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lao

lao

lao Sentence Examples

  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Lao to Lav.

  • The name Lao, which appears to mean simply "man," is the collective Siamese term for all the Thai peoples subject to Siam, while Shan, said to be of Chinese origin, is the collective Burmese term for those subject to Burma.

  • Lao is therefore rather a political than an ethnical title, and the people cordially dislike the name, insisting on their right to be called Thai.

  • The Lao, who descended from the mountain districts of Yunnan, Szechuen and Kweichow to the highland plains of upper Indo-China, and drove the wilder Kha peoples whom they found in possession into the hills, mostly adopted Buddhism, and formed small settled communities or states in which laws were easy, taxes light and a very fair degree of comfort was attained.

  • There are two main divisions, the Lao Pong Dam ("Black Paunch Laos"), so-called from their habit of tattooing the body from the waist to the knees, and the Lao Pong Kao ("White Paunch Laos") who do not tattoo.

  • Lao tattooing is of a most elaborate kind.

  • The Lao Pong Dam now form the western branch of the Lao family, inhabiting the Siamese Lao states of Chieng Mai Lapaun, 'Tern Pre and Nan, and reaching as far south as 17° N.

  • Various influences have contributed to making the Lao the pleasant, easy-going, idle fellow that he is.

  • The Lao Pong Kao, or eastern branch, appear to have migrated southwards by the more easterly route of the Nam-u and the Mekong valley.

  • In contradistinction to the Lao Pong Dam, who have derived their written language from the Burmese character, the eastern race has retained what appears to be the early form of the present Siamese writing, from which it differs little.

  • They formed important settlements at various points on the Mekong, notably Luang Prabang, Wieng Chan (Vien-Tiane) Ubon and Bassac; and, heading inland as far as Korat on the one side and the Annamite watershed in the east, they drove out the less civilized Kha peoples, and even the Cambodians, as the Lao Pong Dam did on the west.

  • Vien-Tiane during the 18th century was the most powerful of the Lao principalities, and was feared and respected throughout Indo-China.

  • The Lao Pong Kao below 18° N.

  • If possible, they are as a race lazier than the western Lao, as they are certainly more musical.

  • The civilized Laos were long addicted to slave-hunting, not only with the sanction but even with the co-operation of their rulers, the Lao mandarins heading regular expeditions against the wilder tribes.

  • Closely allied with the Lao are a number of tribes found throughout the hill regions of the upper Mekong, between Yunnan and Kwangsi in China and the upper waters of the Menam in Siam.

  • Of this group of people, among whom may be named the Yao, Yao Yin, Lanten, Meo, Musur (or Muhso) and Kaw, perhaps the best known and most like the Lao are the Lu - both names meaning originally "man" - who have in many cases adopted a form of Buddhism (flavoured strongly by their natural respect for local spirits as well as tattooing) and other relatively civilized customs, and have forsaken their wandering life among the hills for a more settled village existence.

  • by the Chinese Shan States, portions of the province of Yunnan, the French province of Indo-China, and the Siamese Shan, or Lao States and Siam; on the S.

  • by Burma and the Lao tribes and W.

  • Nearly two million people, mixed Siamese, Lao and Cambodian,.

  • The more important places of northern Siam include Chieng Mai, the capital of the north, Chieng Rai, near the northern frontier; Lampun, also known as Labong (originally Haribunchai), the first Lao settlement in Siam; Lampang, Tern, Nan and Pre, each the seat of a Lao chief and of a Siamese commissioner; Utaradit, Pichai, Pichit, Pechabun and Raheng, the last of importance as a timber station, with Phitsnulok, Sukhotai, Swankalok, Kampeng Pet and Nakhon Sawan, former capitals of Khmer-Siamese kingdoms, and at present the headquarters of provincial governments.

  • The montons consist of groups of the old rural provinces (muang); the hereditary chiefs of which, except in the Lao country in the north and in the Malay States, have been replaced by governors trained in administrative work and subordinate to the high commissioner.

  • While the pure-blooded Malays of the Peninsula are Mahommedans, the Siamese and Lao profess a form of Buddhism which is tinged by Cingalese and Burmese influences, and, especially in the more remote country districts, by the spirit-worship which is characteristic of the imaginative and timid Ka and other hill peoples of Indo-China.

  • The southward movement of the Lao-Tai family from their original seats in south-west China is of very ancient date, the Lao states of Luang Prabang and Wieng Chan on the Mekong having been founded at least two thousand years ago.

