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kingly

kingly

kingly Sentence Examples

  • After him the chief power north of the Tyne came into the hands of a certain Eadulf of Bamburgh, who did not take the kingly title, but accepted the overlordship of Alfred the Great perhaps in 886.

  • 4 2 seq.), to the kingly priesthood of Jesus, as that idea is worked out at length in the Epistle to the Hebrews.

  • Early in 984 the king was seized by Henry II., the Quarrelsome, the deposed duke of Bavaria, who claimed the regency as a member of the reigning house, and probably entertained the idea of obtaining the kingly dignity himself.

  • Again, it is sometimes thought that both nobility and aristocracy are in some special way connected with kingly government.

  • Under a kingly government office bestowed by the sovereign holds the same place which office bestowed by the people holds in a popular government.

  • The kingly house, where there is one, is not a distinct class; it is simply the noblest of the noble.

  • The kingly power in Poland, like the ducal power at Venice, had been so narrowed that Poland, though she still kept a king, called herself a republic no less than Venice.

  • And from one point of view, that from which the kingly house is but the noblest of the noble, kingship and nobility are closely allied.

  • Instead of sacerdotal kings, there were royal priests, anointed with oil, arrayed with kingly insignia, claiming the usual royal dues in addition to the customary rights of the priests.

  • As heir-apparent he collected a bodyguard, and studiously courting personal popularity by a pretended interest in the administration of kingly justice, ingratiated himself with the mass.

  • Æthelflaed and her husband wielded almost kingly authority, and the royal title is often given them by the chroniclers.

  • In 1429, instigated by the emperor Sigismund, whom he magnificently entertained at his court at Lutsk, Witowt revived his claim to a kingly crown, and Jagiello reluctantly consented to his cousin's coronation; but before it could be accomplished Witowt died at Troki, on the 27th of October 1430.

  • His kingly office had come to him from Pelops through the blood-stained hands of Atreus and Thyestes, and had brought with it a certain fatality which explained the hostile destiny which pursued him.

  • He strengthened the position of his family and provided for the security of his kingdom by associating his two sons, Recared and Hermenegild, with himself in the kingly office and placing parts of the land under their rule.

  • recognized Magyar nationality by endowing the young Magyar prince with a kingly crown.

  • of Levi), its very character, in common with the high priest's status, combines kingly and priestly powers in a manner which is impossible for the period (about 15th-13th cent.).

  • and the Psalms of Solomon, constitute an unmeasured attack on every office - prophetic, priestly and kingly - administered by the Maccabees.

  • When Pippin was crowned king of the Franks at St Denis on the 28th of July 754 by Pope Stephen II., Charles, and his brother Carloman were anointed by the pope as a sign of their kingly rank.

  • In especial he vindicates the propriety of resistance to kingly oppression or misrule, upholds the existence of an hereditary nobility interested in their country's good as the firmest barrier against such oppression, and maintains the authority of parliaments.

  • The kingly insignia of the High Priest of the sun at Emesa are described by Herodian (v.

  • Arnold-Forster, The Coming of the Kilogram, 1898), as the foot, palm, hand, digit, nail, pace, ell (ulna), &c. It seems probable, therefore, that a royal cubit may have been derived from some kingly stature, and its length perpetuated in the ancient buildings of Egypt, as the Great Pyramid, &c.

  • This conception, however, is not one of the constant elements of prophecy; other prophecies of Isaiah look for the decisive interposition of Yahweh in the crisis of history without a kingly deliverer.

  • When his father died in 78, he was by his mother forthwith appointed high priest, and on her death in 69 he claimed the succession to the supreme civil authority also; but, after a brief and troubled reign of three months, he was compelled to abdicate both kingly and priestly dignities in favour of his more energetic and ambitious younger brother Aristobulus II.

  • Many, if not all, of these persons were members of the royal family, and it is not unlikely that they originally bore the kingly title.

  • - From the evidence at our disposal it is difficult to determine how far the Teutonic peoples were under kingly government in early times.

  • It is quite in harmony with these statements that many Northern and probably all the Anglo-Saxon kingly families traced their origin to the gods.

  • Agathocles now put his name, first without, and then with, the kingly title, though never his own likeness - Hiero II.

  • The exploits of Hiero had already won him the kingly title (270) at Syracuse, and he was the representative of Hellenic life and independence throughout the island.

  • He was the first of Rome's kingly vassals.

  • Yet, among these and other elements of confusion, Manfred succeeded in setting up again the kingly power, first for his kinsmen and then for himself.

  • But the true evidence that beneath his misanthropical moods there was an enduring sentiment of humanity is afforded by the spirit in which he exercised his kingly functions.

  • Henry may have regarded the assertion of his own claims as part of his kingly duty, but in any case a permanent settlement of the national quarrel was essential to the success of his world policy.

  • Darnley had taken on him (his one act of kingly power) to dismiss the parliament, but he now found himself the mere tool of his accomplices.

  • The high ethical conception of the kingly office in Proverbs is out of keeping with the despotic character of Solomon's government.

