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lancaster

lancaster

lancaster Sentence Examples

  • Our boy was 'James Rogers from Lancaster, Pennsylvania.'

  • In 1779-1780 about 4000 of Burgoyne's troops, surrendered under the "Convention" of Saratoga, were quartered here; in October 1780 part of them were sent to Lancaster, Pa., and later the rest were sent north.

  • The trouble was again revived by the repeal in 1790 of the confirming act 2 Several Scotch-Irish families from Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, accepted Connecticut titles and settled at Hanover under Captain Lazarus Stewart.

  • The barony of Widnes in1554-1555was declared to be part of the duchy of Lancaster.

  • It again returned, however, to the Lacys in 1287, was granted in parcels, and like their other lands became merged in the duchy of Lancaster.

  • In 1732 the presbytery of "Dunagall" (Donegal) was established in Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania.

  • In 1591, three years after the defeat of the Armada, Raymond and Lancaster rounded the Cape, and after cruising off Penang, decided to winter in Achin.

  • Near the town, round a point marked by an obelisk, was fought in 1471 the decisive battle between the houses of York and Lancaster, in which the earl of Warwick fell and the Lancastrians were totally defeated.

  • James Lancaster made a voyage to the Indian Ocean from 1591 to 1594; and in 1599 the merchants and adventurers of London resolved to form a company, with the object of establishing a trade with the East Indies.

  • On the 31st of December 1 599 Queen Elizabeth granted the charter of incorporation to the East India Company, and Sir James Lancaster, one of the directors, was appointed general of their first fleet.

  • This time the family refused to condone his proceedings; he was tried with his confederates at Lancaster assizes, March 1827, convicted, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment in Newgate.

  • (1367-1413), king of England, son of John of Gaunt, by Blanche, daughter of Henry, duke of Lancaster, was born on the 3rd of April 1367, at Bolingbroke in Lincolnshire.

  • When John of Gaunt died in February 1399 Richard, contrary to his promise, confiscated the estates of Lancaster.

  • Ramsay, Lancaster and York (2 vols., Oxford, 1892), and C. W.

  • "JOHN WINGATE WEEKS (1860-), American public official, was born at Lancaster, N.H., April II 1860.

  • His father, George Ewing, settled at Lancaster, Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1792.

  • Thomas graduated at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, in 1815, and in August 1816 was admitted to the bar at Lancaster, where he won high rank as an advocate.

  • He died at Lancaster, Ohio, on the 26th of October 1871.

  • He kept in touch, however, with foreign politics, and having refused to join the ministry of George Canning in 1827, became a member of the cabinet of the duke of Wellington as 'chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster in January 1828.

  • During the 13th and 14th centuries the castle and lordship changed hands very frequently; they were granted successively to Hubert de Burgh, whose son forfeited them after the battle of Evesham, to Richard, earl of Cornwall, whose son Edmund died without issue; to Piers Gaveston, and lastly to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, and so to the Crown as parcel of the duchy of Lancaster.

  • In 1317 John de Lilleburn, who was holding the castle of Knaresburgh for Thomas duke of Lancaster against the king, surrendered under conditions to William de Ros of Hamelak, but before leaving the castle managed to destroy all the records of the liberties and privileges of the town which were kept in the castle.

  • Their founder was Johann Conrad Beissel (1690-1768), a native of Eberbach and one of the first emigrants, who, after living as a hermit for several years on Mill Creek, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, founded the sect (1725), then again lived as a hermit in a cave (formerly occupied by another hermit, one Elimelech) on the Cocalico Creek in Pennsylvania, and in 1732-1735 established a semi-monastic community (the "Order of the Solitary") with a convent (the "Sister House") and a monastery (the "Brother House") at Ephrata, in what is now Lancaster county, about 55 m.

  • German (Ephrata, Penn., 1786) and in English (Lancaster, 1889); G.

  • of the Pennsylvania German Society, Proceedings and Addresses (Lancaster, Penn., 1900); Julius Friedrich Sachse, The German Sectarians of Pennsylvania, 1742-1800: A Critical and Legendary History of the Ephrata Cloister and the Dunkers (Philadelphia, 1900); and John Lewis Gillin, The Dunkers: A Sociological Interpretation (New York, 1906), a doctor's dissertation,, with full bibliography.

  • Some of his chief nobles - Thomas, earl of Lancaster, in 1321, and Sir Andrew Harclay, earl of Carlisle, in 1322 - entered into correspondence with the Scots, and, though Harclay's treason was detected and punished by his death, Edward was forced to make a truce of thirteen years at Newcastle on the 30th of May 1323, which Bruce ratified at Berwick.

  • surrender to Henry of Lancaster, afterwards Henry IV., in whose reign a French fleet with 12,000 men on board sailed to the Haven and disembarked with the object of assisting the rebellion of Owen Glendower.

  • He was transferred to the sinecure office of the Duchy of Lancaster, but held it only till Nov., when, on the appointment of a small war committee of the Cabinet from which he was excluded, he resigned, being unwilling to accept a position of general responsibility for war policy if he had no effective control.

  • The state penal institutions are the boys' industrial school near Lancaster (established in 1854 as a Reform Farm), the girls' industrial home (1869) at Rathbone near Delaware, the reformatory at Mansfield (authorized 1884, opened 1896) and the penitentiary at Columbus (1816).

  • The Rev. Joseph Hunter associated him with the rebel earl of Lancaster of Edward II.'s time.

