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lang

lang

lang Sentence Examples

  • Lang.

  • See Lang, Fiihrer durch Marienbad and Umgebung (Marienbad, 1902); and Kisch, Marienbad, seine Umgebung and Heilmittel (Marienbad, 1895).

  • At the decisive battle of Naseby (the 14th of June 1645) he commanded the parliamentary right wing and routed the cavalry of Sir Marmaduke Lang exclusion from pardon of all the king's leading adherents, besides the indefinite establishment of Presbyterianism and the refusal of toleration to the Roman Catholics and members of the Church of England.

  • Belief in a primitive historical revelation, once universal among Christians, has almost disappeared; but belief in a very early and highly moral theism is stoutly defended, chiefly on Australian evidence, by Andrew Lang (The Making of Religion and later works).

  • (I) True fission or longitudinal division of an individual into two equal and similar daughter-individuals is not common but occurs in Gastroblasta, where it has been described in detail by Arnold Lang [30].

  • Lang [29] in Hydra and other polyps.

  • The tissues of the bud become differentiated into ectoderm and endoderm, and the endoderm of the bud becomes secondarily continuous with that of the parent, but no part of the parental endoderm contributes to the building up of the daughter-polyp. Lang regarded this method of budding as universal in polyps, a notion disproved by O.

  • Seeliger [52] who went to the opposite extreme and regarded the type of budding described by Lang as non-existent.

  • however, both of the statements and figures of Lang and of the facts to be described presently for medusae (Margellium), it is at least theoretically possible that both germinal and vegetative budding may occur in polyps as well as in medusae.

  • Albert Lang, " Ober die Knospung bei Hydra and einigen Hydropolypen," Zeitschr.

  • Arnold Lang, " Gastroblasta Raffaelei.

  • Lang's Hist.

  • Lang, 2 vols., 1879); Theodor Schiemann, Russland, Polen and Livland bis im xvii.

  • Masson's Life of Drummond of Hawthornden; and, above all, Masson's Life of Milton; Andrew Lang, Hist.

  • Lang, " Versuch einer Erklarung der Asymmetric der Gastropoder," Vierteljahrsschr.

  • Lang, Hist.

  • Cosmo Gordon Lang, 1908 Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in York is St Mary's Abbey, situated in Museum Gardens, founded for Benedictines by Alan, lord of Richmond, in 1078, its head having the rank of a mitred abbot with a seat in parliament.

  • Lang's Horace Mann, his Life and Work (New York, 1893), Albert E.

  • He is alluded to by Dunbar in the fragmentary Interlude of the Droichis Part of the Play, where a "droich," or dwarf, personates "the nakit blynd Harry That lang has bene in the fary Farleis to find;" and again in Dunbar's Lament for the Makaris.

  • Among the later writers on statistics, moreover, have been Konek, Keleti, Lang, Foldes, Jekelfalussy, Vorgha, Korbsy, Rath and Vizaknai.

  • Lang, Historical Mysteries (1904).

  • C. Bradley; Canon Rawnsley's Memories of the Tennysons (1900); Alfred Tennyson (1901), by Mr Andrew Lang; an essay on "The Mission of Tennyson" in Mr W.

  • Lang, The Making of Religion, pp. 262-270.

  • Lang), 1884; Royal Academy Catalogue, Winter Exhibition, 1897; National Gallery of British Art Catalogue; C. Monkhouse, British Contemporary Artists (London, 1899); Ernest Rhys, Frederick, Lord Leighton (London, 1898, 1900).

  • Lang's book, The Making of Religion (2nd ed., London, 1902, pp. 87-104).

  • Lang's Introduction to Mr N.

  • Lang's The Making of Religion, ch.

  • Henderson (1889; second issue, 1890, being the more accurate); in The Mystery of Mary Stuart, by Andrew Lang (4th edition, 1904), and in Henderson's criticism of that book, in his Mary, Queen of Scots (1905) (Appendix A).

  • J., who lent them, with his own notes on them, to Andrew Lang for use in his book, The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1900-1904).

  • It was argued by Andrew Lang that Wood was likely to show these letters to Lennox; and that as Lennox follows Moray's version of Mary's long and murderous letter, and does not follow Letter II., the murderous letter (a forgery) was then part of the dossier of Mary's accusers.

