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lafayette

lafayette

lafayette Sentence Examples

  • The memoirs of Lafayette are useful.

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  • In a niche is a Houdon bust of Lafayette, a replica of the original presented to the city of Paris by the state of Virginia.

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  • The resignation of Lafayette and Dupont de l'Eure still further undermined the government, which, incapable even of keeping order in the streets of Paris, ended by being discredited with all parties.

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  • A monument was erected to his memory in 1825, Lafayette laying the corner-stone.

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  • He graduated in 1840 from Lafayette College, where he was tutor in mathematics (1840-1842) and adjunct professor (1843-1844).

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  • He served in the army as marechal-de-camp under Luckner and Lafayette, but was accused of treason on the 15th of August 17 9 2, fled the country, and was imprisoned by the Austrians.

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  • The older formation of the Quaternary period is the Lafayette (also called "Orange-sand" or "stratified drift"), which immediately overlies all the Cretaceous groups except the prairies of the Selma chalk, and all the Tertiary except the Porters Creek and Vicksburg formations and parts of the Jackson.

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  • Mirabeau at first attempted again to make an alliance with Lafayette, but it was useless, for Lafayette was not a strong man himself and did not appreciate "la force" in others.

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  • He also enlisted the services of a number of Continental soldiers of fortune, among whom were Lafayette, Baron Johann De Kalb and Thomas Conway.

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  • Sugar is grown also in St Landry and the eastern part of Attakapas - a name formerly loosely applied to what are now St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette parishes.

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  • The parishes of St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette are known as the Attakapas country from an Indian name.

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  • In 1762, by an act of the assembly, a town was laid out including Cross Creek, and was named Campbelltown (or "Campbeltown"); but in 1784, when Lafayette visited the town, its name was changed in his honour to Fayetteville, though the name Cross Creek continued to be used locally for many years.

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  • Then it was easy to supplant her with another favourite, Mademoiselle de Lafayette.

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  • RUSSELL ALEXANDER ALGER (1836-1907), American soldier and politician, was born in Lafayette township, Medina (disambiguation)|Medina county, Ohio, on the 27th of February 1836.

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  • Here he entertained many distinguished visitors, including Lafayette.

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  • Under all the inconsistencies of Talleyrand's career there lies an aim as steadily consistent as that which inspired his contemporary, Lafayette.

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  • LEXINGTON, a city and the county-seat of Lafayette county, Missouri, U.S.A., situated on the S.

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  • In Maine four peaks exceed 3000 ft., including Katandin (5200 ft.), Mount Washington, in the White Mountains (6279 ft.), Adams (5805), Jefferson (5725), Clay (5554), Monroe (5390), Madison (5380), Lafayette (5269); and a number of summits rise above 4000 ft.

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  • A second time, owing to his violent campaign against Lafayette, he narrowly escaped arrest and had to flee to London (Jan.

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  • The Girondists, for all their fine phrases, were sold to the enemy, as Lafayette, Dumouriez and a hundred others - once popular favourites - had been sold.

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  • On the Franconia, a much shorter range, are Mount Lafayette, 5269 ft.; Mount Lincoln, 5098 ft.; and four others exceeding 4000 ft.

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  • Before Cornwallis could be brought to bay he was faced successively by four antagonists - Generals Gates, Greene, Lafayette and Washington.

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  • A small American force under Lafayette, whom Wayne reinforced during the summer, partially checked the enemy.

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  • At Green Spring, near Jamestown Island, Lafayette boldly attacked his antagonist on the 6th of July, but had to save himself by a hasty retreat.

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  • In addition to these non-marine formations of the west, there is the widespread Lafayette formation, which covers niuch of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plain, reaching far to the north from the western Gulf regio,1, and having uncertain limits, so far as now worked out, in various directions.

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  • The Lafayette formation has been the occasion of much difference of opinion, but is by many held to be a non-marine formation, made up of gravels, sands and clays, accumulated on land, chiefly through the agency of rain and rivers.

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  • The marine-part of the Lafayette is probably covered by sediments of later age.

