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knighted

knighted Sentence Examples

  • succeeded his father in 1251, and was knighted by St Louis in 1252.

  • In 1832 he was knighted, and after serving as one of the municipal corporations commissioners, became deputykeeper of the public records in 1838, holding this office until his death at Hampstead on the 6th of July 1861.

  • His eldest son Alexander, who succeeded him in 1 454, was provost of Edinburgh in 1 455, 1 457 and 1469; he was knighted and held various important court offices under successive monarchs; at the time of his death in 1473 he was master of the household to James III.

  • About 1565 he was knighted at the same time as James Stirling, his colleague, whose daughter John Napier subsequently married.

  • In 1548 he was knighted.

  • In 1453 he was created count of Bistercze, and was knighted at the siege of Belgrade in 1454.

  • from 1660) was knighted in 1673, and was elected president of the Royal Society in 1681.

  • In 1911 he was knighted.

  • He followed the White Rose and was knighted at the crowning of King Edward IV., who pricked him for sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

  • The office of sheriff was thrown open to Jews in 1835 (Moses Montefiore, sheriff of London was knighted in 1837); Sir I.

  • Eustace was knighted in 1147, at which date he was probably from sixteen to eighteen years of age; and in 1151 he joined Louis in an abortive raid upon Normandy, which had accepted the title of the empress Matilda, and was now defended by her husband, Geoffrey of Anjou.

  • In 1803 he was knighted, and received the post of recorder at Bombay.

  • Of his life before 1086, when he was solemnly knighted by his father at Westminster, we know little.

  • In 1845 he was knighted "as an acknowledgment of his services in the removal of the Xanthian antiquities to this country."

  • He was knighted in 1897, and received the Royal (1875), Davy (1888), and Copley (1904) medals of the Royal Society, besides filling the offices of president of the Chemical Society and of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

  • He served in the war of 1899-1902, and was knighted in the last-named year.

  • In 1797, at the instance of English statesmen, he published a translation of a history of French finance by Francois d'Ivernois (1757-1842), an eminent Genevese exile naturalized and knighted in England, extracts from which he had previously given in his journal.

  • In 1804 he was knighted, and in 1805-1806, being by now a lieutenant-general, he commanded the expedition against the Cape of Good Hope with complete success, capturing Cape Town and forcing the Dutch general Janssens to surrender.

  • He was knighted by King James in 1603, and in 1614 was appointed master of the rolls, an office which he held till his death on the 18th of April 1636.

  • Sir Isaac Wake (c. 1580-1632), the diplomatist, was a kinsman of the archbishop. He commenced his diplomatic career in Venice, and then he represented his county for sixteen years at Turin; he was knighted in 1619, and after being sent on various special missions by James I.

  • Leighton was elected an Academician in 1868, and succeeded Sir Francis Grant as President in 1878, when he was knighted.

  • His Son, SIR John Johnson (1742-1830), Who was knighted in 1765 and succeeded to the baronetcy on his father's death, took part in the French and Indian War and in the border warfare during the War of Independence, organizing a loyalist regiment known as the "Queen's Royal Greens," which he led at the battle of Oriskany and in the raids (1778 and 1780) on Cherry Valley and in the Mohawk Valley.

  • He also served on several royal commissions and was knighted in 1907.

  • During a visit to England in 1678 he was knighted.

  • He was knighted on the 11th of October 1551, on the eve of Somerset's second fall, and was congratulated on his success in escaping his benefactor's fate.

  • He was knighted on December 1, 1577, and made chancellor of the order of the Garter on April 22, 1578.

  • He became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1837; in 1847 he married; and in 1868, after the completion of his masterpiece, the automatic telegraph, he was knighted.

  • Beyond the fact that he was knighted by Charles I., nothing is known of his career until in 1646 he received a naval command.

  • In 1514 More was made master of the requests, knighted, and sworn a member of the privy council.

  • He was knighted by his uncle Bedford at Leicester in May 1426, and on the 6th of November 1429 was crowned at Westminster.

