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lamentations

lamentations

lamentations Sentence Examples

  • Bereshith Rabba, on Genesis, and Ekhah Rabbati, on Lamentations, were probably edited in the 7th century.

  • (see also Lamentations).

  • In 1089 he was stricken with fever and he died on the 24th of May amidst universal lamentations.

  • 32) represents the tradition which makes this prophet the author of the book of Lamentations.

  • The faith and hope which breathe in this passage have the closest affinities with the book of Lamentations and Isa.

  • - This section describes in prophetic language borrowed almost wholly from Isaiah and Jeremiah the coming judgment of Rome, and gives the ten lamentations of the kings and the merchants and the seamen over her, and the thanksgivings in heaven for her overthrow.

  • Meanwhile he had published the Lamentations of Jeremiah, and the book of Revelation in Latin verse, which he dedicated to the king, complaining of his hard usage.

  • The poet's most popular work, however, is his Treny or "Lamentations," written on the death of his daughter Ursula.

  • (b) The five Megilloth (or " Rolls ") - grouped thus together in later times, on account of the custom which arose of reading them in the synagogues at five sacred seasons - Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther.

  • Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes and Esther.

  • (h) Ebah (" how ") Rabbathi, a compilation of about the 7th century on Lamentations, from sources cited also in the Palestinian Talmud.

  • of William Amidst general lamentations " the Father of his Country," as he was called, was buried with great state in the Nieuwe Kerk at Delft at the public charge.

  • "Canon"; Canticles; Lamentations.

  • (d) Among the later religious books one or two deserve a special mention, such as The Overthrowing of Apophis, the serpent enemy of the sun-god; The Lamentations of Isis and Nephthys over their murdered brother Osiris; The Book of Breathings, a favorite book among the later Theban priests.

  • He gave vent to his irritability by lamentations so grotesquely exaggerated as to make it difficult to estimate the real extent of the evil.

  • The older incantations, associated with Ea, were re-edited so as to give to Marduk the supreme power over demons, witches and sorcerers; the hymns and lamentations composed for the cult of Bel, Shamash and of Adad were transformed into paeans and appeals to Marduk, while the ancient myths arising in the various religious and political centres underwent a similar process of adaptation to changed conditions, and as a consequence their original meaning was obscured by the endeavour to assign all mighty deeds and acts, originally symbolical of the change of seasons or of occurrences in nature, to the patron deity of Babylon - the supreme head of the entire Babylonian pantheon.

  • They consist of paraphrases of parts of Genesis, Exodus and Daniel, and three separate poems, the first on the lamentations of the fallen angels, the second on the "Harrowing of Hell," the resurrection, ascension and second coming of Christ, and the third (a mere fragment) on the temptation.

  • LAMENTATIONS (Lamentations of Jeremiah), book of the Old Testament.

  • Some Septuagint MSS., and the Syriac and other versions, have the fuller title Lamentations of Jeremiah.

  • In the Hebrew Bible Lamentations is placed among the Cetubim or Hagiographa, usually as the middle book of the five Megilloth or Ferial Rolls (Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther) according to the order of the days on which they are read in the Synagogue, Lamentations being read on the 9th of Ab (6th of August), when the destruction of the Temple is commemorated (Mass.

  • The text of Lamentations, however, so often deviates from it, that we can only affirm the tendency of the poet to cast his couplets into this type (Driver).

  • " Like a few of the Psalms, Lamentations i.-iv.

  • for an eight-fold repetition.) The alphabet of Lamentations ii.

  • cxii., which are alphabetical acrostics, like the Lamentations.

  • General subject and outline of contents.-The theme of Lamentations is the final siege and fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.), and the attendant and subsequent miseries of the Jewish people.

  • The idea that Lamentations was originally appended to Jeremiah in the Hebrew Canon, as it is in the old versions, and was afterwards separated from it and added to the other Megilloth for the liturgical convenience of the Synagogue, rests on the fact that Josephus (Ap. i.

  • i, 8) and, following him, Jerome and Origen reckon 22 books, taking Ruth with Judges and Lamentations with Jeremiah; whereas the ordinary Jewish reckoning gives 24 books, as in our Hebrew Bibles.

  • It appears likely that Lamentations was not translated by the same hand as Jeremiah (Ndldeke).

  • Unlike the latter, the Septuagint Lamentations sticks closely to the Massoretic text.

  • i i) held that Jeremiah composed Lamentations.

  • It is urged, indeed, that the author of Chronicles could not have imagined a prophet to have sympathized with such a king as Zedekiah so warmly as is implied by Lamentations iv.

  • Upon the whole, it does not seem probable, either that the Chronicler mistook Lamentations iv.