  • The first incursions of Lao-Tai among the Khmers of northern Siam were probably later, for the town of Lampun (Labong or Haribunchai), the first Lao capital in Siam, was founded about A.D.

  • The fusion of races may be said to have begun then, for it was during the succeeding centuries that the kings of Swankalok-Sukhotai gradually assumed Lao characteristics, and that the Siamese language, written character and other racial peculiarities were in course of formation.

  • Vigorous attacks were also made during this period on the Lao states to the northwest and north-east, followed by vast deportation of the people, and Siamese supremacy was pretty firmly established in Chiengmai and its dependencies by the end of the 18th century, and over the great eastern capitals, Luang Prabang and Vien-chang, about 1828.

  • In Patani the common language is still Malay, while in the upper parts of northern, and the outlying parts of eastern, Siam the prevailing language is Lao, though the many hill tribes which occupy the ranges of these parts have distinct languages of their own.

  • The Tao-teh-king, or book of aphorisms on " the Tao and virtue " ascribed to Lao Tsze, is wholly unlike such a composition as Deuteronomy; and the disciples of Confucius carefully refrained from attributing to him any kind of supernatural inspiration in his conversations about social and personal morality.

  • An important national monument is the 16th-century That Luang (Royal Stupa) that symbolizes Buddhist and Lao union.

  • opium poppy cultivation in the Golden Triangle: Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand (UNODC, October 2006 ).

  • There are between 25 and 40 million village backyard poultry farmers in Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao, Thailand and Viet Nam.

  • Some legends say that the great Taoist sage Lao Tzu, personally introduced him to the Taoist practices.

  • The Lao Loum women wear the traditional sinh - the wraparound sarong.

  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Lao to Lav.

  • The name Lao, which appears to mean simply "man," is the collective Siamese term for all the Thai peoples subject to Siam, while Shan, said to be of Chinese origin, is the collective Burmese term for those subject to Burma.

  • Lao is therefore rather a political than an ethnical title, and the people cordially dislike the name, insisting on their right to be called Thai.

  • The Lao, who descended from the mountain districts of Yunnan, Szechuen and Kweichow to the highland plains of upper Indo-China, and drove the wilder Kha peoples whom they found in possession into the hills, mostly adopted Buddhism, and formed small settled communities or states in which laws were easy, taxes light and a very fair degree of comfort was attained.

  • There are two main divisions, the Lao Pong Dam ("Black Paunch Laos"), so-called from their habit of tattooing the body from the waist to the knees, and the Lao Pong Kao ("White Paunch Laos") who do not tattoo.

  • Lao tattooing is of a most elaborate kind.

  • The Lao Pong Dam now form the western branch of the Lao family, inhabiting the Siamese Lao states of Chieng Mai Lapaun, 'Tern Pre and Nan, and reaching as far south as 17° N.

  • Various influences have contributed to making the Lao the pleasant, easy-going, idle fellow that he is.

  • The Lao Pong Kao, or eastern branch, appear to have migrated southwards by the more easterly route of the Nam-u and the Mekong valley.

  • In contradistinction to the Lao Pong Dam, who have derived their written language from the Burmese character, the eastern race has retained what appears to be the early form of the present Siamese writing, from which it differs little.

  • They formed important settlements at various points on the Mekong, notably Luang Prabang, Wieng Chan (Vien-Tiane) Ubon and Bassac; and, heading inland as far as Korat on the one side and the Annamite watershed in the east, they drove out the less civilized Kha peoples, and even the Cambodians, as the Lao Pong Dam did on the west.

  • Vien-Tiane during the 18th century was the most powerful of the Lao principalities, and was feared and respected throughout Indo-China.

  • The Lao Pong Kao below 18° N.

  • If possible, they are as a race lazier than the western Lao, as they are certainly more musical.

  • The civilized Laos were long addicted to slave-hunting, not only with the sanction but even with the co-operation of their rulers, the Lao mandarins heading regular expeditions against the wilder tribes.

  • Closely allied with the Lao are a number of tribes found throughout the hill regions of the upper Mekong, between Yunnan and Kwangsi in China and the upper waters of the Menam in Siam.

  • Of this group of people, among whom may be named the Yao, Yao Yin, Lanten, Meo, Musur (or Muhso) and Kaw, perhaps the best known and most like the Lao are the Lu - both names meaning originally "man" - who have in many cases adopted a form of Buddhism (flavoured strongly by their natural respect for local spirits as well as tattooing) and other relatively civilized customs, and have forsaken their wandering life among the hills for a more settled village existence.

