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lamb

lamb

lamb Sentence Examples

  • She pulled out waterproof ankle boots and her thick, lamb's wool-lined coat then quickly gathered her toiletries and packed an overnight bag.

  • She shivered despite her lamb's wool coat, her hands plunged deep into pockets that contained weapons.

  • The others fanned out, and she suddenly felt like a lamb surrounded by a wolf pack trying to decide what to do with her.

  • Katie offered a watery smile, eyes going to the roast lamb, bread, and custard.

  • Five sets of predatory eyes fell to her, as if realizing there was a lame lamb in their midst.

  • Like a lamb to the coyotes.

  • You're doing exactly what Kris wants you to, Rhyn, going to your death like a lamb.

  • It was as if he'd tossed out a sacrificial lamb to a flock of vultures.

  • Finally she spotted the lamb.

  • I bought some lamb milk formula.

  • But the lamb is so tiny.

  • When Alex opened the make-shift gate, Carmen stepped inside and knelt beside the lamb.

  • He must have picked up the lamb and left the clinic, which would explain why he wasn't there when she drove by.

  • Carmen took the phone and thanked Saundra for helping Alex get the lamb to her.

  • Donning a pair of low sandals, she decided to check on the lamb one last time before Alex arrived.

  • The lamb jumped on her, knocking one of her straps down.

  • The lamb was growing.

  • She played with the lamb for a little while longer, unconcerned when both straps fell.

  • A grown woman playing in the hay with a lamb – all dressed up.

  • He pushed flavored lamb around his plate with a hunk of bread.

  • Coleridge wrote to Charles Lamb averring that the book must be his work.

  • A very large industry in Bukhara is the export of Astrakhan lamb skins (called locally Karakul).

  • Among the treasures of the church is the famous "Worship of the Lamb" by Hubert and Jan van Eyck.

  • The slaughter of a lamb at the Passover or Easter season, whose blood was smeared on the door-post, as described in Ex.

  • To the original nomadic Pesah (Passover) - sacrifice of a lamb - there was attached a distinct and agricultural festival of unleavened cakes (ynassoth) which marks the beginning of the corn harvest in the middle of the month Abib (the name of which points to its Canaanite and 1 The tablet is neo-Babylonian and published by Dr Pinches in the Transactions of the Victoria Institute, and is cited by Professor Fried.

  • Thus the Passover, with a new conception added to it of Christ as the true Paschal Lamb and the first fruits from the dead, continued to be observed, and became the Christian Easter.

  • With the Jewish Christians, whose leading thought was the death of Christ as the Paschal Lamb, the fast ended at the same time as that of the Jews, on the fourteenth day of the moon at evening, and the Easter festival immediately followed, without regard to the day of the week.

  • imported column is given the weight of fresh (frozen) mutton and lamb imported, plus the estimated dead weight of the sheep imported on the hoof for slaughter.

  • It has long been famous for its cattle and sheep sales, but more particularly for the great August lamb fair, the largest in Scotland, at which as many as 126,000 lambs have been sold.

  • The lamb thus drained of blood was to be roasted and entirely consumed by the Israelites, who should be ready with loins girded, shoes on feet and staff in hand so as to be prepared for the exodus.

  • Lengerke recognized a double motive: the lamb for atonement, the unleavened bread as a trace of the haste of the early harvest.

  • The first month on the 14th day of the month is the Passover; the 15th day of this month shall be a feast; seven days unleavened bread to be eaten; first day a holy assembly with fire offering, two young bullocks and one lamb and seven firstling he-lambs without blemish, with appropriate meal offering and one he-goat for sin-offering; on the seventh day another hol assembly.

  • In the Deuteronomist the Passover sacrifice can be from either flock or herd, whereas in the Holiness Code only lamb is mentioned, and in the Priestly Code either kid or lamb.

  • In the Deuteronomist the lamb is to be sodden or boiled, whereas in the Priestly Code this is expressly forbidden.

  • Reverting to the origin and the meaning of the feast, modern criticism draws attention to the different nature of the two observances combined with the name Passover, the pastoral sacrifice of the paschal lamb and the agricultural observance of a seven days' abstention from unleavened bread.

  • Finally, the association of the first-born with the festival specially referred to in the texts, and carried out both in Samaritan tradition, which marks the forehead of the first-born with the blood of the lamb, and in Jewish custom, which obliged the first-born to fast on the day preceding Passover, also connects the idea of the feast with the sacro-sanctity of the first-born.

  • The paschal lamb was not necessarily a firstling, but only in the first year of its life (Exod.

  • They sacrifice the paschal lamb, which is probably the oldest religious rite that has been continuously kept up. In two important points they differ from later Jewish interpretation.