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  • In earlier literature the Lafayette formation was described under the name of Orange Sand, and was at one time thought to be the southern equivalent of the glacial drift.

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  • It seems probable that the Lafayette formation of the Gulf coastal plain is continuous northward and westward with gravel deposits on the Great Plains, washed out from the Rocky Mountains to the west.

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  • Its distribution is similar to that of the Lafayette, though the Columbia series is, for the most part, confined to lower levels.

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  • Among the social clubs the Buffalo, the University, the Park, the Saturn and the Country clubs, and among the hotels the Iroquois, Lafayette, Niagara and Genesee, may be especially mentioned.

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  • At the outbreak of the revolution of 1830 he was absent from Paris, having undergone an operation, but he returned at the request of Lafayette to take his share in the elevation of Louis Philippe to the throne.

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  • Other institutions for higher education are the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia (1749), an endowed institution which receives very little support from the state; the University of Pittsburgh (1819), at Pittsburg (q.v.); Dickinson College (Methodist Episcopal, 1783), at Carlisle; Haveriord College (Society of Friends, 1833), at Haverford; Franklin and Marshall {German Reformed, 1853), at Lancaster; Washington and Jefferson {Presbyterian, 1802), at Washington; Lafayette (Presbyterian, 1832), at Easton; Bucknell University (Baptist, 1846), at Lewisburg; Waynesburg (Cumberland Presbyterian, 1851), at Waynesburg; Ursinus (German Reformed, 1870), at Collegeville; Allegheny College (Methodist Episcopal, 1815), at Meadville; Swarthmore (Society of Friends (Hicksites), 1866), at Swarthmore; Muhlenberg (Lutheran, 1867), at Allentown; Lehigh University (non-sectarian) 1867), at Bethlehem; and for women Bryn Mawr College (Society of Friends, 1885), at Bryn Mawr; the Allentown College (German Reformed, 1867), at Allentown; Wilson College (Presbyterian, 1870), and the Pennsylvania College for women (1869), at Pittsburg.

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  • At the head of Jamestown peninsula Cornwallis, in July 1781, attempted to trick the Americans under Lafayette and General Anthony Wayne by displaying a few men on the peninsula and concealing the principal part of his army on the mainland; but when Wayne discovered the trap he made first a vigorous charge, and then a retreat to Lafayette's line.

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  • The next day, wrapped in a tricolour scarf and preceded by a drummer, he went on foot to the Hotel de Ville - the headquarters of the republican party - where he was publicly embraced by Lafayette as a symbol that the republicans acknowledged the impossibility of realizing their own ideals and were prepared to accept a monarchy based on the popular will.

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  • On the 13th of September General Lafayette McLaws carried Maryland Heights and General John G.

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  • Other interesting landmarks are "Woodland" (formerly called "Bloomsbury Court"), built early in the 18th century by William Trent, and said to have sheltered, at various times, Washington, Lafayette and Rochambeau; the "Hermitage," erected some time before the War of Independence; and "Bow Hill," in the suburbs of the city, a quaint old colonial mansion which for some time before 1822 was a home of Joseph Bonaparte.

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  • He was a teacher at Swanzey, New Hampshire, and at the Leicester Academy, Massachusetts, in 1845-1847, and attempted the philological method of teaching English "like Latin and Greek," later described in his Method of Philological Study of the English Language (1865); at Amherst in 1847-1849; at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1852-1855; and in 1855 became a tutor at Lafayette College, where he became adjunct professor of belles-lettres and English literature in 1856, and professor of English language and comparative philology - the first chair of the kind established - in 1857.

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  • At Lafayette he introduced the first carefully scientific study of English in any American college, and in 1870 published A Comparative Grammar of the AngloSaxon Language, in which its Forms are Illustrated by Those of the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Gothic, Old Saxon, Old Friesic, Old Norse and Old High German, and An Anglo-Saxon Reader; he was editor of the "Douglass Series of Christian Greek and Latin Classics," to which he contributed Latin Hymns (1874); he was chairman of the Commission of the State of Pennsylvania on Amended Orthography; and was consulting editor of the Standard Dictionary, and in 1879-1882 was director of the American readers for the Philological Society's (New Oxford) Dictionary.

