Lancashire sentence example

lancashire
  • Even earlier still were the Sunday and day schools in Rossendale, Lancashire, dating from 1793.
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  • It has stations on the London & North-Western and the Lancashire & Yorkshire railways, with running powers for the Midland railway.
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  • The micrometer so mentioned fell into the possession of Richard Townley of Lancashire, who exhibited it at the meeting of the Royal Society held on the 25th of July 1667.
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  • Presbyterianism is comparatively strong in three districts of England, namely Northumberland, Lancashire and London.
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  • There are in England fourteen congregations in connexion with the Church of Scotland, six of them in London and the remainder in Berwick, Northumberland, Carlisle and Lancashire.
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  • Immediately on the fall of Pembroke Cromwell set out to relieve Lambert, who was slowly retreating before Hamilton's superior forces; he joined him near Knaresborough on the 12th of August, and started next day in pursuit of Hamilton in Lancashire, placing himself at Stonyhurst near Preston, cutting off Hamilton from the north and his allies, and defeating him in detail on the 17th, 18th and 19th at Preston and at Warrington.
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  • Aspinall on the Lancashire & Yorkshire railway to ascertain the resistance of trains of bogie passenger carriages of different lengths at varying speeds, and the results are recorded in a paper, " Train Resistance," Proc. Inst.
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  • It lies in the valley of the Tame, close to the junction of the boundaries of Lancashire, Cheshire and Yorkshire, and is surrounded by sharply-rising high ground, especially eastward.
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  • He graduated at Stonyhurst College, Lancashire, in 1843, and in 1844 began the study of law at Dublin.
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  • A small tract, part of the Leicestershire coalfield, lies in the south-east corner, and in the north-west corner a portion of the Lancashire coalfield appears about New Mills and Whaley Bridge.
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  • In 1904-1905 Lancashire (£8510), Kent (£5922) and Cheshire (£4310) spent most in this direction.
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  • A similar work on Lancashire, Cheshire and the Peak was sent out in 1700 by Leigh, and one on Cornwall by Borlase in 1758 - all these four being printed at Oxford.
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  • Frau Holda; others, like the Welsh Pwck, the Lancashire boggarts or the more widely found Jack-o'-Lantern (Will o' the Wisp), are sprites who do no jmore harm than leading the wanderer astray.
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  • Suggestions for its improvement, which if carried out would (it is estimated) result in a monetary saving of £r,000,000 annually, were made by the Lancashire Private Cotton Investigation Commission which visited the Southern States of America in 1906.
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  • As most of the Lancashire cotton mills lie far from Manchester, direct importations to that city do not usually dispense with a " handling," and frequently save little or nothing in freight rates, though in some cases the economy derived from direct importation is considerable.
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  • One gain accruing to Lancashire from the Canal, however, is that its competition has brought down railway rates.
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  • It falls within the north-western counties of Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire (Furness district), about one-half being within the first ' of these.
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  • In 1652 a number of people in Westmorland and north Lancashire who had separated from the common national worship,' came under the influence of Fox, and it was this community (if it can be so called) at Preston Patrick which formed the nucleus of the Quaker church.
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  • It is served by the Lancashire & Yorkshire and London & North-Western railways, and by the Southport & Cheshire Lines Extension system.
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  • He lived much in Lancashire, managed his enormous estates with great skill, and did a great amount of work as a local magnate.
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  • As Lord Stanley the latter had been member of parliament for the West Houghton division of Lancashire from 1892 to 1906; he was financial secretary to the War Office from 1900 to 1903, and postmaster-general from 1903 to 1905.
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  • It is an important station on the Great Northern railway, whose principal locomotive and carriage works are here, and it is also served by the North Eastern, Great Eastern, Great Central, Lancashire & Yorkshire, and Midland railways.
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  • He was educated at Middleton, Lancashire, and at Brasenose College, Oxford, where he is said to have shared rooms with John Foxe the martyrologist.
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  • Gladstone, who had been doubly nominated, was defeated in Lancashire, but was returned for Greenwich.
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  • Gladstone at once turned his steps towards South Lancashire, where he.
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  • This force, together with some ill-armed Irish levies commanded by Sir Thomas Fitzgerald, landed in Lancashire on the 4th of June.
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  • This excess is greatest in what is Gas known as cannel coal, the Lancashire kennel or candle coal, so named from the bright light it gives out when burning.