  • The paschal lamb is no longer eaten but represented by the shank bone of a lamb roasted in the ashes; unleavened bread and bitter herbs (haroseth) are eaten; four cups of wine are drunk before and after the repast, and a certain number of Psalms are recited.

  • These last already appear in miniatures of the 9th century; from the II th onwards they predominated; and in the 13th century they ousted all other forms. Originally plain, the crook was from the lath century onwards often made in the form of a snake (5), which in richer staves encircled the Lamb of God or the representation of a figure.

  • The owners of adjacent lands assembled at the common boundary stone, and crowned their own side of the stone with garlands; an altar was set up and offerings of cakes, corn, honey and wine were made (later, a lamb or a sucking pig was sacrificed).

  • Lamb, Proc. Phys.

  • Lamb, loc. cit.

  • A simplified exposition has been given by Horace Lamb (Prot.

  • Charles Lamb >>

  • Conduit Street off Bond Street, Lamb's Conduit Street, Bloomsbury); and water was also supplied by the company of water-bearers in leathern panniers borne by horses.

  • It is generally and traditionally praised, but those who have read it will be more disposed to agree with Charles Lamb, who considers it "of a vile and debasing tendency," and thinks it "almost impossible to suppose the author in earnest."

  • But there are no reasons for thinking the performance ironical or insincere, and it cannot be doubted that Defoe would have been honestly unable even to understand Lamb's indignation.

  • Charles Lamb's criticisms were made in three short pieces, two of which were written for Wilson's book, and the third for The Reflector.

  • Its main characteristic is perhaps best hit off by Charles Lamb when he calls it "genteel."

  • a three-fold petition to the Lamb of God.

  • 6-21, together with some isolated expressions and all references to the Lamb.

  • The Lamb that was slain has taken upon Himself the burden of the world's history.

  • The destruction of Rome has now become a secondary event: the reviser's thought is fixed on the final strife between the Lamb and the Antichrist.

  • 2, where he speaks of the church as a bride and the marriage supper of the Lamb.

  • He never refers to any previous intercourse with Christ such as we find frequently in the Fourth Gospel, and when he speaks of "the twelve apostles of the Lamb" (xxi.

  • 0 Lord God, heavenly king, God the Father Almighty; 0 Lord, the only begotten Son, Jesus Christ; 0 Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us; Thou that takest away the sins of the world, receive our prayer; Thou that sittest at the right hand of the Father, have mercy upon us; For Thou alone art holy.

  • Lamb's History of the City of New York (2 vols., New York, 1877) and Mrs Schuyler Van Rensselaer's History of the City of New York in the Seventeenth Century (2 vols., New York, 1909) include the history of the province.

  • In the first, John describes how the Baptist, on Jesus' approach, cries " Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sins of, the world "; and how he says " I saw the spirit descending upon Him, and I bore witness that this is the Son of God."

  • This transference is doubtless connected with the change in the relations between the time of the Passover meal and that of His death: in the Synoptists, the Thursday evening's supper is a true Passover meal, the lamb had been slain that afternoon and Jesus dies some twenty-four hours later; in John, the supper is not a Passovermeal, the Passover is celebrated on Friday, and Jesus, proclaimed here from the first, the Lamb of God, dies whilst the paschal lambs, His prototypes, are being slain.

  • And John alone tells how the bones of the dead body remained unbroken, fulfilling the ordinance as to the paschal lamb (Exod.

  • 46) and how blood and water flow from His spear-pierced side: thus the Lamb " taketh away the sins of the world " by shedding His blood which " cleanseth us from every sin "; and " He cometh by water and blood," historically at His baptism and crucifixion, and mystically to each faithful soul in baptism and the eucharist.

  • 19); " the marriage of the Lamb has come " (Rev. xix.

  • Lamb, The Dynamical Theory of Sound (1910), is intended as a stepping-stone to the study of-the writings of Helmholtz and Rayleigh.

  • Perhaps the only actual parallel to Montaigne in literature is Lamb.

  • The signs were usually obtained from the inspection of the liver (according to Johns, that of the lamb that was sacrificed); or it took place through birds; hence the name in this case given to the baru of dagil insure " bird inspector."

  • 19 sqq., we read " that the masmasu (priest's magician) is to pass forth to the gateway, sacrifice a sheep in the palace portal, and to smear the threshold and posts of the palace gateway right 'and left with the blood of the lamb."

  • Lamb, C. Chree, Lord Rayleigh); and to hydrodynamics (Lord Kelvin, Sir G.

  • Early Christian tradition is unanimous on this side; either the 14th is mentioned, or the Crucifixion is made the antitype of the slaughter of the Paschal Lamb (and the Resurrection of the first fruits), in the following authorities anterior to A.D.

  • 4) was used to confirm the Halaka that the man who killed the Passover Lamb must know how many people were about to share it (Jew.

