devoted missionaries, and when some Venetian priests had invented a Latin alphabet for the Magyar language a great step had been taken towards its accomplishment.
    0
    0
  • In some respects the value of the consonants varies from that usual in the Latin alphabet.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • C The third letter in the Latin alphabet and its descendants corresponds in position and in origin to the Greek Gamma (P, y), which in its turn is borrowed from the third symbol of the Phoenician alphabet (Heb.
    0
    0
  • The discoveries of the last quarter of the 19th century carried back our knowledge of the Latin alphabet by at least two centuries, although the monuments of an early age which have been discovered are only three.
    0
    0
  • Evidence in favour of such a position for the Latin alphabet is not forthcoming.
    0
    0
  • took over from Etruscan perhaps the sign but gave it the new value of a spirant which developed out of an earlier d-sound, but which is written in the Latin alphabet with rs.
    0
    0
  • At a much later epoch it was introduced into the Latin alphabet by the emperor Claudius to represent y, and the sound which was written as i or u in maximus, maxumus, &c.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Wimmer's own view is that the runes were developed from the Latin alphabet in use at the end of the 2nd century A.D.
    0
    0
  • The strongest argument for the derivation from the Latin alphabet is undoubtedly the value of f attaching to P; for, as we have seen, the Greek value of this symbol is w, and its value as f arises only by abbreviation from FH.
    0
    0
  • The Latin alphabet is used, with special signs to represent sounds borrowed from Slavonic, &c. All the unaccented vowels except e are pronounced as in Italian; e has the same phonetic value as in Old Slavonic (=French e) and is often similarly preiotized (= ye in yet), notably at the beginning of all words except neologisms. The accented vowels é and ó are pronounced as ea and oa (petra, rock, = peatra; morte, death, = moarte); they are written in full, as diphthongs, at the end of a word and sometimes in other positions.
    0
    0
  • This is preserved for us in some 36 short inscriptions, dating from the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C., and is written in a peculiar alphabet derived from the Etruscan, and written from right to left, but showing some traces of the influence of the Latin alphabet.
    0
    0
  • The Western Greek alphabet had a different symbol, X, for the sound of x and placed it at the end, as did its descendant the Latin alphabet.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • letters in the Latin alphabet.
    0
    0
  • teda in Umbrian alphabet = dirsa in Latin alphabet (see below), "let him give," exactly equivalent to Paelignian dida (see Paeligni).
    0
    0
  • (i.) The Latin alphabet of the latest Tables resembles that of the Tabula Bantina, and might have been engraved at almost any time between 150 B.C. and 50 B.C. It is quite likely that the closer relations with Rome, which began after the Social War, led to the adoption of the Latin alphabet.
    0
    0
  • The Latin alphabet is used, with special signs to represent sounds borrowed from Slavonic, &c. All the unaccented vowels except e are pronounced as in Italian; e has the same phonetic value as in Old Slavonic (=French e) and is often similarly preiotized (= ye in yet), notably at the beginning of all words except neologisms. The accented vowels é and ó are pronounced as ea and oa (petra, rock, = peatra; morte, death, = moarte); they are written in full, as diphthongs, at the end of a word and sometimes in other positions.
    0
    0