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kutuzov

kutuzov

kutuzov Sentence Examples

  • You don't know how Kutuzov is pestered since his appointment as Commander in Chief.

  • Certainly; but about Kutuzov, I don't promise.

  • He received, however, no appointment to Kutuzov's staff despite all Anna Mikhaylovna's endeavors and entreaties.

  • Suvorov couldn't manage them so what chance has Michael Kutuzov?

  • Braunau was the headquarters of the commander-in-chief, Kutuzov.

  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.

  • Beside Kutuzov sat an Austrian general, in a white uniform that looked strange among the Russian black ones.

  • Kutuzov and the Austrian general were talking in low voices and Kutuzov smiled slightly as treading heavily he stepped down from the carriage just as if those two thousand men breathlessly gazing at him and the regimental commander did not exist.

  • At first Kutuzov stood still while the regiment moved; then he and the general in white, accompanied by the suite, walked between the ranks.

  • Kutuzov walked through the ranks, sometimes stopping to say a few friendly words to officers he had known in the Turkish war, sometimes also to the soldiers.

  • Behind Kutuzov, at a distance that allowed every softly spoken word to be heard, followed some twenty men of his suite.

  • Kutuzov walked slowly and languidly past thousands of eyes which were starting from their sockets to watch their chief.

  • "We all have our weaknesses," said Kutuzov smiling and walking away from him.

  • The officer evidently had complete control of his face, and while Kutuzov was turning managed to make a grimace and then assume a most serious, deferential, and innocent expression.

  • The third company was the last, and Kutuzov pondered, apparently trying to recollect something.

  • "Where is Dolokhov?" asked Kutuzov.

  • Kutuzov asked with a slight frown.

  • And they said Kutuzov was blind of one eye?

  • Kutuzov and his suite were returning to the town.

  • The hussar cornet of Kutuzov's suite who had mimicked the regimental commander, fell back from the carriage and rode up to Dolokhov.

  • But now that Kutuzov had spoken to the gentleman ranker, he addressed him with the cordiality of an old friend.

  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.

  • Kutuzov and the Austrian member of the Hofkriegsrath were sitting at the table on which a plan was spread out.

  • It was evident that Kutuzov himself listened with pleasure to his own voice.

  • And Kutuzov smiled in a way that seemed to say, You are quite at liberty not to believe me and I don't even care whether you do or not, but you have no grounds for telling me so.

  • Kutuzov bowed with the same smile.

  • But Kutuzov went on blandly smiling with the same expression, which seemed to say that he had a right to suppose so.

  • "Give me that letter," said Kutuzov turning to Prince Andrew.

  • Kutuzov sighed deeply on finishing this paragraph and looked at the member of the Hofkriegsrath mildly and attentively.

  • "Excuse me, General," interrupted Kutuzov, also turning to Prince Andrew.

  • From Vienna Kutuzov wrote to his old comrade, Prince Andrew's father.

  • On Kutuzov's staff, among his fellow officers and in the army generally, Prince Andrew had, as he had had in Petersburg society, two quite opposite reputations.

  • Coming out of Kutuzov's room into the waiting room with the papers in his hand Prince Andrew came up to his comrade, the aide-de-camp on duty, Kozlovski, who was sitting at the window with a book.

  • "Commander in Chief Kutuzov?" said the newly arrived general speaking quickly with a harsh German accent, looking to both sides and advancing straight toward the inner door.

  • The door of the private room opened and Kutuzov appeared in the doorway.

  • The general with the bandaged head bent forward as though running away from some danger, and, making long, quick strides with his thin legs, went up to Kutuzov.

  • Kutuzov's face as he stood in the open doorway remained perfectly immobile for a few moments.

  • Kutuzov fell back toward Vienna, destroying behind him the bridges over the rivers Inn (at Braunau) and Traun (near Linz).

  • Austrian troops that had escaped capture at Ulm and had joined Kutuzov at Braunau now separated from the Russian army, and Kutuzov was left with only his own weak and exhausted forces.

  • On the twenty-eighth of October Kutuzov with his army crossed to the left bank of the Danube and took up a position for the first time with the river between himself and the main body of the French.

  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.

  • "From General Field Marshal Kutuzov?" he asked.

  • They had known each other previously in Petersburg, but had become more intimate when Prince Andrew was in Vienna with Kutuzov.

  • Kutuzov alone at last gains a real victory, destroying the spell of the invincibility of the French, and the Minister of War does not even care to hear the details.

  • Then followed other questions just as simple: Was Kutuzov well?

  • A thanksgiving service was arranged, Kutuzov was awarded the Grand Cross of Maria Theresa, and the whole army received rewards.

  • You are faced by one of two things," and the skin over his left temple puckered, "either you will not reach your regiment before peace is concluded, or you will share defeat and disgrace with Kutuzov's whole army."

  • Passing by Kutuzov's carriage and the exhausted saddle horses of his suite, with their Cossacks who were talking loudly together, Prince Andrew entered the passage.

  • Kutuzov himself, he was told, was in the house with Prince Bagration and Weyrother.

  • Through the door came the sounds of Kutuzov's voice, excited and dissatisfied, interrupted by another, an unfamiliar voice.

  • Just as he was going to open it the sounds ceased, the door opened, and Kutuzov with his eagle nose and puffy face appeared in the doorway.

  • Prince Andrew stood right in front of Kutuzov but the expression of the commander in chief's one sound eye showed him to be so preoccupied with thoughts and anxieties as to be oblivious of his presence.

  • "I have the honor to present myself," repeated Prince Andrew rather loudly, handing Kutuzov an envelope.

  • Kutuzov went out into the porch with Bagration.