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  • In the Lancashire and the Midland districts wire-rope guides have been introduced to a very considerable extent, with a view of meeting the above objections.
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  • There are eight colleges in England, viz., besides Mansfield and Cheshunt, New and Hackney Colleges, London; Western College, Bristol; Yorkshire United College, Bradford; Lancashire Independent College, Manchester; the Congregational Institute, Nottingham.
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  • Prescot was formerly of greater importance in relation to the now populous district of south-west Lancashire; it was also a postal centre, and it is curious to notice that such addresses as.
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  • He was given the colonelcy of the 10th (Lancashire Fusiliers), but was too late to take part in the battle of Culloden.
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  • Becoming a Congregationalist, he accepted in 1842 the chair of biblical criticism, literature and oriental languages at the Lancashire Independent College at Manchester; but he was obliged to resign in 1857, being brought into collision with the college authorities by the publication of an introduction to the Old Testament entitled The Text of the Old Testament, and the Interpretation of the Bible, written for a new edition of Horne's Introduction to the Sacred Scripture.
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  • Its liberal tendencies caused him to be accused of unsound views, and a most exhaustive report prepared by the Lancashire College committee was followed by numerous pamphlets for and against.
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  • At Shaw, a populous village included within it, is a station on the Lancashire & Yorkshire railway.
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  • On the coast of Lancashire also the fishery, if it may be so called, is of considerable importance.
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  • In Great Britain, whither they began to straggle over during the revolutionary troubles at the close of the 18th century, and where, practically unaffected by the clause directed against them in the Emancipation Act of 1829, their chief settlement has been at Stonyhurst in Lancashire, an estate conferred on them by Thomas Weld in 1795, they have been unmolested; but there has been little affinity to the order in the British temperament, and the English province has consequently never risen to numerical or intellectual importance in the Society.
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  • The more valuable kinds are known as: New kind, Black mauls, Spaniards, Glibskins, Long-bud, Long-skin, Lancashire red-bud, French, Italians, Pomeranians and Councillors and scores of other local names.
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  • It is served by the Midland and the North Eastern railways (Midland station), and by the Great Northern and the Lancashire & Yorkshire railways (Exchange station).
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  • Modern experiments in cross-fertilization in Lancashire by the Garton Brothers have evolved the most extraordinary "sports," showing, it is claimed, that the plant has probably passed through stages of which until the present day there had been no conception.
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  • Salford also gives its name to the hundred of south-west Lancashire in which Manchester is situated; probably because when the district was divided into hundreds Manchester was in a ruinous condition from Danish ravages.
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  • The Lancashire & Yorkshire and the London & North-Western railways serve the town.
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  • It was erected into a duchy and county palatine in 1353, and when the house of Lancaster succeeded to the throne their Lancashire possessions were kept separate.
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  • In 1808 he accompanied the community of Crook Hall to the new college at Ushaw, Durham, but in 1811, after declining the presidency of the college at Maynooth, he withdrew to the secluded mission at Hornby in Lancashire, where for the rest of his life he devoted himself to literary pursuits.
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  • In the latter edition a continuation, the Annales Furnesienses (1190-1298), composed by a monk of Furness Abbey, Lancashire, is also given.
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  • Hull is one of the principal shipping ports for the manufactures of Yorkshire and Lancashire, and has direct communication with the coal-fields of the West Riding.
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  • Against this we must set off a decided increase in the manufacture of mixed goods, carried on principally in Scotland, Yorkshire and Lancashire.
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  • Silk spinning has chiefly developed in the Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cheshire and Staffordshire textiles centres.
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  • The diocese includes rather less than one-third of the parishes of Yorkshire, and also a small part of Lancashire.
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  • In addition, two or three cross roads, not yet sufficiently explored, maintained communication between the troops in Yorkshire and those in Cheshire and Lancashire.
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  • Spinning mills are established, however, in most of the large Lancashire towns as well as in some parts of Cheshire and in Yorkshire, where there is a considerable industry in doubling yarns.
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  • It is nevertheless the experience of yarn salesmen that Lancashire produces an increasingly large amount of specialities that indicate a continued differentiation in trade.
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  • A remarkable point in the Lancashire yarn trade is the looseness of the contracts between spinner and manufacturer.
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  • Litigation in the yarn trade is very unusual, and Lancashire traders generally have only vague notions of the bearing of law upon their transactions, and a wholesome dread of the exp'erience that would lead to better knowledge.
