Lake sentence example

lake
  • She went to the edge of the lake and peered into it.

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  • The lake was placid.

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  • The lake glowed like it was radioactive.

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  • The bottom of the lake glowed with souls.

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  • She touched the water of the lake and groaned.

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  • Gabriel reached the end of the assassins and turned to gaze at the lake with its souls.

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  • Sometimes even she had put one in her pocket and forgotten to drop it in the lake for weeks.

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  • The Lake of Souls in her underworld was always still.

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  • What if the lake cracked, too, and the souls went the other way, out of the underworld and into the mortal realm?

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  • In the meantime, the lost souls were stuck in a lake in the mortal world.

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  • The massive lake was roughly round with a panhandle on the side nearest the fortress.

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  • More gems swirled in the lake, seemingly at random.

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  • She didn't understand what her instincts were trying to tell her, but right now, they wanted her to climb a tree to see the lake from above.

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  • The Lake of Souls is much larger than any lake on the mortal world.

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  • When you left, the demons were pouring in, the Lake of Souls was bubbling and everything else was falling apart.

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  • Lake water seeped through his clothing.

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  • Gabriel didn't say what he thought, that she might've been better off in the Lake of Souls than with Darkyn.

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  • The movements seemed to start there, circle around the lake then drop, as if there was an invisible wall.

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  • Thinking of taking a dive in the lake and not surfacing again, except that it meant she'd lose her soul.

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  • A gem bubbled to the top of the lake then dropped down, rejoining the rest of them beneath the surface.

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  • You're saying there are fifty cracks in the Lake of Souls?

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  • He glanced around the lake.

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  • She nodded and swallowed then motioned him away from the lake, towards the trees.

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  • She stopped a dozen meters before the edge of the forest, wondering if there was any sort of hazard in being so close to whatever it was causing the lake to be green in the first place.

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  • Or cast myself into the Lake of Souls.

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  • It's like someone dropped a stone in the lake.

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  • This is my lake country.

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  • The helo flew over Tim's ranch and mansion, perched on a lake.

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  • The southern basin of Chad is described under the Shari, which empties its waters into the lake about the middle of the southern shore, forming a delta of considerable extent.

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  • Green power flowed from the souls in the lake, through him and into the gem.

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  • The lake blinked out for a second, the light gone completely, then blinked back on, this time much, much dimmer.

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  • So you're a lost soul, too, like the rest of the lake and me.

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  • Her thoughts turned to the mansion on the lake and to the idea of spending her life there with Brady.

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  • They reached the ranch beside the lake, and her spirits lifted.

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  • Dan bypassed the mansion and led him towards the lake, where two forms stood on a large dock.

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  • She makes whatever she wants out of them.  Most of them go in the bottom of the Lake of Souls, where they can find their loved ones and be in peace.

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  • The idea of emeralds swimming around in a lake was too much for Katie.  She felt nauseous again at her overwhelming situation and stopped, leaning against a tree.  What she would give for a sip of real water!

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  • Gabe stepped closer to the Lake.  Even through the black water, he could see the green souls at the bottom.

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  • Darian found a summer cabin beside a lake in a small logging town near the Black God's hideout.

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  • It rises at an elevation of 7800 ft., in a small lake under the Piz Longhino, in the Swiss canton of the Grisons.

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  • It is a lonely lake, situated in extremely wild surroundings at a height of 1153 ft.

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  • The city of Leon, founded by Francisco Hernandez de Cordova in 1523, was originally situated at the head of the western bay of Lake Managua, and was not removed to its present position till 1610.

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  • He took the command at Sackett's Harbor on Lake Ontario in October 1812.

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  • He was described as chasing the British squadron all round the lake, but his encounters did not go beyond artillery duels at long range, and he allowed his enemy to continue in existence long after he might have been destroyed.

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  • When the cruising season of the lake was nearly over he in his turn retired to Sackett's Harbor, and did not leave it for the rest of the war.

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  • Stavanger commands a considerable tourist traffic. It is the starting-point of a favourite tour, embracing the fine valley of the Sand River, the great Lake Suldal and the Bratlandsdal.

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  • At the extreme north-eastern end of the lake, on an islet which, when the water is low, becomes part of the mainland, stand the imposing ruins of Kilchurn Castle.

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  • Williams was killed in the battle of Lake George on the 8th of September 1 755, but while in camp in Albany, New York, a few days before the battle, he drew a will containing a small bequest for a free school at West Hoosac on condition that the township when incorporated should be called Williamstown.

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  • Bay City is served by the Michigan Central, the Pere Marquette, the Grand Trunk and the Detroit & Mackinac railways, and by lake steamers.

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  • The Golden Temple is so called on account of its copper dome, covered with gold foil, which shines brilliantly in the rays of the Indian sun, and is reflected back from the waters of the lake; but the building as a whole is too squat to have much architectural merit apart from its ornamentation.

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  • Callander owes much of its prosperity to the fact that it is the centre from which the Trossachs is usually visited, the route being that described in Scott's Lady of the Lake.

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  • It is a well-to-do place, beautifully situated near the Lake of Varese, and for this reason a favourite summer and autumn resort of the Milanese, who have numerous country houses in the vicinity.

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  • There is an archaeological museum with prehistoric antiquities from the lake-dwellings on an island in the Lake of Varese.

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  • The palace of the khan, with its gardens and lake, itself formed an inner enclosure fronting the south.

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  • A proposal to confine the Drin to its former course by means of a dyke, and to ease the downflow of the Boyana by a canal opening navigation to Lake Scutari, has long been considered by the Turkish authorities.

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  • The lake of Butrinto (Buthrotum) is near the sea-coast opposite Corfu.

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  • There are several interesting limestone caverns, and Sylvan Lake, in the high mountain district, is an important resort.

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  • The name Manitoba sprang from the union of two Indian words, Manito (the Great Spirit), and Waba (the " narrows " of the lake, which may readily be seen on the map).

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  • The chief rivers emptying into Lake Winnipeg are the Winnipeg, the Red and the Saskatchewan.

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  • The Winnipeg, which flows from the territory lying south-east of Lake Winnipeg, is a noble river some 200 m.

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  • At its falls from Lake of the Woods is one of the greatest and most easily utilized water-powers in the world, and from falls lower down the river electric power for the city of Winnipeg is obtained.