  • This close connexion with the royal house did not prevent him, as it did not prevent Earl Thomas of Lancaster, from joining the opposition to the feeble Edward II.

  • From these two marriages sprang the houses of Lancaster and Stafford.

  • In 1886 he was made under secretary for foreign affairs; in 1892 he joined the cabinet as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster; in 1894 he was president of the Board of Trade, and acted as chairman of the royal commission on secondary education; and in Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet (1905) he was made chief secretary for Ireland; but in February 1907 he was appointed British ambassador at Washington, and took leave of party politics, his last political act being a speech outlining what was then the government scheme for university reform in Dublin - a scheme which was promptly discarded by his successor Mr Birrell.

  • This agrees in many particulars with the Chronicon Angliae, but it is much less hostile to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster.

  • Won over by the surrender of Cherbourg in July 1378, the English under John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, came to his aid; but a heavy price had to be paid for the neutrality of the king of Castile.

  • Margaret Fell (1614-1702), wife of Thomas Fell (1598-1658), vice-chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, and afterwards of George Fox, opened her house, Swarthmore Hall near Ulverston, to these preachers and probably contributed largely to this fund.

  • In 1798 Joseph Lancaster, himself a Friend, opened his first school for the education of the poor; and the cause of unsectarian religious education found in the Quakers steady support.

  • He married a daughter of Henry, earl of Lancaster, and was appointed lieutenant of Ireland in 1331, but was murdered in his 21st year, leaving a daughter, the sole heiress, not only of the de Burgh possessions, but of vast Clare estates.

  • On St Thomas's Hill, where Thomas, earl of Lancaster, was beheaded in 1322, a chantry was erected in 1373, the site of which is now occupied by a windmill built of its stones.

  • The manor remained in the Lacy family until it passed by marriage to Thomas, duke of Lancaster, who was beheaded on a hill outside the town after the battle of Boroughbridge.

  • His estates were restored to his brother Henry, earl of Lancaster, on the accession of Edward III., and the manor has since then formed part of the duchy of Lancaster.

  • LANCASTER, a city and the county-seat of Fairfield county, Ohio, U.S.A., on the Hocking river (non-navigable), about 32 m.

  • Lancaster is served by the Hocking Valley, the Columbus & Southern and the Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley (Pennsylvania Lines) railways, and by the electric line of the Scioto Valley Traction Company, which connects it with Columbus.

  • Lancaster has a public library and a children's home; and 6 m.

  • Lancaster is the trade centre of a fertile agricultural region, has good transportation facilities, and is near the Hocking Valley and Sunday Creek Valley coal-fields; its commercial and industrial importance increased greatly, after 1900, through the development of the neighbouring natural gas fields and, after 1907-1908, through the discovery of petroleum near the city.

  • Some of the early settlers were from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, whence the name.

  • Lancaster was incorporated as a village in 1831 and twenty years later became a city of the third class.

  • Lancaster, Pennsylvania >>

  • EDMUND, king of Sicily and earl of Lancaster - (1245-1296), was the second son of Henry III.

  • In 1265, after Montfort's fall, Edmund received the earldom of Leicester, and two years later was created earl of Lancaster.

  • Although the county of Champagne had descended to his wife's infant daughter, Joan, Edmund assumed the title "Count Palatine of Champagne and Brie," and is described in the English patent rolls as earl of Lancaster and Champagne.

  • See "Edmund, Earl of Lancaster," by W.

  • In English history the system of appanages never played any great part, and the term is now properly applied only to the appanages of the crown: the duchy of Cornwall, assigned to the king's eldest son at birth, or on his father's accession to the crown, and the duchy of Lancaster.

  • In March 1848 he unsuccessfully contested the borough of Lancaster, and then made a long tour in the West Indies, Canada and the United States.

  • CATHERINE SWYNFORD (c. 1350-1403), wife of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, was a daughter of Sir Payne Roelt, a knight who came to England from Hainault in the train of Edward III.'s queen, Philippa.

  • In 1586 Witherington plundered Bahia; E and i n 1591 Cavendish made an abortive attack on Santos; French in 1595 Lancaster attacked Olinda.

  • During the following night and day London was given over to plunder and slaughter, the victims being chiefly Flemish merchants, lawyers and personal adherents of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster.

  • Lord Ripon became leader in the House of Lords; and Lord Elgin (colonial secretary), Lord Carrington(agriculture), Lord Aberdeen (lord lieutenant of Ireland), Sir Henry Fowler (chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster), Mr Sidney Buxton (postmaster-general), Mr L.

  • Although very hostile to Earl Thomas of Lancaster, Badlesmere helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318, and was a member of the middle party which detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster.

  • After the defeat of Lancaster at Boroughbridge, Badlesmere was taken and hanged at Canterbury on the 14th of April 1322.

  • In 1399 together with his father he joined Henry of Lancaster.

  • Ramsay (Lancaster and York) estimates that in the four years from 1399 to 1403 they had received from the king the sum of X41,750, which represented a very large capital in the 14th century, and they had also received considerable grants of land.

  • Ramsay's Lancaster and York (Oxford, 1892).

  • Sherman, was born at Lancaster, Ohio, on the 10th of May 1823.

  • The township was formed from a part of Lancaster township in 1740.

  • There is also the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, American Historical Review, issued quarterly.

  • WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN (1820-1891), American general, was born on the 8th of February 1820, at Lancaster, Ohio.

  • Early in the next year he was made Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, but when the first Coalition Ministry was formed he returned to his former post at the Treasury.