  • Kutuzov repeated and went toward his carriage.

  • "Get in," said Kutuzov, and noticing that Bolkonski still delayed, he added: "I need good officers myself, need them myself!"

  • Prince Andrew glanced at Kutuzov's face only a foot distant from him and involuntarily noticed the carefully washed seams of the scar near his temple, where an Ismail bullet had pierced his skull, and the empty eye socket.

  • Kutuzov did not reply.

  • On November 1 Kutuzov had received, through a spy, news that the army he commanded was in an almost hopeless position.

  • The spy reported that the French, after crossing the bridge at Vienna, were advancing in immense force upon Kutuzov's line of communication with the troops that were arriving from Russia.

  • If Kutuzov decided to remain at Krems, Napoleon's army of one hundred and fifty thousand men would cut him off completely and surround his exhausted army of forty thousand, and he would find himself in the position of Mack at Ulm.

  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.

  • Kutuzov chose this latter course.

  • The French, the spy reported, having crossed the Vienna bridge, were advancing by forced marches toward Znaim, which lay sixty-six miles off on the line of Kutuzov's retreat.

  • The night he received the news, Kutuzov sent Bagration's vanguard, four thousand strong, to the right across the hills from the Krems-Znaim to the Vienna-Znaim road.

  • Kutuzov himself with all his transport took the road to Znaim.

  • Kutuzov with his transport had still to march for some days before he could reach Znaim.

  • The success of the trick that had placed the Vienna bridge in the hands of the French without a fight led Murat to try to deceive Kutuzov in a similar way.

  • Meeting Bagration's weak detachment on the Znaim road he supposed it to be Kutuzov's whole army.

  • Bagration replied that he was not authorized either to accept or refuse a truce and sent his adjutant to Kutuzov to report the offer he had received.

  • A truce was Kutuzov's sole chance of gaining time, giving Bagration's exhausted troops some rest, and letting the transport and heavy convoys (whose movements were concealed from the French) advance if but one stage nearer Znaim.

  • Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon Prince Andrew, who had persisted in his request to Kutuzov, arrived at Grunth and reported himself to Bagration.

  • The command of the left flank belonged by seniority to the commander of the regiment Kutuzov had reviewed at Braunau and in which Dolokhov was serving as a private.

  • Next day the French army did not renew their attack, and the remnant of Bagration's detachment was reunited to Kutuzov's army.

  • On the twelfth of November, Kutuzov's active army, in camp before Olmutz, was preparing to be reviewed next day by the two Emperors--the Russian and the Austrian.

  • I only sent you the note yesterday by Bolkonski--an adjutant of Kutuzov's, who's a friend of mine.

  • When the review was over, the newly arrived officers, and also Kutuzov's, collected in groups and began to talk about the awards, about the Austrians and their uniforms, about their lines, about Bonaparte, and how badly the latter would fare now, especially if the Essen corps arrived and Prussia took our side.

  • In spite of this, or rather because of it, next day, November 15, after dinner he again went to Olmutz and, entering the house occupied by Kutuzov, asked for Bolkonski.

  • But this is what we'll do: I have a good friend, an adjutant general and an excellent fellow, Prince Dolgorukov; and though you may not know it, the fact is that now Kutuzov with his staff and all of us count for nothing.

  • But on the afternoon of that day, this activity reached Kutuzov's headquarters and the staffs of the commanders of columns.

  • At six in the evening, Kutuzov went to the Emperor's headquarters and after staying but a short time with the Tsar went to see the grand marshal of the court, Count Tolstoy.

  • "Despite my great respect for old Kutuzov," he continued, "we should be a nice set of fellows if we were to wait about and so give him a chance to escape, or to trick us, now that we certainly have him in our hands!

  • Except your Kutuzov, there is not a single Russian in command of a column!

  • "However, I think General Kutuzov has come out," said Prince Andrew.

  • On the way home, Prince Andrew could not refrain from asking Kutuzov, who was sitting silently beside him, what he thought of tomorrow's battle.

  • Kutuzov looked sternly at his adjutant and, after a pause, replied: I think the battle will be lost, and so I told Count Tolstoy and asked him to tell the Emperor.

  • Shortly after nine o'clock that evening, Weyrother drove with his plans to Kutuzov's quarters where the council of war was to be held.

  • Weyrother, who was in full control of the proposed battle, by his eagerness and briskness presented a marked contrast to the dissatisfied and drowsy Kutuzov, who reluctantly played the part of chairman and president of the council of war.

  • Kutuzov was occupying a nobleman's castle of modest dimensions near Ostralitz.

  • In the large drawing room which had become the commander in chief's office were gathered Kutuzov himself, Weyrother, and the members of the council of war.

  • Prince Andrew came in to inform the commander-in-chief of this and, availing himself of permission previously given him by Kutuzov to be present at the council, he remained in the room.

  • Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.

  • If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander-in-chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else--he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.

  • Weyrother, with the gesture of a man too busy to lose a moment, glanced at Kutuzov and, having convinced himself that he was asleep, took up a paper and in a loud, monotonous voice began to read out the dispositions for the impending battle, under a heading which he also read out:

  • Kutuzov here woke up, coughed heavily, and looked round at the generals.

  • Whether Dolgorukov and Weyrother, or Kutuzov, Langeron, and the others who did not approve of the plan of attack, were right--he did not know.

  • But was it really not possible for Kutuzov to state his views plainly to the Emperor?

  • He firmly and clearly expresses his opinion to Kutuzov, to Weyrother, and to the Emperors.

  • Nominally he is only an adjutant on Kutuzov's staff, but he does everything alone.

  • Kutuzov is removed and he is appointed...

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