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lares

lares

lares Sentence Examples

  • His miraculous birth, commemorated by Servius himself in the festival established by him in honour of the Lares, recalls that of Romulus.

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  • The state itself had its own Lares, called praestites, the protecting patrons and guardians of the city.

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  • Mention may also be made of the Lares grundules, whose worship was connected with the white sow of Alba Longa and its thirty young (the epithet has been connected with grunnire, to grunt): the viales, who protected travellers; the hostilii, who kept off the enemies of the state; the permarini, connected with the sea, to whom L.

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  • The Revolution of 1868 in Spain promised such salutary changes for the Antilles as the introduction of political parties, the restoration of representation in the Spanish Cortes, and the enfranchisement of the slaves; but the imprudent "Insurrection of Lares," and other outbreaks of 1867-68, delayed these anticipated reforms. The reactionaries feared separation from the mother country.

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  • 3 The Lares are thus represented in art.

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  • Barker, Lares and Penates (1853); V.

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  • The Lar familiaris has been regarded' as the embodiment of all the family dead and his cult as a consummation of ancestor-worship, but a more probable explanation regards him as one of the Lares (q.v.; numina of the fields worshipped at the compita, the places where properties marched) who had special charge of the house or possibly of the household servants (familia); for it is significant that his worship was committed to the charge of the vilica.

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  • As Janus is in the household the numen of the door, so in the state he is the god associated with the great gate near the corner of the forum: the Penates have their analogy in the Di Penates populi Romani Quiritium by whom the magistrates take their oath on entering office, the Lar familiaris in the Lares Praestites of the community, and the Genius in the new notion of the Genius populi Romani or Genius urbis Romae.

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  • As the palace cults became national, the worship of the Genius was bound to spread, and ultimately Augustus sanctioned its celebration at the compita together with the worship of the old Lares.

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  • LARES (older form Lases), Roman tutelary deities.

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  • The attempt to harmonize the Stoic demonology with Roman religion led to the Lares being compared with the Greek "heroes" during the period of Greco-Roman culture, and the word is frequently translated ilpcoEs.

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  • The distinction between public and private Lares existed from early times.

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  • It is certain that originally each household had only one Lar; the plural was at first only used to include other classes of Lares, and only gradually, after the time of Cicero, ousted the singular.

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  • The whole group was called indifferently Lares or Penates.

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  • On these occasions the Lares were crowned with garlands, and offerings of cakes and honey, wine and incense, but especially swine, were laid before them.

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  • The emperor Alexander Severus had images of Abraham, Christ and Alexander the Great among his household Lares.

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  • The public Lares belonged to the state religion.

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  • Amongst these must be included, at least after the time of Augustus, the Lares compitales.

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  • The old view that the Lares were the deified ancestors of the family has been rejected lately by Wissowa, who holds that the Lar was originally the protecting spirit of a man's lot of arable land, with a shrine at the compitum, i.e.

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  • Muller, p. 239) that pilae and effigies viriles et muliebres made of wool were hung at the crossroads to the Lares, the number of pilae equalling that of the slaves of the family, the effigies that of the children; the purpose being to induce the Lares to spare the living, and to be content with the pilae and images.

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  • Such libations to the gods were made as part of the daily ritual of domestic worship, or at banquets or feasts to the Lares, or to special deities, as by the Greeks to Hermes, the god of sleep, when going to rest.

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  • To them, under the name of Lares, it was the solemn preoccupation of male descendants to offer food and sacrifice and to keep alight the hearth fire which cooked the offerings.

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  • Small waxen images of the Manes called Lares, clothed in dogskin, and on feast days crowned with garlands, stood round the family hearth of which they were the unseen guardians (but see Lares).

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  • In the worship of the Lares the head of a Roman household commemorated and reinforced the blood tie which made one flesh of all its members living and dead.

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  • The Lares are brought out to preside over this solemn feast, and for the occasion are incincti or clothed in tunics girt at the loins.

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  • Passo di Lares (Lares Glacier to the Lobbia Glacier), snow.

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  • Next to this comes the sanctuary of the Lares of the city, a square room with a large apse; and beyond this, as Mau proves, the small temple of Vespasian.

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  • This legend probably arose from the connexion of Acca Larentia, as mater Larum, with the Lares who had a part in the religious ceremonies of the Arvales.

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  • 2 The Chinese Shin were similarly organized; so (less elaborately) were the Japanese Kami;" and the Roman lares, the old local land-gods, found their highest co-ordinating term in the Lares Augusti, just as the Genius was extended to the legion and the colony, and finally to Rome itself.

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  • According to some, Acca Larentia was the mother of the Lares, and, like Ceres, Tellus, Flora and others, symbolized the fertility of the earth - in particular the city lands and their crops.

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  • is the chief authority for the earlier events of his life, 127 seq.: "Ossaque legisti non illa aetate legenda Patris et in tenues cogeris ipse Lares.

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  • The Revolution of 1868 in Spain promised such salutary changes for the Antilles as the introduction of political parties, the restoration of representation in the Spanish Cortes, and the enfranchisement of the slaves; but the imprudent "Insurrection of Lares," and other outbreaks of 1867-68, delayed these anticipated reforms. The reactionaries feared separation from the mother country.

