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lamina

lamina

lamina Sentence Examples

  • The conception of the lamina leads immediately to two schemes, according to which a primary wave may be supposed to be broken up. In the first of these the element dS, the effect of which is to be estimated, is supposed to execute its actual motion, while every other element of the plane lamina is maintained at rest.

    29
    3
  • Respiration is conducted by the general surface, by the branchial lamina (external branch) of the feet, and the vesicular appendage (when present) at the base of this branch.

    15
    13
  • Now it is evident that the aerial motion in front of the lamina is determined by what happens at the lamina without regard to the cause of the motion there existing.

    14
    1
  • Imagine a flexible lamina to be introduced so as to coincide with the plane at which resolution is to be effected.

    11
    3
  • Some of the feathers of the straw-coloured throat and cheeks partake of the same structure, but in a less degree, while the subterminal part of the lamina is of a lustrous pearly-white.

    11
    12
  • When the secondary disturbance thus obtained is integrated with respect to dS over the entire plane of the lamina, the result is necessarily the same as would have been obtained had the primary wave been supposed to pass on without resolution, for this is precisely the motion generated when every element of the lamina vibrates with a common motion, equal to that attributed to dS.

    10
    9
  • Or the thallus may have a leaf-like form, the branches from the central threads which form the midrib growing out mainly in one plane and forming a lamina, extended right and left of the midrib.

    9
    3
  • 5); or with veins diverging from the base of the lamina in more or less FIG.

    9
    3
  • When prolonged heating is required at very high temperatures it is found necessary to line the furnace-cavity with alternate layers of magnesia and carbon, taking care that the lamina next to the lime is of magnesia; if this were not done the lime in contact with the carbon crucible would form calcium carbide and would slag down, but magnesia does not yield a carbide in this way.

    9
    11
  • When prolonged heating is required at very high temperatures it is found necessary to line the furnace-cavity with alternate layers of magnesia and carbon, taking care that the lamina next to the lime is of magnesia; if this were not done the lime in contact with the carbon crucible would form calcium carbide and would slag down, but magnesia does not yield a carbide in this way.

    9
    11
  • At every point the motion of the lamina will be the same as would have occurred in its absence, the pressure of the waves impinging from behind being just what is required to generate the waves in front.

    8
    13
  • Here again, on integration over the entire lamina, the aggregate effect of the secondary waves is necessarily the same as that of the primary.

    6
    3
  • Here again, on integration over the entire lamina, the aggregate effect of the secondary waves is necessarily the same as that of the primary.

    6
    3
  • in the case of Dionaea muscipula we find a two-lobed lamina, the two lobes being connected by a midrib, which can play the part of a kind of hinge.

    5
    12
  • In this way two marked forms of leaf are produced - (I) Simple form, in which the segmentation, however deeply it extends into the lamina, does not separate portions of the lamina which become articulated with the midrib or petiole; and (2) Compound form, where portions of the lamina are separated as detached leaflets, which become articulated with the midrib or petiole.

    5
    14
  • and lateral sides, of a calcareous lamina covered externally by a soft membrane.

    4
    2
  • The,ideal surface of resolution may be there regarded as a flexible lamina; and we know that, if by forces locally applied every element of the lamina be made to move normally to itself exactly as the air at that place does, the external aerial motion is fully determined.

    3
    1
  • If, instead of supposing the motion at dS to be that of the primary wave, and to be zero elsewhere, we suppose the force operative over the element dS of the lamina to be that corresponding to the primary wave, and to vanish elsewhere, we obtain a secondary wave following quite a different law.

    3
    6
  • The arrangement of the fibro-vascular system in the lamina constitutes the venation or nervation.

    3
    6
  • If, instead of supposing the motion at dS to be that of the primary wave, and to be zero elsewhere, we suppose the force operative over the element dS of the lamina to be that corresponding to the primary wave, and to vanish elsewhere, we obtain a secondary wave following quite a different law.

    3
    6
  • of a plane lamina bounded by the area, in which the surface density is p. If p is uniform, the C.P. and C.G.

    3
    7
  • Lateral segmentation affects the lamina, producing indentations, lobings or fissuring of its margins.

    2
    1
  • lamina in fig.