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  • The Saskatchewan, though not in the province, empties into Lake Winnipeg less than half a degree from the northern boundary.

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  • Steamers run from Grand Rapids, through Lake Winnipeg, up Red river to the city of Winnipeg, important locks having been constructed on the river at St Andrews.

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  • The region of the Red River and Assiniboine valleys was opened up by the fur traders, who came by the waterways from Lake Superior, and afterwards by the water communication with Hudson Bay.

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  • Lake Manitoba also affords opportunity for inland shipping.

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  • This railway has six radiating lines leaving the city of Winnipeg, and its main line connects Port Arthur on Lake Superior with Edmonton in the west.

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  • The rebellion was quieted and Sir Garnet Wolseley (now Lord Wolseley) was sent from Canada by the lake route, with several regiments of troops - regulars and volunteers.

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  • Animals, hitherto unknown to the Romans, were exhibited in the circus, and an artificial lake (eunipus) was made for the reception of crocodiles and hippopotamuses.

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  • It lies on either side of the formerly natural, now artificial outlet of the river Waveney to the North Sea, while to the west the river forms Oulton Broad and Lothing Lake.

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  • The lake is situated about 850 ft.

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  • The area of the lake is shrinking owing to the progressive desiccation of the country, Saharan climate and conditions replacing those of the Sudan.

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  • The drying-up process has been comparatively rapid since the middle of the 19th century, a town which in 1850 was on the southern margin of the lake being in 1905 over 20 m.

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  • On the west the shore is perfectly flat, so that a slight rise in the water causes the inundation of a considerable area - a fact not without its influence on the estimates made at varying periods as to the size of the lake.

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  • But what were islands when viewed by Overweg in 185r, formed in 1903 part of the mainland and new islands had arisen in the lake.

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  • It is also, especially on the east, lined by lagoons which communicate with the lake by intricate channels.

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  • The lake is nowhere of great depth, and about midway numerous mud-banks, marshes, islands and dense growths of aqueous plants stretch across its surface.

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  • Another stretch of marsh usually cuts off the northernmost part of the lake from the central sections.

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  • Fed by the Shari and other rivers, the lake has no outlet and its area varies according to the season.

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  • The flood water brought down by the Shari in December and January causes the lake to rise to a maximum of 24 ft., the water spreading over low-lying ground, left dry again in May or June.

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  • In 1870 the lake rose to an exceptional height, but since then, save in 1897, there has been only the normal seasonal rise.

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  • In the south-west end of the lake the water is yellow, caused by banks of clay; elsewhere it is clear.

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  • Beyond the south-east corner of the lake is a depression known as the Bahr-el-Ghazal (not to be confounded with the Nile affluent of the same name).

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  • Coming from the Tibesti highlands the Bahr-el-Ghazal has a south-westerly trend to Lake Chad.

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  • Near the lake the valley was formerly swampy, and at high-water the lake overflowed into it.

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  • There is now neither inlet nor outlet to the lake in this direction, the mouth of the Ghazal having become a fertile millet field.

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  • Besides the Shari, the only important stream entering Lake Chad is the Waube or Yo (otherwise the Komadugu Yobe), which rises near Kano, and flowing eastward enters the lake on its western side 40 m.

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  • In the rains the Waube carries down a considerable body of water to the lake.

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  • Lake Chad is supposed to have been known by report to Ptolemy, and is identified by some writers with the Kura lake of the middle ages.

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  • By them the lake was named Waterloo.

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  • In 1850 James Richardson, accompanied by Heinrich Barth and Adolf Overweg, reached the lake, also via Tripoli, and Overweg was the first European to navigate its waters (1851).

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  • The lake was visited by Eduard Vogel (1855) and by Gustav Nachtigal (1870), the last-named investigating its hydrography in some detail.

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  • A small steamer, brought from the Congo by Emile Gentil, was in 1897 launched on the Shari, and reaching the Chad, navigated the southern part of the lake.

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  • Joalland, reached the lake from the middle Niger, continuing his journey round the north end to Kanem.

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  • Morland visited the lake at the beginning of 1902, and in May of the same year the Germans first reached it from Cameroon.

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  • Boyd Alexander, a British officer, further explored the lake, which then contained few stretches of open water.

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  • One of the ancient trade routes across the Sahara - that from Tripoli to Kuka in Bornu - strikes the lake at its northwest corner, but this has lost much of its former importance.

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  • In the third and longest section, the line starts from a pillar erected in the Perez Rosales pass, near Lake Nahuel-Huapi, and follows the water-parting southward to the highest point of Mt.

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  • The Desaguadero also receives the outflow of the Laguna Bebedero, an intensely saline lake of western San Luis.

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  • The Lake of Geneva, which forms 32 m.

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  • The most important French lake is that of Grand-Lieu, between Nantes and Pairnbceuf (Loire-Infrieure), which presents a surface of 17,300 acres.

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  • Her worship was early transferred to Rome, localized by the Lacus Juturnae near the temple of Vesta, at which Castor and Pollux, after announcing the victory of lake Regillus, were said to have washed the sweat from their horses.

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  • It is this tropical downpour that fills and floods the rivers flowing into Lake Eyre and those falling into the Darling on its right bank.

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  • Messrs Hamilton Hume and Hovell set out from Lake George, crossed the Murrumbidgee, and, after following the river for a short distance, struck south, skirting the foothills of what are now known as the Australian Alps until they reached a fine river, which was called the Hume after the leader's father.

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  • This stream, the Murray, in the upper part of its course runs in a north-westerly direction, but afterwards turning southwards, almost at a right angle, expands into Lake Alexandrina on the south coast, about 60 m.

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  • The first of his tours independently performed, in 1858 and 1859, were around the South Australian lakes, namely, Lake Torrens, Lake Eyre and Lake Gairdner.

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  • These waters had been erroneously taken for parts of one vast horseshoe or sickle shaped lake, only some 20 m.

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  • When Mr Eyre viewed the country from Mount Deception in 1840, looking between Lake Torrens and the lake which now bears his own name, the refraction of light from the glittering crust of salt that covers a large space of stony or sandy ground produced an appearance of water.

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  • He started in March 1860, passing Lake Torrens and Lake Eyre, beyond which he found a pleasant, fertile country till he crossed the Macdonnell range of mountains, just under the line of the tropic of Capricorn.

