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lancastrians

lancastrians Sentence Examples

  • He lived with the exiled court of Margaret of Anjou at Bar until 1470, and took an active part in the diplomacy which led to the coalition of Warwick and Clarence with the Lancastrians and Louis XI., and indirectly to Edward IV.'s expulsion from the throne.

  • Near the town, round a point marked by an obelisk, was fought in 1471 the decisive battle between the houses of York and Lancaster, in which the earl of Warwick fell and the Lancastrians were totally defeated.

  • To the west on the borders of Shropshire is Blore Heath, the scene of a defeat of the Lancastrians by the Yorkists in 1459.

  • The Lancastrians were defeated in 1464 near Hexham, and legend says that it was in the woods round the town that Queen Margaret and her son hid until their escape to Flanders.

  • In politics, the queen-mother, who had the private guardianship of her boys, the king and the dukes of Albany and Ross, turned from the Lancastrian to the Yorkist side, while Kennedy and his party (Lancastrians) were accused of endangering Scotland to please France.

  • Then Louis, inducing his brother to accept Guienne, - where, surrounded by faithful royal officers, he was harmless for the time being, - undertook to play off the Lancastrians against Edward IV.

  • There, on the 30th of December, he was hemmed in by a superior force of Lancastrians.

  • The result was the defeat of the Lancastrians at St Albans, and for a year Margaret had to acquiesce in York's power.

  • Three weeks later the Lancastrians were defeated at Tewkesbury, and Edward was killed.

  • He accompanied Edward in his temporary flight to the Continent, and on his return to England had a share in the victory of Barnet and Tewkesbury and defended London from the Lancastrians: In 1473 he became guardian and governor to the young prince of Wales, and for the next few years there was no man in England of greater responsibility or enjoying more considerable honours in the royal service.

  • Thence in the following July he accompanied them in their successful invasion of England, to be welcomed in London, and to share in the victory over the Lancastrians at Northampton.

  • Marching south he was welcomed at London on the 11th of April, defeated Warwick at Barnet three days later, and the Lancastrians at Tewkesbury on the 4th of May.

  • From the road over the fine Llanberis pass towards Capel Curig, a turn to the right leads to Beddgelert, through Nant Gwynnant ("white" or "happy valley," or "stream"), where Pembroke and Ieuan ap Robert (for the Lancastrians)had many skirmishes in the time of Edward IV.

  • Though the Lancastrians ~ made much play with the watchword of loyalty to the crown, and though the Yorkists never forgot to speak of the need for strong and wise governance, and the welfare of the realm, y~ personal and family enmities had in many cases more effect in determining their action than a zeal for King Henrys rights or for the prosperity of England.

  • the Lancastrians at Northampton before he had been Lancnsfifteen days on shore (July 10, 1460).

  • But it was not his Richard death that was the main misfortune, but the fact slain, that in the battle the Lancastrians gave no quarter to small or great, and that after it they put to death Yorks brother-in-law Salisbury and other prisoners.

  • But the duke of Clarence betrayed to his brother the army which he had gathered in King Henrys name, and Battle of many of the Lancastrians were slow to join the earl, Barnet.

  • struggle ended, and gathered the Lancastrians of the Death of west for a final rally.

  • The victorious Edward sent to the block the last Beaufort duke of Somerset, and nearly all Capture of Queen the other captains of rank, whether Lancastrians or Margaret followers of.

  • For the successive attainders of the Lancastrians and the Nevilles had swept away many of the older noble families, and Edwards house of peers consisted for the main part of new men, his own partisans promoted for good service, who had not the grip on the land that their predecessors had possessed.

  • The Yorkists courted the approval of public opinion by their careful avoidance of pillage and requisitions; and the Lancastrians, though less scrupulous, only once launched out into general raiding and devastation, during the advance of the queens army to St Albans in the early months of 1461.

  • The claim of the Lancastrians to represent loyalty soon grew almost as hollow.

  • This time it was successfully carried out, and the earl of Richmond landed at Milford Haven with many exiles, both Yorkists and Lancastrians, and 1000 mercenaries lent him by the princess regent of France.

  • we have also Malverne and the Monk of Evesham; for the early Lancastrians, Capgrave, Elmham, Otterbourne, Adam of Usk; and for Henry VI., Amundesham, Whethamstede, William of Worcester and John Hardyng, as well as a number of anonymous briefer chronicles, edited, though not in the Rolls series, by J.

  • superiority in age, relations with the Lancastrians and with Germany, and territorial wealth and power.

  • The Lancastrians will bring with them some 80 supporting troops for the sports clash who will be ' garrisoned ' at local youth hostels.