  • He was knighted in 1904, and in 1908 he was awarded the Albert medal of the Society of Arts.

  • In 1905 he held the professorship of physics in the Royal Institution, London, in addition to his Cambridge professorship. He was knighted in 1908 and awarded the O.M.

  • had created several naval officers bannerets towards the end of the last century, because he knighted them on board ship under the royal standard displayed.

  • Baronets are not knights unless they are knighted like anybody else; and, so far from being knights because they are baronets, one of the privileges granted to them shortly after the institution of their dignity was that they, not being knights, and their successors and their eldest sons and heirs-apparent should, when they attained their majority, be entitled if they desired to receive knighthood.

  • 1 But that the order, although from this manifestly already fully constituted in the autumn of 1348, was not in existence before the summer of 1346 Sir Harris Nicolas proves pretty conclusively by pointing out that nobody who was not a knight could under its statutes have been admitted to it, and that neither the prince of Wales nor several others of the original companions were knighted until the middle of that year.

  • a distinction is drawn between those who are to be knighted by the king himself or by the sheriffs of counties respectively, and bishops and abbots could make knights in the iith and 12th centuries.

  • 3 Many sovereigns, too, both of England and of France, have been knighted after their accession to the throne by their own subjects, as, for instance, Edward III.

  • was knighted by his greatuncle David I.

  • was knighted in 1338 at the age of seven to avoid the possible evils of wardship, and Thomas V.

  • Although by the code of chivalry no candidate could be knighted before the age of twenty-one, we have seen how great nobles like the Berkeleys obtained that honour for their infant heirs in order to avoid possible pecuniary loss; and French writers of the r4th century complained of this knighting of infants as a common and serious abuse.'

  • At almost every period there have been men of obscure and illegitimate birth who have been knighted.

  • By the common law, if a villein were made a knight he was thereby enfranchised and accounted a gentleman, and if a person under age and in wardship were knighted both his minority and wardship terminated.

  • Knights of the Bath, although they were allowed precedence before knights bachelors, were merely knights bachelors who were knighted with more elaborate ceremonies than others and on certain great occasions.

  • In 1531 he had been made a serjeant-at-law and king's serjeant; and on the 10th of May 1532 he was knighted, and succeeded Sir Thomas More as lord keeper of the great seal, being appointed lord chancellor on the 26th of January 1533.

  • He was knighted in 1890.

  • in May 1894 he was knighted by Queen Victoria in acknowledgment of his distinguished public services.

  • On the 29th of September 1342 he was made earl of Richmond; as a child he was present at the sea fight with the Spaniards in August 1350, but his first military service was in 1355, when he was knighted.

  • in 1881, and was knighted in 1884.

  • Pedro de Menezes (c. 1450), states that Amadis de Gaula was written by Vasco de Lobeira in the time of king Ferdinand of Portugal who died in 1383: as Vasco de Lobeira was knighted in 1385, it would follow that he wrote the elaborate romance in his earliest youth.

  • On the 11th of October 1551 he was knighted; in 1553 he was made one of the secretaries of state, and sworn of the privy council.

  • When the first Coalition Ministry was formed in May 1915, he was appointed Solicitor-General and knighted, and he succeeded Sir Edward Carson in November as AttorneyGeneral, a post he held till 1919.

  • He sailed for England in 1811, and shortly after his arrival in the following year was knighted.

  • He was at the same time knighted.

  • He was knighted in 1786 when he presented a congratulatory address from the wapentake of Wirksworth to George III., on his escape from the attempt on his life by Margaret Nicholson.

  • He was knighted in 1891, and created a baronet in 1893.

  • The Persian officials were at first hostile, but their opposition, which was attributed to Russian influence at Teheran, was eventually overcome, and Colonel MacMahon (who was knighted in 1906) delivered his final award, sustaining the Persian contention, in February 1905.

