Lamenting sentence example

lamenting
  • She kept on lamenting and crying, continued the woman.
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  • Loaded carts stood at the house next to Ferapontov's and women were wailing and lamenting as they said good-by.
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  • As he is thus lamenting, a woman appears to him of dignified mien, whom he recognizes as his guardian, Philosophy.
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  • Disputes about vestments had expanded into a controversy over the whole field of Church government and authority, and Parker died on the 17th of May, 1575, lamenting that Puritan ideas of "governance" would "in conclusion undo the queen and all others that depended upon her."
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  • But, while thus lamenting this unfortunate perversion into a mistaken channel of ornithological energy, we must not overblame those who caused it.
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  • Each episode ends with the losing contestant cleaning up his or her working space and lamenting about the loss.
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  • Those who maintain the impunity of the practice rely for their authority upon certain passages in the classical authors, which, while bitterly lamenting the frequency of this enormity, yet never allude to any laws by which it might be suppressed.
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  • Though to death he was wounded he struck so strong a stroke That from the shattered shield-rim forthwith out there broke Showers of flashing jewels; the shield in fragments lay.2 Then reproaching them for their cowardice and treachery, Siegfried fell dying "amid the flowers," while the knights gathered round lamenting.
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  • Why were those who once played the cem and ala drums spending their time in bitter lamenting?
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  • I had to laugh when, after Broken came out, I got a lot of email lamenting the end of Elena as a narrator.
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  • About the time when he was writing The Mask of Pandora, he could see "in the sunset Jason's fleece of gold," and hear "the waves of the distracted sea piteously calling and lamenting" his lost friend.
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  • He treated the struggle as one simply for the establishment of free institutions; and when at last the crimes of the leaders became patent to the world, he contented himself with lamenting the unfortunate fact, and fell back on the argument that though England could not sympathize with the French tyrants, there was no reason why she should go to war with them.
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  • Its foundation was probably certain expressions lamenting Scottish interference in English affairs.
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