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  • 1863), adjunctprofessor of modern languages in 1884-1891 and subsequently professor of English literature at Lafayette, he edited A Thesaurus Dictionary of the English Language (1903).

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  • It is the outgrowth of the Apprentices' Library Association, founded in 1824, of which General Lafayette laid the corner-stone on the 4th of July of that year.

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  • Cuyler (1822-1909), pastor of the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian church from 1860 to 1890.

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  • W Story) in the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution, of John Marshall (by Story) on the west terrace of the Capitol, of General Andrew Jackson (by Clark Mills) and, in Lafayette Square, of the Marquis de Lafayette (by Falguiere and Mercie), of the Comte de Rochambeau (by F.

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  • Several fruitless conferences between the governor and the Indian chiefs, who were believed to be encouraged by the British, resulted in Harrison's advance with a force of militia and regulars to the Tippecanoe river, where (near the present Lafayette, Ind.) on the 7th of November 1811 he won over the Indians a victory which established his military reputation and was largely responsible for his subsequent nomination and election to the presidency of the United States.

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  • Soon after the close of the war it was neglected, and by 1791 it was in bad repair; therefore at the time of the Indian hostilities of 1792 another stockade fort was built near the bank of the Allegheny river and about a quarter of a mile above the site of Fort Pitt, this new fort being named Fort Lafayette, or, as it was more commonly called, Fort Fayette.

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  • A mass meeting of about 5000 citizens of the above-mentioned counties (many of them armed militiamen), at Braddock's Field, on the 1st and 2nd of August 1794, threatened to take possession of Fort Lafayette and to burn Pittsburg, but cooler counsel prevailed, and after voting to proscribe several persons, and marching in a body through the streets of the town, the crowd dispersed without doing any damage.

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  • Macon, Lafayette and Adair are the leading counties in output; Lexington and Bevier are the leading mining centres.

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  • Purdue University (1874) at Lafayette, maintained under state control, received the benefit of the Federal grant under the Morrill Act.

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  • There are a Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home at Knightstown (1868), and a State Soldiers' Home at Lafayette (1896); a School for FeebleMinded Youth (1879), removed from Knightstown to Fort Wayne in 1890; a village for epileptics at New Castle (1907); and a hospital for the treatment of tuberculosis, authorized in 1907, for which a site at Rockville was purchased in 1908.

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  • of the present city of Lafayette), the headquarters of the Wea branch of the Miami, on the upper Wabash.

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  • The first Territorial Council met in 1836 at Old Belmont, now Leslie, Lafayette county, but in December of that year Madison was selected as the capital, after a contest in which Fond du Lac, Milwaukee, Racine, Green Bay, Portage and other places were considered, and in which James Duane Doty, later governor, owner of the Madison town plat, was charged with bribing legislators with town lots in Madison.

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  • The marquis Lafayette, doubly popular as a veteran of the American War and as one of the nobles who heartily upheld the cause of the Assembly, was chosen commandant of the new civic force, thenceforwards known as the National Guard.

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  • Lafayette, who imagined himself to be copying the American constitution, proposed that the king should have a suspensive veto.

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  • Thinking that it would be politic to claim no more, Necker persuaded the king to intimate that he was satisfied with Lafayette's proposal.

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  • Lafayette was slow to follow it and, when he arrived, took insufficient precautions.

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  • Talleyrand celebrated Mass, and Lafayette was the first to swear fidelity to the Assembly and the nation.

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  • Lafayette was to march against Namur, Biron against Mons, and Dillon against Tournay.

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  • On hearing of these disasters Lafayette found it necessary to retreat.

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  • Lafayette, who the 20th remained faithful to the constitution of 1791, ventured of June on a letter of remonstrance to the Assembly.

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  • no attention, for Lafayette could no longer sway the people.

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  • Lafayette himself came to Paris in the hope of rallying the constitutional party, but the king and queen eluded his offers of assistance.