    2
    2
  • The only assumption here involved is the evidently legitimate one that, when two systems of variously distributed motion at the lamina are superposed, the corresponding motions in front are superposed also.

    2
    8
  • The petiole varies in length, being usually shorter than the lamina, but sometimes much longer.

    1
    0
  • For instance, the lamina FIG.

    1
    0
  • Internally they are found to consist of a lamina twisted upon itself, and externally they generally exhibit a tortuous structure, produced, before the cloaca was reached, by the spiral valve of a compressed small intestine (as in skates, sharks and dog-fishes); the surface shows also vascular impressions and corrugations due to the same cause.

    1
    1
  • (iv.) In the Microporidae and Steganoporellidae the body-cavity becomes partially subdivided by a calcareous lamina ("cryptocyst," Jullien) which grows from the proximal and lateral sides in a plane parallel to the frontal membrane and not far below it.

    1
    1
  • The leaf has a broadly sheathing base succeeded by a short stalk bearing the pitcher, which represents a much enlarged midrib with a winglike lamina.

    0
    0
  • pair bisegmented completely chelate, furnished with peculiar organs, the serrula and the lamina.

    0
    0
  • 1, Genital or first opisthosomatic (Original.) The serrula or the movable digit free at its distal end, narrowed at the base; no external lamina on the immovable digit.

    0
    0
  • When the vascular bundles reach the base of the lamina they separate and spread out in various ways, as already described under venation.

    0
    0
  • On the same acacia there occur leaves with the petiole and lamina perfect; others having the petiole slightly expanded or winged, and the lamina imperfectly developed; and others in which there is no lamina, and the petiole becomes large and broad.

    0
    0
  • - Leaf of an Acacia (Acacia heterophylla), showing a flattened leaf-like petiole p, called a phyllode, with straight venation, and a bipinnate lamina.

    0
    0
  • Ovular characters determine the grouping in the Dicotyledons, van Tieghem supporting the view that the integument, the outer if there be two, is the lamina of a leaf of which the funicle is the petiole, whilst the nucellus is an outgrowth of this leaf, and the inner integument, if present, an indusium.

    0
    0
  • While the laminated portion of the thallus is being gradually worn off in our latitudes during the autumnal storms, a vigorous new growth appears at the junction of the stipe and the blade, as the result of which a new piece is added to the stipe and the lamina entirely renovated.

    0
    0
  • Laminaria, Padina, Cutleria, Punctaria, Iridaea, Ulva, Porphyra, are leaf-like with a rigidity varying from a fleshy lamina to the thin and pliable.

    0
    0
  • For the present we confine ourselves to the consideration of displacements in two dimensions, so that the body is adequately represented by a thin lamina or plate.

    0
    0
  • The position of a lamina movable in its own plane is determinate when we know the positions of any two points A, B of it.

    0
    0
  • Since the four co-ordinates (Cartesian or other) of these two points are connected by the relation which expresses the invariability of the length AB, it is plain that virtually three inde pendent elements are re quired and suffice to specify the position of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • They may be called (in a generalized sense) the co-ordinates of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • The lamina when perfectly free to move in its own plane is said to have three degrees of freedom.

    0
    0
  • Chasles any displacement whatever of the lamina in its own plane is equivalent to a rotation about some finite or infinitely distant point J.

    0
    0
  • For suppose that in consequence of the displacement a point of the lamina is brought from A to B, whilst the point of the lamina which was originally at B is brought to C. Since AB, BC, are two different positions of the same line in the B C lamina they are equal, and it is evident that the rotation could have been effected by a rotation about J,

    0
    0
  • As a special case A the three points A, B, C may be in a straight line; J is then at infinity and the displacement is equivalent to FIG 10 a pure translation, since every point of the lamina is now displaced parallel to AB through a space equal to AB.

    0
    0
  • Next, consider any continuous motion of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • The instantaneous centre will have a certain locus in space, and a certain locus in the lamina.

    0
    0
  • II); and let J11, Jfs, Jis be the positions in space of the j,~ centres of the rotations by - which the lamina can be brought from the first position to the second, from the second .li_s to the third, and soon.

    0
    0
  • be the points of the ~ lamina which have become the FIG.