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  • McKinlay, from Adelaide, made for the Barcoo by way of Lake Torrens.

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  • The Barcoo or Cooper's Creek and its tributary streams were traced from the Queensland mountains, holding a south-westerly course to Lake Eyre in South Australia; the Flinders, the Gilbert, the Gregory, and other northern rivers watering the country towards the Gulf of Carpentaria were also explored.

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  • He passed the Reynolds range and Lake Amadeus in that direction, but was compelled to turn south, where he found a tract of well-watered grassy land.

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  • After a few months' rest it started on the return journey, following Sturt Creek until its termination in Gregory's Salt Sea, and then keeping parallel with the South Australian border as far as Lake Macdonald.

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  • Rounding that lake the expedition moved south-west and reached the settled districts in August 1897.

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  • The Black, Barton and Clyde rivers flow into Lake Memphremagog.

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  • Lake Champlain, which lies beautifully in the valley between the Green and Adirondack mountains, belongs mostly to Vermont.

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  • Of these Lake Bomoseen in Rutland (disambiguation)|Rutland county and Willoughby Lake in Orleans county are the largest.

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  • Willoughby Lake is about 6 m.

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  • A few sturgeon are taken in Lake Champlain.

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  • Along the shore of Lake Champlain are a few species of maritime plants that remain from the time when portions of western Vermont were covered by the sea, and on the upper slopes of some of the higher mountains are a few Alpine species; these, however, are much less numerous on the Green Mountains of Vermont than on the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

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  • Vermont was heavily forested with white pine, spruce and hemlock, and, in the southern part of the state and along the shore of Lake Champlain, with some hard woods.

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  • Lake Champlain furnishes the only commerical fishing grounds in Vermont, with the exceptions of small catches of white fish in Lake Bomoseen, Lake St Catherine in Rutland county and Lake Memphremagog.

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  • The most valuable fish taken was walleyed pike, and the catch of this fish and of pickerel from Lake Champlain in 1902 exceeded in value that from any other body of fresh water in the United States excepting Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

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  • The first important industry of the state was "rafting" lumber from Vermont through Lake Champlain and the Richelieu and St Lawrence rivers to Quebec. Burlington became a great lumber market for a trade moving in the direction of Boston after the Richelieu river was blocked to navigation and railway transportation began, and in 1882 Burlington was the third lumber centre in the United States.

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  • Water communication is afforded by Lake Champlain to the south, for seven months of the year, by way of the Champlain canal, via Whitehall, New York, to Troy and the Hudson river and the Atlantic coast, and to the north by way of the Richelieu river and the Chambly canal to the St Lawrence.

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  • The commerce of the lake consists principally of coal, wood pulp and building material, besides general merchandise.

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  • The only river with traffic of commercial importance is Otter Creek, flowing northwards into the southern part of Lake Champlain and having a navigable length of 8 m.

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  • The commerce on Lake Champlain is carried on chiefly through Burlington, the port of entry for the Vermont customs district.

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  • Christina (martyred by drowning in the lake, according to the legend, in 278) which dates from the 11th century and contains some frescoes, perhaps of the school of Giotto.

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  • Crater lakes are Telaga (lake) Budas, in the crater of the volcano of the same name in the south-east, and Telaga Warna, on the slopes of the Gede, famous for its beautiful tinting.

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  • The limestone forms fine scarps on the southern side of the lake, capped by beds regarded as the Yoredale series.

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  • Upper Lough Erne is a typical meandering lake of the limestone lowland, with outliers of higher Carboniferous strata forming highlands northeast and south-west of it.

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  • It stands at the mouth of the Veveyse and commands fine views of the snowy mountains seen over the glassy surface of the lake.

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  • South of the port is the shallow entrance to the Lagoa do Norte, or Lagoa Mundahu, a salt-water lake extending inland for some miles.

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  • In prehistoric times the river ran straight on along the valley of the Chiana and joined the Tiber near Orvieto; and there was a great lake, the north end of which was at Incisa and the south at the lake of Chiusi.

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  • Two streams, the Angreb on the east side and the Gaha or Kaha on the west, flow from the ridge, and meeting below the town, pass onwards to the lake.

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  • A post-station bearing the name Sirmio stood on the high-road between Brixia and Verona, near the southern shore of the lake.

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  • The only basin of any extent is the Sambhar salt lake, of about 50 m.

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  • He served with Commodore Chauncey, and then was sent from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie, where he took up the chief command at the end of March 1813.

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  • With the help of a strong detachment of officers and men from the Atlantic coast he equipped a squadron consisting of one brig, six fine schooners and one sloop. Other vessels were laid down at Presque Isle (now Erie), where he concentrated the Lake Erie fleet in July.

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  • Captain Barclay, after a hot engagement - the Battle of Lake Erie - in which Captain Perry's flagship the "Lawrence," a brig, was so severely shattered that he had to leave her, was completely defeated.

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  • Attempts have been made to improve submarine cables in this respect, and in 1906 a short cable " loaded " with Pupin coils was laid across Lake Constance.

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  • This plateau region is watered by numerous tributaries of the Parnahyba, chief of which are the Urussuhy, the Caninde and its tributary the Piauhy, the Gurgueia and its tributary the Parahim, which drains the large inland lake of Parnagua, the Longa, and the Poty, which has its source in the state of Ceara.

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  • Or the west side of the lake the Toccia or Tosa descends from the pass of the Gries nearly due south to Domodossola, where it receives the waters of the Doveria from the Simplon, and a few miles lower down those of the Val d'Anzasca from the foot of Monte Rosa, and 12 m.

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  • The next great affluent of the Po, the Adda, forms the outflow of the Lake of Como, and has also its sources in the Alps, above Bormio, whence it flows through the broad and fertile valley of the Valtellina for more than 65 m.

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  • The Adda flows out of the lake at its south-eastern extremity at Lecco, and has thence a course through the plain of above 70 m.

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  • The Oglio, a more considerable stream than either of the last two, rises in the Monte Tonale above Edolo, and descends through the Val Camonica to Lovere, where it expands into a large lake, called Iseo from the town of that name on its southern shore.

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  • These are the Monte Terminillo, near Leonessa (7278 ft.), and the Monte Velino near the Lake Fucino, rising to 8192 ft., both of which are covered with snow from November till May.

