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kumasi

kumasi

kumasi Sentence Examples

  • south-east of Kumasi is Lake Busumchwi, the sacred lake of the Ashanti.

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  • The mean temperature at Kumasi is 76° F., the mean annual rainfall 40 ins.

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  • The Ashanti are divided into a large number of tribes, of whom a dozen may be distinguished, namely, the Bekwai, Adansi, Juabin, Kokofu, Kumasi, Mampon, Nsuta, Nkwanta, Dadiassi, Daniassi, Ofinsu and Adjisu.

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  • Each tribe has its own king, but from the beginning of the 18th century the king of Kumasi was recognized as king paramount, and was spoken of as the king of Ashanti.

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  • After the deposition of Prempeh (1896) no king of Kumasi was chosen; Prempeh himself was never "enstooled."

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  • Besides the capital, Kumasi, with a population of some 6000, there are few important towns in Ashanti.

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  • north-east of Kumasi.

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  • A large quantity of silver-plate and goldsmiths' work of great value and considerable artistic elaboration was found in 1874 in the king's palace at Kumasi, not the least remarkable objects being masks of beaten gold.

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  • Part of the trade of Ashanti had been diverted to the French port of Assini in consequence of the wars waged between England and the Ashanti, but on the suppression of the revolt of 1900 measures were taken to improve trade between Kumasi and Cape Coast.

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  • Kumasi is the distributing centre for the whole of Ashanti and the hinterland.

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  • The railway to Kumasi from Sekondi, which was completed in 1903, passes through the auriferous region.

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  • The railway to Kumasi, cut through one of the densest forest regions, is described under Gold Coast.

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  • long, has been cut through the bush from Cape Coast to Kumasi, and from Kumasi ancient caravan routes go to the chief trading centres farther inland.

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  • Telegraph lines connect Kumasi with the coast towns and with the towns in the Northern Territories.

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  • He either built or greatly extended Kumasi; British.

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  • Hutchinson on a mission to Kumasi.

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  • After one or two harmonious interviews, the king advanced a claim for the payment of the quit rents for Anamabo fort and Cape Coast castle, rents the major part of which the Fanti had induced the British to pay to them, leaving only a nominal sum for transmission to Kumasi.

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  • They sent out, therefore, to Kumasi, as consul, Mr Joseph Dupuis, formerly consul at Mogador, who arrived at Cape Coast in January 1819.

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  • Dupuis set out on the 9th of February 1820, and on the 28th arrived at Kumasi.

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  • The skull of the governor was afterwards used at Kumasi as a royal drinking-cup. It was asserted that Sir Charles lost the battle through his ordnance-keeper bringing up kegs filled with vermicelli instead of ammunition.

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  • The governor, Mr Richard Pine, urged the advisability of an advance on Kumasi, but this the British government would not allow.

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  • The captives were taken to Kumasi.

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  • He determined, however, to march to Kumasi, whilst Captain (afterwards Sir) John Glover, R.N., administrator of Lagos, was with a force of native levies to co-operate from the east and take the Ashanti in rear.

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  • The Ashanti army re-entered Kumasi on the 22nd of December.

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  • Sir Garnet determined that peace must be signed in Kumasi and continued his advance.

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  • On the 10th of January the river Prah was crossed by the European troops; on the 24th the Adansi hills were reached; on the 31 st there was severe fighting at Amoaful; on the 1st of February Bekwai was captured; and on the evening of the 4th the victorious army was in Kumasi, after seven hours' fighting.

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  • As the 42nd Highlanders pushed forward to Kumasi, the town was found full of Ashanti soldiers, but not a shot was fired at the invaders.

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  • In the meantime Captain Glover's force had crossed the Prah on the 15th of January, and the Ashanti opposition weakening after the capture of Kumasi, Glover was able to push forward.

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  • Sartorius, who had been sent ahead with twenty Hausa only, found Kumasi still deserted.