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  • A very large proportion of the Lancashire export trade is in grey goods and a smaller yet considerable proportion of the home trade.
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  • Shirting, which has long since ceased to refer exclusively to shirt cloths, includes a large proportion of Lancashire manufacture.
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  • American sheetings compete with Lancashire goods in the China market.
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  • The chief place in Lancashire for the manufacture of printing-cloths is Burnley, and in the United States, Fall River.
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  • They now make one of the principal staple trades of Lancashire with India.
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  • The main lines of the Lancashire export trade in cotton goods are indicated in the Board of Trade returns.
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  • Glasgow buys largely of yarns and cloth, some considerable part of which is dyed or printed, for India and elsewhere, and has an indigenous manufacture and trade in fine goods such as book-muslins and lappets, a somewhat delicate department of manufacture which necessitates a slower running of machinery than is usual in Lancashire.
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  • Of course by far the larger part of the yarn spun in Lancashire is woven in Lancashire, but of the cotton cloth woven in Lancashire it is roughly estimated that about 20% is used in Great Britain.
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  • Large warehouses in the city of London carry on the trade and frequently supply Lancashire with her own goods.
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  • By far the majority of Lancashire manufacturers sell their goods as they come from the loom, or, as it is called, in the "grey state," but an increasing number now cultivate the trade in finished goods.
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  • The present building is, however, the largest of the kind in the world, and the history of the various exchanges coincides with the expansion of the Lancashire industry.
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  • Carlow to a minor post (1839) in the Irish ordnance survey, thence (1842) to the English survey, attending mechanics' institute lectures at Preston in Lancashire.
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  • It occupies a hilly site at the junction of the rivers Tame and Mersey; the larger part of the town lying on the south (left) bank, while the suburb of Heaton Norris is on the Lancashire bank.
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  • In 1890 also the Hall process operated by steam power was installed at Patricroft, Lancashire, where the plant had a capacity of 300 lb per day, but by 1894 the turbines of the Swiss and French works ruined the enterprise.
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  • It is served by the Midland, Great Central, Lancashire & Yorkshire, Great Northern, and Hull & Barnsley railways.
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  • The Upper Carboniferous in Lancashire is from 12,000 to 13,000 ft.; elsewhere in Britain it is thinner.
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  • In 1905 the Cleveland district in North Yorkshire supplied 41% of the total British product of iron ores; Lincolnshire, 14.8%; Northamptonshire, 13.9%; Leicestershire, 4.7%; Cumberland, 8.6%; North Lancashire, 2.7%; Staffordshire, 6.1%; and Scotland, 5.7%.
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  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.
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  • The family had reached Lancashire by two migrations.
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  • Inquiries made under the auspices of the British Cotton Growing Association have led to the conclusion that Northern Nigeria offers the most promising field contained within the empire for the growth of cotton required to render Lancashire looms independent of foreign supplies.
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  • Lyttelton (1st Northumberlands and Grenadier Guards, 2nd Lancashire and Rifle Brigade); Egyptian division, under Major-General Hunter, consisting of four brigades, commanded by Colonels MacDonald, Maxwell, Lewis and, Collinson; mounted troops2Ist Lancers, camel corps, and Egyptian cavalry; artillery, under Colonel Long, 2 British batteries, 5 Egyptian batteries, and 20 machine guns; detachment of Royal Engineers.
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  • The heads of houses were to elect a superior general, and Rice held this office from 1822 to 1838, during which time the institution extended to several English towns (especially in Lancashire), and the course of instruction grew out of the primary stage.
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  • Much salt is obtained from north Lancashire, as also from the brine pits of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire, Durham and the Isle of Man (Point of Ayre).
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  • Passenger steamship services are worked in connexion with the Lancashire & Yorkshire railway to Amsterdam, Antwerp, Bruges, Copenhagen, Rotterdam and other north European ports.
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  • During the winter of1862-1863the count took a special interest in the organization of the Lancashire Cotton Famine Fund, and contributed an article to the Revue des deux mondes entitled "Christmas Week in Lancashire."
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  • The eggs have also been obtained from the Bay of Naples, and near Marseilles, also off the coast of Holland, and once at least off the coast of Lancashire.
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  • Immediately to the west lie the towns of Dukinfield, and across the river in Lancashire, Ashton-underLyne; while 2 m.