  • (paragraph 7, p. 398, in Lang's Mystery of Mary Stuart, 1901) Mary writes, "I asked why he (Darnley) would pass away in the English ship. He denies it, and swears thereunto; but he grants that he spoke unto the men."

  • Lang, Ibid., June, July 1893, on Achilles in Scyros.

  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion, ii.

  • KARL HEINRICH LANG, RITTER VON (1764-1835), German historian, was born on the 7th of June 1764 at Balgheim, near Nordlingen.

  • But Lang did not long remain an official.

  • In 1792 Lang again betook himself to a university, this time to Gottingen.

  • At intervals from 1793 to 1801 Lang was closely connected with the Prussian statesman Hardenberg, who employed him as his private secretary and archivist, and in 1 797 he was present with Hardenberg at the congress of Rastadt as secretary to the legation.

  • When in 1805 the principalities became part of Bavaria, Lang entered the Bavarian service (1806), was ennobled in 1808 and from 1810 to 1817 held the office of archivist in Munich.

  • For the rest, Lang did great service to the study of the history of Bavaria, especially by bringing fresh material from the archives to bear upon it.

  • In 1817 Lang retired from active life, and until his death, which took place on the 26th of March 1835, lived chiefly in Ansbach.

  • Lang is best known through his Memoiren, which appeared at Brunswick in two parts in 1842, and were republished in 1881 in a second edition.

  • Lang's character, as can be gathered especially from a consideration of his behaviour at Munich, is darkened by many shadows.

  • Decker, Die griechische Helena in Mythos and Epos (1894); Andrew Lang, Helen of Troy (1883); P. Paris in Daremberg and Saglio's Dictionnaire des antiquites; the exhaustive article by R.

  • Lang, Origin and Migrations of the Polynesian Nation (Sydney, 1877); A.

  • Lists of phenomena from the contemplation of which the savage was led to believe in animism have been given by Dr Tylor, Herbert Spencer, Mr Andrew Lang and others; an animated controversy arose between the former as to the priority of their respective lists.

  • America in Internationales Archiv, xiii., Suppl.; Andrew Lang, Making of Religion; Skeat, Malay Magic; Sir G.

  • Lang's Custom and Myth, " The Story of Cupid and Psyche").

  • His work on The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies, left in MS. and incomplete (the remainder is in the Laing MSS., Edinburgh University library), was published (a hundred copies) in 1815 by Sir Walter Scott, and in the Bibliotheque de Carabas (Lang) there is a French translation.

  • Ian Maclaren's first sketches of rural Scottish life, Beside the Bonnie Briar Bush (1894), achieved extraordinary popularity and were followed by other successful books, The Days of Auld Lang Syne (1895), Kate Carnegie and those Ministers (1896) and Afterwards and other Stories (1898).

  • Matthàus LANG VON WELLENBURG (1469-1540), German statesman and ecclesiastic, was the son of a burgher of Augsburg.

  • Lang's adherence to the older faith, together with his pride and arrogance, made him very unpopular in his diocese of Salzburg; in 1523 he was involved in a serious struggle with his subjects, and in 1525, during the Peasants' War, he had again to fight hard to hold his own.

  • Lang, Die Trophocoel-Theorie (Jena, 1903); (4) E.

  • Lang, Maine de Biran and die neuere Philosophie (Cologne, 1901); monographs by A.

  • 1819); Andrew Lang, History of Scotland (1902).

  • Mr Andrew Lang says that "whenever a native dies, no matter how evident it may be that death has been the result of natural causes, it is at once set down that the defunct was bewitched."

  • The chief topographical feature of the burgh is its length, from which it is called the "Lang toun."

  • Tytler, John Hill Burton, Malcolm Laing and Andrew Lang.

  • Henderson, The Casket Letters and Mary Queen of Scots (Edinburgh, 1889); Andrew Lang, The Mystery of Mary Stuart (London, 1900).

  • Forbes, The Lyon in Mourning (1895-1896); Andrew Lang, Pickle, the Spy (1897), and Prince Charles Edward (1900); R.

  • "COSMO GORDON LANG (1864-), Archbishop of York, was born Oct.

  • 31 1864 at Aberdeen, son of John Marshall Lang, sometime moderator of the Church of Scotland, and educated at Glasgow University until 1882, when he won a scholarship at Balliol College, Oxford.

  • Lang, History of Scotland (Edinburgh, 1900); S.

  • Murray, Rise of the Greek Epic 0907), chap. ii.; Andrew Lang, Homer and his Age (1906); G.