  • For the next four years Isabella and Mortimer governed in his name, though nominally his guardian was Henry, earl of Lancaster.

  • In the - end the estates of the houses of Lancaster, Kent, Bohun, Burgh and Mortimer swelled the revenues of Edward's children and grandchildren; in whose favour also the new title of duke was introduced.

  • In 1371 the Black Prince came back to England with broken health, and in 1373 John of Lancaster marched to little purpose through France, from Calais to Bordeaux.

  • Five of his sons played some part in the history of their time, these being Edward the Black Prince, Lionel of Antwerp, duke of Clarence, John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, Edmund of Langley, afterwards duke of York, and Thomas of Woodstock, afterwards duke of Gloucester.

  • John and Edmund are also important as the founders of the rival houses of Lancaster and York.

  • In 1415 Ceuta was taken from the Moors by his sons who had been born to him by his wife Philippa, daughter of John, duke of Lancaster; specially distinguished in the siege was Prince Henry afterwards generally known as "the Navigator."

  • LANCASTER The name House of Lancaster is commonly used to designate the line of English kings immediately descended from John of Gaunt, the fourth son of Edward III.

  • Edmund, earl of Lancaster in 1267.

  • His second daughter, Blanche, became the wife of John of Gaunt, who thus succeeded to the duke's inheritance in her right; and on the 13th of November 1362, when King Edward attained the age of fifty, John was created duke of Lancaster, his elder brother, Lionel, being at the same time created duke of Clarence.

  • It was from these two dukes that the rival houses of Lancaster and York derived their respective claims to the crown.

  • As Clarence was King Edward's third son, while John of Gaunt was his fourth, in ordinary course on the failure of the elder line the issue of Clarence should have taken precedence of that of Lancaster in the succession.

  • But the rights of Clarence were conveyed in the first instance to an only daughter, and the ambition and policy of the house of Lancaster, profiting by advantageous circumstances, enabled them not only to gain possession of the throne but to maintain themselves in it for three generations before they were dispossessed by the representatives of the elder brother.

  • How far this was due to religious and how far to political considerations may be a question; but not only John of Gaunt but his immediate descendants, the three kings of the house of Lancaster, all took deep interest in the religious movements of the times.

  • Gloucester even contemplated the dethronement of the king, but found that in this matter he could not rely on the support of his associates, one of whom was Henry, earl of Derby, the duke of Lancaster's son.

  • His father, John of Gaunt, had died in the interval, and the king, troubled with a rebellion in Ireland, and sorely in want of money, had seized the duchy of Lancaster as forfeited property.

  • The duke of Lancaster then claimed the kingdom as due to himself by virtue of his descent from Henry III.

  • The claim which he put forward involved, to all appearance, a strange falsification of history, for it seemed to rest upon the supposition that Edmund of Lancaster, and not Edward I., was the eldest son of Henry III.

  • Henry, Earl Of Lancaster >>

  • In early manhood he was an engraver, but in 1776 he began preaching, and was minister of the Independent church at Lancaster from 1778 to 1783.

  • This quiet was interrupted, however, by the " Paxton Massacre " (Dec. 14, 1763) - the slaughter of a score of Indians (children, women and old men) at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, by some young rowdies from the town of Paxton, who then marched upon Philadelphia to kill a few Christian Indians there.

  • In 1733 he had established a press in Charleston, South Carolina, and soon after did the same in Lancaster, Pa., in New Haven, Conn., in New York, in Antigua, in Kingston, Jamaica, and in other places.

  • created his sons Lionel and John dukes of Clarence and Lancaster respectively.

  • In 1844 he was appointed vice-chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, a well-paid post which enabled him to enjoy his popularity in London society.

  • The state institutions, each governed by a board of trustees, and all under the supervision of the state board of charity, include a state hospital at Tewksbury, for paupers (1866); a state farm at Bridgewater (1887) for paupers and petty criminals; the Lyman school for boys at Westboro, a reformatory for male criminals under fifteen years of age sentenced to imprisonment for terms less than life in connexion with which a very successful farm is maintained for the younger boys at Berlin; an industrial school for girls at Lancaster, also a reformatory school - a third reformatory school for boys was planned in 1909; a state sanatorium at Rutland for tuberculous patients (the first public hospital for such in the United States) and a hospital school at Canton for the care and instruction of crippled and deformed children.

  • When Rennes and Dinan were attacked by the duke of Lancaster in 1356, Du Guesclin fought continuously against the English, and at this time he engaged in a celebrated duel with Sir Thomas Canterbury.

  • Bigelow established in Clinton the Lancaster Mills for the manufacture of ginghams. From 1845 to 1851 he perfected his loom for the weaving of Brussels and Wilton carpets, the greatest of his inventions; and he established the Bigelow Carpet Mills here.

  • Clinton was a part of Lancaster, now a small farming township (pop. in 1905, 2406), until 1850, when it was set off as an independent township. The earliest settlement goes back to 1645.

  • SAMUEL ADJAI CROWTHER (1809?-1891), African missionary-bishop, was born at Ochugu in the Yoruba country, 1 The duchy of Lancaster, which was the private property of Henry IV.

  • An English squadron under Sir James Lancaster came into conflict with the Portuguese in 1591, and an expedition under Sir Henry Middleton traded in the archipelago in 1604.

  • In 1917 he was appointed officer in charge of the Canadian war records, and in 1918 entered the Government as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster in succession to Lord Cawley and director of the Ministry of Information in succession to Sir Edward Carson, but resigned in Oct.