  • p. 433 f.), and the supposed reference in Lamentations iii.

  • It is certainly true that the same emotional temperament, dissolving in tears at the spectacle of the country's woes, and expressing itself to a great extent in the same or similar language, is noticeable in the author(s) of Lamentations i.-iv.

  • (ii.) Lamentations i.-iv.

  • Lamentations ii.

  • (iv.) The point of view of Lamentations sometimes differs from that of the prophet.

  • It must be admitted that Lamentations exhibits, upon the whole, " a poet (more) in sympathy with the old life of the nation, whose attitude towards the temple and the king is far more popular than Jeremiah's" (W.

  • 6, 7, loc. (v.) While we find in Lamentations some things that we should not have expected from Jeremiah, we miss other things characteristic of the prophet.

  • The only hope expressed in Lamentations i.

  • 2-5 with Lamentations V.

  • 15 with Lamentations v.

  • Montet, Etude sur le livre des Lamentations (Geneva, 1875); G.

  • Like the Greek drama and the mysteries of the European middle ages, it is the offspringof purely religious ceremony, which for centuries has been performed annually during the first ten days of the month Muharramthe recital of mournful lamentations in memory of the tragic fate of the house of the caliph All, the hero of the Shiitic Persians.

  • Up to the present time its verses are used as amulets; it is employed in the lamentations for the dead; it has been frequently edited and made the basis for other poems, and new poems have been made by interpolating four or six lines after each line of the original.

  • His wife had died many years before, and it jars upon us to read how he then commanded the young man to hush his lamentations of sorrow.

  • The address of the clergy, inspired by the great prelates, sought to make inaccurate lamentations over the progress of impiety a means of safeguarding their enormous spiritual and temporal powers, their privileges and exemptions, and their vast wealth.

  • The Isiac mysteries were a representation of the chief events in the myth of Isis and Osiris - the murder of Osiris, the lamentations of Isis and her wanderings, followed by the triumph of Horus over Seth and the resurrection of the slain god - accompanied by music and an exposition of the inner meaning of the spectacle.

  • between Jeremiah and Lamentations, and in the Vulgate after Lamentations.

  • She first complained in murmurs, then wept, and at last burst into loud lamentations, earnestly beseeching the operator to stop.

  • At times we hear the lamentations of the Greek people, at other times the hero himself addresses them.

  • The Doctor called, and shouted, and fired signals, and Duk made piteous lamentations; but there was no response.

  • The temple which he has made a sacrilege utters bitter lamentations; he has made its eyes blurred with tears.

  • She first complained in murmurs, then wept, and at last burst into loud lamentations, earnestly beseeching the operator to stop.

  • They were interred with great pomp and ceremony, and amid the universal and heartfelt lamentations of the Scottish nation.

  • There are no remiss or sleepy praises in heaven, nor such lamentations in hell.

  • Bereshith Rabba, on Genesis, and Ekhah Rabbati, on Lamentations, were probably edited in the 7th century.

  • (see also Lamentations).

  • In 1089 he was stricken with fever and he died on the 24th of May amidst universal lamentations.

  • 32) represents the tradition which makes this prophet the author of the book of Lamentations.

  • The faith and hope which breathe in this passage have the closest affinities with the book of Lamentations and Isa.

  • - This section describes in prophetic language borrowed almost wholly from Isaiah and Jeremiah the coming judgment of Rome, and gives the ten lamentations of the kings and the merchants and the seamen over her, and the thanksgivings in heaven for her overthrow.

  • Meanwhile he had published the Lamentations of Jeremiah, and the book of Revelation in Latin verse, which he dedicated to the king, complaining of his hard usage.

  • The poet's most popular work, however, is his Treny or "Lamentations," written on the death of his daughter Ursula.

  • (b) The five Megilloth (or " Rolls ") - grouped thus together in later times, on account of the custom which arose of reading them in the synagogues at five sacred seasons - Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther.

  • Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes and Esther.

  • The date of Ruth is disputed: Driver has defended a pre-exilic date for it, but the general opinion of modern scholars is that it belongs to the 5th century B.C. The Lamentations consist of five elegies on the fall of Jerusalem, and the sufferings which its people experienced in consequence; they must all have been composed not long after 586 B.C. Ecclesiastes, thethird book belonging (see above) to the Wisdom-literature,.

  • (h) Ebah (" how ") Rabbathi, a compilation of about the 7th century on Lamentations, from sources cited also in the Palestinian Talmud.

  • of William Amidst general lamentations " the Father of his Country," as he was called, was buried with great state in the Nieuwe Kerk at Delft at the public charge.

  • "Canon"; Canticles; Lamentations.