  • In 1681 he was knighted by Charles II., and in July 1689 he was with Viscount Dundee at Killiecrankie.

  • In 1788 he was appointed solicitor-general, and was knighted, and at the close of this year he attracted attention by his speeches in support of Pitt's resolutions on the state of the king (George III., who then laboured under a mental malady) and the delegation of his authority.

  • at Bosworth, where he was severely wounded, was knighted on the field, and was throughout one of the first Tudor's most trusted councillors.

  • After the Restoration he returned to England and was favourably received and knighted by Charles II., who was "much pleased with his ingenious discourses," and who, it is said, intended to create him earl of Kilmore.

  • He served first as a private archer and man-at-arms in Italy, with Bayard for his captain, fought all through the wars of Francis I., and was knighted on the field of Cerisoles (1544), to which victory he had brilliantly contributed as adviser to the young duke of Enghien.

  • He was knighted by the prince, but being suspected by the Royalists, was put ashore mutinously in Holland and returned to England.

  • On the 8th of April 1812 he was knighted by the prince regent; on the 9th he gave his farewell lecture as professor of chemistry at the Royal Institution; and on the 11th he was married to Mrs Apreece, daughter and heiress of Charles Kerr of Kelso, and a distant connexion of Sir Walter Scott.

  • He was knighted in 1908, and received the K.C.M.G.

  • He was knighted at his father's coronation on the 11th of October 1 399, and created duke of Gloucester by Henry V.

  • Nevertheless Marignan was in the main the work of the gendarmerie, the last and greatest triumph of the armoured lancer; and as a fitting close to the battle the young king was knighted by Bayard on the field.

  • Anthony, who was knighted before he became of age, and fought at Towton in 1461, married the daughter of Lord Scales, and became a peer jure uxoris in 1462, two years after the death of that nobleman.

  • From 1892 to 1899 he conducted the Philharmonic Concerts, and was knighted in 1894.

  • At the Restoration he obtained the office of Norroy king-at-arms, and in 1677 was created garter principal king-at-arms, and was knighted.

  • In 1835, being secretary to the meeting of the British Association which was held that year in Dublin, he was knighted by the lord-lieutenant.

  • He was knighted in 1886.

  • In 1623 he was sent to join Prince Charles, afterwards Charles I., at Madrid, and was knighted on the 23rd of October of that year.

  • being now on the throne, Leicester secured the earldom of Lancaster and his brother's lands, becoming also steward of England; he knighted the young king and was the foremost Table Of The Principal Descendants Of John Of Gaunt.

  • In 1415 the town was captured by the Portuguese under John I., among those taking part in the attack being Prince Henry "the Navigator" and two of his brothers, who were knighted on the day following in the mosque (hastily dedicated as a Christian church).

  • Richard was a member of parliament in 1467; afterwards he joined Henry, earl of Richmond, in Brittany, returned with the earl to England, and fought at Bosworth, where he was knighted.

  • The pseudo-chief MacWilliam became earl of Clanricarde, and others reached lower steps in the peerage, or were knighted by the king's own hand.

  • In 1831 he was knighted.

  • In 1914 he was knighted.

  • A colonel of the Royal Army, he was both knighted and made baronet on the same day at Durham in 1642.

  • He was knighted by William IV, refusing a baronetcy.

  • He should really have been knighted by now, or made a dame.

  • It wasn't uncommon for a squire to be knighted after such heroism for bravery on the field.

  • The answer was provided by holiday camp supremo Fred Pontin, later to be knighted for his services to the British holiday industry.

  • knighted with a sword, especially designed for the the ceremony.

  • The source states simply that one of the great nobles had knighted him.

  • Rogers was knighted in 1991 and received a peerage five years later.

  • succeeded his father in 1251, and was knighted by St Louis in 1252.

  • In 1832 he was knighted, and after serving as one of the municipal corporations commissioners, became deputykeeper of the public records in 1838, holding this office until his death at Hampstead on the 6th of July 1861.