  • ANDREW LANG (1844-), British man of letters, was born on the 31st of March 1844, at Selkirk, Scotland.

  • To the study of Scottish history Mr Lang brought a scholarly care for detail, a piquant literary style, and a gift for disentangling complicated questions.

  • Mr Lang's versatility was also shown in his valuable works on folk-lore and on primitive religion.

  • Karl Heinrich, Ritter Von Lang >>

  • Lang, Roxburghe Club, London, 1902).

  • Lang's Pickle, the Spy, and Life of Prince Charles).

  • Lang (Edinburgh, 1900-1907).

  • Lang; Miss Shield's King over the Water and Martin Haile's James Francis Stuart (the old Chevalier); Omond's Lord Advocates of Scotland; Willcock's The Great Marquess (of Argyll); Napier's Lives of Montrose and Dundee; Clarke and Foxcroft's Life of Bishop Burnet; Sir Herbert Maxwell's Robert Bruce and Book of Douglas, with all Sir W.

  • Mr Andrew Lang (History of Scotland, vol.

  • See The Lockhart Papers (2 vols., London, 1817); Andrew Lang, History of Scotland (4 vols., London, 1900).

  • Matthaus Lang Von Wellenburg >>

  • Lang, Origins of Religion (1890), p. 124.

  • For the murder of Escovedo, see Andrew Lang's discussion of it in his Historical Mysteries (1904); and the Espanoles e ingleses (1903) of Major" Martin Hume, who had access to various newly discovered MSS.

  • Lang, Contemporary Review, vol.

  • Lang (see especially the latter's Homer and his Age, 1907).

  • Lang (1870-1872) had excavated a sanctuary of Aphrodite at Dali; 10 and at the time of the publication of the 9th ed.

  • Lang, Numism.

  • Mr Andrew Lang, on the other hand, supposes that belief in a supreme being came first in order of evolution, but was afterwards thrust into the background by belief in ghosts and lesser divinities (Magic and Religion, 1901, p. 224).

  • Lang, The Making of Religion 2, x.

  • Lang, l.c.).

  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion (2nd ed., Lond.

  • Andrew Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion; and Miss Harrison, Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion.

  • 2) Above these, to use again Usener's nomenclature,4 are the " special " or functional " gods, " departmental gods," as Mr Lang has called them.

  • Lang, Modern Mythology (1897).

  • Butler (3(3 vols., London, 1896); Usener, Gotternamen (Bonn, 1896); Grant Allen, The Evolution of the Idea of God (London, 1897); Forlong, Short Studies in the Science of Comp. Religions (London, 1897); Lang, The Making of Religion (1898); Lyall, Asiatic Studies (2 vols., London, 1899); Baissac, Les Origines de la religion (Paris, 1899); Marillier, " Religion," Grande Encyclop. xxviii.

  • Any one who accepts the Mattioli theory must be driven, as Lang suggests, to suppose that the mystery which grew up about the unknown prisoner was somehow transferred to Mattioli from Dauger.

  • We will take first a theory propounded by Andrew Lang in The Valet's Tragedy (1903).

  • As the result of research in the diplomatic correspondence at the Record Office in London 4 Mr Lang finds a clue in the affairs of the French Huguenot, Roux de Marsilly, the secret agent for a Protestant league against France between Sweden, Holland, England and the Protestant cantons of Switzerland, who in February 1669 left London, where he had been negotiating with Arlington (apparently with Charles II.'s knowledge), for Switzerland, his confidential valet Martin remaining behind.

  • Assuming the words here, "as he is only a valet," to refer to Dauger, and taking into account the employment of Dauger from 1675 to 1680 as Fouquet's valet, Mr Lang now obtains a solution of the problem of why a mere valet should be a political Funck-Brentano argues that "un ancien prisonnier qu'il avait a Pignerol" (du Junca's words) cannot apply to Dauger, because then du Junca would have added "et a Exiles."

  • Mr Lang regards his conclusion as to the identity between these valets as irresistible.

  • But Mr Lang's answer on that point is that this humble supernumerary in Roux de Marsilly's conspiracy simply became one more wretched victim of the "red tape" of the old French absolute monarchy.

  • In The Man of the Mask (1908) Monsignor Barnes, while briefly dismissing Mr Lang's identification with Martin, and apparently not realizing the possibility of reading Louvois's letter of July 19, 166 9, as indicated above 1 deals in detail with the history of James de la Cloche, the natural son of Charles II.