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  • They had always disliked and distrusted Lafayette and the Feuillants, and preferred to rest their hopes of deliverance on the foreigner.

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  • Lafayette returned to his troops without having effected anything.

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  • When Lafayette heard of the insurrection in Paris he tried to rally his troops in defence of the constitution, but they refused to follow him.

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  • The memoirs of Lafayette are useful.

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  • After the emeute of August 10 and Lafayette's flight he was appointed to the command of the "Army of the Centre," and at the same moment the Coalition assumed the offensive.

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  • In the main hall hangs a glass casket containing the key to the Bastille which Washington received from Lafayette in 1790.

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  • From each end of the house a curved colonnade and a pavement lead westerly to a row of out-buildings which partially enclose a bowling green and spacious lawn with shaded drives and walks, and beautiful gardens (with trees planted by Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Lafayette and others).

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  • The readjusted American line was composed of the divisions of Lafayette, Greene, Alexander and Patterson, while Wayne's brigade, which had been in Lee's advance from the first, was posted in a favourable position.

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  • Then followed the celebrated march of the combined forces to Yorktown, where on the 22nd of September they formed a junction with the troops of Lafayette; as the result Cornwallis was forced to surrender on the 19th of October.

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  • A statue of Rochambeau by Ferdinand Hamar, the gift of France to the United States, was unveiled in Lafayette Square, Washington, by President Roosevelt on the 24th of May 1902.

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  • Representatives of the Lafayette and Rochambeau families also attended.

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  • General Lafayette first landed on American soil at Georgetown on the 24th of April 1 777.

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  • He graduated in 1840 from Lafayette College, where he was tutor in mathematics (1840-1842) and adjunct professor (1843-1844).

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  • He served in the army as marechal-de-camp under Luckner and Lafayette, but was accused of treason on the 15th of August 17 9 2, fled the country, and was imprisoned by the Austrians.

    0
    0
  • The older formation of the Quaternary period is the Lafayette (also called "Orange-sand" or "stratified drift"), which immediately overlies all the Cretaceous groups except the prairies of the Selma chalk, and all the Tertiary except the Porters Creek and Vicksburg formations and parts of the Jackson.

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  • He also attempted to form an alliance with Lafayette, but the general was as vain and as obstinate as Mirabeau himself, and had his own theories about a new French constitution.

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  • Target, mayor of Paris, Lafayette generalissimo to reform the army, Louis Philippe, comte de Segur (foreign affairs), Mounier and I.

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  • Mirabeau at first attempted again to make an alliance with Lafayette, but it was useless, for Lafayette was not a strong man himself and did not appreciate "la force" in others.

    0
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  • In a niche is a Houdon bust of Lafayette, a replica of the original presented to the city of Paris by the state of Virginia.

    0
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  • He also enlisted the services of a number of Continental soldiers of fortune, among whom were Lafayette, Baron Johann De Kalb and Thomas Conway.

    0
    0
  • Sugar is grown also in St Landry and the eastern part of Attakapas - a name formerly loosely applied to what are now St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette parishes.

    0
    0
  • The parishes of St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette are known as the Attakapas country from an Indian name.

    0
    0
  • In 1762, by an act of the assembly, a town was laid out including Cross Creek, and was named Campbelltown (or "Campbeltown"); but in 1784, when Lafayette visited the town, its name was changed in his honour to Fayetteville, though the name Cross Creek continued to be used locally for many years.

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  • Then it was easy to supplant her with another favourite, Mademoiselle de Lafayette.

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  • RUSSELL ALEXANDER ALGER (1836-1907), American soldier and politician, was born in Lafayette township, Medina (disambiguation)|Medina county, Ohio, on the 27th of February 1836.

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  • Here he entertained many distinguished visitors, including Lafayette.

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  • The resignation of Lafayette and Dupont de l'Eure still further undermined the government, which, incapable even of keeping order in the streets of Paris, ended by being discredited with all parties.

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  • Under all the inconsistencies of Talleyrand's career there lies an aim as steadily consistent as that which inspired his contemporary, Lafayette.

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  • A monument was erected to his memory in 1825, Lafayette laying the corner-stone.