    0
    0
  • If the origin of rectangular axes fixed in the lamina be shifted through a space whose projections on the original directions of the axes are X, u, and if the axes are simultaneously turned through an angle e, the coordinates of a point of the lamina, relative to the original axes, are changed from x, y to X+x cos ey sin e, u+x sin e+y cos e, or X + x ye, u + Xe + y, ultimately.

    0
    0
  • In this chain of lovely upland lakes, some fresh, some brackish, some completely closed, others connected by short channels, the chief links in their order from north to south are: - Zwai, communicating southwards with Hara and Lamina, all in the Arusi Galla territory; then Abai with an outlet to a smaller tarn in the romantic Baroda and Gamo districts, skirted on the west sides by grassy slopes and wooded ranges from 6000 to nearly 9000 ft.

    0
    0
  • horridus, the lamina is deeply lobed; and in a species of the Australian genus Macrozamia, M.

    0
    0
  • The young leaves arise on the stem-apex as conical protuberances with winged borders, on which the pinnae appear as rounded humps, usually in basipetal order; the scale-leaves in their young condition resemble fronds, but the lamina remains undeveloped.

    0
    0
  • These are often wedge-shaped and angular; in some cases they consist of a short, thick stalk, terminating in a peltate expansion, or prolonged upwards in the form of a triangular lamina.

    0
    0
  • 10 and 11) have a long, slender petiole terminating in a fanshaped lamina, which may be entire, divided by a median incision into two wedge-shaped lobes, or subdivided into several narrow segments.

    0
    0
  • Adiantum; the lowest vein in each half of the lamina follows a course parallel to the edge, and gives off numerous branches, which fork repeatedly as they spread in a palmate manner towards the leaf margin.

    0
    0
  • Each ovule is enclosed at the base by an envelope or collar homologous with the lamina of a leaf; the fleshy and hard coats of the nucellus constitute a single integument.

    0
    0
  • The long linear leaves of some species of Podocarpus, in which the lamina is traversed by a single vein, recall the pinnae of Cycas; the branches of some Dacrydiums and other forms closely resemble those of lycopods; these superficial resemblances, both between different genera of conifers and between conifers and other plants, coupled with the usual occurrence of fossil coniferous twigs without cones attached to them, render the determination of extinct types a very unsatisfactory and frequently an impossible task.

    0
    0
  • A pair of small strapshaped leaves succeed the two cotyledons of the seedling, and persist as the only leaves during the life of the plant; they retain the power of growth in their basal portion, which is sunk in a narrow groove near the edge of the crown, and the tough lamina, 6 ft.

    0
    0
  • The older view was that it was a fertile segment of the leaf; and though its ventral position presents a difficulty, this must be regarded as a possible explanation; the occasional occurrence of sporangia on the lamina in Botrychium has been regarded as supporting it.

    0
    0
  • The sori are borne on the under surface of the pinnae, usually in a single row on either side of the midrib, but in Kaulfussia dotted over the expanded lamina.

    0
    0
  • The leaves are large and pinnate; their lamina is usually thick, though filmy species of Todea occur.

    0
    0
  • In Osmunda the region of the leaf which bears the sporangia has its lamina little developed; the leaf thus bears sterile and fertile pinnae, or, as in 0.

    0
    0
  • The leaves are simple and linear in Pilularia, but in Marsilia bear a pinnate four-lobed lamina.

    0
    0
  • A petal often consists of two portions - the lower narrow, resembling the petiole of a leaf, and called the unguis or claw; the upper broader, like the blade of a leaf, and called the lamina or limb.

    0
    0
  • c, The claw or unguis; I, the blade or lamina.

    0
    0
  • The free lamina, however, was always considerably more developed than in the recent family; in form it was usually linear or narrowly lanceolate.

    0
    0
  • Where the structure of the leaves is preserved it proves to be of an extremely simple type; the narrow lamina is traversed by a single vascular bundle, separated by a sheath from the surrounding palisadeparenchyma.

    0
    0
  • The most interesting point in the structure of the leaf-base is the presence of a ligule, like that of Isoetes or Selaginella, which was seated in a deep pit, opening on the upper surface of the cushion, just above the insertion of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • lq The sporophyll, usually almost horizontal in position, has an upturned lamina beyond the sporangium, and a shorter dorsal lobe, so that the form of the whole is somewhat peltate.