  • Mr Lang, in The Valet's Tragedy, had some years earlier ironically wondered why nobody made this suggestion, which, however, he regarded as untenable.

  • Apart from the modern studies by Lair, FunckBrentano, Lang and Barnes, referred to above, there is valuable historical matter in the work of Roux-Fazaillac, Recherches historiques sur l'homme au masque defer (1801); see also Marius Topin, L'Homme au masque de fer (Paris, 1870), and Loiseleur, Trois Enigmes historiques (1882).

  • According to Herbert Lang, its most prominent chance of success is in localities where fuel is dear, and the ores contain precious metals and sufficient sulphides and arsenides to render profitable dressing unnecessary.

  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion (1899); C. Pascal, Studii di antichita e mitologia (1896), who sees in Lycaon a god of death honoured by human sacrifice; Ed.

  • John Knox and the Reformation, by Andrew Lang (London, 1905), is not so much a biography as a collection of materials, bearing upon many parts of the life, but nearly all on the unfavourable side.

  • Lang, vol.

  • Lang, Das Liederbuch der Konigs Denis von Portugal (1894).

  • The last king's second son, Lang Darma, concluded in May 822 a treaty with the then emperor of China (the twelfth of the Tang dynasty), a record of which was engraved on a stone put up in the above-mentioned great convent of La Brang (Jokhang), and is still to be seen there.'

  • The period from Srong Tsan Gampo down to the death of Lang Darma, who was murdered about A.D.

  • We may indeed with Mr Andrew Lang explain the many myths of the bestial transformations of Zeus on the theory that the God was the tribal ancestor and assumed the shape of the animal-totem in order to engender the tribal patriarch; 7 but on the actual cults of Zeus theriomorphism has left less trace than on those.

  • Lang (1880; prose); J.

  • (1897); Lang, " Studies in the Development and Morphology of Cycadean Sporangia, No.

  • Lang on " the voices " in Prot,.

  • Dunand, Jeanne d'Arc et l'eglise (1908); and especially Andrew Lang, The Maid of France (1908).

  • Lang); Boucher de Molandon and A.

  • Lang's article in his Valet's Tragedy (1903).

  • Lang, "Apollo and the Mouse," in Custom and Myth, p. 101; against this, W.

  • Lang, TextBook of Comparative Anatomy, transl., part ii.

  • 1 Mr Andrew Lang takes a different view of the character of Albany and his attitude in this matter.

  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion, ii.; Farnell, Cults, ii.

  • - See Wiirttembergische Jahrbiicher fiir Statistik and Landeskunde; Das Konigreich Wurttemberg, eine Beschreibung nach Kreisen, Oberdmtern and Gemeinden (Stuttgart, 1904); Statistisches Handbuch fur das Konigreich Wurttemberg (Stuttgart, 1885 fol.); Das Konigreich Wurttemberg, eine Beschreibung von Land, Volk and Staat (1893); the Jahresberichte der Handelsand Gewerbekammern in Wurttemberg; Lang, Die Entwickelung der Bevolkerung Wurttembergs im Laufe des .r9ten Jahrhunderts (Tubingen, 1903); Engel and Schulze, Geognosticher Wegweiser durch Wurttemberg (Stuttgart, 1908); Goz, Staatsrecht des Konigreichs Wurttemberg (Tubingen, 1908); and F.

  • of Publications de l'ecole des lang.

  • Lang, St Andrews (London, 18 93), pp. 4 ff.; W.

  • LAING'S [or [[Lang'S] Nek]], a pass through the Drakensberg, South Africa, immediately north of Majuba, at an elevation of 5400 to 6000 ft.

  • Lang, Magic and Religion (London, 1901), for a criticism in detail of the general theory as set forth in The Golden Bough.

  • A list of such otiose great beings in the background of religion is given in Lang's The Making of Religion (1898).

  • Century, 1892) have not been successful (see Lang, Magic and Religion, " The Theory of Loan Gods ") and N.W.Thomas in Man (1905), v., 49 et seq.

  • For South African religion see Lang.

  • Lang, Outline of Herbart's Pedagogics (1894); H.

  • Langstroth was experimenting on the same lines in America, and in 1852 his important invention was made known, giving to the world of Lang.

  • C. Lang, 1881).