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  • Such is the basin of Lake Fucino, situated in the centre of the mass, almost exactly midway between the two seas, at an elevation of 2180 ft.

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  • South of this the country between the frontier of Tuscany and the Tiber is in great part of volcanic origin, forming hills with distinct crater-shaped basins, in several instances occupied by small lakes (the Lake of Bolsena, Lake of Vico and Lake of Bracciano).

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  • The Liri (Liris) or Garigliano, which has its source in the central Apennines above Sora, not far from Lake Fucino, and enters the Gulf of Gaeta about 10 m.

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  • The neighbouring lake of Chiusi is of similar character, but much smaller dimensions.

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  • Such is the Lago di Bolsena, near the city of the same name, which is an extensive sheet of water, as well as the much smaller Lago di Vico (the Ciminian lake of ancient writers) and the Lago di Bracciano, nearer Rome, while to the south of Rome the well known lakes of Albano and Nemi have a similar origin.

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  • The only lake properly so called in southern Italy is the Lago del Matese, in the heart of the mountain group of the same name, of small extent.

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  • The district from the south-east of Lake Fucino to the Piano di Cinque Miglia, enclosing the upper basin of the Sangro and the small lake of Scanno, is the coldest and most bleak part of Italy south of the Alps.

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  • Partridges, woodcock, snipe, &c., are among the game-birds; but all kinds of small birds are also shot for food, and their number is thus kept down, while many members of the migratory species are caught by traps in the foothills on the south side of the Alps, especially near the Lake of Como, on their passage.

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  • Berengar imprisoned her upon the Lake of Como, and threatened her with a forced marriage to his son Adalbert.

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  • It is served by the Virginia and Truckee railway, which has repair shops here, and by stage to Lake Tahoe, 12 m.

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  • Another notice occurs in the story of Nicolo Conti (c. 1440), who explains the name to mean "Island of Gold," and speaks of a lake with peculiar virtues as existing in it.

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  • Limnocnida tanganyicae was discovered first in Lake Tanganyika, but has since been discovered also in Lake Victoria and in the river Niger.

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  • The Lombardy poplar is valuable chiefly as an ornamental tree, its timber being of very inferior quality; its tall, erect growth renders it useful to the landscape-gardener as a relief to the rounded forms of other trees, or in contrast to the horizontal lines of the lake or river-bank where it delights to grow.

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  • This tree, the "liard" of the Canadian voyageur, abounds on many of the river sides of the northwestern plains; it occurs in the neighbourhood of the Great Slave Lake and along the Mackenzie River, and forms much of the driftwood of the Arctic coast.

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  • When war with England broke out, in 1812, he was ordered to cruise in the lakes between Canada and the United States, with his headquarters on lake Champlain.

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  • He was instrumental in saving New York and Vermont from invasion by his brilliant victory of lake Champlain gained, on the nth of September 1814, with a flotilla of 14 vessels carrying 86 guns, over Captain George Downie's 16 vessels and 92 guns.

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  • The Persians are not mentioned in history before the time of Cyrus; the attempt to identify them with the Parsua, a district in the Zagros chains south of Lake Urmia, often mentioned by the Assyrians, is not tenable.

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  • Fathers Mendez and Lobo traversed the deserts between the coast of the Red sea and the mountains, became acquainted with Lake Tsana, and discovered the sources of the Blue Nile in 1624-1633.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & North-Western railway, by interurban electric lines connecting with Chicago and Milwaukee, and by freight and passenger steamship lines on Lake Michigan.

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  • It has a good harbour and a considerable lake commerce.

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  • The city is finely situated on high bluffs above the lake, and is widely known for its healthiness.

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  • The city is supplied with good water from Lake Sebago, 17 m.

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  • It lies in the midst of the great red and brown hematite iron-ore deposits of the Mesabi Range - the richest in the Lake Superior district - and the mining and shipping of this ore are its principal industries.

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  • In the interior of the mines are sixteen ponds, of which the large lake of Przykos is 195 ft.

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  • Lake Balkash, or Denghiz, Lake Ala-kul (which was connected with Balkash in the post-Pliocene period, but now stands some hundred feet higher, and is connected by a chain of smaller lakes with Sissyk-kul), Lake Issyk-kul and the alpine lakes of Son-kul and Chatyr-kul are the principal sheets of water.

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  • The Winnipeg River has at this point a fall of 16 ft., which, with the lake as a reservoir, furnishes an abundant and unfailing waterpower.

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  • It is the distributing point for the gold mines of the district, and during the summer months steamboat communication is maintained on the lake.

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  • Here it is joined by the Kara Su (Teleboas), which, rising near Lake Van, runs past Wish and waters the plain.

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  • A crowded native quarter built round a picturesque lake lies close to the river with the European quarter to the south of it.

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  • The eastern part of the township is generally hilly, reaching a maximum altitude of about 2200 ft., and there are two considerable bodies of water - Laurel Lake in the N.W.

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  • Ungava includes much of the lower portion of Labrador, with a rim of recent marine deposits along its western coast, but the interior has the usual character of low rocky hills of Archean rocks, especially granite and gneiss, with a long band of little disturbed iron-bearing rocks, resembling the Animikie, or Upper Huronian of the Lake Superior region, near its eastern side.

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  • The boundaries separating it from Rio Grande do Sul, a province of Brazil, are Lake Mirim, the rivers Chuy, Jaguarao and Quarahy, and a cuchilla or low range of hills called Santa Ana.

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  • Besides the rivers mentioned, the chief streams are the Santa Lucia, which falls into the Plata a little west of Montevideo; the Queguay, in Paysandu; and the Cebollati, rising in the sierras in Minas and flowing into Lake Mirim.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central System), the Lake Erie & Western (New York Central System), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania System) and the Vandalia (Pennsylvania System) railways.

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  • The last named was opened in 1904, and is controlled by the Winona Lake corporation, having official connexion with several national trade unions.

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  • Cape Mount (on the northern side of which is a large lagoon - Fisherman Lake) at its highest point is 1050 ft.

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  • There is a salt lake or lagoon between the Cape Palmas river and the vicinity of the Cavalla.

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  • Yo Chow, the treaty port of the province, stands at the outlet of the river Siang into this lake.

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  • Frankfort is served by the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville, the Lake Erie & Western, the Vandalia, and the Toledo, St Louis & Western railways, and by the Indianapolis & North -Western Traction Interurban railway (electric).