    0
    0
  • below the lamina, its position 1 showing that the whole of 1 ' »

    0
    0
  • (X about 30.) 1, Lamina of sporophyll.

    0
    0
  • The sporangia were large pyriform sacs, shortly stalked, and borne in tufts on the branches of the fertile rachis, which developed no lamina.

    0
    0
  • This Jurassic species bore bipinnate fronds not unlike those of the South African, Australian, and New Zealand Fern Todea barbara, which were characterized by a stout rachis and short broad pinnules bearing numerous large sporangia covering the under surface of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • basal lamina along the base of the cells was damaged at several foci.

    0
    0
  • The lamina dura is a thin white line around the root.

    0
    0
  • This type of arrangement is found in the kidney glomerulus, where the basal lamina acts as a permeability barrier or sieve.

    0
    0
  • Beneath these is a springy layer of protein called an elastic lamina.

    0
    0
  • The destinations and connectivities of these repeating units of eight cells, at the point where they join the lamina, is being determined.

    0
    0
  • Each of these layers have a basal lamina that add slightly to the distance across which exchanges are made.

    0
    0
  • The basal lamina along the base of the cells was damaged at several foci.

    0
    0
  • Abstract The nuclear lamina is a filamentous structure composed of lamins that supports the inner nuclear membrane.

    0
    0
  • The cabinet is made from wood covered with a double synthetic lamina and edged with aluminum (inside/outside ).

    0
    0
  • lamina propria.

    0
    0
  • lamina reticularis.

    0
    0
  • lamina dura is a thin white line around the root.

    0
    0
  • lamina propria layers.

    0
    0
  • These can occur anywhere on the leaf lamina but are most commonly found progressing from the leaf tip or margin (see Fig.

    0
    0
  • scaffolding proteins, preventing their proper integration into the lamina.

    0
    0
  • tendrils of young plants sometimes expands into a narrow lamina or blade.

    0
    0
  • The leaf has a broadly sheathing base succeeded by a short stalk bearing the pitcher, which represents a much enlarged midrib with a winglike lamina.

    0
    0
  • Or the thallus may have a leaf-like form, the branches from the central threads which form the midrib growing out mainly in one plane and forming a lamina, extended right and left of the midrib.

    0
    0
  • in the case of Dionaea muscipula we find a two-lobed lamina, the two lobes being connected by a midrib, which can play the part of a kind of hinge.

    0
    0
  • Internally they are found to consist of a lamina twisted upon itself, and externally they generally exhibit a tortuous structure, produced, before the cloaca was reached, by the spiral valve of a compressed small intestine (as in skates, sharks and dog-fishes); the surface shows also vascular impressions and corrugations due to the same cause.

    0
    0
  • In certain forms, as in Terebratula and Terebratulina, it is short and simple, .and attached to a small divided hingeplate, the two riband-shaped lamina being bent upwards in the middle (fig.

    0
    0
  • pair bisegmented completely chelate, furnished with peculiar organs, the serrula and the lamina.

    0
    0
  • 1, Genital or first opisthosomatic (Original.) The serrula or the movable digit free at its distal end, narrowed at the base; no external lamina on the immovable digit.

    0
    0
  • The,ideal surface of resolution may be there regarded as a flexible lamina; and we know that, if by forces locally applied every element of the lamina be made to move normally to itself exactly as the air at that place does, the external aerial motion is fully determined.

    0
    0
  • Imagine a flexible lamina to be introduced so as to coincide with the plane at which resolution is to be effected.

    0
    0
  • The introduction ctf the lamina (supposed to be devoid of inertia) will make no difference to the propagation of plane parallel sonorous waves through the position which it occupies.

    0
    0
  • At every point the motion of the lamina will be the same as would have occurred in its absence, the pressure of the waves impinging from behind being just what is required to generate the waves in front.

    0
    0
  • Now it is evident that the aerial motion in front of the lamina is determined by what happens at the lamina without regard to the cause of the motion there existing.

    0
    0
  • The conception of the lamina leads immediately to two schemes, according to which a primary wave may be supposed to be broken up. In the first of these the element dS, the effect of which is to be estimated, is supposed to execute its actual motion, while every other element of the plane lamina is maintained at rest.