  • The institution embraces a college of liberal arts, a college of engineering, a college of law (united in 1897 with the law school of Cincinnati College, then the only surviving department of that college, which was founded as Lancaster Seminary in 1815 and was chartered as Cincinnati College in 1819), a college of medicine (from 1819 to 1896 the Medical College of Ohio; the college occupies the site of the old M`Micken homestead), a college for teachers, a graduate school, and a technical school (founded in 1886 and transferred to the university in 1901); while closely affiliated with it are the Clinical and Pathological School of Cincinnati and the Ohio College of Dentistry.

  • to the English throne in 1399; it follows the strife between the houses of Lancaster and York, and with Grafton's continuation carries the story down to the death of Henry VIII.

  • of Navarre and Champagne, married Edmund, first earl of Lancaster, brother of Edward I.; and she and her English husband kept Champagne until, in 1284, Jeanne came of age.

  • Alice, only daughter and heiress of Henry de Lacy, married Thomas Plantagenet, earl of Lancaster, and on the attainder of her husband she and Joan, widow of Henry, were obliged to release their rights in the manor to the king.

  • The earl of Lancaster's attainder being reversed in 1327, Bradford, with his other property, was restored to his brother and heir, Henry Plantagenet, but again passed to the crown on the accession of Henry IV., through the marriage of John of Gaunt with Blanche, one of the daughters and heirs of Henry Plantagenet.

  • Towards the close of his last term as governor he was elected a member of the state assembly, but died during the first session, at Lancaster, on the 10th of January 1800.

  • Gregson's Fragments relative to the Duchy of Lancaster, p. 166 (1817); Liverpool Repository, i.

  • Among the more important periodicals are the Bulletin of the Geological Society of America (Rochester, N.Y., 1889 seq.); the American Journal of Science (New Haven, Conn., 1818 seq.); the American Geologist (Minneapolis, i888 seq.); Journal of Geology (Chicago, 1893 seq.); Economic Geology (Lancaster, Pa., 1905 seq.).

  • After Simon's death at Evesham his forfeited estates were conferred on his son Edmund of Lancaster, who also obtained a grant of the stewardship, but only for life.

  • The subsequent earls and dukes of Lancaster were all recognized as stewards of England, the office apparently being treated as annexed to the earldom, or honor, of Leicester.

  • On the accession of Edward III., Henry, earl of Lancaster, as president of the council, had superintended the coronation of the infant king; John of Gaunt did the same for the infant Richard II.; and, as part of the duties involved, sat in the White Hall of Westminster to hear and determine the claims to perform coronation services.

  • After successively belonging to the earls of Chester and of Derby it passed to Edward Crouchback, earl of Lancaster.

  • It was erected into a duchy and county palatine in 1353, and when the house of Lancaster succeeded to the throne their Lancashire possessions were kept separate.

  • Salford and Pendleton are still parts of the ancient duchy of Lancaster, belonging to the English crown.

  • In 1581 he became acquainted with Edward Kelly, an apothecary, who had been convicted of forgery and had lost both ears in the pillory at Lancaster.

  • In 1525 More was appointed chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, and no pains were spared to attach him to the court.

  • In 1311 Robert de Holland fortified a mansion here, and in 1327 this castle belonged to Henry, earl of Lancaster; but it was dismantled in 1460, and little more than the site is now traceable.

  • It came, by succession and marriage, into the possession of the crown under Henry IV., andwasincluded in the duchy of Lancaster.

  • It would be here out of place to follow with any minuteness the details of his subsequent imprisonments, such as that at Carlisle in 1653; London 1654; Launceston 1656; Lancaster 1660, and again in 1663, whence he was taken to Scarborough in 1665; and Worcester 1673.

  • Another range of hills, known as the Trenton Prong, extends from the northern suburbs of Philadelphia both westward and southward through Chester, Delaware, Lancaster and York counties, but these rise only 400-600 ft.

  • In Bucks and Montgomery counties is a large sandstone area; traversing Chester county is the narrow Chester Valley with a limestone bottom, and in Lancaster county is the most extensive limestone plain.

  • More than two-thirds of the state's crop of 1899 was produced in Lancaster county, which is one of the largest tobacco-producing counties in the United States, and most of the other third was produced in York, Tioga, Bradford and Clinton counties.

  • Limestones and dolomites suitable for building purposes are obtained chiefly in Montgomery, Chester and Lancaster counties, and even these are generally rejected for ornamental work on account of their colour, which is usually bluish, grey or mottled.

  • The populations of the principal cities in 1900 were as follows: Philadelphia, 1,293,697 Pittsburg, 321,616; Allegheny, 129,896 (subsequently annexed to Pittsburg); Scranton, 102,026; Reading, 78,961; Erie, 52,733 Wilkes-Barre, 51,721; Harrisburg, 50,167; Lancaster, 4 1, 459; Altoona, 38,973; Johnstown, 35,936; Allentown, 35,416; McKeesport, 34, 22 7; Chester, 33,988; York, 33,708; Williamsport, 28,757; New Castle, 28,339; Easton, 25,238; Norristown, 22,265; Shenandoah, 20,321; Shamokin (borough), 18,202; Lebanon, 17,628.

  • Stevens industrial school (1905) at Lancaster, hospitals for the treatment of persons injured in the mines, at Ashland (1879), Hazleton (1887) and Shamokin (1907), and cottage hospitals at Blossburg, Connellsville, Mercer and Philipsburg (all 1887).

