Kinship sentence example

kinship
  • Vara felt a kinship with him after freeing him from the catacombs.
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  • However, I do feel a kinship to this Elizabeth woman.
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  • Powell sets forth the laws of real and artificial kinship among the North American tribes, as well as tribal organization and government, the formation of confederacies, and the intricate rules of artificial kinship by which rank and courtesy were established.
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  • And he did not realize the importance of the kinship between Christian doctrine and Hellenistic syncretism, which helped to promote the reception of Christianity.
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  • Genealogical studies had become necessary through Omar's system of assigning state pensions to certain classes of persons according to their kinship with the Prophet, or their deserts during his lifetime.
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  • Homogeny, in contrast, the " special homology " of Owen, is the supreme test of kinship or of hereditary relationship, and thus the basis of all sound reasoning in phylogeny.
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  • He had against him, not merely England, but the kith and kin of Comyn, including the potent clan of MacDowall or MacDougall in Galloway and Lorne; on his own side he had his kinship, broken men, and the clergy of Scotland.
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  • But in addition, among the peers to be assassinated were included many Roman Catholics and some lords nearly connected in kinship or friendship with the plotters themselves.
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  • The black Kerry breed and the black or brown Scotch cattle are also more or less nearly related; and a similar kinship is claimed for the Siemental cattle of Switzerland, although their colour is white and fawn.
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  • His indebtedness to Luther is of course great, but his spiritual kinship with Martin Bucer of 1 This edition forms a small 8vo of 514 pages, and 6 pages of index.
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  • In Ireland there were no cities and no municipal institutions; the nation consisted of groups of tribes connected by kinship, and loosely held together by a feudal system which we shall examine later.
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  • Thus we find in Asia, Africa, America and Australia that the marriage laws of the lower races are connected with a belief in kinship or other relationship with animals.
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  • But the chief evidence for the savage theory of man's close kinship with the lower animals is found in the institution called totemism - the belief that certain stocks of men in the various tribes are descended by blood descent from, or are developed out of, or otherwise connected with, certain objects animate or inanimate, but especially with beasts.
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  • The jubilee showed conclusively that, whatever politicians might say, the ties of blood and kinship, which united the two peoples, were too close to be severed by either for some trifling cause; that the wisest heads in both nations were aware of the advantages which must arise from the closer union of the Anglo-Saxon races; and that the true interests of both countries lay in their mutual friendship. A war in which the United States was subsequently engaged with Spain cemented this feeling.
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  • Be this as it may, there can be little doubt that the creodonts are related to the Insectivora, which, as stated above, show decided signs of kinship with the marsupials.
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  • The last contention is probably true; but the kinship was certainly more distant than that between two branches of one Ionian stock.
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  • All theism implies the assertion of kinship between man, especially in his moral being, and God.
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  • The compound is headed by the oldest male inhabitant, irrespective of his kinship affiliation with the other residents of the group.
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  • Our bonds of kinship make some claims on us, bonds of kinship make some claims on us, bonds that I pray will always remain strong.
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  • In many of these fur-trade enterprises, kinship ties proved far more enduring than company loyalties.
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  • According to Hanks and Richardson (1945: 3, 20 ), the kinship and social systems were characterized by " anarchistic individualism.
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  • Amber felt a particular kinship to McLean, the band member often dubbed the " bad boy " of the group.
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  • Like Neal Morris she claimed kinship with Jesse James.
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  • Attempts to create kinship across Europe take diverse forms, from transnational cultural projects to efforts to control populations by redrawing borders.
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  • Damaged or different people drawn to find spiritual kinship among oppressed people perhaps?
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  • America & Britain have a proud kinship we're always being told by the leaders of both countries.
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  • Despite this, considerable indirect evidence suggests that biological kinship plays an important role in altruistic behavior.
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  • Many of these symbolism of the Chinese Pakua thus find close kinship with the Middle East, specially Hebrew culture.
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  • He felt a certain kinship with the irrepressible fellow.
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  • Little wore needs to be said about this clan's strong contribution to Scottish politics and their strong kinship within the clan.
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  • May we be bold in bringing to fruition the golden dreams of human kinship and justice.
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  • Jesus quickly makes his identity known in a way that shows there are ties that are stronger than blood kinship.
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  • Feature analysis has been extremely important in the analysis of kinship terminology.
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  • In Raymond of Sabunde's form of moral argument - there must be a God to reward and punish, if human life is not to be " vain " - we see the kinship of that argument to the argument from design.
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  • (ii.) The piacular sacrifice arose from the need of atoning for bloodshed within the kinship group; properly speaking, the culprit himself should suffer: should he be unknown or beyond the reach of vengeance, a substitute had to be found.