  • m., Great Nicobar (Lang), the largest and southernmost of any size, covering 333 sq.

  • The flawless technique and supreme artistry of Chinese pianist Lang Lang has left audiences awestruck and critics lost for words.

  • Should auld acquaintance be forgot, For the sake of auld acquaintance be forgot, For the sake of auld lang syne?

  • encodefiles will be in a default encoding which might be determined by your LANG environmental variable.

  • The date command uses TZ to determine the correct time zone information [see LANG on environ (5)] .

  • It closes with a tribute to the many fishers who lost their lives plying their trade at the Lang Lines.

  • hames o ' pure delight, That I ha'e lo'ed sae weel and lang!

  • Fareweel, ye hames o ' pure delight, That I ha'e lo'ed sae weel and lang!

  • The singer Bryan Adams refuses to eat milk or cheese or any other animal product, as do k or cheese or any other animal product, as do k d lang and Moby.

  • The singer Bryan Adams refuses to eat milk or cheese or any other animal product, as do k or cheese or any other animal product, as do k d lang and Moby.

  • A silent killer (Robert Lang ), wearing white sneakers, has been slashing to death women in London.

  • Lang syne, when I was a bit lassie, no twenty yet - " She paused and sighed.

  • So ' lang may yer lum reek ' is a wish for enduring household warmth.

  • minuscule part of the equation, says Peter Honey of Jones Lang LaSalle, who guided Intel into Winnersh.

  • silent killer (Robert Lang ), wearing white sneakers, has been slashing to death women in London.

  • See Andrew Lang, History of Scotland, vol.

  • Lang, History of Scotland, vol.

  • See Lang, Fiihrer durch Marienbad and Umgebung (Marienbad, 1902); and Kisch, Marienbad, seine Umgebung and Heilmittel (Marienbad, 1895).

  • At the decisive battle of Naseby (the 14th of June 1645) he commanded the parliamentary right wing and routed the cavalry of Sir Marmaduke Lang exclusion from pardon of all the king's leading adherents, besides the indefinite establishment of Presbyterianism and the refusal of toleration to the Roman Catholics and members of the Church of England.

  • Belief in a primitive historical revelation, once universal among Christians, has almost disappeared; but belief in a very early and highly moral theism is stoutly defended, chiefly on Australian evidence, by Andrew Lang (The Making of Religion and later works).

  • If Lang is right, " primitive " peoples drew typical theistic inferences, and argued to God from nature and from conscience, though without displacing other types of religious belief and practice.

  • (I) True fission or longitudinal division of an individual into two equal and similar daughter-individuals is not common but occurs in Gastroblasta, where it has been described in detail by Arnold Lang [30].

  • Lang [29] in Hydra and other polyps.

  • The tissues of the bud become differentiated into ectoderm and endoderm, and the endoderm of the bud becomes secondarily continuous with that of the parent, but no part of the parental endoderm contributes to the building up of the daughter-polyp. Lang regarded this method of budding as universal in polyps, a notion disproved by O.

  • Seeliger [52] who went to the opposite extreme and regarded the type of budding described by Lang as non-existent.

  • however, both of the statements and figures of Lang and of the facts to be described presently for medusae (Margellium), it is at least theoretically possible that both germinal and vegetative budding may occur in polyps as well as in medusae.

  • Albert Lang, " Ober die Knospung bei Hydra and einigen Hydropolypen," Zeitschr.

  • Arnold Lang, " Gastroblasta Raffaelei.

  • Lang's Hist.

  • Lang, 2 vols., 1879); Theodor Schiemann, Russland, Polen and Livland bis im xvii.

  • Masson's Life of Drummond of Hawthornden; and, above all, Masson's Life of Milton; Andrew Lang, Hist.

  • pp. 103-118 (1855); and the article by Andrew Lang, "The death of the Admirable Crichton," in the Morning Post (London), Feb.

  • Lang, " Versuch einer Erklarung der Asymmetric der Gastropoder," Vierteljahrsschr.

  • The first Lang portion of this was published at Paris in 1820, and of its one hundred and two livraisons, which appeared with great irregularity (Ibis, 1868, p. 500), the last was issued in 1839, containing the titles of the five volumes that the whole forms, together with a " Tableau methodique " which but indifferently serves the purpose of an index.

  • Lang, Hist.

  • Cosmo Gordon Lang, 1908 Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in York is St Mary's Abbey, situated in Museum Gardens, founded for Benedictines by Alan, lord of Richmond, in 1078, its head having the rank of a mitred abbot with a seat in parliament.