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  • Most of the British alkali works are situated in South Lancashire and the adjoining part of Cheshire, near the mouth of the Tyne and in the West of Scotland.
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  • This was most notably the case in South Lancashire, and it led to the passing of Lord Derby's " Alkali Act," in 1863, supplemented by further legislation in 1874, 1881 and later.
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  • The present importance of the cotton crop dates only from the crisis in Lancashire caused by the American War.
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  • It is calculated that an Indian power-loom weaver working 72 hours a week can turn out 70 lb of cloth, while a European working 54 hours can turn out 468 lb, and that one Lancashire weaver can do the work of six Indian power-loom weavers and nine hand-loom weavers.
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  • Dalby (London, 1906), where the inertia stresses brought upon the several links of a Joy valve gear, belonging to an express passenger engine of the Lancashire & Yorkshire railway, are investigated for an engine-speed of 68 m.
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  • Joseph Berington, himself a distinguished Catholic priest, considers that this number was above the mark; he reports that his co-religionists were most numerous in Lancashire and London; next came Yorkshire, Northumberland and Staffordshire.
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  • It is served by the Great Northern, Midland and Great Central railways (Westgate station), and the Lancashire and Yorkshire and North-Eastern railways (Kirkgate station), the Great Northern Company using both stations.
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  • The diocese includes about one-seventh of the parishes of Yorkshire, and also covers a very small portion of Lancashire.
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  • Shortly afterwards it was granted to William, Earl Warenne, and his heirs, under whom it formed an extensive baronial liberty, extending to the confines of Lancashire and Cheshire.
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  • About 1839, on the recommendation of Graham, whom in 1837 he had accompanied to University College, London, he was appointed chemist at James Muspratt's alkali works in Lancashire; in connexion with alkali he showed that cast-iron vessels could be satisfactorily substituted for silver in the manufacture of caustic soda, and worked out improvements in the production of chlorate of potash.
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  • Thus it appears that of the coal raised in England the county of Durham contributes about 22%, Yorkshire 17%, Lancashire 16%, Stafford and Derbyshire each about 9%, and Northumberland 7%; while of the coal raised in Wales 85% is contributed by the county of Glamorgan; and that the coal production of England and Wales together constitutes, in quantity and value, 85% of the whole production of the United Kingdom.
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  • Their territory thus included most of Yorkshire, the whole of Lancashire, Durham, Westmorland, Cumberland and part of Northumberland.
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  • It is wholly of modern growth, although the name of Byrkhed is traced to the forest which is believed to have extended between the mouths of the Dee and the Ribble in Lancashire.
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  • He was proclaimed king at Carlisle, joined by the earl of Derby in Lancashire, evaded the troops of Lambert and Harrison in Cheshire, marched through Shropshire, meeting with a rebuff at Shrewsbury, and entered Worcester with a small, tired and dispirited force of only 16,000 men (22nd of August).
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  • For a summary of these investigations see papers on "Artificial Fish-hatching in Norway," by Captain Dannevig and Mr Dahl, in the Report of the Lancashire Sea Fisheries Laboratory for 1906 (Liverpool, 1907).
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  • In 1632 a church was organized and the present name was adopted from Duxbury Hall, Lancashire, the old seat of the Standish family; the Indian name had been Mattakeeset.
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  • The hue and cry was out against him; henceforth he led a hunted life, preaching and ministering to Catholics in Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Lancashire.
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  • In England valuable deposits occur in the Carboniferous Limestone of west Cumberland (Whitehaven district) and north Lancashire (Ulverston district).
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  • The chief localities of natural scalps on the British coast are Morecambe Bay in Lancashire and the flat eastern shores, especially that of the Wash of Lincoln, and similar shallow bays.
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  • Many thousand tons of mussels are wastefully employed as manure by the farmers on lands adjoining scalp-producing coasts, as in Lancashire and Norfolk, three half-pence a bushel being the price quoted in such cases.
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  • Through his influence Lancashire became the stronghold of the Swedenborgians, and to-day includes a third of the congregations and more than half the members of the New Church in the United Kingdom.
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  • In Lancashire a flat coastal strip occurs between the western front of the Pennine Chain and the Irish Sea, and, widening southward, extends into Cheshire and comprises the lower valleys of the Mersey and the Dee.
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  • Low shores correspond to the plains of Cheshire, Lancashire and the Solway, while the intervening coast is of no great elevation, as only the foothills of the Lake District approach it with a gradual slope.