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  • of gold, to renounce all claim to homage from certain neighbouring kings, and all pretensions of supremacy over any part of the former Dutch protectorate, to promote freedom of trade, to keep open a road from Kumasi to the Prah, and to do his best to check the practice of human sacrifice.

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  • A mission was despatched to Prempeh, calling upon him to fulfil the terms of the 1874 treaty, and further, to accept a British protectorate and receive a resident at Kumasi.

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  • To enforce the British demands, to put an end to the misgovernment and barbarities carried on at Kumasi, and to establish law, order and security for trade, an expedition was at length decided upon.

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  • from Kumasi, on the 4th of January 1896.

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  • On the 17th of January Kumasi was occupied, and Colonel Sir F.

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  • Gouldsbury on a mission to Eastern Akim, Juabin and Kumasi, to repair the effects of the previous inaction of the colonial government, but without success.

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  • from Kumasi, and Maheer, the king's summer palace, were visited by the native scouts and found deserted.

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  • On the same day, leaving the Hausa at Kumasi, the expedition began the return march of i so m.

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  • Stewart, was installed at Kumasi, and whilst the Siege and other states of the confederacy retained their kingand relief of y' Kumasi.

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  • tribal system the affairs of the Kumasi were adminis tered by chiefs under British guidance.

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  • Mr and Mrs Ramseyer (two of the missionaries imprisoned by King Kofi Karikari for four and a half years) returned to Kumasi, and other missionaries followed.

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  • A fort was built in Kumasi and garrisoned with Gold Coast constabulary.

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  • Though outwardly submissive, the Kumasi chiefs were far from reconciled to British rule, and in 1900 a serious rebellion broke out.

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  • The tribes involved were the Kumasi, Adansi and Kokofu; the other tribes of the Ashanti confederation remained loyal.

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  • Hodgson, in a public palaver at Kumasi, announced that the Ashanti chiefs would have to pay the British government 4000 oz.

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  • Three days afterwards the Kumasi warriors attacked a party of Hausa sent with the chief object of discovering the golden stool.

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  • On the 29th the Kumasi attacked in force, but were repulsed.

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  • The same day a party of 250 Lagos constabulary reached Kumasi.

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  • A force of 100 Hausa, with three white men (Captain Bishop, Mr Ralph and Dr Hay), was left behind in Kumasi fort with rations to last three weeks.

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  • On the next day he heard of the escape of the governor and of the straits of the garrison left at Kumasi.

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  • Making his final dispositions, the colonel spread a report that on the 13th he would attack Kokofu, east of Bekwai, and this drew off several thousands of the enemy from Kumasi.

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  • Kumasi was entered the same evening, a bugler of the war-worn garrison of the fort sounding the "general salute" as the relieving column came in view.

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  • The relieving force that marched into Kumasi consisted of moo fighting men (all West Africans), with 60 white officers and non-commissioned officers, two 75-millimetre guns, four seven-pounder guns and six Maxims.

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  • Kumasi relieved, there remained the task of crushing the rebellion.

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  • On the 30th of September the Kumasi were completely beaten at Obassa.

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  • A battalion of the Gold Coast regiment is stationed in the country with headquarters at Kumasi.

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  • Montanaro (London, 1901); The Relief of Kumasi, by Capt.

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  • The two books following are by besieged residents in Kumasi: The Siege of Kumasi, by Lady Hodgson (London, 1901); Dark and Stormy Days at Kumasi, 1900, from the diary of the Rev. Fritz Ramseyer (London, 1901).

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  • south-east of Kumasi is Lake Busumchwi, the sacred lake of the Ashanti.

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  • The mean temperature at Kumasi is 76° F., the mean annual rainfall 40 ins.

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  • The Ashanti are divided into a large number of tribes, of whom a dozen may be distinguished, namely, the Bekwai, Adansi, Juabin, Kokofu, Kumasi, Mampon, Nsuta, Nkwanta, Dadiassi, Daniassi, Ofinsu and Adjisu.