  • Lang's Horace Mann, his Life and Work (New York, 1893), Albert E.

  • He is alluded to by Dunbar in the fragmentary Interlude of the Droichis Part of the Play, where a "droich," or dwarf, personates "the nakit blynd Harry That lang has bene in the fary Farleis to find;" and again in Dunbar's Lament for the Makaris.

  • Among the later writers on statistics, moreover, have been Konek, Keleti, Lang, Foldes, Jekelfalussy, Vorgha, Korbsy, Rath and Vizaknai.

  • Lang, Historical Mysteries (1904).

  • Lang.).3 The following is probably an exhaustive list of the substances available for incense or perfume mentioned in the Hebrew Scriptures: - Algum or almug wood (almug in I Kings X.

  • C. Bradley; Canon Rawnsley's Memories of the Tennysons (1900); Alfred Tennyson (1901), by Mr Andrew Lang; an essay on "The Mission of Tennyson" in Mr W.

  • Lang, The Making of Religion, pp. 262-270.

  • Lang), 1884; Royal Academy Catalogue, Winter Exhibition, 1897; National Gallery of British Art Catalogue; C. Monkhouse, British Contemporary Artists (London, 1899); Ernest Rhys, Frederick, Lord Leighton (London, 1898, 1900).

  • Lang's book, The Making of Religion (2nd ed., London, 1902, pp. 87-104).

  • Lang's Introduction to Mr N.

  • Lang's The Making of Religion, ch.

  • See Westphal, Geschichte der Stadt Metz (1875-1877); Georg Lang, Metz and seine Umgebungen (1883), the Statistisch-topographisches Handbuch fiir Lothringen; Albers, Geschichte der Stadt Metz (Metz, 1902); G.

  • Henderson (1889; second issue, 1890, being the more accurate); in The Mystery of Mary Stuart, by Andrew Lang (4th edition, 1904), and in Henderson's criticism of that book, in his Mary, Queen of Scots (1905) (Appendix A).

  • J., who lent them, with his own notes on them, to Andrew Lang for use in his book, The Mystery of Mary Stuart (1900-1904).

  • It was argued by Andrew Lang that Wood was likely to show these letters to Lennox; and that as Lennox follows Moray's version of Mary's long and murderous letter, and does not follow Letter II., the murderous letter (a forgery) was then part of the dossier of Mary's accusers.

  • The force of this contention lies in the close verbal identities between Crawford's account of the Darnley-Mary interviews (see Crawford's Declaration of December 9, 1568, in Lang's Mystery of Mary Stuart, pp. 428-431; from State Papers Scotland, Elizabeth vol.

  • (paragraph 7, p. 398, in Lang's Mystery of Mary Stuart, 1901) Mary writes, "I asked why he (Darnley) would pass away in the English ship. He denies it, and swears thereunto; but he grants that he spoke unto the men."

  • Lang, Ibid., June, July 1893, on Achilles in Scyros.

  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion, ii.

  • KARL HEINRICH LANG, RITTER VON (1764-1835), German historian, was born on the 7th of June 1764 at Balgheim, near Nordlingen.

  • But Lang did not long remain an official.

  • In 1792 Lang again betook himself to a university, this time to Gottingen.

  • At intervals from 1793 to 1801 Lang was closely connected with the Prussian statesman Hardenberg, who employed him as his private secretary and archivist, and in 1 797 he was present with Hardenberg at the congress of Rastadt as secretary to the legation.

  • When in 1805 the principalities became part of Bavaria, Lang entered the Bavarian service (1806), was ennobled in 1808 and from 1810 to 1817 held the office of archivist in Munich.

  • For the rest, Lang did great service to the study of the history of Bavaria, especially by bringing fresh material from the archives to bear upon it.

  • In 1817 Lang retired from active life, and until his death, which took place on the 26th of March 1835, lived chiefly in Ansbach.

  • Lang is best known through his Memoiren, which appeared at Brunswick in two parts in 1842, and were republished in 1881 in a second edition.

  • Lang's character, as can be gathered especially from a consideration of his behaviour at Munich, is darkened by many shadows.

  • Decker, Die griechische Helena in Mythos and Epos (1894); Andrew Lang, Helen of Troy (1883); P. Paris in Daremberg and Saglio's Dictionnaire des antiquites; the exhaustive article by R.