  • His eldest son Alexander, who succeeded him in 1 454, was provost of Edinburgh in 1 455, 1 457 and 1469; he was knighted and held various important court offices under successive monarchs; at the time of his death in 1473 he was master of the household to James III.

  • About 1565 he was knighted at the same time as James Stirling, his colleague, whose daughter John Napier subsequently married.

  • In 1548 he was knighted.

  • His paternal grandfather was Sir Henry Cromwell of Hinchinbrook, a leading personage in Huntingdonshire, and grandson of Richard Williams, knighted by Henry VIII., nephew of Thomas Cromwell, earl of Essex, Henry VIII.'s minister, whose name he adopted.

  • In 1453 he was created count of Bistercze, and was knighted at the siege of Belgrade in 1454.

  • from 1660) was knighted in 1673, and was elected president of the Royal Society in 1681.

  • In 1911 he was knighted.

  • He followed the White Rose and was knighted at the crowning of King Edward IV., who pricked him for sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

  • The office of sheriff was thrown open to Jews in 1835 (Moses Montefiore, sheriff of London was knighted in 1837); Sir I.

  • Eustace was knighted in 1147, at which date he was probably from sixteen to eighteen years of age; and in 1151 he joined Louis in an abortive raid upon Normandy, which had accepted the title of the empress Matilda, and was now defended by her husband, Geoffrey of Anjou.

  • In 1803 he was knighted, and received the post of recorder at Bombay.

  • Of his life before 1086, when he was solemnly knighted by his father at Westminster, we know little.

  • In 1845 he was knighted "as an acknowledgment of his services in the removal of the Xanthian antiquities to this country."

  • He was knighted in 1897, and received the Royal (1875), Davy (1888), and Copley (1904) medals of the Royal Society, besides filling the offices of president of the Chemical Society and of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

  • He served in the war of 1899-1902, and was knighted in the last-named year.

  • In the latter year he was knighted (G.C.B.).

  • In 1797, at the instance of English statesmen, he published a translation of a history of French finance by Francois d'Ivernois (1757-1842), an eminent Genevese exile naturalized and knighted in England, extracts from which he had previously given in his journal.

  • In 1804 he was knighted, and in 1805-1806, being by now a lieutenant-general, he commanded the expedition against the Cape of Good Hope with complete success, capturing Cape Town and forcing the Dutch general Janssens to surrender.

  • The story of the first Atlantic cable is told elsewhere (see Telegraph), and it must suffice here to say that in 1858, after two disappointments, Bright successfully accomplished what to many had seemed an impossible feat, and within a few days of landing the Irish end of the line at Valentia he was knighted in Dublin.

  • He was knighted by King James in 1603, and in 1614 was appointed master of the rolls, an office which he held till his death on the 18th of April 1636.

  • Sir Isaac Wake (c. 1580-1632), the diplomatist, was a kinsman of the archbishop. He commenced his diplomatic career in Venice, and then he represented his county for sixteen years at Turin; he was knighted in 1619, and after being sent on various special missions by James I.

  • Leighton was elected an Academician in 1868, and succeeded Sir Francis Grant as President in 1878, when he was knighted.

  • His Son, SIR John Johnson (1742-1830), Who was knighted in 1765 and succeeded to the baronetcy on his father's death, took part in the French and Indian War and in the border warfare during the War of Independence, organizing a loyalist regiment known as the "Queen's Royal Greens," which he led at the battle of Oriskany and in the raids (1778 and 1780) on Cherry Valley and in the Mohawk Valley.

  • He also served on several royal commissions and was knighted in 1907.

  • During a visit to England in 1678 he was knighted.

  • He was knighted on the 11th of October 1551, on the eve of Somerset's second fall, and was congratulated on his success in escaping his benefactor's fate.

  • He was knighted on December 1, 1577, and made chancellor of the order of the Garter on April 22, 1578.

  • He became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1837; in 1847 he married; and in 1868, after the completion of his masterpiece, the automatic telegraph, he was knighted.