  • (d) Among the later religious books one or two deserve a special mention, such as The Overthrowing of Apophis, the serpent enemy of the sun-god; The Lamentations of Isis and Nephthys over their murdered brother Osiris; The Book of Breathings, a favorite book among the later Theban priests.

  • He gave vent to his irritability by lamentations so grotesquely exaggerated as to make it difficult to estimate the real extent of the evil.

  • The older incantations, associated with Ea, were re-edited so as to give to Marduk the supreme power over demons, witches and sorcerers; the hymns and lamentations composed for the cult of Bel, Shamash and of Adad were transformed into paeans and appeals to Marduk, while the ancient myths arising in the various religious and political centres underwent a similar process of adaptation to changed conditions, and as a consequence their original meaning was obscured by the endeavour to assign all mighty deeds and acts, originally symbolical of the change of seasons or of occurrences in nature, to the patron deity of Babylon - the supreme head of the entire Babylonian pantheon.

  • They consist of paraphrases of parts of Genesis, Exodus and Daniel, and three separate poems, the first on the lamentations of the fallen angels, the second on the "Harrowing of Hell," the resurrection, ascension and second coming of Christ, and the third (a mere fragment) on the temptation.

  • LAMENTATIONS (Lamentations of Jeremiah), book of the Old Testament.

  • Some Septuagint MSS., and the Syriac and other versions, have the fuller title Lamentations of Jeremiah.

  • In the Hebrew Bible Lamentations is placed among the Cetubim or Hagiographa, usually as the middle book of the five Megilloth or Ferial Rolls (Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther) according to the order of the days on which they are read in the Synagogue, Lamentations being read on the 9th of Ab (6th of August), when the destruction of the Temple is commemorated (Mass.

  • The text of Lamentations, however, so often deviates from it, that we can only affirm the tendency of the poet to cast his couplets into this type (Driver).

  • " Like a few of the Psalms, Lamentations i.-iv.

  • for an eight-fold repetition.) The alphabet of Lamentations ii.

  • cxii., which are alphabetical acrostics, like the Lamentations.

  • (Alliteration, both initial and internal, is common in Lamentations.) As the final piece, ch.

  • General subject and outline of contents.-The theme of Lamentations is the final siege and fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.), and the attendant and subsequent miseries of the Jewish people.

  • The idea that Lamentations was originally appended to Jeremiah in the Hebrew Canon, as it is in the old versions, and was afterwards separated from it and added to the other Megilloth for the liturgical convenience of the Synagogue, rests on the fact that Josephus (Ap. i.

  • i, 8) and, following him, Jerome and Origen reckon 22 books, taking Ruth with Judges and Lamentations with Jeremiah; whereas the ordinary Jewish reckoning gives 24 books, as in our Hebrew Bibles.

  • It appears likely that Lamentations was not translated by the same hand as Jeremiah (Ndldeke).

  • Unlike the latter, the Septuagint Lamentations sticks closely to the Massoretic text.

  • i i) held that Jeremiah composed Lamentations.

  • It is urged, indeed, that the author of Chronicles could not have imagined a prophet to have sympathized with such a king as Zedekiah so warmly as is implied by Lamentations iv.

  • Upon the whole, it does not seem probable, either that the Chronicler mistook Lamentations iv.

  • Later writers misunderstood him, because - on the ground of certain obtrusive similarities between Jeremiah and Lamentations (see Driver, L.O.T.

  • p. 433 f.), and the supposed reference in Lamentations iii.

  • It is certainly true that the same emotional temperament, dissolving in tears at the spectacle of the country's woes, and expressing itself to a great extent in the same or similar language, is noticeable in the author(s) of Lamentations i.-iv.

  • (i.) The language and style of Lamentations are in general very unlike those of Jeremiah (see the details in Nagelsbach and Lohr); whatever allowance may be made for conventional differences in the phraseology of elegiac poetry and prophetic prose, even of a more or less lyrical cast.

  • (ii.) Lamentations i.-iv.

  • Lamentations ii.

  • (iii.) The coincidences of language between Lamentations and certain late Psalms, such as Psalms lxix., lxxiv., lxxx., lxxxviii., lxxxix., cxix., are numerous and significant, at least as a general indication of date.

  • (iv.) The point of view of Lamentations sometimes differs from that of the prophet.

  • It must be admitted that Lamentations exhibits, upon the whole, " a poet (more) in sympathy with the old life of the nation, whose attitude towards the temple and the king is far more popular than Jeremiah's" (W.

  • 6, 7, loc. (v.) While we find in Lamentations some things that we should not have expected from Jeremiah, we miss other things characteristic of the prophet.

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