    0
    0
  • When the secondary disturbance thus obtained is integrated with respect to dS over the entire plane of the lamina, the result is necessarily the same as would have been obtained had the primary wave been supposed to pass on without resolution, for this is precisely the motion generated when every element of the lamina vibrates with a common motion, equal to that attributed to dS.

    0
    0
  • The only assumption here involved is the evidently legitimate one that, when two systems of variously distributed motion at the lamina are superposed, the corresponding motions in front are superposed also.

    0
    0
  • of a plane lamina bounded by the area, in which the surface density is p. If p is uniform, the C.P. and C.G.

    0
    0
  • When a = b, a = o, and the stream is very broad compared with he wedge or lamina; so, putting w=w' (a-b)la in the penultimate ase, and A B A (7) When the polygon is closed by the walls joining, instead of reaching back to infinity at xx', the liquid motion must be due to a source, and this modification has been worked out by B.

    0
    0
  • and lateral sides, of a calcareous lamina covered externally by a soft membrane.

    0
    0
  • (iv.) In the Microporidae and Steganoporellidae the body-cavity becomes partially subdivided by a calcareous lamina ("cryptocyst," Jullien) which grows from the proximal and lateral sides in a plane parallel to the frontal membrane and not far below it.

    0
    0
  • Respiration is conducted by the general surface, by the branchial lamina (external branch) of the feet, and the vesicular appendage (when present) at the base of this branch.

    0
    0
  • Some of the feathers of the straw-coloured throat and cheeks partake of the same structure, but in a less degree, while the subterminal part of the lamina is of a lustrous pearly-white.

    0
    0
  • A leaf, whether aerial or submerged, generally consists of a flat expanded portion, called the blade, or lamina, of a narrower portion called the petiole or stalk, and sometimes of a portion at the base of the petiole, which forms a sheath or vagina (fig.

    0
    0
  • The arrangement of the fibro-vascular system in the lamina constitutes the venation or nervation.

    0
    0
  • In the leaves of some plants there exists a midrib with large veins running nearly parallel to it from the base to the apex of the lamina, as in grasses (fig.

    0
    0
  • 5); or with veins diverging from the base of the lamina in more or less FIG.

    0
    0
  • Lateral segmentation affects the lamina, producing indentations, lobings or fissuring of its margins.

    0
    0
  • In this way two marked forms of leaf are produced - (I) Simple form, in which the segmentation, however deeply it extends into the lamina, does not separate portions of the lamina which become articulated with the midrib or petiole; and (2) Compound form, where portions of the lamina are separated as detached leaflets, which become articulated with the midrib or petiole.

    0
    0
  • If the divisions extend more deeply into the lamina than the margin, the leaf receives different names according to the nature of the segments; thus, when the divisions extend about half-way down (fig.

    0
    0
  • When the vascular bundles reach the base of the lamina they separate and spread out in various ways, as already described under venation.

    0
    0
  • The petiole varies in length, being usually shorter than the lamina, but sometimes much longer.

    0
    0
  • On the same acacia there occur leaves with the petiole and lamina perfect; others having the petiole slightly expanded or winged, and the lamina imperfectly developed; and others in which there is no lamina, and the petiole becomes large and broad.

    0
    0
  • In the latter plants there is also a membranous outgrowth, the ligule, at right angles to the median plane of the leaf from the point where the sheath passes into the lamina, there being no petiole (fig.

    0
    0
  • The pitcher is formed so as to form an in- to the lamina 1.

    0
    0
  • In the pitcher plant, Nepenthes, the pitcher is a modification of the lamina, the petiole often plays the part of a tendril, while the leaf base is flat and leaf-like (fig.

    0
    0
  • - Leaf of an Acacia (Acacia heterophylla), showing a flattened leaf-like petiole p, called a phyllode, with straight venation, and a bipinnate lamina.

    0
    0
  • Ovular characters determine the grouping in the Dicotyledons, van Tieghem supporting the view that the integument, the outer if there be two, is the lamina of a leaf of which the funicle is the petiole, whilst the nucellus is an outgrowth of this leaf, and the inner integument, if present, an indusium.