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  • LEXINGTON, a city and the county-seat of Lafayette county, Missouri, U.S.A., situated on the S.

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  • In Maine four peaks exceed 3000 ft., including Katandin (5200 ft.), Mount Washington, in the White Mountains (6279 ft.), Adams (5805), Jefferson (5725), Clay (5554), Monroe (5390), Madison (5380), Lafayette (5269); and a number of summits rise above 4000 ft.

    0
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  • A second time, owing to his violent campaign against Lafayette, he narrowly escaped arrest and had to flee to London (Jan.

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  • The Girondists, for all their fine phrases, were sold to the enemy, as Lafayette, Dumouriez and a hundred others - once popular favourites - had been sold.

    0
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  • On the Franconia, a much shorter range, are Mount Lafayette, 5269 ft.; Mount Lincoln, 5098 ft.; and four others exceeding 4000 ft.

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    0
  • Before Cornwallis could be brought to bay he was faced successively by four antagonists - Generals Gates, Greene, Lafayette and Washington.

    0
    0
  • A small American force under Lafayette, whom Wayne reinforced during the summer, partially checked the enemy.

    0
    0
  • At Green Spring, near Jamestown Island, Lafayette boldly attacked his antagonist on the 6th of July, but had to save himself by a hasty retreat.

    0
    0
  • In addition to these non-marine formations of the west, there is the widespread Lafayette formation, which covers niuch of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plain, reaching far to the north from the western Gulf regio,1, and having uncertain limits, so far as now worked out, in various directions.

    0
    0
  • The Lafayette formation has been the occasion of much difference of opinion, but is by many held to be a non-marine formation, made up of gravels, sands and clays, accumulated on land, chiefly through the agency of rain and rivers.

    0
    0
  • The marine-part of the Lafayette is probably covered by sediments of later age.

    0
    0
  • In earlier literature the Lafayette formation was described under the name of Orange Sand, and was at one time thought to be the southern equivalent of the glacial drift.

    0
    0
  • It seems probable that the Lafayette formation of the Gulf coastal plain is continuous northward and westward with gravel deposits on the Great Plains, washed out from the Rocky Mountains to the west.

    0
    0
  • Its distribution is similar to that of the Lafayette, though the Columbia series is, for the most part, confined to lower levels.

    0
    0
  • Among the social clubs the Buffalo, the University, the Park, the Saturn and the Country clubs, and among the hotels the Iroquois, Lafayette, Niagara and Genesee, may be especially mentioned.

    0
    0
  • At the outbreak of the revolution of 1830 he was absent from Paris, having undergone an operation, but he returned at the request of Lafayette to take his share in the elevation of Louis Philippe to the throne.

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    0
  • Other institutions for higher education are the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia (1749), an endowed institution which receives very little support from the state; the University of Pittsburgh (1819), at Pittsburg (q.v.); Dickinson College (Methodist Episcopal, 1783), at Carlisle; Haveriord College (Society of Friends, 1833), at Haverford; Franklin and Marshall {German Reformed, 1853), at Lancaster; Washington and Jefferson {Presbyterian, 1802), at Washington; Lafayette (Presbyterian, 1832), at Easton; Bucknell University (Baptist, 1846), at Lewisburg; Waynesburg (Cumberland Presbyterian, 1851), at Waynesburg; Ursinus (German Reformed, 1870), at Collegeville; Allegheny College (Methodist Episcopal, 1815), at Meadville; Swarthmore (Society of Friends (Hicksites), 1866), at Swarthmore; Muhlenberg (Lutheran, 1867), at Allentown; Lehigh University (non-sectarian) 1867), at Bethlehem; and for women Bryn Mawr College (Society of Friends, 1885), at Bryn Mawr; the Allentown College (German Reformed, 1867), at Allentown; Wilson College (Presbyterian, 1870), and the Pennsylvania College for women (1869), at Pittsburg.

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  • At the head of Jamestown peninsula Cornwallis, in July 1781, attempted to trick the Americans under Lafayette and General Anthony Wayne by displaying a few men on the peninsula and concealing the principal part of his army on the mainland; but when Wayne discovered the trap he made first a vigorous charge, and then a retreat to Lafayette's line.