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  • These traditions of migration and kinship are in themselves entirely credible, but the detailed accounts of the ancestors Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, as given in Genesis, are inherently doubtful as regards both the internal conditions, which the (late) chronological scheme ascribes to the first half of the second millennium B.C., and the general circumstances of the life of these strangers in a foreign land.
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  • The skull was small, with proportionately minute brain; and the arched back, strong lumbar vertebrae, long and powerful tail, and comparatively feeble fore-quarters all proclaim kinship with the primitive creodont Carnivora (see Creodonta), from which Phenacodus and its allies, and through them the more typical Ungulata, are probably derived.
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  • In 1865 he published Primitive Marriage, in which, arguing from the prevalence of the symbolical form of capture in the marriage ceremonies of primitive races, he developed an intelligible picture of the growth of the marriage relation and of systems of kinship (see Family) according to natural laws.
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  • Personal protection and revenge, oaths, marriage, wardship, succession, supervision over settlement, and good behaviour, are regulated by the law of kinship. A man's actions are considered not as exertions of his individual will, but as acts of the kindred, and all the fellows of the maegth are held responsible for them.
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  • Since the kinship of the latter with the members of adjacent non-Dorian states was admitted, two different explanations seem to have been made, (I) on behalf of the non-Dorian populations, either that the Dorians were no true sons of Hellen, but were of some other northerly ancestry; or that they were merely Achaean exiles; and in either case that their historic predominance resulted from an act of violence, ill-disguised by their association with the ancient claims of the Peloponnesian Heraclidae; (2) on behalf of the Dorian aristocracies, that they were in some special sense " sons of Hellen," if not the only genuine Hellenes; the rest of the European Greeks, and in particular the anti-Dorian Athenians (with their marked likeness to Ionians), being regarded as Hellenized barbarians of " Pelasgian " origin (see Pelasgians).
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  • So great was Rome's sense of kinship to the Latins that in two cases Latin cults were introduced inside the pomoerium: the worship of Hercules, which came from Tibur in connexion with commerce, was established at the ara maxima in the forum boarium, and the Tusculan cult of Castor as the patron of cavalry found a home close to the forum Romanum: it is a strange irony that both these deities should in reality have been in their origin Greek.
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  • When a confederacy was organized under a council, intermarriage between tribes sometimes occurred; an artificial kinship thus arose, in which event the council established the rank of the tribes as elder and younger brother, grandfather, father and sons, rendering the relationship and its vocabulary most intricate, but necessary in a social system in which age was the predominant consideration and etiquette most exacting.
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  • The conclusion is that the sum of homogenous parts, which may be similar or dissimilar in external form according to their similarity or diversity of function, and the recognition of former similarities of adaptation (see below) are the true bases for the critical determination of kinship and phylogeny.
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  • As a small-town boy yourself what kind of kinship did you feel with Clark Kent?
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  • Localism maintains the traditional ties of blood and kinship but undermines modern, universalist democratic ideals.
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  • There's a soft and supple character that finishes with a silky texture and creates a sense of kinship with the Rhône's Châteauneuf-du-Pape.
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  • In 2002, about 405,000 children were placed in court-appointed kinship care.
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  • Many of these kinship caregivers are grandparents or elderly aunts and uncles.
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  • Kinship caregivers offer family support and stability, and more frequent contact with parents or legal guardians, and siblings.
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  • Nevertheless, kinship caregivers, especially grandparents, face a number of challenges.
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  • Most of the formal and informal kinship caregivers experience economic hardship as they take in one or more of their relative's children.
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  • They also may not have adequate medical insurance; however, Medicaid often will cover the foster child in a formal kinship arrangement.
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  • About 40 percent of the 127,000 adoptions in 2000 and 2001 were primarily private agency, kinship, or tribal adoptions.
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  • However, in 1992, for example, stepparent adoptions (a form of kinship adoption) alone accounted for 42 percent of all adoptions.
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  • While these data are non-specific, it is safe to say that a significant number of the stepchildren were neither kinship nor stepparent adoptions.
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  • Many older teens feel a certain kinship with evil skull tattoos for their rebellious qualities.
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  • In 1930, the founders changed the name to Citizen Watch Company because the word citizen created a kinship or citizenship among people all over the world.
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  • It took me back to when we were kids, in Amherst and this knowing kind of trust and kinship we'd shared.
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  • In fact, while Robertson Smith (in Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia, as well as his Religion of the Semites, followed by Stade and Benzinger) strongly advocated the view that clear traces of totemism can be found in early Israel, later writers, such as Marti, Gesch.
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  • A reprint of Primitive Marriage, with "Kinship in Ancient Greece" and some other essays not previously published, appeared in 1876, under the title of Studies in Ancient History.