    0
    0
  • While the laminated portion of the thallus is being gradually worn off in our latitudes during the autumnal storms, a vigorous new growth appears at the junction of the stipe and the blade, as the result of which a new piece is added to the stipe and the lamina entirely renovated.

    0
    0
  • In Iridaea the thallus is an entire lamina; in Callophyllis a lobed lamina; in Delesseria it is provided with midrib and veins, simulating the appearance of a leaf of the higher plants; in Constantinea the axis remains cylindrical, and the lateral branches assume the form of leaves.

    0
    0
  • Laminaria, Padina, Cutleria, Punctaria, Iridaea, Ulva, Porphyra, are leaf-like with a rigidity varying from a fleshy lamina to the thin and pliable.

    0
    0
  • For the present we confine ourselves to the consideration of displacements in two dimensions, so that the body is adequately represented by a thin lamina or plate.

    0
    0
  • The position of a lamina movable in its own plane is determinate when we know the positions of any two points A, B of it.

    0
    0
  • Since the four co-ordinates (Cartesian or other) of these two points are connected by the relation which expresses the invariability of the length AB, it is plain that virtually three inde pendent elements are re quired and suffice to specify the position of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • For instance, the lamina FIG.

    0
    0
  • They may be called (in a generalized sense) the co-ordinates of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • The lamina when perfectly free to move in its own plane is said to have three degrees of freedom.

    0
    0
  • Chasles any displacement whatever of the lamina in its own plane is equivalent to a rotation about some finite or infinitely distant point J.

    0
    0
  • For suppose that in consequence of the displacement a point of the lamina is brought from A to B, whilst the point of the lamina which was originally at B is brought to C. Since AB, BC, are two different positions of the same line in the B C lamina they are equal, and it is evident that the rotation could have been effected by a rotation about J,

    0
    0
  • As a special case A the three points A, B, C may be in a straight line; J is then at infinity and the displacement is equivalent to FIG 10 a pure translation, since every point of the lamina is now displaced parallel to AB through a space equal to AB.

    0
    0
  • Next, consider any continuous motion of the lamina.

    0
    0
  • The instantaneous centre will have a certain locus in space, and a certain locus in the lamina.

    0
    0
  • of the lamina (fig.

    0
    0
  • II); and let J11, Jfs, Jis be the positions in space of the j,~ centres of the rotations by - which the lamina can be brought from the first position to the second, from the second .li_s to the third, and soon.

    0
    0
  • be the points of the ~ lamina which have become the FIG.

    0
    0
  • lamina in fig.

    0
    0
  • If the origin of rectangular axes fixed in the lamina be shifted through a space whose projections on the original directions of the axes are X, u, and if the axes are simultaneously turned through an angle e, the coordinates of a point of the lamina, relative to the original axes, are changed from x, y to X+x cos ey sin e, u+x sin e+y cos e, or X + x ye, u + Xe + y, ultimately.

    0
    0
  • As an example, any system of forces acting on the lamina in fig.

    0
    0
  • In this chain of lovely upland lakes, some fresh, some brackish, some completely closed, others connected by short channels, the chief links in their order from north to south are: - Zwai, communicating southwards with Hara and Lamina, all in the Arusi Galla territory; then Abai with an outlet to a smaller tarn in the romantic Baroda and Gamo districts, skirted on the west sides by grassy slopes and wooded ranges from 6000 to nearly 9000 ft.

    0
    0
  • horridus, the lamina is deeply lobed; and in a species of the Australian genus Macrozamia, M.

    0
    0
  • The young leaves arise on the stem-apex as conical protuberances with winged borders, on which the pinnae appear as rounded humps, usually in basipetal order; the scale-leaves in their young condition resemble fronds, but the lamina remains undeveloped.

    0
    0
  • These are often wedge-shaped and angular; in some cases they consist of a short, thick stalk, terminating in a peltate expansion, or prolonged upwards in the form of a triangular lamina.

    0
    0
  • 10 and 11) have a long, slender petiole terminating in a fanshaped lamina, which may be entire, divided by a median incision into two wedge-shaped lobes, or subdivided into several narrow segments.