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  • But even this sheet of water is an inland sea, the only outlet of which, the Bosphorus, is in foreign hands, while the Caspian, an immense shallow lake, mostly bordered by deserts, possesses more importance as a link between Russia and her Asiatic settlements than as a channel for intercourse with other countries.

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  • The round flattened summits of the Valdai plateau do not rise above 1100 ft., and they present the appearance of mountains only in consequence of the depths of the valleys - the rivers which flow towards the depression of Lake Peipus being only 200 to 250 ft.

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  • Only a few low swellings penetrate into it from the N.W., about Lake Onega, and reach 900 ft., while in the N.E.

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  • The Neva (40 m.) flows from Lake Ladoga into the Gulf of Finland.

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  • The Volkhov, discharging into Lake Ladoga, and forming part of the Vyshniy-Volochok system of canals, is an important channel for navigation; it flows from Lake Ilmen, which receives the Msta, connected with the Volga, and the Lovat.

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  • The Svir, also discharging into Lake Ladoga, flows from Lake Onega, and, being part of the Mariinsk canal system, is of great importance for navigation.

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  • The Kuma, the Terek and the Kura, with the Aras, which receives the waters of Lake Gok-cha, belong to Caucasia.'

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  • Finland; the Karelians, in the E., who also occupy the lake regions of Olonets and Archangel, and have settlements in Novgorod and Tver; the Izhores, on the Neva and the S.E.

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  • The most important of the new railways is the Siberian, of which the first section, Chelyabinsk to Omsk, was opened in December 1895, and which, except for a short section round Lake Baikal, in 1901 was completed right through to Stryetensk, on the Shilka, the head of navigation on the Shilka and the Amur, 2710 m.

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  • Taking the Lake Aral and Siberian river fisheries into account, it is estimated that altogether the fishing industries yield a revenue to the state of £330,000 annually.'

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  • Nestor, an old monkish chronicler Origin of Kiev, relates that in the middle of the 9th century of the the Slav and Finnish tribes inhabiting the forest region around Lake Ilmen, between Lake Ladoga and the upper waters of the Dnieper, paid tribute to military adventurers from the land of Ras, which is commonly supposed to have been a part of Sweden.

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  • Lake Ilmen and the river Volkhov, on which stands Novgorod, Rurik's capital, formed part of the great waterway from the Baltic to the Black Sea, and we know that by this route travelled from Scandinavia to Constantinople the tall fair-haired Northmen who composed the famous Varangian bodyguard of the Byzantine emperors.

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  • Some rivers, notably the Kur (Kyros, Araxes) which flows into the Bakhtegan lake east of Shiraz, drain into inland depressions or lakes.

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  • Within the boundaries of the United States the northernmost of the transcontinental lines was the Great Northern railway, extending from a point opposite Vancouver, B.C., and from Seattle, Wash., to Duluth, on Lake Superior, and to St Paul and Minneapolis, Minn., where connexion through to Chicago was made over an allied line,.

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  • The largest of all, Great Salt Lake, is maintained by the waters of the Wasatch and associated plateaus.

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  • Such are the Great Salt Lake and Carson deserts in the north, the Mohave and Colorado and Amargosa (Death Valley) deserts of the south-west.

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  • In the Pleistocene period many large lakes were formed within the Great Basin; especially, by the fusion of small catchment basins, two great confluent bodies of water - Lake Lahontan (in the Nevada basin) and Lake Bonneville (in the Utah basin).

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  • The bounds of the thus enlarged Cisalpine Republic were afterwards extended eastwards to the banks of the Adige by the terms of the treaty of Campo Formio; and in November 1797 Bonaparte added the formerly Swiss district of the Valtelline, north-east of Lake Como, to its territory.

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  • An equally significant hint, that the Ionian Isles might easily be regained by France, further helped to open the eyes of the purblind Addington ministry to the resolve of Napoleon to make the Mediterranean a French lake.

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  • The road which ascended to the temple from the rim of the lake is still well preserved.

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  • On arrival at the supreme Mongol court - either that on the Imyl river (near Lake Ala-kul and the present Russo-Chinese frontier in the Altai), or more probably at or near Karakorum itself, south-west of Lake Baikal - Andrew found Kuyuk Khan dead, poisoned, as the envoy supposed, by Batu's agents.

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  • Indeed, in this as in the earlier styles, Venice struck out a line for herself and developed a style of her own, known as Lombardesque, after the family of the Lombardi (Solari) who came from Carona on the Lake of Lugano and may be said to have created it.

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  • Those that flow directly into the lake are short, but some of the rivers of this region, such as the Cuyahoga and the'Grand, are turned by drift ridges into circuitous courses and flow through narrow valleys with numerous falls and rapids.

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  • Whitefish, bass, trout and pickerel are an important food supply obtained from the waters of the lake, and some perch, catfish and sunfish are caught in the rivers and brooks.

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  • Commercial fishing is important only in Lake Erie.

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  • Among the railways are the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the New York, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania), the Pittsburgh, Ft.

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  • When discovered by Europeans, late in the first half of the 17th century, the territory included within what is now Ohio was mainly a battle-ground of numerous Indian tribes and the fixed abode of none except the Eries who occupied a strip along the border of Lake Erie.

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  • Connecticut, however, excepted a strip bordering on Lake Erie for 120 m.

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  • In March 1786 the second Ohio Company (q.v.), composed chiefly of New England officers and soldiers, was organized in Boston, Massachusetts, with a view to founding a new state between Lake Erie and the Ohio river.

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  • Especially prominent in Europe, classical, medieval and modern, and in East Asia, is the spirit of the lake, river, spring, or well, often conceived as human, but also in the form of a bull or horse; the term Old Nick may refer to the water-horse Nok.

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  • The character of the lake, which has no outlet, varies greatly according to the amount of water brought down by its principal feeder, the Dulei, which enters at its north end, being there a fairly rapid stream so yds.

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  • The Sagan in times of flood receives the overflow of the next lake in the series, Chambo or Ganjule, which lies, at a height of 3460 ft., 70 m.

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  • Chambo in turn receives the waters of a larger lake - Abai, Abaya, Pagade or Regina Margherita - through the river Walo, across a plain only 2 m.

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  • There are a number of islands on the lake.