    0
    0
  • The next day, wrapped in a tricolour scarf and preceded by a drummer, he went on foot to the Hotel de Ville - the headquarters of the republican party - where he was publicly embraced by Lafayette as a symbol that the republicans acknowledged the impossibility of realizing their own ideals and were prepared to accept a monarchy based on the popular will.

    0
    0
  • On the 13th of September General Lafayette McLaws carried Maryland Heights and General John G.

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    0
  • Other interesting landmarks are "Woodland" (formerly called "Bloomsbury Court"), built early in the 18th century by William Trent, and said to have sheltered, at various times, Washington, Lafayette and Rochambeau; the "Hermitage," erected some time before the War of Independence; and "Bow Hill," in the suburbs of the city, a quaint old colonial mansion which for some time before 1822 was a home of Joseph Bonaparte.

    0
    0
  • He was a teacher at Swanzey, New Hampshire, and at the Leicester Academy, Massachusetts, in 1845-1847, and attempted the philological method of teaching English "like Latin and Greek," later described in his Method of Philological Study of the English Language (1865); at Amherst in 1847-1849; at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1852-1855; and in 1855 became a tutor at Lafayette College, where he became adjunct professor of belles-lettres and English literature in 1856, and professor of English language and comparative philology - the first chair of the kind established - in 1857.

    0
    0
  • At Lafayette he introduced the first carefully scientific study of English in any American college, and in 1870 published A Comparative Grammar of the AngloSaxon Language, in which its Forms are Illustrated by Those of the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Gothic, Old Saxon, Old Friesic, Old Norse and Old High German, and An Anglo-Saxon Reader; he was editor of the "Douglass Series of Christian Greek and Latin Classics," to which he contributed Latin Hymns (1874); he was chairman of the Commission of the State of Pennsylvania on Amended Orthography; and was consulting editor of the Standard Dictionary, and in 1879-1882 was director of the American readers for the Philological Society's (New Oxford) Dictionary.

    0
    0
  • 1863), adjunctprofessor of modern languages in 1884-1891 and subsequently professor of English literature at Lafayette, he edited A Thesaurus Dictionary of the English Language (1903).

    0
    0
  • It is the outgrowth of the Apprentices' Library Association, founded in 1824, of which General Lafayette laid the corner-stone on the 4th of July of that year.

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    0
  • Cuyler (1822-1909), pastor of the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian church from 1860 to 1890.

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  • W Story) in the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution, of John Marshall (by Story) on the west terrace of the Capitol, of General Andrew Jackson (by Clark Mills) and, in Lafayette Square, of the Marquis de Lafayette (by Falguiere and Mercie), of the Comte de Rochambeau (by F.

    0
    0
  • Several fruitless conferences between the governor and the Indian chiefs, who were believed to be encouraged by the British, resulted in Harrison's advance with a force of militia and regulars to the Tippecanoe river, where (near the present Lafayette, Ind.) on the 7th of November 1811 he won over the Indians a victory which established his military reputation and was largely responsible for his subsequent nomination and election to the presidency of the United States.

    0
    0
  • Soon after the close of the war it was neglected, and by 1791 it was in bad repair; therefore at the time of the Indian hostilities of 1792 another stockade fort was built near the bank of the Allegheny river and about a quarter of a mile above the site of Fort Pitt, this new fort being named Fort Lafayette, or, as it was more commonly called, Fort Fayette.

    0
    0
  • A mass meeting of about 5000 citizens of the above-mentioned counties (many of them armed militiamen), at Braddock's Field, on the 1st and 2nd of August 1794, threatened to take possession of Fort Lafayette and to burn Pittsburg, but cooler counsel prevailed, and after voting to proscribe several persons, and marching in a body through the streets of the town, the crowd dispersed without doing any damage.

    0
    0
  • Macon, Lafayette and Adair are the leading counties in output; Lexington and Bevier are the leading mining centres.