  • Beyond the fact that he was knighted by Charles I., nothing is known of his career until in 1646 he received a naval command.

  • In 1514 More was made master of the requests, knighted, and sworn a member of the privy council.

  • He was knighted by his uncle Bedford at Leicester in May 1426, and on the 6th of November 1429 was crowned at Westminster.

  • He was knighted in 1904, and in 1908 he was awarded the Albert medal of the Society of Arts.

  • In 1905 he held the professorship of physics in the Royal Institution, London, in addition to his Cambridge professorship. He was knighted in 1908 and awarded the O.M.

  • had created several naval officers bannerets towards the end of the last century, because he knighted them on board ship under the royal standard displayed.

  • Baronets are not knights unless they are knighted like anybody else; and, so far from being knights because they are baronets, one of the privileges granted to them shortly after the institution of their dignity was that they, not being knights, and their successors and their eldest sons and heirs-apparent should, when they attained their majority, be entitled if they desired to receive knighthood.

  • io " Sir Henry Ferrers, Baronet, was indicted by the name of Sir Henry Ferrers, Knight, for the murther of one Stone whom one Nightingale feloniously murthered, and that the said Sir Henry was present aiding and abetting, &c. Upon this indictment Sir Henry Ferrers being arraigned said he never was knighted, which being confessed, the indictment was held not to be sufficient, wherefore he was indicted de novo by the name of Sir Henry Ferrers, Baronet."

  • 1 But that the order, although from this manifestly already fully constituted in the autumn of 1348, was not in existence before the summer of 1346 Sir Harris Nicolas proves pretty conclusively by pointing out that nobody who was not a knight could under its statutes have been admitted to it, and that neither the prince of Wales nor several others of the original companions were knighted until the middle of that year.

  • a distinction is drawn between those who are to be knighted by the king himself or by the sheriffs of counties respectively, and bishops and abbots could make knights in the iith and 12th centuries.

  • 3 Many sovereigns, too, both of England and of France, have been knighted after their accession to the throne by their own subjects, as, for instance, Edward III.

  • was knighted by his greatuncle David I.

  • was knighted in 1338 at the age of seven to avoid the possible evils of wardship, and Thomas V.

  • Although by the code of chivalry no candidate could be knighted before the age of twenty-one, we have seen how great nobles like the Berkeleys obtained that honour for their infant heirs in order to avoid possible pecuniary loss; and French writers of the r4th century complained of this knighting of infants as a common and serious abuse.'

  • At almost every period there have been men of obscure and illegitimate birth who have been knighted.

  • By the common law, if a villein were made a knight he was thereby enfranchised and accounted a gentleman, and if a person under age and in wardship were knighted both his minority and wardship terminated.

  • Knights of the Bath, although they were allowed precedence before knights bachelors, were merely knights bachelors who were knighted with more elaborate ceremonies than others and on certain great occasions.

  • In 1531 he had been made a serjeant-at-law and king's serjeant; and on the 10th of May 1532 he was knighted, and succeeded Sir Thomas More as lord keeper of the great seal, being appointed lord chancellor on the 26th of January 1533.

  • He was knighted in 1890.

  • in May 1894 he was knighted by Queen Victoria in acknowledgment of his distinguished public services.

  • On the 29th of September 1342 he was made earl of Richmond; as a child he was present at the sea fight with the Spaniards in August 1350, but his first military service was in 1355, when he was knighted.

  • in 1881, and was knighted in 1884.

  • Pedro de Menezes (c. 1450), states that Amadis de Gaula was written by Vasco de Lobeira in the time of king Ferdinand of Portugal who died in 1383: as Vasco de Lobeira was knighted in 1385, it would follow that he wrote the elaborate romance in his earliest youth.

  • On the 11th of October 1551 he was knighted; in 1553 he was made one of the secretaries of state, and sworn of the privy council.