  • He lived with the exiled court of Margaret of Anjou at Bar until 1470, and took an active part in the diplomacy which led to the coalition of Warwick and Clarence with the Lancastrians and Louis XI., and indirectly to Edward IV.'s expulsion from the throne.

  • Near the town, round a point marked by an obelisk, was fought in 1471 the decisive battle between the houses of York and Lancaster, in which the earl of Warwick fell and the Lancastrians were totally defeated.

  • To the west on the borders of Shropshire is Blore Heath, the scene of a defeat of the Lancastrians by the Yorkists in 1459.

  • Dafydd ap Ieuan ap Einion held it for the Lancastrians, until famine, rather than Edward IV., made him surrender.

  • The Lancastrians were defeated in 1464 near Hexham, and legend says that it was in the woods round the town that Queen Margaret and her son hid until their escape to Flanders.

  • In politics, the queen-mother, who had the private guardianship of her boys, the king and the dukes of Albany and Ross, turned from the Lancastrian to the Yorkist side, while Kennedy and his party (Lancastrians) were accused of endangering Scotland to please France.

  • Then Louis, inducing his brother to accept Guienne, - where, surrounded by faithful royal officers, he was harmless for the time being, - undertook to play off the Lancastrians against Edward IV.

  • There, on the 30th of December, he was hemmed in by a superior force of Lancastrians.

  • The result was the defeat of the Lancastrians at St Albans, and for a year Margaret had to acquiesce in York's power.

  • Three weeks later the Lancastrians were defeated at Tewkesbury, and Edward was killed.

  • He accompanied Edward in his temporary flight to the Continent, and on his return to England had a share in the victory of Barnet and Tewkesbury and defended London from the Lancastrians: In 1473 he became guardian and governor to the young prince of Wales, and for the next few years there was no man in England of greater responsibility or enjoying more considerable honours in the royal service.

  • Thence in the following July he accompanied them in their successful invasion of England, to be welcomed in London, and to share in the victory over the Lancastrians at Northampton.

  • Marching south he was welcomed at London on the 11th of April, defeated Warwick at Barnet three days later, and the Lancastrians at Tewkesbury on the 4th of May.

  • From the road over the fine Llanberis pass towards Capel Curig, a turn to the right leads to Beddgelert, through Nant Gwynnant ("white" or "happy valley," or "stream"), where Pembroke and Ieuan ap Robert (for the Lancastrians)had many skirmishes in the time of Edward IV.

  • Though the Lancastrians ~ made much play with the watchword of loyalty to the crown, and though the Yorkists never forgot to speak of the need for strong and wise governance, and the welfare of the realm, y~ personal and family enmities had in many cases more effect in determining their action than a zeal for King Henrys rights or for the prosperity of England.

  • the Lancastrians at Northampton before he had been Lancnsfifteen days on shore (July 10, 1460).

  • But it was not his Richard death that was the main misfortune, but the fact slain, that in the battle the Lancastrians gave no quarter to small or great, and that after it they put to death Yorks brother-in-law Salisbury and other prisoners.

  • But the duke of Clarence betrayed to his brother the army which he had gathered in King Henrys name, and Battle of many of the Lancastrians were slow to join the earl, Barnet.

  • struggle ended, and gathered the Lancastrians of the Death of west for a final rally.

  • The victorious Edward sent to the block the last Beaufort duke of Somerset, and nearly all Capture of Queen the other captains of rank, whether Lancastrians or Margaret followers of.

  • For the successive attainders of the Lancastrians and the Nevilles had swept away many of the older noble families, and Edwards house of peers consisted for the main part of new men, his own partisans promoted for good service, who had not the grip on the land that their predecessors had possessed.

  • The Yorkists courted the approval of public opinion by their careful avoidance of pillage and requisitions; and the Lancastrians, though less scrupulous, only once launched out into general raiding and devastation, during the advance of the queens army to St Albans in the early months of 1461.

  • The claim of the Lancastrians to represent loyalty soon grew almost as hollow.

  • This time it was successfully carried out, and the earl of Richmond landed at Milford Haven with many exiles, both Yorkists and Lancastrians, and 1000 mercenaries lent him by the princess regent of France.

  • we have also Malverne and the Monk of Evesham; for the early Lancastrians, Capgrave, Elmham, Otterbourne, Adam of Usk; and for Henry VI., Amundesham, Whethamstede, William of Worcester and John Hardyng, as well as a number of anonymous briefer chronicles, edited, though not in the Rolls series, by J.

  • superiority in age, relations with the Lancastrians and with Germany, and territorial wealth and power.

  • The Lancastrians will bring with them some 80 supporting troops for the sports clash who will be ' garrisoned ' at local youth hostels.

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