    0
    0
  • Adiantum; the lowest vein in each half of the lamina follows a course parallel to the edge, and gives off numerous branches, which fork repeatedly as they spread in a palmate manner towards the leaf margin.

    0
    0
  • Each ovule is enclosed at the base by an envelope or collar homologous with the lamina of a leaf; the fleshy and hard coats of the nucellus constitute a single integument.

    0
    0
  • The facts on which this description is based are derived partly from anatomical evidence, and in part from an account given by a Japanese botanist, Fujii, of several abnormal female flowers; in some cases the collar at the base of an ovule, often described as an arillus, is found to pass gradually into the lamina of a leaf bearing marginal ovules (fig.

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  • The long linear leaves of some species of Podocarpus, in which the lamina is traversed by a single vein, recall the pinnae of Cycas; the branches of some Dacrydiums and other forms closely resemble those of lycopods; these superficial resemblances, both between different genera of conifers and between conifers and other plants, coupled with the usual occurrence of fossil coniferous twigs without cones attached to them, render the determination of extinct types a very unsatisfactory and frequently an impossible task.

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  • A pair of small strapshaped leaves succeed the two cotyledons of the seedling, and persist as the only leaves during the life of the plant; they retain the power of growth in their basal portion, which is sunk in a narrow groove near the edge of the crown, and the tough lamina, 6 ft.

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  • The older view was that it was a fertile segment of the leaf; and though its ventral position presents a difficulty, this must be regarded as a possible explanation; the occasional occurrence of sporangia on the lamina in Botrychium has been regarded as supporting it.

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  • The sori are borne on the under surface of the pinnae, usually in a single row on either side of the midrib, but in Kaulfussia dotted over the expanded lamina.

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  • The leaves are large and pinnate; their lamina is usually thick, though filmy species of Todea occur.

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  • In Osmunda the region of the leaf which bears the sporangia has its lamina little developed; the leaf thus bears sterile and fertile pinnae, or, as in 0.

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  • The leaves are simple and linear in Pilularia, but in Marsilia bear a pinnate four-lobed lamina.

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  • A petal often consists of two portions - the lower narrow, resembling the petiole of a leaf, and called the unguis or claw; the upper broader, like the blade of a leaf, and called the lamina or limb.

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  • c, The claw or unguis; I, the blade or lamina.

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  • The parts composing the disk sometimes unite and form a glandular ring, as in the orange; or they form a dark-red lamina covering the pistil, as in Paeonia Moutan (fig.

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  • The free lamina, however, was always considerably more developed than in the recent family; in form it was usually linear or narrowly lanceolate.

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  • Where the structure of the leaves is preserved it proves to be of an extremely simple type; the narrow lamina is traversed by a single vascular bundle, separated by a sheath from the surrounding palisadeparenchyma.

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  • The most interesting point in the structure of the leaf-base is the presence of a ligule, like that of Isoetes or Selaginella, which was seated in a deep pit, opening on the upper surface of the cushion, just above the insertion of the lamina.

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  • lq The sporophyll, usually almost horizontal in position, has an upturned lamina beyond the sporangium, and a shorter dorsal lobe, so that the form of the whole is somewhat peltate.

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  • below the lamina, its position 1 showing that the whole of 1 ' »

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  • (X about 30.) 1, Lamina of sporophyll.

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  • The sporangia were large pyriform sacs, shortly stalked, and borne in tufts on the branches of the fertile rachis, which developed no lamina.

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  • This Jurassic species bore bipinnate fronds not unlike those of the South African, Australian, and New Zealand Fern Todea barbara, which were characterized by a stout rachis and short broad pinnules bearing numerous large sporangia covering the under surface of the lamina.

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  • There, he suspected, it enmeshed other scaffolding proteins, preventing their proper integration into the lamina.

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  • Moreover, the green edging of the tendrils of young plants sometimes expands into a narrow lamina or blade.

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  • The pitcher is formed so as to form an in- to the lamina 1.

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  • In Iridaea the thallus is an entire lamina; in Callophyllis a lobed lamina; in Delesseria it is provided with midrib and veins, simulating the appearance of a leaf of the higher plants; in Constantinea the axis remains cylindrical, and the lateral branches assume the form of leaves.

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  • As an example, any system of forces acting on the lamina in fig.

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