  • by the Chinese Shan States, portions of the province of Yunnan, the French province of Indo-China, and the Siamese Shan, or Lao States and Siam; on the S.

  • by Burma and the Lao tribes and W.

  • Nearly two million people, mixed Siamese, Lao and Cambodian,.

  • The more important places of northern Siam include Chieng Mai, the capital of the north, Chieng Rai, near the northern frontier; Lampun, also known as Labong (originally Haribunchai), the first Lao settlement in Siam; Lampang, Tern, Nan and Pre, each the seat of a Lao chief and of a Siamese commissioner; Utaradit, Pichai, Pichit, Pechabun and Raheng, the last of importance as a timber station, with Phitsnulok, Sukhotai, Swankalok, Kampeng Pet and Nakhon Sawan, former capitals of Khmer-Siamese kingdoms, and at present the headquarters of provincial governments.

  • The montons consist of groups of the old rural provinces (muang); the hereditary chiefs of which, except in the Lao country in the north and in the Malay States, have been replaced by governors trained in administrative work and subordinate to the high commissioner.

  • While the pure-blooded Malays of the Peninsula are Mahommedans, the Siamese and Lao profess a form of Buddhism which is tinged by Cingalese and Burmese influences, and, especially in the more remote country districts, by the spirit-worship which is characteristic of the imaginative and timid Ka and other hill peoples of Indo-China.

  • The southward movement of the Lao-Tai family from their original seats in south-west China is of very ancient date, the Lao states of Luang Prabang and Wieng Chan on the Mekong having been founded at least two thousand years ago.

  • The first incursions of Lao-Tai among the Khmers of northern Siam were probably later, for the town of Lampun (Labong or Haribunchai), the first Lao capital in Siam, was founded about A.D.

  • The fusion of races may be said to have begun then, for it was during the succeeding centuries that the kings of Swankalok-Sukhotai gradually assumed Lao characteristics, and that the Siamese language, written character and other racial peculiarities were in course of formation.

  • Vigorous attacks were also made during this period on the Lao states to the northwest and north-east, followed by vast deportation of the people, and Siamese supremacy was pretty firmly established in Chiengmai and its dependencies by the end of the 18th century, and over the great eastern capitals, Luang Prabang and Vien-chang, about 1828.

  • In Patani the common language is still Malay, while in the upper parts of northern, and the outlying parts of eastern, Siam the prevailing language is Lao, though the many hill tribes which occupy the ranges of these parts have distinct languages of their own.

  • The Tao-teh-king, or book of aphorisms on " the Tao and virtue " ascribed to Lao Tsze, is wholly unlike such a composition as Deuteronomy; and the disciples of Confucius carefully refrained from attributing to him any kind of supernatural inspiration in his conversations about social and personal morality.

  • Some legends say that the great Taoist sage Lao Tzu, personally introduced him to the Taoist practices.

  • The Lao Loum women wear the traditional sinh - the wraparound sarong.

  • Join the adventures of Liu Kang and Kung Lao in this action-packed game.

  • Once a member of the White Lotus Society alongside the legendary Kung Lao, Liu Kang enters the tournament representing the Shaolin order.

  • Just to make things as confusing as possible, Midway decided that this Kung Lao is a descendent of "Great Kung Lao", bearing a striking resemblance to the legendary figure.

  • The current Kung Lao, Liu Kang's sparring partner, is a Shaolin monk from the "Temple of Light" and a student of Bo' Rai Cho.

  • Donning a razor-trimmed hat, Kung Lao is a quiet but righteous man.

  • She later aligned herself with Sindel (her mother), Liu Kang, Kung Lao, and other Earthrealm warriors.

  • In the forward to the book, Carl Gustav Jung states that Wilhelm was a long time practitioner of I Ching, and that he studied under a Chinese scholar in the field, Lao Nai-hsüan.

  • Lao Tzu, the keeper of the Imperial Library from ancient times in China was considered the wisest man during his time.

  • Considered by many to be the founder of Taoism, Lao Tzu lived from 604-531 BC.

  • Considered to be a mystic of deep wisdom Lao Tzu worked in the Imperial Archives, the library of the emperor.Just before retiring Tzu wrote his only known book, the Tao Te Ching, a collection of 81 reflections and short poems.

  • Children hanging muslin stockings for "Dun Che Lao Ren" (Christmas Old Man), who leaves gifts in them.

  • Or perhaps when you took a college course in eastern religion, you thought it sounded like the Prof was quoting Lucas, when in fact he was quoting Lao T'se and the Tao Te Ching.

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