    0
    0
  • Purdue University (1874) at Lafayette, maintained under state control, received the benefit of the Federal grant under the Morrill Act.

    0
    0
  • There are a Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home at Knightstown (1868), and a State Soldiers' Home at Lafayette (1896); a School for FeebleMinded Youth (1879), removed from Knightstown to Fort Wayne in 1890; a village for epileptics at New Castle (1907); and a hospital for the treatment of tuberculosis, authorized in 1907, for which a site at Rockville was purchased in 1908.

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    0
  • of the present city of Lafayette), the headquarters of the Wea branch of the Miami, on the upper Wabash.

    0
    0
  • The first Territorial Council met in 1836 at Old Belmont, now Leslie, Lafayette county, but in December of that year Madison was selected as the capital, after a contest in which Fond du Lac, Milwaukee, Racine, Green Bay, Portage and other places were considered, and in which James Duane Doty, later governor, owner of the Madison town plat, was charged with bribing legislators with town lots in Madison.

    0
    0
  • The marquis Lafayette, doubly popular as a veteran of the American War and as one of the nobles who heartily upheld the cause of the Assembly, was chosen commandant of the new civic force, thenceforwards known as the National Guard.

    0
    0
  • Lafayette, who imagined himself to be copying the American constitution, proposed that the king should have a suspensive veto.

    0
    0
  • Thinking that it would be politic to claim no more, Necker persuaded the king to intimate that he was satisfied with Lafayette's proposal.

    0
    0
  • Lafayette was slow to follow it and, when he arrived, took insufficient precautions.

    0
    0
  • Talleyrand celebrated Mass, and Lafayette was the first to swear fidelity to the Assembly and the nation.

    0
    0
  • Lafayette was to march against Namur, Biron against Mons, and Dillon against Tournay.

    0
    0
  • On hearing of these disasters Lafayette found it necessary to retreat.

    0
    0
  • Lafayette, who the 20th remained faithful to the constitution of 1791, ventured of June on a letter of remonstrance to the Assembly.

    0
    0
  • no attention, for Lafayette could no longer sway the people.

    0
    0
  • Lafayette himself came to Paris in the hope of rallying the constitutional party, but the king and queen eluded his offers of assistance.

    0
    0
  • They had always disliked and distrusted Lafayette and the Feuillants, and preferred to rest their hopes of deliverance on the foreigner.

    0
    0
  • Lafayette returned to his troops without having effected anything.

    0
    0
  • When Lafayette heard of the insurrection in Paris he tried to rally his troops in defence of the constitution, but they refused to follow him.

    0
    0
  • After the emeute of August 10 and Lafayette's flight he was appointed to the command of the "Army of the Centre," and at the same moment the Coalition assumed the offensive.

    0
    0
  • In the main hall hangs a glass casket containing the key to the Bastille which Washington received from Lafayette in 1790.

    0
    0
  • From each end of the house a curved colonnade and a pavement lead westerly to a row of out-buildings which partially enclose a bowling green and spacious lawn with shaded drives and walks, and beautiful gardens (with trees planted by Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Lafayette and others).

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  • The readjusted American line was composed of the divisions of Lafayette, Greene, Alexander and Patterson, while Wayne's brigade, which had been in Lee's advance from the first, was posted in a favourable position.

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  • Then followed the celebrated march of the combined forces to Yorktown, where on the 22nd of September they formed a junction with the troops of Lafayette; as the result Cornwallis was forced to surrender on the 19th of October.

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  • A statue of Rochambeau by Ferdinand Hamar, the gift of France to the United States, was unveiled in Lafayette Square, Washington, by President Roosevelt on the 24th of May 1902.

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  • Representatives of the Lafayette and Rochambeau families also attended.

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  • Although intimate with Lafayette and others, he took no actual share in their schemes for the overthrow of the government., but in 1827 he joined the association known as Aide-toi, le ciel t'aidera.

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  • General Lafayette first landed on American soil at Georgetown on the 24th of April 1 777.

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  • The affaire Favras (Dec. 1789) aroused great feeling against Monsieur, who was believed by many to have conspired with Favras, only to abandon him (see Lafayette's Mems. and Corr.