  • Also, the Passover Lamb could be sacrificed on the Sabbath, and justification for this was found in Num.

  • Bitter herbs also were often added, probably because they were eaten with the Paschal lamb.

  • At Lamb Head, its southeasterly point, is a broch and Pictish pier, and about 2 m.

  • of Charles Lamb, from whom " Elia " professes to have got that translation of a Chinese MS. which furnished the dissertation on roast pig.

  • The paschal lamb is now eaten on Sunday, but until the 11th century, and even later, it was eaten with the Eucharist at a Lord's Supper celebrated on the evening of Maundy Thursday after the rite of pedilavium or washing of feet.

  • Did not the Lamb of God, suspended at each knight's heart, symbolize at once the woollen fabrics to which so much of Flemish wealth and Burgundian power was owing, and the gentle humility of Christ which was ever to characterize the order?

  • It was defended by Fort Fisher, a heavy earthwork on the peninsula between the ocean and Cape Fear river, manned by 1400 men under Colonel William Lamb.

  • With regard to the rearing of the Persian lamb, there is a prevalent idea that the skins of the unborn lamb are frequently used; this, however, is a mistake.

  • August: Nizhniy Novgorod, Persian lamb and general Russia furs.

  • When this fur is symmetrically spotted with black lamb pieces it is styled miniver, in which form it is used at the grand coronation functions of British sovereigns.

  • The Tibet lamb so largely imported and used for children's wear is often miscalled Tibet goat.

  • Lambs.-The sorts that primarily interest the fur trade in Europe and America are those from south Russia, Persia and Afghanistan, which are included under the following wholesale or retail commercial terms: Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, Shiraz, Bokharan and caracul lamb.

  • With the public the general term astrachan is an old one, embracing all the above curly sorts; the flatter kinds, as broadtail and caracul lamb, have always been named separately.

  • Persian Lamb price 12s.

  • Tibet Lamb.

  • As illustrative of this, it may be explained that any brown tone of fur such as sable, marten, mink, black marten, beaver, nutria, &c., will go well upon black or very dark-brown furs, while those of a white or grey nature, such as ermine, white lamb, chinchilla, blue fox, silver fox, opossum, grey squirrel, grey lamb, will set well upon seal or black furs, as Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, caracul lamb, &c. White is also permissible upon some light browns and greys, but brown motley colours and greys should never be in contrast.

  • The principal linings are as follows: Sable sides, sable heads and paws, sable gills, mink sides, heads and gills, marten sides, heads and gills, Persian lamb pieces and paws, caracul lamb pieces or paws, musquash sides and heads, nutria sides, genet pieces, raccoon sides or flanks, fox sides, kolinski whole skins, and small rodents as kaluga and hamster.

  • Garments made of sealskin pieces and Persian lamb pieces are frequently sold as if they were made of solid skins, the term "pieces" being simply suppressed.

  • Kids Sold as lamb or broadtails.

  • On a lower floor he sometimes, but very rarely, regaled a friend with a plain dinner - a veal pie, or a leg of lamb and spinach, and a rice pudding.

  • Lammergeier, Lamm, lamb, and Geier, vulture), or bearded vulture, the Falco barbatus of Linnaeus and the Gypaetus barbatus of modern ornithologists, one of the grandest birds-of-prey of the Palaearctic region - inhabiting lofty mountain chains from Portugal to the borders of China, though within historic times it has been exterminated in several of its ancient haunts.

  • He also became known to Wordsworth and Lamb.

  • Under the advice of the second Mrs Godwin, and with her active co-operation, he carried on business as a bookseller under the pseudonym of Edward Baldwin, publishing several useful school books and books for children, among them Charles and Mary Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare.

  • 1-13 the choice of the lamb and the manner in which it is to be eaten constitute the essential feature, the smearing with the blood being quite secondary; in vv.

  • that returns from the bottomless pit, "that was, and is not, and yet is"; the head "as it were wounded to death" that lives again; the gruesome similitude of the Lamb that was slain, and his adversary in the final struggle.

  • The Baptist has pointed Him out to them in striking language, which recalls at once the symbolic ritual of the law and the spiritual lessons of the prophets: " Behold, the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world."

  • The Passover was at hand, and the last supper of our Lord with His disciples on the evening before the Passover lamb was killed is made the occasion of the most inspiring consolations.

  • The principal exports are cattle and dairy produce, grain, lamb and goat skins, and cloth (shayak); the imports include coal, iron and machinery, textiles, petroleum and chemicals.

  • Participation in the mass also releases from guilt, as the Lamb of God offered up atones for sin and intercedes with the Father in our behalf.

  • Thus yr oen, " the lamb," i'r ty, " into the house," yn y ty, " in the house."

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