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  • All the lakes of the series are shut in by high mountains, those surrounding Lake Abai, together with the islands with which its surface is broken, being clothed with luxuriant vegetation.

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  • Harrison in 1899 found the lake quite dried up, and two years later Count Wickenburg found water only in the northern part.

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  • An agreement of 1907 with Great Britain recognized the lake as within the Abyssinian Empire.

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  • A noteworthy feature of the metropolitan public water service was begun in 1896 in the Wachusett lake reservoir at Clinton, on the Nashua river.

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  • The harbour is deep enough for the largest lake vessels.

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  • This light railway runs at a considerable elevation (some 700 ft.), commanding a view across the valley and lake of Tan y Bwlch.

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  • Its southern extremity penetrates into the high plateau of Asia, and the lake lies entirely in the Alpine zone which fringes that plateau on the north-west.

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  • A hydrographic survey of this lake was made by Drizhenko in 1897-1902.

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  • The elongated hilly island of Olkhon, and the peninsula of Svyatoi Nos, which forms its continuation on the opposite eastern shore, divide the lake into two basins.

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  • The depth of the middle portion of the lake has not yet been measured, but must exceed 500 fathoms. It was expected that an underground ridge would be found connecting Olkhon with Svyatoi Nos; but depths exceeding 622 fathoms have been sounded even along that line.

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  • The lake freezes usually at the end of December, or in the beginning of January, so solidly that a temporary post-horse station is erected on the ice in the middle of the lake, and it remains frozen till the second half of May.

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  • Lake Baikal receives over 300 streams, mostly short mountain torrents, besides the Upper Angara, which enters its north-east extremity, the Barguzin, on the east, and the Selenga on the south-east.

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  • It is certain that in previous geological ages Lake Baikal had a much greater extension.

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  • The fauna, explored by Dybowski and Godlewski, and in 1900-2 by Korotnev, is much richer than it was supposed to be, and has quite an original character; but hypotheses as to a direct communication having existed between Lake Baikal and the Arctic Ocean during the Post-Tertiary or Tertiary ages are not proved.

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  • Still, Lake Baikal has a seal (Phoca vitulina, Phoca baikalensis of Dybowski) quite akin to the seals of Spitsbergen, marine sponges, polychaetes, a marine mollusc (ancilodoris), and some marine gammarids.

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  • The waters of the lake swarm with fish (sturgeons and salmonidae), and its herring (Salmo omul) is the chief product of the fisheries, though notably fewer have been taken within the last forty or fifty years.

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  • Navigation of the lake is rendered difficult both by sudden storms and by the absence of good bays and ports.

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  • Steamers ply from it weekly to Misovaya (Posolskoe) on the opposite shore, a few times a year to VerkhneAngarsk, at the northern extremity of the lake, and frequently to the mouth of the Selenga.

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  • In winter, when the lake is covered with ice 3 ft.

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  • The active growth of the petroleum industry of the United States began in 1859, though in the early part of the century the petroleum of Lake Seneca, N.Y., was used as an embrocation under the name of " Seneca oil," and the "American Medicinal Oil" of Kentucky was largely sold after its discovery in 1829.

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  • The others, which terminate streams, are the Bahr el-Ateiba, which receives the waters of Damascus; the Mat, into which the Kuwaik flows below Kinnesrin; and the Ak Deniz, or Bahrat Antakia, the ancient Lake of Antioch, which collects the waters of the Kara Su and Afrin, the southward from the watershed which shuts off Commagene.

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  • The petroleum (Quirinus-oil) found in the neighbourhood of the lake takes its name from him.

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  • Having served his apprenticeship as gardener from the age of fifteen, and himself constructed a large lake when gardener to Battlesden in 1821, he was in 1823 employed in the arboretum at Chiswick, the seat of the duke of Devonshire, and eventually became superintendent of the duke's gardens and grounds at Chatsworth, and manager of his Derbyshire estates.

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  • Along much of the western coast and along nearly the whole of the eastern coast extends a line of sand reefs and narrow islands, enclosing shallow and narrow bodies of water, such as Indian river and Lake Worth - called rivers, lakes, lagoons, bays and harbours.

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  • The central region is remarkable for its large number of lakes, approximately 30,000 between Gainesville in Alachua county, and Lake Okeechobee.

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  • Many of the lakes are connected by subterranean channels, and a change in the surface of one lake is often accompanied by a change in the surface of another.

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  • The springs often merge into lakes, and lake systems are usually the sources of the rivers, Lake George being the principal source of the St Johns, and Lake Kissimmee of the Kissimmee, while a number of smaller lakes are the source of the Oklawaha, one of the most beautiful of the Floridian rivers.

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  • The eight in 1905 were Jacksonville (35,301), Tampa (22,823), Pensacola (21,505), Key West (20,498), Live Oak (7200), Lake City (6409), Gainesville (J413), and St Augustine (5121).

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  • Before 1905 the state provided for higher education by the Florida State College, at Tallahassee, formerly the West Florida Seminary (founded in 1857); the University of Florida, at Lake City, which was organized in 1903 by enlarging the work of the Florida Agricultural College (founded in 1884); the East Florida Seminary, at Gainesville (founded 1848 at Ocala); the normal school (for whites) at De Funiak Springs; and the South Florida Military Institute at Bartow; but in 1905 the legislature passed the Buckman bill abolishing all these state institutions for higher education and establishing in their place the university of the state of Florida and a state Agricultural Experiment Station, both now at Gainesville, and the Florida Female College at Tallahassee, which has the same standards for entrance and for graduation as the state university for men.

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  • Their headquarters there were on Lake Mareotis, which at that time debouched into the sea.

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  • The maximum depth recorded by the United States Lake Survey is 870 ft.; the mean level of the surface is 5813 ft.

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  • The shores of Lake Michigan are generally low and sandy, and the land slopes gradually to the water.

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  • The northern shore of the lake is irregular and more rugged and picturesque than the other shores, the summit of the highest peak being about 1400 ft.

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  • The cliffs on the east shore of Green Bay form a bold escarpment, and from this ridge the land slopes gradually to the lake.

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  • With the exception of Green and Traverse bays, Lake Michigan has few indentations of the coast line, and except at the north end it is free from islands.

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  • The finest agricultural land in the United States is near the lake, and there is an immense trade in all grains, fruits, livestock and lumber, and in products such as flour, pork, hides, leather goods, furniture, &c. Rich lead and copper mines abound, as also salt, iron and coal.