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  • In France there once lived a famous man who was known as the Marquis de Lafayette. When he was a little boy his mother called him Gilbert.

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  • Gilbert de Lafayette's father and grandfather and great-grandfather had all been brave and noble men.

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  • Military heroes of the last several centuries, such as the aforementioned Lafayette and Hamilton and Travis, were not bloodthirsty.

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  • Cotton merchant Andrew Low built this home on Lafayette Square between 1848 and 1849.

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  • It was built in 1856 on Lafayette Square.

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  • Lafayette 148: From coats with distinctive draped collars to practical and edgy leather jackets, this revered label has everything a couture lover could possibly want in a coat.

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  • Ray Hatton, a 20-year-old avid RPG player in Lafayette, LA, says that video games are more fun when, inside the game play, you have more choices.

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  • Saint Louis University, Salus Center 3545 Lafayette Ave. St. Louis, MO 63104.

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  • Fans held their collective breaths for months as spoilers pointed to Lafayette as the victim in the car, after all, Lafayette dies at the end of the first book and beginning of the second.

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  • It makes sense that Lafayette is the victim.

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  • Spoiler sites posted their speculations, many of Charlaine Harris' fans posted confidently that it would be Lafayette that was found dead.

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  • Executive producer Alan Ball deftly dodged questions about Lafayette as did series leads Anna Paquin and Stephen Moyer.

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  • Fans of Nelsan Ellis, the delightful actor behind Lafayette crossed their fingers and hoped, after all, series differences existed between the first book and the first season, so perhaps there could be hope for Lafayette.

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  • Tara's cousin Lafayette is another character with a checkered past.

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  • Unfortunately, Lafayette's bad things are catching up with him after Jason Stackhouse's girlfriend kills a vampire that worked for Eric and lands Lafayette in the hot seat.

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  • Images of Eric, Bill, Sookie and Sam are popular with many fans, but still others enjoy Tara, Lafayette and Jason.

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  • The survival of Lafayette played by Nelsan Ellis is a noticeable difference from the novel.

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  • Lafayette's involvement with Eric promises to add another layer to the elder vamp's interest in telepath Sookie Stackhouse.

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  • Jason turns to Lafayette for help when he can't 'perform' for Dawn.

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  • Lafayette tempts Jason with more v-juice.

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  • Jason and Amy kidnap Lafayette's vampire friend Eddie in order to drain him.

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  • Eric uses his blood to bond Lafayette to him because of Lafayette's connections to Sookie.

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  • Lafayette's survival in the series is another noticeable difference, as Lafayette was found dead in the back of Andy's car at the end of the first book.

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  • Sookie and Lafayette team up to protect Tara who is possessed by Maryann's madness.

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  • Tara and her cousin Lafayette (Nelsan Ellis) share a sibling-like relationship and look out for each other.

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  • Unfortunately, the hope Tara found in Miss Jeannette's actions left Tara angry and aimless, lashing out at the people in her life including cousin Lafayette; best friend Sookie; and bar owner, boss and sometime lover Sam.

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  • Sookie and Lafayette rescued her, purging Maryann's control.

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  • Tara and Lafayette were never related and while Tara did have a relationship with a vampire named Franklin, it was never as abusive as the one portrayed in the series.

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  • In the first season, Jason worked as a supervisor for the road crew in Bon Temps along with friends Rene, Hoyt and Lafayette.

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  • He had an addiction to vampire blood that led to the death of a Lafayette's V dealer in the first season.

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  • James Clement - James is 32, from Lafayette, Louisiana.

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  • Often top designers and design companies such as Workstyle by Lafayette, Michaels Kors and Cynthia Rowley join with the Cintas team to create distinctive and stylish work clothes for clients.

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  • At that time, George "Rose" Barclay, who played for Lafayette College as a halfback, began using straps that stretched over the top of the head and had earpieces to protect the ears.

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  • One possibility is that George Barclay, a player for Lafayette College, had a harness maker create a leather "head harness" which was little more than three leather straps wrapped around the skull.

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