  • Lang, Origin and Migrations of the Polynesian Nation (Sydney, 1877); A.

  • Lists of phenomena from the contemplation of which the savage was led to believe in animism have been given by Dr Tylor, Herbert Spencer, Mr Andrew Lang and others; an animated controversy arose between the former as to the priority of their respective lists.

  • America in Internationales Archiv, xiii., Suppl.; Andrew Lang, Making of Religion; Skeat, Malay Magic; Sir G.

  • Lang's Custom and Myth, " The Story of Cupid and Psyche").

  • His work on The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies, left in MS. and incomplete (the remainder is in the Laing MSS., Edinburgh University library), was published (a hundred copies) in 1815 by Sir Walter Scott, and in the Bibliotheque de Carabas (Lang) there is a French translation.

  • Ian Maclaren's first sketches of rural Scottish life, Beside the Bonnie Briar Bush (1894), achieved extraordinary popularity and were followed by other successful books, The Days of Auld Lang Syne (1895), Kate Carnegie and those Ministers (1896) and Afterwards and other Stories (1898).

  • Matthàus LANG VON WELLENBURG (1469-1540), German statesman and ecclesiastic, was the son of a burgher of Augsburg.

  • Lang's adherence to the older faith, together with his pride and arrogance, made him very unpopular in his diocese of Salzburg; in 1523 he was involved in a serious struggle with his subjects, and in 1525, during the Peasants' War, he had again to fight hard to hold his own.

  • "Now Ithaca lies low, farthest up the sea line towards the darkness, but those others face the dawning and the sun" (Butcher and Lang).

  • Lang, Die Trophocoel-Theorie (Jena, 1903); (4) E.

  • Lang, Maine de Biran and die neuere Philosophie (Cologne, 1901); monographs by A.

  • 1819); Andrew Lang, History of Scotland (1902).

  • Mr Andrew Lang says that "whenever a native dies, no matter how evident it may be that death has been the result of natural causes, it is at once set down that the defunct was bewitched."

  • The chief topographical feature of the burgh is its length, from which it is called the "Lang toun."

  • Tytler, John Hill Burton, Malcolm Laing and Andrew Lang.

  • Henderson, The Casket Letters and Mary Queen of Scots (Edinburgh, 1889); Andrew Lang, The Mystery of Mary Stuart (London, 1900).

  • Forbes, The Lyon in Mourning (1895-1896); Andrew Lang, Pickle, the Spy (1897), and Prince Charles Edward (1900); R.

  • "COSMO GORDON LANG (1864-), Archbishop of York, was born Oct.

  • 31 1864 at Aberdeen, son of John Marshall Lang, sometime moderator of the Church of Scotland, and educated at Glasgow University until 1882, when he won a scholarship at Balliol College, Oxford.

  • Lang, History of Scotland (Edinburgh, 1900); S.

  • Murray, Rise of the Greek Epic 0907), chap. ii.; Andrew Lang, Homer and his Age (1906); G.

  • ANDREW LANG (1844-), British man of letters, was born on the 31st of March 1844, at Selkirk, Scotland.

  • To the study of Scottish history Mr Lang brought a scholarly care for detail, a piquant literary style, and a gift for disentangling complicated questions.

  • Mr Lang's versatility was also shown in his valuable works on folk-lore and on primitive religion.

  • Karl Heinrich, Ritter Von Lang >>

  • Lang, Roxburghe Club, London, 1902).

  • Lang's Pickle, the Spy, and Life of Prince Charles).

  • Lang (Edinburgh, 1900-1907).

  • Lang; Miss Shield's King over the Water and Martin Haile's James Francis Stuart (the old Chevalier); Omond's Lord Advocates of Scotland; Willcock's The Great Marquess (of Argyll); Napier's Lives of Montrose and Dundee; Clarke and Foxcroft's Life of Bishop Burnet; Sir Herbert Maxwell's Robert Bruce and Book of Douglas, with all Sir W.

  • Mr Andrew Lang (History of Scotland, vol.

  • See The Lockhart Papers (2 vols., London, 1817); Andrew Lang, History of Scotland (4 vols., London, 1900).

  • Matthaus Lang Von Wellenburg >>

  • Lang, Origins of Religion (1890), p. 124.