  • Other institutions for higher education are the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia (1749), an endowed institution which receives very little support from the state; the University of Pittsburgh (1819), at Pittsburg (q.v.); Dickinson College (Methodist Episcopal, 1783), at Carlisle; Haveriord College (Society of Friends, 1833), at Haverford; Franklin and Marshall {German Reformed, 1853), at Lancaster; Washington and Jefferson {Presbyterian, 1802), at Washington; Lafayette (Presbyterian, 1832), at Easton; Bucknell University (Baptist, 1846), at Lewisburg; Waynesburg (Cumberland Presbyterian, 1851), at Waynesburg; Ursinus (German Reformed, 1870), at Collegeville; Allegheny College (Methodist Episcopal, 1815), at Meadville; Swarthmore (Society of Friends (Hicksites), 1866), at Swarthmore; Muhlenberg (Lutheran, 1867), at Allentown; Lehigh University (non-sectarian) 1867), at Bethlehem; and for women Bryn Mawr College (Society of Friends, 1885), at Bryn Mawr; the Allentown College (German Reformed, 1867), at Allentown; Wilson College (Presbyterian, 1870), and the Pennsylvania College for women (1869), at Pittsburg.

  • There are theological seminaries at Pittsburg, the Allegheny Seminary (United Presbyterian, 1825), Reformed Presbyterian (1856), and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian, 1827); at Lancaster (German Reformed, 1827); at Meadville (Unitarian, 18 44); at Bethlehem (Moravian, 1807); at Chester, the Crozer Theological Seminary (Baptist, 1868); at Gettysburg (Lutheran, 1826); and in Philadelphia several schools, notably the Protestant Episcopal Church divinity school (1862) and a Lutheran seminary (1864), at Mount Airy.

  • In December 1763 six Christian Indians, Conestogas, were massacred by the " Paxton boys " from Paxton near the present Harrisburg; the Indians who had escaped were taken to Lancaster for safe keeping but were seized and killed by the " Paxton boys," who with other backwoodsmen marched upon Philadelphia early in 1764, but Quakers and Germans gathered quickly to protect it and civil war was averted, largely by the diplomacy of Franklin.

  • The two Continental Congresses (1774, and 1 7751 781) met in Philadelphia, except for the months when Philadelphia was occupied by the British army and Congress met in Lancaster and York, Pennsylvania, and then in Princeton, New Jersey.

  • The state capital was removed from Philadelphia to Lancaster in 1799 and from Lancaster to Harrisburg in 1812.

  • Their children were: the future king Edward I.; Edmund, earl of Lancaster; Margaret (1240-1275), the wife of Alexander III., king of Scotland; Beatrice; and Katherine.

  • Ill-health compelled his resignation of office in 1871, but next year he returned to the ministry as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster.

  • In 1280 Roger de Lancaster obtained a charter from Edward I.

  • by Henry, earl of Lancaster, Edward VI.

  • On the fall of the latter in 1529, he was made chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster, and the same year speaker of the House of Commons, presiding over the famous assembly styled the Black or Long Parliament of the Reformation, which abolished the papal jurisdiction.

  • A partner's venture in the iron business having involved him in a debt of $21 7,000, he retired from public life in 1842 and practised law in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with such success as within six years to reduce this debt to $30,000.

  • He died at Washington, D.C., on the rrth of August 1868, and was buried at Lancaster, Pennsylvania.'

  • From him it descended by marriage to the earls of Lincoln, and, then passing by marriage to Earl Thomas of Lancaster, it became parcel of the county and later of the duchy of Lancaster; an inquisition of 1352 found that Henry, duke of Lancaster, had 77s.

  • A church was built in 1736 at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where Johann Bartholomaeus Rieger (1707-1769), who came from Germany with Weiss on his return in 1731, had preached for several years.

  • Franklin College was founded by Lutherans and Reformed, with much outside help, notably that of Benjamin Franklin, at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1787.

  • The Coetus had actually assumed the power of ordination in 1772 and formally assumed it in 1791; in 1792 a synodical constitution was prepared; and in 1793 the first independent synod met in Lancaster and adopted the constitution, thus= becoming independent of Holland.

  • The strongest churches were those of Philadelphia, Lancaster and Germantown in Pennsylvania, and Frederick in Maryland.

  • The seminary was removed in 1871 from Mercersburg to Lancaster, whither the college had gone in 1853 to form, with Franklin College, Franklin and Marshall College.

  • Colleges connected with the Church, besides the seminary at Lancaster, Franklin and Marshall College and Heidelberg University, are: Catawba College (1851) at Newton, North Carolina; and Ursinus College (1869), founded by the Low Church wing, at Collegeville, Pennsylvania, which had, until 1908, a theological seminary, then removed to Dayton, Ohio, where it united with Heidelberg Theological Seminary (until 1908 at Tiffin) to form the Central Theological Seminary.

  • and his younger brother, the founder of the house of Lancaster, had still nicknames respectively, as " Longshanks " and " Crouchback."

  • But John of Gaunt, the next brother, who had married the heiress of Lancaster and had been created duke of Lancaster in consequence, refounded the Lancastrian line, which obtained the throne in the person of his only son by her, Henry IV., on the deposition of Richard II., to the exclusion of the infant earl of March.

  • Of the house of Lancaster, the only son of Henry VI.

  • and his son in 1471, so complete was the extinction of their line that its representation vested in the heirs of the two daughters of John of Gaunt by the heiress of Lancaster, viz.

  • JOHN OF GAUNT LANCASTER, DUKE OF (1340-1399), fourth son of Edward III.