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  • In all parts of the western hemisphere society was organized on cognate kinship, real or artificial, the unit being the clan.
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  • The due performance of funeral rites re-created the blood tie and renewed the kinship of living and dead at the moment when death seemed specially to endanger it by removal of that representative of the household whose special duty it had been to keep up the family sacra.
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  • But if classification is to express relationship, it is impossible to associate in the same order families whose kinship to insects of other orders is nearer than their kinship to each other.
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  • In Anglo-Saxon society, as in that of all Teutonic nations in early times, the two most important principles were those of kinship and personal allegiance.
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  • The actual worship on the island of a hero or god named Achilles, and the probable kinship of its inhabitants with a Thessalian people, whose hero Achilles also was, form the historical foundation of the legends.
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  • The nilgai is held peculiarly sacred by Hindus, from its fancied kinship to the cow, and on this account its destructive inroads upon the crops are tolerated.
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  • 8 This peculiar " kinship " between serpent-clans and serpents may be further illustrated from Senegambia, where a python is supposed to visit every child of the python-clan within eight days of birth, apparently as a sign of recognition.
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  • The minstrel of early Germanic times was required to be learned not only in the traditions of his own people, but also in those of the other peoples with whom they felt their kinship. He had a double task to perform.
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  • All or nearly all of these were at one time totem animals among one or another of the Semitic tribes, and were not eaten because primitive men will not eat animals between which and themselves and their gods they believe a peculiar tie of kinship to exist.
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  • (5) Kinship. It is hard to say whether the unit of primitive society is the tribe or the group of kinsmen.
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  • See, for further history, Herod; Jews.4 Although but little is known of the inhabitants of Edom, their close relationship to Judah and their kinship with the surrounding tribes invest them with particular interest.
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  • His chief contributions to this branch of learning were his article Sacrifice in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, his Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia (Cambridge, 1885), and above all his Lectures on the Religion of the Semites (1st edition 1889, 2nd edition 189 4).
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  • His "Replies" to Bishop Morton and Dr Burgess on "Ceremonies" tell us that even kinship could not prevent him from "contending earnestly for the faith."
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  • The present drawing, which under the authority of Linnaeus shows an anthropomorphic series from which the normal type of man, the Homo sapiens, is conspicuously absent, brings zoological similarity into view without suggesting kinship to account for it.
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  • This relationship is morally and legally regarded as not less binding than kinship by birth.
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  • He published an astounding pedigree, in which, starting from " Hercules Triptolemus," he wound his way through the royal Servian line to the kinship of Moldavian voivodes, and, having won the emperor Ferdinand to his financial and military support, succeeded, though at the head of only 1600 cavalry, in routing by a bold dash the vastly superior forces of the voivode, and even in purchasing the Turkish confirmation of his usurped title.
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  • The poet and the statesman showed their kinship by the " dark, deep-set and lustrous eyes " that impressed one who met either of these uncommon men.
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  • Kinship with the clan was an essential qualification for holding any office or property.
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  • The rules of kinship largely determined status with its correlative rights and obligations, supplied the place of contract and of laws affecting the ownership, disposition and devolution of property, constituting the clan an organic, selfcontained entity, a political, social and mutual insurance copartnership. The solidarity of the clan was its most important and all-pervading characteristic. The entire territory occupied by a clan was the common and absolute property of that clan.
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  • Rank, with the accompanying privileges, jurisdiction and responsibility, was based upon a qualification of kinship and of property, held by a family for a specified number of generations, together with certain concurrent conditions; and it could be lost by loss of property, crime, cowardice or other disgraceful conduct.
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  • Dr. Hale claims kinship with Helen, and seems very proud of his little cousin.
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  • Despite the different traditions of culture due to the rival ecclesiastical influence of Rome and Byzantium, a sense of kinship had survived throughout centuries of separation, and was strengthened by continual migration.
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  • (1st ed., 1860; 2nd, 1871) was concerned with the origin and racial affinities of the Hindus, exhibiting all the then available evidences of their connexion, their linguistic, social and political kinship, with the other branches of the Indo-European stock.
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  • 6 Intercourse with India had given Persian mysticism the form of Buddhistic monkery, while the Arabs imitated the Christian anchorites; thus the two movements had an inner kinship and an outer form so nearly identical that they naturally coalesced, and that even the earliest organizations of orders of dervishes, whether in the East or the West, appeared to Mahommedan judgment to be of one type.
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  • I did nothing but explore with my hands and learn the name of every object that I touched; and the more I handled things and learned their names and uses, the more joyous and confident grew my sense of kinship with the rest of the world.
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  • The sacrifice is in its origin a communion; god and worshippers have a bond of kinship between them; but it is liable to be interrupted or its strength diminished.