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  • Each tribe has its own king, but from the beginning of the 18th century the king of Kumasi was recognized as king paramount, and was spoken of as the king of Ashanti.

    0
    0
  • After the deposition of Prempeh (1896) no king of Kumasi was chosen; Prempeh himself was never "enstooled."

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  • Besides the capital, Kumasi, with a population of some 6000, there are few important towns in Ashanti.

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  • north-east of Kumasi.

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  • A large quantity of silver-plate and goldsmiths' work of great value and considerable artistic elaboration was found in 1874 in the king's palace at Kumasi, not the least remarkable objects being masks of beaten gold.

    0
    0
  • Part of the trade of Ashanti had been diverted to the French port of Assini in consequence of the wars waged between England and the Ashanti, but on the suppression of the revolt of 1900 measures were taken to improve trade between Kumasi and Cape Coast.

    0
    0
  • Kumasi is the distributing centre for the whole of Ashanti and the hinterland.

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    0
  • The railway to Kumasi from Sekondi, which was completed in 1903, passes through the auriferous region.

    0
    0
  • The railway to Kumasi, cut through one of the densest forest regions, is described under Gold Coast.

    0
    0
  • long, has been cut through the bush from Cape Coast to Kumasi, and from Kumasi ancient caravan routes go to the chief trading centres farther inland.

    0
    0
  • Telegraph lines connect Kumasi with the coast towns and with the towns in the Northern Territories.

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    0
  • He either built or greatly extended Kumasi; British.

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  • Hutchinson on a mission to Kumasi.

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    0
  • After one or two harmonious interviews, the king advanced a claim for the payment of the quit rents for Anamabo fort and Cape Coast castle, rents the major part of which the Fanti had induced the British to pay to them, leaving only a nominal sum for transmission to Kumasi.

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    0
  • They sent out, therefore, to Kumasi, as consul, Mr Joseph Dupuis, formerly consul at Mogador, who arrived at Cape Coast in January 1819.

    0
    0
  • Dupuis set out on the 9th of February 1820, and on the 28th arrived at Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • The skull of the governor was afterwards used at Kumasi as a royal drinking-cup. It was asserted that Sir Charles lost the battle through his ordnance-keeper bringing up kegs filled with vermicelli instead of ammunition.

    0
    0
  • The governor, Mr Richard Pine, urged the advisability of an advance on Kumasi, but this the British government would not allow.

    0
    0
  • The captives were taken to Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • He determined, however, to march to Kumasi, whilst Captain (afterwards Sir) John Glover, R.N., administrator of Lagos, was with a force of native levies to co-operate from the east and take the Ashanti in rear.

    0
    0
  • The Ashanti army re-entered Kumasi on the 22nd of December.

    0
    0
  • Sir Garnet determined that peace must be signed in Kumasi and continued his advance.

    0
    0
  • On the 10th of January the river Prah was crossed by the European troops; on the 24th the Adansi hills were reached; on the 31 st there was severe fighting at Amoaful; on the 1st of February Bekwai was captured; and on the evening of the 4th the victorious army was in Kumasi, after seven hours' fighting.

    0
    0
  • As the 42nd Highlanders pushed forward to Kumasi, the town was found full of Ashanti soldiers, but not a shot was fired at the invaders.

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    0
  • In the meantime Captain Glover's force had crossed the Prah on the 15th of January, and the Ashanti opposition weakening after the capture of Kumasi, Glover was able to push forward.

    0
    0
  • Sartorius, who had been sent ahead with twenty Hausa only, found Kumasi still deserted.

    0
    0
  • of gold, to renounce all claim to homage from certain neighbouring kings, and all pretensions of supremacy over any part of the former Dutch protectorate, to promote freedom of trade, to keep open a road from Kumasi to the Prah, and to do his best to check the practice of human sacrifice.