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  • The Lake District occupies the counties of Cumberland, Westmorland and North Lancashire.
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  • It includes the whole of Northumberland and Durham, the West Riding of Yorkshire, most of Lancashire and Derbyshire, the north of Staffordshire and the west of Nottinghamshire.
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  • The belt of Millstone Grit south of the Aire, lying between the great coal-fields of the West Riding and Lancashire, has a lower elevation, and forms grassy uplands and dales; but farther south, the finest scenery of the whole region occurs in the limestones of Derbyshire, in which the range terminates.
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  • Across the moors, on the western side of the anticline, the vast and dense population of the Lancashire coal-field is crowded in the manufacturing towns surrounding the great commercial centre, Manchester, which itself stands on the edge of the Triassic plain.
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  • The Lancashire coal-field, and the portion of the bounding plain between it and the seaport of Liverpool, contain a population greater than that borne by any equal area in the country, the county of London and its surroundings not excepted.
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  • Farther south, these rocks form the low coastal belt of Lancashire, edged with the longest stretches of blown sand in England, and dotted here and there with pleasure towns, like Blackpool and Southport.
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  • The plain sweeps round south of the Lancashire coal-field, forms the valley of the Mersey from Stockport to the sea, and farther south in Cheshire the salt-bearing beds of the Keuper marls give rise to a characteristic industry.
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  • The Pennine Chain has always separated the traffic from south to north into an east coast route through the Vale of York, and a west coast route by the Lancashire plain.
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  • Essex and Suffolk, Suffolk and Norfolk, Cornwall and Devon, Durham and Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cheshire, are all separated by rivers, while rivers form some part of the boundaries of almost every county.
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  • The Triassic rocks, red sandstones, marls and conglomerates cover a broad area in the Midlands in Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Leicestershire, whence they may be followed south-westward through Somerset to the coast at Sidmouth, and northward, round either flank of the Pennine Hills, through Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire to Middlesbrough on the one hand, and upon the other through Staffordshire, Cheshire and Lancashire to Carlisle.
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  • The great populous area which covers south Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, and extends beyond them into Cheshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Nottinghamshire, is not in reality a unit.
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  • The whole of the lowland in the south of Lancashire has almost the appearance of one vast town, whereas among the hills of the Pennine Chain the population crowds the valleys on either flank and leaves in the high-lying centre some of the largest tracts of practically uninhabited country in England.
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  • Docks at Heysham, Lancashire; and steamship services to Belfast, &c.
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  • The two most important railway companies not possessing lines to London are the North-Eastern and the Lancashire & Yorkshire.
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  • Extensive system in south Lancashire, connecting Manchester with Preston and Fleetwood (where the docks and steamship services to Ireland are worked jointly with the London & NorthWestern company), Southport, Liverpool, &c.
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  • Cheshire Lines, worked by a committee representative of the Great Central,Great Northernand Midland Companies, andaffording important connexions between the lines of these systems and south Lancashire and Cheshire (Godley, Stockport, Warrington, Liverpool; Manchester and Liverpool; Manchester and Liverpool to Southport; Godley and Manchester to Northwich and Chester, &c.).
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  • But the history of canal-building in England is usually dated from about 1760, and from the construction, at the instance of Francis, Duke of Bridgewater, of the Bridgewater canal in South Lancashire, now belonging to the Manchester Ship Canal Company.
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  • The manufacturing districts of South Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire are traversed and connected by several canals following transverse valleys of the Pennine Chain.
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  • Those with the smallest proportional cultivated area are Westmorland, Middlesex, Northumberland, Surrey, Cumberland, the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire, Lancashire, Durham and Cornwall.
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  • The presence of a widespread urban population must also be remembered in the case of Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire.
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  • Riding of Yorkshire are especially productive in all crops these; the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire pro duce a notable quantity of barley and oats; and the oat-crops in the following counties deserve mention - Devonshire, Hampshire, Lancashire, Cumberland, Cornwall, Cheshire and Sussex.
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  • Cattle are reared in great numbers in Lincolnshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, Devonshire, Somersetshire and Cornwall; but the numbers of both cattle and sheep are in no English county (save Middlesex) to be regarded as insignificant.