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  • The lake is practically tideless, though true tidal pulsations amounting to 3 in.

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  • In the water of the lake there is a general set of current towards the outlet at the strait of Mackinac, following the east shore, with slight circular currents in the main portion of the lake and at the northern end around Beaver island.

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  • The level of the lake is subject to seasonal fluctuations, reaching a maximum in midsummer and a minimum in February, as well as to alternating cycles of years of high and low water.

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  • Regular lines 'of steamers specially equipped to meet winter conditions, most of them being car ferries, cross the lake and the strait of Mackinac all winter between the various ports.

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  • No notable rivers flow into Lake Michigan, the largest being the Big Manistee and Muskegon on the east shore, and on the west shore the Menominee and the Fox, both of which empty into Green Bay, the most important arm of the lake.

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  • The numerous harbours are chiefly artificial, usually located at the mouths of streams, the improvements consisting of two parallel piers extending into the lake and protecting a dredged channel.

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  • Chicago, the principal port on the lake, is at its south-west extremity, and is remarkable for the volume of its trade, the number of vessels arriving and departing exceeding that of any port in the United States, though the tonnage is less than that of New York.

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  • The port is protected by breakwaters enclosing a portion of the lake front.

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  • The level of the city above the lake being only 14 ft., much difficulty arose in draining it.

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  • Milwaukee, situated on the shore of Milwaukee Bay, on the western side of the lake, is, next to Chicago, the largest city on the lake, and has a large commerce and a harbour of refuge.

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  • Escanaba, on Little Bay de Noc (Noquette), in the northern part of the lake, is a natural harbour and a large iron shipping port.

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  • Green Bay and Lake Michigan are connected by a canal extending from the lake to the head of Sturgeon Bay.

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  • Lake Michigan is connected at its north-east extremity with lake Huron by the strait of Mackinac, 48 m.

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  • Sailing directions for Lake Michigan, Green Bay, and the Strait of Mackinac, U.S. Navy Hydrographic office publication No.

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  • There was a tradition in antiquity that the city of Tantalus had been swallowed up in a lake on the mountain; but the legend may, as Ramsay thinks, have been suggested by the vast ravine which yawns beneath the acropolis.

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  • Reinach (Revue archeologique, 1903), Tantalus was represented in a picture standing in a lake and clinging to the branches of a tree, which gave rise to the idea that he was endeavouring to pluck its fruit.

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  • It is served by the Pere Marquette Railroad, by steamboat lines to Chicago and other lake ports, and by electric lines connecting with Grand Rapids, Saugatuck, and the neighbouring summer resorts.

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  • Of the laws of the Alamanni, who dwelt between the Rhine and the Lech, and spread over Alsace and what is now Switzerland to the south of Lake Constance, we possess two different texts.

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  • Etruscan tombs have been found on the Isola Bisentina, in the lake; and on the west bank was the town of Visentium, Roman inscriptions belonging to which have been found.

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  • On the east side of the lake are remains of baths, including a great octagonal hall known as the Temple of Apollo, built of brickwork, and belonging to the 1st century.

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  • To the south-east of the lake is the Monte Nuovo, a volcanic hill upheaved in 1538, with a deep extinct crater in the centre.

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  • P. Grant, an Atlanta railroad builder, in 1882, and subsequently enlarged by the city (in its south-east corner is Fort Walker); the Lake wood, 6 m.

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  • Within this circle, besides the largest lake, Windermere, is the highest point in England, Scafell Pike; yet Windermere is but 102 m.

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  • To the north, west and south, a flat coastal belt, bordering the Irish Sea, with its inlets Morecambe Bay and Solway Firth, and broadest in the north, marks off the Lake District, while to the east the valleys of the Eden and the Lune divide it from the Pennine mountain system.

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  • The considerable village of Grasmere lies beautifully at the head of the lake of that name; and above Esthwaite is the small town of Hawkshead, with an ancient church, and picturesque houses curiously built on the hill-slope and sometimes spanning the streets.

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  • The industries of the Lake District include slate quarrying and some lead and zinc mining, and weaving, bobbin-making and pencil-making.

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  • Setting aside London and Edinburgh, no locality in the British Isles is so intimately associated with the history of English literature as the Lake District.

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  • But it was Wordsworth, a native of Cumberland, born on the outskirts of the Lake District itself, who really made it a.Mecca for lovers of English poetry.

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  • Brantwood, a house beside Coniston Lake, was the home of Ruskin during the last years of his life.

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  • But there is a deeper connexion than this between the Lake District and English letters.

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  • The most notable instance - indeed it is almost the only instance - of the kind in English literature is the Lake School of Poets.

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  • It issues from the south-west corner of Lake Ladoga in two channels, which are obstructed by sandstone reefs, so that the better of the two has a depth of only 7 to 16 ft.

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  • The ordinary rise and fall of the river is comparatively slight, but when the west wind blows steadily for a long time, or when Lake Ladoga sends down its vast accumulations of block-ice, inundations of a dangerous kind occur, as in 1777, 1824, 1879 and 1903.

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  • It is a scattered township lying on the south-western shore of lake Rotorua, amid hills reaching 2600 ft.

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  • Four miles from Rotorua, near the centre of the lake, the island of Mokoia rises to 1518 ft.

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  • A short channel connects lake Rotorua with lake Rotoiti to the N.E.

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  • Both this lake and the smaller ones to the east, Rotoehu and Rotoma, have deeply indented shores, and are set in exquisite scenery.

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  • For the most part the country is flat, the only mountains being a low range which, rising in the west, runs south-east in an irregular line towards the Chilka lake and forms a water-parting between the district and the valley of the Mahanadi.

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  • The Chilka lake is one of the largest in India; its length is 44 m., and its breadth in some parts 20 m.

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  • The lake is saline and everywhere very shallow, its mean depth ranging from 3 to 5 ft.

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  • It is on the main line of the Pere Marquette railway, and during the summer season is served by lake steamers.

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  • Charlevoix is an important hardwood lumber port, and the principal industries are the manufacture of lumber and of cement; fishing (especially for lake trout and white fish); the raising of sugar beets; and the manufacture of rustic and fancy wood-work.