  • For the murder of Escovedo, see Andrew Lang's discussion of it in his Historical Mysteries (1904); and the Espanoles e ingleses (1903) of Major" Martin Hume, who had access to various newly discovered MSS.

  • Lang, Contemporary Review, vol.

  • Lang (see especially the latter's Homer and his Age, 1907).

  • Lang (1870-1872) had excavated a sanctuary of Aphrodite at Dali; 10 and at the time of the publication of the 9th ed.

  • Lang, Numism.

  • Mr Andrew Lang, on the other hand, supposes that belief in a supreme being came first in order of evolution, but was afterwards thrust into the background by belief in ghosts and lesser divinities (Magic and Religion, 1901, p. 224).

  • Lang, The Making of Religion 2, x.

  • Lang, l.c.).

  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion (2nd ed., Lond.

  • Andrew Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion; and Miss Harrison, Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion.

  • 2) Above these, to use again Usener's nomenclature,4 are the " special " or functional " gods, " departmental gods," as Mr Lang has called them.

  • Lang, Modern Mythology (1897).

  • Butler (3(3 vols., London, 1896); Usener, Gotternamen (Bonn, 1896); Grant Allen, The Evolution of the Idea of God (London, 1897); Forlong, Short Studies in the Science of Comp. Religions (London, 1897); Lang, The Making of Religion (1898); Lyall, Asiatic Studies (2 vols., London, 1899); Baissac, Les Origines de la religion (Paris, 1899); Marillier, " Religion," Grande Encyclop. xxviii.

  • Any one who accepts the Mattioli theory must be driven, as Lang suggests, to suppose that the mystery which grew up about the unknown prisoner was somehow transferred to Mattioli from Dauger.

  • We will take first a theory propounded by Andrew Lang in The Valet's Tragedy (1903).

  • As the result of research in the diplomatic correspondence at the Record Office in London 4 Mr Lang finds a clue in the affairs of the French Huguenot, Roux de Marsilly, the secret agent for a Protestant league against France between Sweden, Holland, England and the Protestant cantons of Switzerland, who in February 1669 left London, where he had been negotiating with Arlington (apparently with Charles II.'s knowledge), for Switzerland, his confidential valet Martin remaining behind.

  • Assuming the words here, "as he is only a valet," to refer to Dauger, and taking into account the employment of Dauger from 1675 to 1680 as Fouquet's valet, Mr Lang now obtains a solution of the problem of why a mere valet should be a political Funck-Brentano argues that "un ancien prisonnier qu'il avait a Pignerol" (du Junca's words) cannot apply to Dauger, because then du Junca would have added "et a Exiles."

  • Mr Lang regards his conclusion as to the identity between these valets as irresistible.

  • But Mr Lang's answer on that point is that this humble supernumerary in Roux de Marsilly's conspiracy simply became one more wretched victim of the "red tape" of the old French absolute monarchy.

  • In The Man of the Mask (1908) Monsignor Barnes, while briefly dismissing Mr Lang's identification with Martin, and apparently not realizing the possibility of reading Louvois's letter of July 19, 166 9, as indicated above 1 deals in detail with the history of James de la Cloche, the natural son of Charles II.

  • Mr Lang, in The Valet's Tragedy, had some years earlier ironically wondered why nobody made this suggestion, which, however, he regarded as untenable.

  • Apart altogether, however, from such considerations, it now seems fairly certain, from Mr Lang's further research into the problem of James de la Cloche (see LA Cloche), that the latter was identical with the "Prince" James Stuardo who died in Naples in 1669, and that he hoaxed the general of the Jesuits and forged a number of letters purporting to be from Charles II.

  • Apart from the modern studies by Lair, FunckBrentano, Lang and Barnes, referred to above, there is valuable historical matter in the work of Roux-Fazaillac, Recherches historiques sur l'homme au masque defer (1801); see also Marius Topin, L'Homme au masque de fer (Paris, 1870), and Loiseleur, Trois Enigmes historiques (1882).

  • According to Herbert Lang, its most prominent chance of success is in localities where fuel is dear, and the ores contain precious metals and sufficient sulphides and arsenides to render profitable dressing unnecessary.

  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion (1899); C. Pascal, Studii di antichita e mitologia (1896), who sees in Lycaon a god of death honoured by human sacrifice; Ed.

  • John Knox and the Reformation, by Andrew Lang (London, 1905), is not so much a biography as a collection of materials, bearing upon many parts of the life, but nearly all on the unfavourable side.

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