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  • The railways having the heaviest coal traffic are the North-Eastern, which monopolizes the traffic of Northumberland and Durham; the Midland, commanding the Derbyshire, Yorkshire and East Midland traffic, and some of the Welsh; the London & North Western, whose principal sources are the Lancashire, Staffordshire 1 The figure 17.76 is the percentage for the whole of Yorkshire.
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  • The richness of the ore (about 30% of metal) is by no means so great as the red haematite ore found in Cumberland and north Lancashire (Furness district, &c.).
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  • Slate is worked in Cornwall and Devon, and also in Lancashire and Cumberland, where, in the Lake District, there are several large quarries.
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  • It was not till the later part of the 18th century, when a series of inventions, unparalleled in the annals of industry, followed each other in quick succession, that the cotton manufacture took real root in the country, gradually eclipsing that of other European nations, although a linen manufacture in Lancashire had acquired some prominence as early as the 16th century.
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  • It belongs almost entirely to south Lancashire - to Manchester and the great industrial towns in its neighbourhood.
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  • As the cotton industry has in some degree extended from Lancashire into the West Riding, so has the woollen from the West Riding into a few Lancastrian towns, such as Rochdale.
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  • Derby has a similar fame, while the manufacture of glass, important in Leeds and elsewhere in the West Riding of Yorkshire, and in the London district, centres peculiarly upon a single town in South Lancashire - St Helens.
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  • In Lancashire the cost of main roads falls upon the hundred, as distinguished from the county at large, special provision being made to that effect.
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  • In Lancashire the spectre-hound is called Trash or Striker.
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  • It is served by the Great Northern railway (Central station), the Midland (Wellington station), North-Eastern and London & North-Western (New station), and Great Central and Lancashire & Yorkshire railways (Central station).
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  • Rupert rallied some six thousand of the men and escaped over the hills into Lancashire, thence rejoining King Charles in the south.
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  • In 1838 he went into the office of John Urpeth Rastrick, one of the leading railway engineers of the day, where he was employed in designing bridges for the line from London to Brighton, and also in surveying for railways in Lancashire.
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  • At once a large section of Unionists, especially in Unionist Lancashire, became alarmed lest their electoral chances should be jeopardized by the prospect of food taxes imposed without reference to the people.
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  • In the manufacturing districts of Lancashire and Yorkshire it generally amounts to one-third of the whole so-called " available supply."
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  • Perhaps the first important cases occurred in the earlier part of the 19th century on the Lancashire shore of the Mersey estuary, where, one after another, deep wells in the New Red Sandstone had to be abandoned for most purposes.
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  • It is served by the Lancashire & Yorkshire and London & North Western 1 Skeat, Etym.
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  • He landed in Lancashire, and pushed forward, hoping to gather the English Yorkists to his aid.
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  • It forms the greater part of the North Lonsdale parliamentary division of Lancashire, and contains the parliamentary borough of Barrow-in-Furness.
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  • The introduction of machinery, however, which led to the rise of the great cotton industry of Lancashire, had very prejudicial effects, and by 1839 the number of persons employed had fallen to 4622.
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  • In 1900 an outbreak of "peripheral neuritis" with various skin affections occurred in Lancashire, which was traced to beer made from glucose and invert sugar, in the preparation of which sulphuric acid contaminated with arsenic was said to have been used.
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  • The Midland company has a branch from Newark to Lincoln, and the Lancashire, Derbyshire, and East Coast line terminates at Lincoln.
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  • The township of Newton-in-Makerfield, gave its name in Saxon times and in the reign of William the Conqueror to one of the hundreds of Lancashire.
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  • It is served by the London & NorthWestern and the Lancashire & Yorkshire railways (Charlestown station), and by the Great Central (Park Parade station).
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  • Another case of a " seed-bearing " Lycopod has lately been discovered by Miss Benson in Miadesmia membranacea, a slender Selaginella-like plant from the Lower Coal Measures of Lancashire.
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  • Cleethorpes is greatly favoured by visitors from the midland counties, Lancashire and Yorkshire.
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  • He reported that the Lancashire Strategic Initiative will now include aerospace.
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  • England had hoped the star all-rounder would return to captain them for the second match of the series at his Lancashire home ground.
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  • Replies Di - Lancashire 13/03/2006 Everyone I know who has osteo arthritis swears by glucosamine and chondroitin.
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  • Page 328 Ringley Chapel appears to have been the first built and endowed in Lancashire by private benevolence after the Reformation.