    0
    0
  • His miraculous birth, commemorated by Servius himself in the festival established by him in honour of the Lares, recalls that of Romulus.

    0
    0
  • 3 The Lares are thus represented in art.

    0
    0
  • Barker, Lares and Penates (1853); V.

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  • The Lar familiaris has been regarded' as the embodiment of all the family dead and his cult as a consummation of ancestor-worship, but a more probable explanation regards him as one of the Lares (q.v.; numina of the fields worshipped at the compita, the places where properties marched) who had special charge of the house or possibly of the household servants (familia); for it is significant that his worship was committed to the charge of the vilica.

    0
    0
  • As Janus is in the household the numen of the door, so in the state he is the god associated with the great gate near the corner of the forum: the Penates have their analogy in the Di Penates populi Romani Quiritium by whom the magistrates take their oath on entering office, the Lar familiaris in the Lares Praestites of the community, and the Genius in the new notion of the Genius populi Romani or Genius urbis Romae.

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  • As the palace cults became national, the worship of the Genius was bound to spread, and ultimately Augustus sanctioned its celebration at the compita together with the worship of the old Lares.

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  • aedis or aedes, a temple or house), a small house or temple, - a household shrine holding small altars or the statues of the Lares and Penates.

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  • LARES (older form Lases), Roman tutelary deities.

    0
    0
  • The attempt to harmonize the Stoic demonology with Roman religion led to the Lares being compared with the Greek "heroes" during the period of Greco-Roman culture, and the word is frequently translated ilpcoEs.

    0
    0
  • The distinction between public and private Lares existed from early times.

    0
    0
  • It is certain that originally each household had only one Lar; the plural was at first only used to include other classes of Lares, and only gradually, after the time of Cicero, ousted the singular.

    0
    0
  • The whole group was called indifferently Lares or Penates.

    0
    0
  • On these occasions the Lares were crowned with garlands, and offerings of cakes and honey, wine and incense, but especially swine, were laid before them.

    0
    0
  • The emperor Alexander Severus had images of Abraham, Christ and Alexander the Great among his household Lares.

    0
    0
  • The public Lares belonged to the state religion.

    0
    0
  • Amongst these must be included, at least after the time of Augustus, the Lares compitales.

    0
    0
  • Its importance was revived by Augustus, who added to these Lares his own Genius, the religious personification of the empire.

    0
    0
  • The state itself had its own Lares, called praestites, the protecting patrons and guardians of the city.

    0
    0
  • Mention may also be made of the Lares grundules, whose worship was connected with the white sow of Alba Longa and its thirty young (the epithet has been connected with grunnire, to grunt): the viales, who protected travellers; the hostilii, who kept off the enemies of the state; the permarini, connected with the sea, to whom L.

    0
    0
  • The old view that the Lares were the deified ancestors of the family has been rejected lately by Wissowa, who holds that the Lar was originally the protecting spirit of a man's lot of arable land, with a shrine at the compitum, i.e.

    0
    0
  • Muller, p. 239) that pilae and effigies viriles et muliebres made of wool were hung at the crossroads to the Lares, the number of pilae equalling that of the slaves of the family, the effigies that of the children; the purpose being to induce the Lares to spare the living, and to be content with the pilae and images.

    0
    0
  • Such libations to the gods were made as part of the daily ritual of domestic worship, or at banquets or feasts to the Lares, or to special deities, as by the Greeks to Hermes, the god of sleep, when going to rest.

    0
    0
  • To them, under the name of Lares, it was the solemn preoccupation of male descendants to offer food and sacrifice and to keep alight the hearth fire which cooked the offerings.

    0
    0
  • Small waxen images of the Manes called Lares, clothed in dogskin, and on feast days crowned with garlands, stood round the family hearth of which they were the unseen guardians (but see Lares).

    0
    0
  • In the worship of the Lares the head of a Roman household commemorated and reinforced the blood tie which made one flesh of all its members living and dead.

    0
    0
  • The Lares are brought out to preside over this solemn feast, and for the occasion are incincti or clothed in tunics girt at the loins.

    0
    0
  • Passo di Lares (Lares Glacier to the Lobbia Glacier), snow.

    0
    0
  • Next to this comes the sanctuary of the Lares of the city, a square room with a large apse; and beyond this, as Mau proves, the small temple of Vespasian.

    0
    0
  • This legend probably arose from the connexion of Acca Larentia, as mater Larum, with the Lares who had a part in the religious ceremonies of the Arvales.

    0
    0
  • 2 The Chinese Shin were similarly organized; so (less elaborately) were the Japanese Kami;" and the Roman lares, the old local land-gods, found their highest co-ordinating term in the Lares Augusti, just as the Genius was extended to the legion and the colony, and finally to Rome itself.

    0
    0
  • According to some, Acca Larentia was the mother of the Lares, and, like Ceres, Tellus, Flora and others, symbolized the fertility of the earth - in particular the city lands and their crops.

    0
    0
  • Other places where the legends about fairies were passed down included Roman mythology with the modern-day "angels," or lares, genii and penates.

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