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  • Again, on the map illustrating Livingstone's " Last Journals " the Luapula is shown as issuing from the Bangweulu in the north-west, when an examination of the account of the natives who carried the great explorer's remains to the coast would have shown that it leaves that lake on the south.

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  • Surveys in British Central Africa were taken up in 1894; a survey of Lake Nyasa, by Lieut.

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  • The Hare Indian dog of the Great Bear Lake and the Mackenzie river is more slender, gentle and affectionate than the Eskimo dog, but is impatient of restraint, and preserves many of the characters of its wild ally, the coyote, and is practically unable to bark.

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  • He explored (1894-1895) the headstreams of the Shebeli, reached Lake Rudolf, and eventually descended the Tana river to the sea, his journey thus taking him through southern Somaliland.

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  • In 1895 Bottego, with three European companions, left Brava to investigate the river system north of Lake Rudolf, and succeeded in tracing the Omo to that lake.

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  • Cavendish (1896-1897) followed somewhat in Donaldson Smith's steps, and the last named traveller again crossed Somaliland in his journey from Berbera via Lake Rudolf to the Upper Nile (1899-Igoo).

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  • Assal Lake, according to this theory, formed part of the sea bed.

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  • Pursuing their courses eastward the North and South Saskatchewan rivers unite in the Saskatchewan (Cree, rapid-flowing river), which finds its way to Lake Winnipeg, and thence by way of Nelson river to Hudson Bay.

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  • After descending north-eastward to within a few miles of Lake Athabasca, it is met by a stream emerging from that lake.

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  • The united river carrying down the waters of the Athabasca slope is called the Slave river, which, passing through Great Slave Lake, emerges as the great Mackenzie river, which falls into the Arctic Sea.

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  • Roderick Mackenzie, cousin of Sir Alexander Mackenzie, built Fort Chipewyan on Lake Athabasca in 1788.

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  • Afterward going westward from Lake Athabasca and through the Peace river, he reached the Pacific Ocean, being the first white man to cross the North American continent, north of Mexico.

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  • Behind it (according to the Alexandrian treatise, known as pseudo-Callisthenes) were five native villages scattered along the strip between Lake Mareotis and the sea.

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  • The battle of Alexandria, fought on the 21st of March of that year, between the French army under General Menou and the British expeditionary corps under Sir Ralph Abercromby, took place near the ruins of Nicopolis, on the narrow spit of land between the sea and Lake Aboukir, along which the British of troops had advanced towards Alexandria after the actions of Aboukir on the 8th and Mandora on the 13th.

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  • The British position on the night of the 10th extended across the isthmus, the right resting upon the ruins of Nicopolis and the sea, the left on the lake of Aboukir and the Alexandria canal.

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  • As to cultivation of the plant in Europe, according to Strabo the Romans obtained the papyrus plant from Lake Trasimene and other lakes of Etruria, but this statement is unsupported by any other ancient authority.

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  • Near Lake Charles, at Sulphur, are very extraordinary sulphur deposits.

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  • Rice is milled at New Orleans, Crowley, Abbeville, Gayden, Jennings and Lake Charles.

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  • Lake Charles, Westlake, Bogalusa, Bon Ami, Carson, Fisher, Fullerton, Leesville, Oakdale and Pickering were the leading sawmill towns of the state in 1908.

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  • They serve the trade of Lake Pontchartrain and the Florida parishes, the lumber, coal, fish, oyster and truck trade of New Orleans, and to some extent are the highway of a miscellaneous coasting trade.

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  • The iron ores are even more accessible than the famous ones of the Lake Superior region in the United States.

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  • An artificial lake in New Providence, constructed for the use of the turtle-catchers, is noted as exhibiting an extraordinary degree of phosphorescence.

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  • The surface of some, as notably the Mostarsko Blato, lying west of Mostar, is marshy, and in spring forms a lake; others are watered by streams which disappear in swallow-holes of the rock, and make their way by underground channels either to the sea or the Narenta.

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  • Sir Walter Raleigh, who resumed the search in 1595, described Manoa as a city on Lake Parima in Guiana.

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  • Birds came at his call, and forgot their hereditary fear of man; beasts lipped and caressed him; the very fish in lake and stream would glide, unfearful, between his hands.

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  • In 1847 Thoreau left Walden Lake abruptly, and for a time occupied himself with lead-pencil making, the parental trade.

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  • The Black Sea was practically a Turkish lake, only the Circassians on the east coast retaining their independence; and as a result of the wars with Persia the whole Euphrates valley, with Bagdad, had fallen into the sultan's power, now established on the Persian Gulf.

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  • In the oldest (Pindar) the "Argo" sailed along the river Phasis into the eastern Oceanus, round Asia to the south coast of Libya, thence to the mythical lake Tritonis, of ter being carried twelve days over land through Libya, and thence again to Iolcus.

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  • The "Argo" was now carried twelve days and twelve nights to the Hesperides, and thence to lake Tritonis (where the seer Mopsus died), whence Triton conducted them to the Mediterranean.

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  • In flood time the country at places becomes a huge lake, through which it is extremely difficult to find the channel.

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  • During part of the next few years they resided at Coppet, her father's estate on the Lake of Geneva, which she herself made famous.

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  • It is on Lake Erie at the mouth of Cuyahoga river, about 260 m.

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  • The court-house and city hall are on the bluff overlooking Lake Erie.

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  • Perry, erected in commemoration of his victory on Lake Erie in 1813, is in Wade Park, where there is also a statue of Harvey Rice (1800-1891), who reformed the Ohio public school system and wrote Pioneers of the Western Reserve (1882) and Sketches of Western Life (1888).

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  • Lake View Park along the lake shore contains only 102 acres, but is a much frequented restingplace near the business centre of the city, and affords pleasant views of the lake and its commerce.

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  • Besides the city, there are the Northern Ohio (for the insane, founded in 1855), the Cleveland general, Lake Side (endowed), St Alexis and the Charity hospitals (the last managed by Sisters of Charity).

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  • Cleveland's rapid growth both as a commercial and as a manufacturing city is due largely to its situation between the iron regions of Lake Superior and the coal and oil regions of Pennsylvania and Ohio.

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  • The city is served by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern; the New York, Chicago & St Louis; the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis; the Pennsylvania; the Erie; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways; by steamboat lines to the principal ports on the Great Lakes; and by an extensive system of inter-urban electric lines.

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