  • On the 19th of May 13 59 he married his cousin Blanche, daughter and ultimately sole heiress of Henry, duke of Lancaster.

  • In her right he became earl of Lancaster in 1361, and next year was created duke.

  • He was also the patron of Chaucer, whose Boke of the Duchesse was a lament for Blanche of Lancaster.

  • For his descendants see the table under LANCASTER, HOUSE OF.

  • Joseph Lancaster >>

  • He granted it to Robert de Lacy, in whose family it remained with two short intervals until it passed by marriage to Thomas, earl of Lancaster, in 1310.

  • It formed part of the duchy of Lancaster till Charles II.

  • See Francis Olcutt Allen, History of Enfield (Lancaster, Pa., 1900).

  • He made powerful onslaughts on the Church in connexion with the Bell and Lancaster controversy, and took a prominent part in the discussions which led to the foundation of London University in 1825.

  • MORECAMBE, a municipal borough, watering-place and seaport in the Lancaster parliamentary division of Lancashire, England, on Morecambe Bay, 236 m.

  • In August 1873 Mr Gladstone reconstructed his cabinet, and Bright returned to it as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster.

  • At the general election in 1880 he was re-elected at Birmingham, and joined Mr Gladstone's new government as chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster.

  • The situatioh on the 27th tempted attack by an enterprising enemy, and Major-General Grahams force, consisting of a squadron of the r9th Hussars, the York and Lancaster Regiment, the duke of Cornwalls Light Infantry, the Marine Artillery Battalion and two R.H.A.

  • HENRY BEAUFORT (c. 1377-1447), English cardinal and bishop of Winchester, was the second son of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine, wife of Sir Hugh Swynford.

  • He exercised considerable influence over the prince of Wales, afterwards King Henry V., and although he steadily supported the house of Lancaster he opposed the party led by Thomas Arundel, archbishop of Canterbury.

  • Sverdrup and his party conducted explorations in 1900-1902; (3) with the more southerly part of the same archipelago by Lancaster Sound.

  • Baffin Land is separated from Greenland by Baffin Bay and Davis Strait, from Ungava by Hudson Strait, from Keewatin and Melville Peninsula by Fox Channel and Fury-and-Hecla Strait, from Boothia Peninsula and North Somerset by the Gulf of Boothia and Prince Regent Inlet, and from North Devon by Lancaster Sound.

  • Harcourt (commissioner of works), Mr John Morley (India) and Sir Henry Fowler (duchy of Lancaster) retained their offices, the two latter being created peers.

  • He graduated at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 1809, studied law at Lancaster in 1809-1812, and was admitted to the bar in 1812.

  • On the expiration of his term of office(March 4, 1861) Buchanan retired to his home at Wheatland, near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he died on the 1st of June 1868.

  • Here they might have had fighting enough, as Lancaster led a force against them, while Richard II.

  • In 1380 and 1381, Lancaster, uncle of Richard II., arranged truces, but difficulties were caused by the late proclamation, in Scotland, of a truce made with her ally, France, on the 26th of January 1384.

  • It was captured and plundered in 1 595 by the English privateer James Lancaster.

  • SIR EDWARD FRANKLAND (1825-1899), English chemist, was born at Churchtown, near Lancaster, on the 18th of January 1825.

  • At this time Job Charnock was the chief of the Bengal council, and, owing to an affray with the Mogul troops at Hugli on the 28th of October 1686, he embarked the company's goods and servants on board light vessels and dropped down the on the 31st of December 1600, and the first expedition of four ships under James Lancaster left Torbay towards the end of April 1601, and reached Achin in Sumatra on the 5th of June 16.02, returning with a cargo of spices.

  • SIMON CAMERON (1799-1889), American, politician, was born in Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, on the 8th of March 1 799.

  • to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, and it remained part of the duchy of Lancaster until James I.

  • JACKSON, ANDREW (1767-1845), 41 president of the United States, was born on the 15th of March 1767, at the Waxhaw or Warsaw settlement, in Union county, North Carolina, or in Lancaster county, South Carolina, whither his parents had immigrated from Carrickfergus, Ireland, in 1765.

  • The second was Henry, earl of Lancaster, Derby, Lincoln and Leicester, who was created duke of Lancaster in 1351.

  • On the outlawry of Robert his grandson it passed to Edmund, earl of Lancaster, and, reverting to the crown in 1322, was granted to Aymer de Valence, earl of Pembroke, but escheated to the crown in 1327, and was granted to Henry, earl of Lancaster.

  • granted to Edmund, earl of Lancaster, and Avelina his wife, then lord and lady of the manor, the right of holding a fair at Hedon on the eve, day, and morrow of the feast of St Augustine and for five following days.

  • Edmund, earl of Lancaster >>

  • For modern accounts see especially Sir James Ramsay's Lancaster and York, and The Political History of England, vol.

  • 1415), a descendant of the former princes of Powys and a favourite courtier of the late King Richard, smarting under the effect of personal wrongs received from Henry of Lancaster.

  • The Yorkist faction seems to have been strongest in the eastern portion of the Principality, where the Mortimers were all-powerful, but later the close connexion of the house of Lancaster with Owen Tudor, a gentleman of Anglesea (beheaded in 1461) who had married Catherine of France, widow of Henry V., did much to invite Welsh sympathy on behalf of the claims of Henry Tudor his grandson, who claimed the English throne by right of his grandmother.

  • LANCASTER, a city and the county-seat of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the Conestoga river, 68 m.