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  • The wavy fess represents the River Calder which, at the time the arms were granted, was the boundary between Yorkshire and Lancashire.
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  • These include fiche holding back copies of Lancashire magazine, and those which are one name studies for example.
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  • Take an award winning Lancashire Cheese an add some healthy flaxseed and you have the Healthy Cheese.
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  • In just five weeks the mobile muggers have extorted £ 330,000 from Lancashire's drivers.
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  • Working With Victims of Crime Over many years probation in Lancashire has worked to uphold the rights of victims of crime.
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  • As part of the service offering TDG will manage stocks of aerosol propellant at one of its operating centers in Lancashire.
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  • Spanning the coastline of northern Lancashire and southern Cumbria, Morecambe Bay has dangerous quicksands and fast moving tides.
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  • The two have refused to pay fines imposed after they held a sit-in at the Lancashire County Council's offices in Preston.
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  • The lack of a quality one-day spinner, or, preferably, two such bowlers, will continue to be a problem for Lancashire.
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  • Disappointing result in stockman contest FOUR local young farmers were in Lancashire at the weekend for the stockman contest FOUR local young farmers were in Lancashire at the weekend for the stockman of the year competition.
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  • She was born in 1857 in Bootle, Lancashire, the daughter of Ben THORPE, a journeyman stonemason, and Sarah TURNER.
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  • Deaf Identities review 34 Chris Payton tod, Lancashire encourages ToDs to include this volume on their bookshelves and university reading lists.
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  • The Lancashire petition was a qualified pledge of support in return for assurances of the King's continuing vigilance against Papist forces.
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  • A third outbreak took place in April among the cotton weavers of Lancashire.
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  • He was the author of several widely popular poems (principally in the Lancashire dialect) showing sympathy with the conditions of his class, and his Passages in the Life of a Radical (1840-1844) is an authoritative history of the condition of the working classes in the years succeeding the battle of Waterloo.
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  • Twelve presbyteries were erected in London; Shropshire and Lancashire were organized; and Bolton was so vigorous in the cause as to gain the name of the Gene Ta of Lancashire.
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  • According to its so fifth report, it originated " in the prospective fears of a portion of the trade that some dire calamity must inevitably, sooner or later, overtake the cotton manufacture of Lancashire, whose vast superstructure had so long rested upon the treacherous foundation of restricted slave labour as the main source of supply for its raw material."
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  • There has been a longcontinued discussion, which between buyer and seller sometimes degenerates into a dispute, on the subject of moisture in yarns, and the difficulty is not confined to the Lancashire industry.
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  • A quack doctor who was virtually illiterate, Joseph Healey was one of the main leaders of the parliamentary reform movement in Lancashire.
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  • Eric Alston Eric Alston is a successful racehorse trainer based in near Preston, Lancashire in the UK.
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  • Another Lancashire side with a famous past recently returned to the league - what are your feelings on Accrington Stanley 's revival of fortunes?
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  • The two have refused to pay fines imposed after they held a sit-in at the Lancashire County Council 's offices in Preston.
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  • Disappointing result in stockman contest FOUR local young farmers were in Lancashire at the weekend for the stockman of the year competition.
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  • Deaf Identities review 34 Chris Payton ToD, Lancashire encourages ToDs to include this volume on their bookshelves and university reading lists.
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  • Many of Lancashire 's towns still have the unmistakable physical stamp of an earlier manufacturing era.
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  • The Lancashire petition was a qualified pledge of support in return for assurances of the King 's continuing vigilance against Papist forces.
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  • The best are those raised years ago, such as Cheshire Favourite, George the Fourth, Formosa, Duke of Wellington, Black Prince, Lancashire Hero, and others, and they are mentioned in most florists catalogues of hardy plants.
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  • Located in Chorley, Lancashire, Camelot Theme Park is ideal for those who love witches, wizards, knights, round tables and the mystical magical time of King Arthur.
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  • Youth Music: This charity operates in Cumbria and Lancashire and tries to promote an interest in music in young people through musical events such as concerts.
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  • Several other beloved characters, including Sarah Lancashire's Raquel Wolstenhulme, Elizabeth Bradley's Maud Grimes and Steven Arnold's Ashley Peacock, also joined the show during this period.
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  • Real cotton goods were not made in Lancashire till 1641, when Bolton is named as the chief seat of the manufacture of fustians, vermilions and dimities.
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