    0
    0
  • A mission was despatched to Prempeh, calling upon him to fulfil the terms of the 1874 treaty, and further, to accept a British protectorate and receive a resident at Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • To enforce the British demands, to put an end to the misgovernment and barbarities carried on at Kumasi, and to establish law, order and security for trade, an expedition was at length decided upon.

    0
    0
  • from Kumasi, on the 4th of January 1896.

    0
    0
  • On the 17th of January Kumasi was occupied, and Colonel Sir F.

    0
    0
  • Gouldsbury on a mission to Eastern Akim, Juabin and Kumasi, to repair the effects of the previous inaction of the colonial government, but without success.

    0
    0
  • from Kumasi, and Maheer, the king's summer palace, were visited by the native scouts and found deserted.

    0
    0
  • On the same day, leaving the Hausa at Kumasi, the expedition began the return march of i so m.

    0
    0
  • Stewart, was installed at Kumasi, and whilst the Siege and other states of the confederacy retained their kingand relief of y' Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • tribal system the affairs of the Kumasi were adminis tered by chiefs under British guidance.

    0
    0
  • Mr and Mrs Ramseyer (two of the missionaries imprisoned by King Kofi Karikari for four and a half years) returned to Kumasi, and other missionaries followed.

    0
    0
  • A fort was built in Kumasi and garrisoned with Gold Coast constabulary.

    0
    0
  • Though outwardly submissive, the Kumasi chiefs were far from reconciled to British rule, and in 1900 a serious rebellion broke out.

    0
    0
  • The tribes involved were the Kumasi, Adansi and Kokofu; the other tribes of the Ashanti confederation remained loyal.

    0
    0
  • Hodgson, in a public palaver at Kumasi, announced that the Ashanti chiefs would have to pay the British government 4000 oz.

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    0
  • of gold yearly, and he reproached the chiefs with not having brought to him the golden stool, which the Kumasi had kept hidden since 1896.

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  • Three days afterwards the Kumasi warriors attacked a party of Hausa sent with the chief object of discovering the golden stool.

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  • (In the previous January a secret attempt to seize the stool had failed.) The Kumasi, who were longing to wipe out the dishonour of having let Prempeh be deported without fighting, next threatened the fort of Kumasi.

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  • On the 29th the Kumasi attacked in force, but were repulsed.

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    0
  • The same day a party of 250 Lagos constabulary reached Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • A force of 100 Hausa, with three white men (Captain Bishop, Mr Ralph and Dr Hay), was left behind in Kumasi fort with rations to last three weeks.

    0
    0
  • On the next day he heard of the escape of the governor and of the straits of the garrison left at Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • Making his final dispositions, the colonel spread a report that on the 13th he would attack Kokofu, east of Bekwai, and this drew off several thousands of the enemy from Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • Kumasi was entered the same evening, a bugler of the war-worn garrison of the fort sounding the "general salute" as the relieving column came in view.

    0
    0
  • The relieving force that marched into Kumasi consisted of moo fighting men (all West Africans), with 60 white officers and non-commissioned officers, two 75-millimetre guns, four seven-pounder guns and six Maxims.

    0
    0
  • Kumasi relieved, there remained the task of crushing the rebellion.

    0
    0
  • On the 30th of September the Kumasi were completely beaten at Obassa.

    0
    0
  • A battalion of the Gold Coast regiment is stationed in the country with headquarters at Kumasi.

    0
    0
  • Montanaro (London, 1901); The Relief of Kumasi, by Capt.

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    0
  • The two books following are by besieged residents in Kumasi: The Siege of Kumasi, by Lady Hodgson (London, 1901); Dark and Stormy Days at Kumasi, 1900, from the diary of the Rev. Fritz Ramseyer (London, 1901).

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  • When walking, wear the Tranquil II, or the Kumasi Walking Shoe.

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