  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia & Reading and the Lancaster, Oxford & Southern railways, and by tramways of the Conestoga Traction Company, which had in 1909 a mileage of 152 m.

  • Lancaster has a fine county court house, a soldiers' monument about 43 ft.

  • Stevens Industrial School (for orphans), a children's home,' the Mechanics' Library, and the Library of the Lancaster Historical Society.

  • The college was founded in 1852 by the consolidation of Franklin College, founded at Lancaster in 1787, and Marshall College, founded at Mercersburg in 1836, both of which had earned a high standing among the educational institutions of Pennsylvania.

  • The Theological Seminary was opened in 1825 at Carlisle, Pa., and was removed to York, Pa., in 1829, to Mercersburg, Pa., in 1837 and to Lancaster in 1871; in 1831 it was chartered by the Pennsylvania legislature.

  • of Lancaster, is the Second Pennsylvania State Normal School.

  • At Lancaster are the graves of General John F.

  • Lancaster county has long been one of the richest agricultural counties in the United States, its annual products being valued at about $10,000,000; in 1906 the value of the tobacco crop was about $3,225,000, and there were 824 manufactories of cigars in the county.

  • Lancaster was settled about 1717 by English Quakers and Germans, was laid out as a town in 1730, incorporated as a borough in 1742, and chartered as a city in 1818.

  • The Continental Congress sat here on the 27th of September 1777 after being driven from Philadelphia by the British; and subsequently, after the organization of the Federal government, Lancaster was Jne of the places seriously considered when a national capital was to be chosen.

  • From 1799 to 1812 Lancaster was the capital of Pennsylvania.

  • It is connected with Barrow Strait and Lancaster Sound by Prince Regent Inlet, with Franklin Strait by Bellot Strait, and with Fox Channel by Fury and Hecla Strait.

  • There is no distinct mention of Belper till 1296, when the manor was held by Edmund Crouchback, earl of Lancaster, who is said to have enclosed a park and built a hunting seat, to which, from its situation, he gave the name Beaurepaire.

  • The manor thus became parcel of the duchy of Lancaster and is said to have been the residence of John of Gaunt.

  • From the first he ranged himself among the opponents of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster; he was a firm upholder of the rights of the English Church, and was always eager to root out Lollardry.

  • In 1373 he declared in convocation that he would not contribute to a subsidy until the evils from which the church suffered were removed; in 1375 he incurred the displeasure of the king by publishing a papal bull against the Florentines; and in 1377 his decided action during the quarrel between John of Gaunt and William of Wykeham ended in a temporary triumph for the bishop. Wycliffe was another cause of difference between Lancaster and Courtenay.

  • In 1377 the reformer appeared before Archbishop Sudbury and Courtenay, when an altercation between the duke and the bishop led to the dispersal of the court, and during the ensuing riot Lancaster probably owed his safety to the good offices of his foe.

  • But Richard, having been dethroned by Henry of Lancaster (Henry IV.), hostilities were resumed, Henry profiting little by the internal discords of France.

  • Ramsay, Lancaster and York 1 3991485 (Oxford, 1892).

  • By 1787 his practice at the equity bar had so far increased that he was obliged to give up the eastern half of his circuit (which embraced six counties) and attend it only at Lancaster.

  • In 1387 he had married Philippa of Lancaster, daughter of John of Gaunt; Richard II.

  • COLUMBIA, a borough of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the W.

  • From this time she was the ardent champion of her husband's and son's rights; to her energy the cause of Lancaster owed its endurance, but her implacable spirit contributed to its failure.

  • He continued, however, to take part in public affairs; mediating between the king and Earl Thomas of Lancaster in 1318, and attempting to do so between Edward and his rebellious barons in 1321.

  • Sir James Lancaster, the English commodore, carried letters from Queen Elizabeth to the king of Achin, and was well received by the prince then reigning, Alauddin Shah.

  • Tadcaster, Lancaster; and in the south-west and in the midlands we have a group of towns with the form cester: - Bicester, Gloucester, Cirencester, Worcester, Alcester, Leicester, Towcester.

  • Ramsay's Lancaster and York; Political History of England, vol.

  • Lancaster, the Belgian meteorologist, formulated, as the result of a study of all the available data, the following rule: - That the rainfall increases in the Congo basin (1) in proportion as one nears the equator from the south, (2) as one passes from the coast to the interior.

  • 2 William Trent (c. 1715-1778) was a native of Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, became a captain in the state militia in 1746 and served against the French and Indians, was for many years, after 1 749, a justice of the court of common pleas and general sessions of the peace for Cumberland (disambiguation)|Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and in1750-1756was the partner of George Crogan in an extensive trade with the Indians.

  • For modern authors, consult Sir James Ramsay's Lancaster and York (1892), and the Political History of England, vol.

  • Another brother, Gotthilf Henry Ernest Muhlenberg (1753-1815), was a prominent Lutheran clergyman, and was pastor of a church in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, from 1779 to his death; but he is best known as a botanist, and published Catalogus plantarum Americae septentrionalis (1813) and Descriptio uberior graminum et plantarum calamariarum Americae septentrionalis indignarum et circurum (1817).

  • Margaret died two years later, leaving William, who had married Matilda of Lancaster, in possession of the entire Holland-Hainaut inheritance (July 1356).

  • For the duke was descended from Lionel, duke of Clarence, the third son of Edward III., while the house of Lancaster came of John of Gaunt, a younger brother of Lionel.