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  • Smith, Marillier also maintained, but without clearly explaining the relation of this part of his theory to the preceding, that a human kinship group conceived the idea of allying itself with one god in particular.
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  • Then all the people repented except the men of Judah, who were not to be conciliated without a virtual admission of prerogative of kinship to the king.
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  • It is not, therefore, surprising that when Pausanias was recalled to Sparta on the charge of treasonable overtures to the Persians, the Ionian allies appealed to the Athenians on the grounds of kinship and urgent necessity, and that when Sparta sent out Dorcis to supersede Pausanias he found Aristides in unquestioned command of the allied fleet.
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  • The addition of an "Achaean " group, and the inclusion of this and the Ionic group under a single generic name, would naturally follow the recognition of the real kinship of the " Achaean " colonies of Magna Graecia with those of Ionia.
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  • However, before the conquest, in no other part of the globe did language tally so nearly with kinship. Marriage was exogamic among clans in a tribe, but practically, though not wholly, endogamic as between tribes, wife and slave capture being common in places.
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  • There were tribes where the basis of kinship was agnate, but these were the exceptions.
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  • Analogy, in its power of transforming unlike and unrelated animals or unlike and unrelated parts of animals into likeness, has done such miracles that the inference of kinship is often almost irresistible.
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  • Nature, limited in her resources for adaptation, fashioned so many of these animals in like form that we have learned only recently to distinguish similarities cf analogous habit from the similitudes of real kinship. From whatever order of Mammalia or Reptilia an animal may be derived, prolonged aquatic adaptation will model its outer, and finally its inner, structure according to certain advantageous designs.
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  • The only inkling of possible underlying principles in this orderly process is that there appears to be in respect to certain characters a potentiality or a predisposition through hereditary kinship to evolve in certain definite directions.
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  • Least of all is it a sacramental eating of the flesh and drinking of the blood of Jesus, a perpetual renewal of kinship, physical and spiritual, with him.
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  • By a mysterious sympathy the bread and wine over which the words, " This is my body which is for you," and " This cup is the new covenant in my blood," had been uttered, became Christ's body and blood; so that by partaking of these the faithful were united with each other and with Christ into one kinship. They became the body of Christ, and his blood or life was in them, and they were members of him.
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  • The family must be sacrificed to the divine kinship. He that loveth father or mother more than Christ is not worthy of him, nor he that loveth more his son or daughter.
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  • Bandhotm aPPet A Danes are a yellow-haired and blue-eyed Teutonic race of middle stature, bearing traces of their kinship with the northern Scandinavian peoples.
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  • I loved "Little Women" because it gave me a sense of kinship with girls and boys who could see and hear.
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  • Really, he urged, there could be only one substance - Descartes himself had dropped a passing hint to that effect - and the bold deductive reasoning of Spinoza's Ethics, in process if not in result, betrays its kinship to the ontological argument, with its affirmation of what must be.
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  • Ceremonies of initiation are the means by which the alliance is established between the deity and the young man, when the latter enters upon the rights of manhood; and the supposed bond of kinship is thus regarded as an artificial union from the outset, so far as the individual is concerned, although Robertson Smith still maintains the theory of the fatherhood of the god, where it is a question of the origin of the totem-kin.
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  • With the decline of totemism arose the need for human sacrifice - the only means of re-establishing the broken tie of kinship when the animal species was no longer akin to man.
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  • Next come the various kinds of inhumation graves, the most important of which are rock-hewn chambers, many of which contain well-preserved paintings of various periods; some show close kinship to archaic Greek art, while others are more recent, and one, the Grotta del Tifone (so called from the typhons, or winged genii of death, represented) in which Latin as well as Etruscan inscriptions appear, belongs perhaps to the middle of the 4th century B.C. Fine sarcophagi from these tombs, some showing traces of painting, are preserved in the municipal museum, and also numerous fine Greek vases, bronzes and other objects.
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  • Lastly, a classical mode of consecrating persons, or winning or reinforcing their holiness or kinship with the god, is the sacrificial meal at which sacred animals or the god himself are eaten.
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  • Of the former class the most conspicuous was the Holy Roman Empire; but in Europe all monarchies were, within certain limits, originally elective; and, after the introduction of Christianity, the essential condition of the assumption of sovereign power was not so much kinship with the reigning family as the "sacring" by the divine authority of the Church.
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  • Structurally it would seem to have some relation to the siskins (Chrysomitris), though the members of the two groups have very different habits, and perhaps its nearest kinship lies with the hawfinches (Coccothraustes).
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  • A few hours ago, my wife was calling Molly's mother Julie a bitch, now, with a quickly appointed kinship, she was her assigned sister!
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