  • When the first Coalition Ministry was formed in May 1915, he was appointed Solicitor-General and knighted, and he succeeded Sir Edward Carson in November as AttorneyGeneral, a post he held till 1919.

  • He sailed for England in 1811, and shortly after his arrival in the following year was knighted.

  • He was at the same time knighted.

  • He was knighted in 1786 when he presented a congratulatory address from the wapentake of Wirksworth to George III., on his escape from the attempt on his life by Margaret Nicholson.

  • He was knighted in 1891, and created a baronet in 1893.

  • The Persian officials were at first hostile, but their opposition, which was attributed to Russian influence at Teheran, was eventually overcome, and Colonel MacMahon (who was knighted in 1906) delivered his final award, sustaining the Persian contention, in February 1905.

  • In 1681 he was knighted by Charles II., and in July 1689 he was with Viscount Dundee at Killiecrankie.

  • In 1788 he was appointed solicitor-general, and was knighted, and at the close of this year he attracted attention by his speeches in support of Pitt's resolutions on the state of the king (George III., who then laboured under a mental malady) and the delegation of his authority.

  • at Bosworth, where he was severely wounded, was knighted on the field, and was throughout one of the first Tudor's most trusted councillors.

  • After the Restoration he returned to England and was favourably received and knighted by Charles II., who was "much pleased with his ingenious discourses," and who, it is said, intended to create him earl of Kilmore.

  • He served first as a private archer and man-at-arms in Italy, with Bayard for his captain, fought all through the wars of Francis I., and was knighted on the field of Cerisoles (1544), to which victory he had brilliantly contributed as adviser to the young duke of Enghien.

  • He was knighted by the prince, but being suspected by the Royalists, was put ashore mutinously in Holland and returned to England.

  • On the 8th of April 1812 he was knighted by the prince regent; on the 9th he gave his farewell lecture as professor of chemistry at the Royal Institution; and on the 11th he was married to Mrs Apreece, daughter and heiress of Charles Kerr of Kelso, and a distant connexion of Sir Walter Scott.

  • He was knighted in 1908, and received the K.C.M.G.

  • He was knighted at his father's coronation on the 11th of October 1 399, and created duke of Gloucester by Henry V.

  • Nevertheless Marignan was in the main the work of the gendarmerie, the last and greatest triumph of the armoured lancer; and as a fitting close to the battle the young king was knighted by Bayard on the field.

  • Anthony, who was knighted before he became of age, and fought at Towton in 1461, married the daughter of Lord Scales, and became a peer jure uxoris in 1462, two years after the death of that nobleman.

  • From 1892 to 1899 he conducted the Philharmonic Concerts, and was knighted in 1894.

  • At the Restoration he obtained the office of Norroy king-at-arms, and in 1677 was created garter principal king-at-arms, and was knighted.

  • In 1835, being secretary to the meeting of the British Association which was held that year in Dublin, he was knighted by the lord-lieutenant.

  • He was knighted in 1886.

  • In 1623 he was sent to join Prince Charles, afterwards Charles I., at Madrid, and was knighted on the 23rd of October of that year.

  • being now on the throne, Leicester secured the earldom of Lancaster and his brother's lands, becoming also steward of England; he knighted the young king and was the foremost Table Of The Principal Descendants Of John Of Gaunt.

  • In 1415 the town was captured by the Portuguese under John I., among those taking part in the attack being Prince Henry "the Navigator" and two of his brothers, who were knighted on the day following in the mosque (hastily dedicated as a Christian church).

  • Richard was a member of parliament in 1467; afterwards he joined Henry, earl of Richmond, in Brittany, returned with the earl to England, and fought at Bosworth, where he was knighted.

  • The pseudo-chief MacWilliam became earl of Clanricarde, and others reached lower steps in the peerage, or were knighted by the king's own hand.

  • In 1831 he was knighted.

  • In 1914 he was knighted.

  • In early 2006, Tom joined the ranks of Elton John and Mick Jagger by being knighted by Queen Elizabeth.

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