  • in his French campaigns secured the weak title of the house of Lancaster against further attack for forty years.

  • After his recovery of the throne in 1471 he had little more to fear from the rivalry of the house of Lancaster.

  • and so unite the houses of York and Lancaster.

  • of Hartfield duke of William de Burgh, duke of Lancaster.

  • granted it to Hamelin, Earl Warenne, and when his heirs failed, it merged in the duchy of Lancaster and so in the crown.

  • From the Lacys the manor passed to Thomas Plantagenet, duke of Lancaster, through his marriage with Alice de Lacy, and so came to the crown on the accession of Henry IV.

  • Nebraska, U.S.A., county-seat of Lancaster county and capital of the state.

  • The manor, part of that of Canford, belonged in 1086 to Edward of Salisbury, and passed by marriage to William Longespee, earl of Salisbury, thence to Edmund de Lacy, earl of Lincoln, and with his heiress to Thomas, earl of Lancaster, and so to the Crown.

  • Some years later the Scottish prince also got possession of the great Honor of Lancaster.

  • The French expedition, which was led by the kings brother Edmund, earl of Lancaster, failed to recover Gascony, and came to an ignominious end.

  • But Arch bishop Winchelsea had returned from exile in a belli gerent mood, and the place of Norfolk and Hereford was taken by an ambitious prince of the royal house, Thomas, earl of Lancaster, the son of the younger brother of Edward I.

  • During all this time the English king only once went north of the Border-in Il 11and then with a very small army, for Lancaster and his friends had refused to join his banner.

  • But he spent what small energy he possessed in a wretched strife of chicanery and broken promises with Thomas of Lancaster and his party, dismissing and recalling Gaveston according to the exigencies of the moment, while he let the Scottish war shift for itself.

  • But there were two great faults in the proceedings of Thomas of Lancaster and his friends.

  • He was being conducted to London to be tried in parliament, when his two greatest enemies, Thomas of Lancaster and Guy, earl of Warwick, took him out of the hands of his escort, and beheaded him by the wayside without any legal authority or justification.

  • Thomas of Lancaster, who had refused to join in the late campaign, took advantage of its results to place the king once more in complete tutelage.

  • His household was dismissed, he was bidden to live as best he could on an allowance of fmo a day, and all his ministers and Lancaster.

  • For more than three years Lancaster practically reigned in his cousins name; it was soon found that the realm got no profit thereby, for Earl Thomas, though neither so apathetic nor so frivolous as Edward, was not a whit more competent to conduct either war or domestic administration.

  • Though the Scottish expedition to Ireland had been beaten off, this was not in the least to be ascribed to the credit of Lancaster, who was showing the grossest incompetence as an administrator.

  • These were the two Hugh Despensers, father and son; the elder was an ambitious baron who hated Lancaster, the younger had been made Edwards chamberlain in 1318 and had become his secret councillor and constant companion.

  • The task was the more easy because Lancaster was at open discord with the men who had supplanted him, so that the baronial party was divided; while the mishaps of the last six years had convinced the nation that other rulers could be as incompetent and as unlucky as the king.

  • Indeed, there was a decided reaction in Edwards favor, since Lancaster and his friends had been tried and found wanting.

  • On this Thomas of Lancaster and the more resolute of his associates took arms, but the majority both of the baronage and of the commons remained quiescent, public opinion being rather with than against the king.

  • The rebels displayed great indecision, and Lancaster proved such a bad general that he was finally driven into the north and beaten at the battle of Boroughbridge (March 16, 1322), where his chief associate, the earl of Hereford, was slain.

  • Such severity was most impolitic, and Lancaster was ere long hailed as a saint and a martyr.

  • When she landed with her son in Essex in September 1326, she was at once joined by Henry of Lancaster, the heir of Earl Thomas, and most of the baronage of the eastern counties.

  • Having secured promise of aid from Henry of Lancaster, his cousins and other barons, he executed a coup de main, and seized Mortimer in -his chamber at midnight.

  • The years 1345I 347 saw the zenith of King Edwards prosperity; in them fell not only his own triumphs at Crecy and Calais, but a victory at Auberoche in Prigord won ~ by his cousin Henry of Lancaster, which restored Cruss.

  • Edward, prince of Wales, ravaged Languedoc as far as the Mediterranean, while his younger brother John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, executed a less ambitious raid in Picardy and Artois.

  • While Lancaster landed in Normandy, and with the aid of local rebels occupied the greater part of the peninsula of the Ctentin, the prince of Wales accomplished greater things on the borders of Aquitaine.

  • The charge of the military operations of the English armies had passed to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, the kings younger son, a prince far inferior in capacity to his father and brother.

  • Though not destitute of good impulses Lancaster was hasty, improvident and obstinate; he was unfortunate in his choice of friends, for he allied himself to all his fathers unscrupulous dependents.

  • Since Lancaster, in hi~ great circular raids, had never the leist~re to sit down to a siegegenerally a matter of long months in the I4th ceni dryhe repeatedly crossed France leaving a train of ruined villages behind him, but having accomplished nothing else save the exhaustion of his own army.

  • It was to no effect that, in the year after the battle of La Rochelle,Lancaster carried out the last, the most expensive, and the most fruitless of his great raids across France.

  • The nation ascribed the series of disasters D~oHsi,Jestic which had filled the space from 1369 to 1375 entirely to the maladministration of Lancaster and the kings favorites, failing to see that it was largely due to the mere fact that England was not strong enough to hold down Aquitaine, when France was administered by a capable king and served by a great general.

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