  • Among these was a noble young soldier, Ahmad Khan, of the Saddozai family of the Abdali clan, who after the assassination of Nadir (1747) was chosen by the Afghan chiefs at Kandahar to be their leader, and assumed kingly authority over the eastern part of Nadir's empire, with the style of Dur-i-Durdn, " Pearl of the Age," bestowing that of Durani upon his clan, the Abdalis.

  • The kingly government is portrayed almost as described in Manu, with its hereditary castes of councillors and soldiers.

  • Agamemnon performs sacrifice himself, not because a priestly character was attached to the kingly office, but simply because he was " master in his own house."

  • The Sassanid ruler is the representative of the Kingly Majesty, derived from Ormuzd, which appears in the Avesla as the angel Kavaem Hvareno, the royal glory, and, according to legend, once beamed in the Iranian kings, unattainable to all but those of royal blood.

  • From this time till the fall of the Lombard power before the arms of their rivals the Franks under Charles the Great, the kingly rule continued.

  • Annalistik, Berlin, 1873) reveals in the first place a marked difference between the kingly period and that which followed the establishment of the republic. The history of the former stretches back into the regions of pure mythology.

  • When he took the kingly title in 1130 it became "Prima sedes, corona regis, et regni caput."

  • The mildest of men, a crowned monk, who let slip the reins of government from his hands while he busied himself in prayer and church building, he lowered the kingly power to a depth to which it had never sunk before in England.

  • It was rather, if some explanation must be found for it, a strife between the kingly power and feudal anarchy.

  • Unfortunately for England the kingly power was in the hands of an incapable holder, and feudal anarchy found a plausible mask by adopting the disguise of loyalty to the rightful heiress.

  • hated all kingly duties; he detested war, but he detested even more the routine work of administration.

  • Thereupon Edward, to the deep humiliation of the people, sued for another cessation of hostilities, and obtained it by conceding all that Robert asked, save the formal acknowledgment of his kingly title.

  • His personal beauty, his keen intelligence, his scholarship, his love of music and the arts, his kingly ambition, were all obvious enough.

  • The oratories were of the same form and material, but the larger churches and kingly banqueting halls were rectangular and made of sawn boards.

  • Conrad then travelled through his dominions, received tribute from tribes dwelling east of Saxony, and by his journey "bound the kingdom most firmly in the bond of peace, and the kingly protection."

  • From 1431 to 1454 the struggle against the English went on energetically; and the king, relieved in 1433 of his evil genius, La Trmoille, then became a man once more, playing a kingly part under the guidance of Dunois, Richemont, La Hire and Saintrailles, leaders of worth on the field of battle.

  • The most important work of the elector was to crown the labours of his father by securing the kingly title for himself and his descendants.

  • Bluff, hearty, good-natured and simple in his habits, yet he always had a high idea of his own kingly dignity, and his really statesmanlike qualities often surprised foreign diplomats, who were deceived by his homely exterior.

  • Offa's policy was apparently the extinction of the dependent kingdoms. In his reign the dynasties of Kent, Sussex and the Hwicce seem to have disappeared, or at all events to have given up the kingly title.

  • The coronation ring (representing kingly dignity, and dating from 1831) and the scepters are then presented.

  • kingly crowns are fashioned from the purest gold; and coins are minted from true silver, on which the royal portrait is stamped.

  • kingly dignity, and dating from 1831) and the scepters are then presented.

  • kingly rule has directly entered time and space.

  • kingly office or service of Christ among his people.

  • kingly messiah.

  • After him the chief power north of the Tyne came into the hands of a certain Eadulf of Bamburgh, who did not take the kingly title, but accepted the overlordship of Alfred the Great perhaps in 886.

  • 4 2 seq.), to the kingly priesthood of Jesus, as that idea is worked out at length in the Epistle to the Hebrews.

  • The thegn was inferior to the aethel, the member of a kingly family, but he was superior to the ceorl, and, says C:_adwick,"from the time of Aethelstan the distinction between thegn and ceorl was the broad line of demarcation between the classes of society."

  • Early in 984 the king was seized by Henry II., the Quarrelsome, the deposed duke of Bavaria, who claimed the regency as a member of the reigning house, and probably entertained the idea of obtaining the kingly dignity himself.

  • Again, it is sometimes thoughtthat both nobility and aristocracy are in some special way connected with kingly government.

  • Under a kingly government office bestowed by the sovereign holds the same place which office bestowed by the people holds in a popular government.

  • The kingly house, where there is one, is not a distinct class; it is simply the noblest of the noble.

  • The kingly power in Poland, like the ducal power at Venice, had been so narrowed that Poland, though she still kept a king, called herself a republic no less than Venice.

  • And from one point of view, that from which the kingly house is but the noblest of the noble, kingship and nobility are closely allied.

  • Instead of sacerdotal kings, there were royal priests, anointed with oil, arrayed with kingly insignia, claiming the usual royal dues in addition to the customary rights of the priests.

  • As heir-apparent he collected a bodyguard, and studiously courting personal popularity by a pretended interest in the administration of kingly justice, ingratiated himself with the mass.

  • Æthelflaed and her husband wielded almost kingly authority, and the royal title is often given them by the chroniclers.

  • In 1429, instigated by the emperor Sigismund, whom he magnificently entertained at his court at Lutsk, Witowt revived his claim to a kingly crown, and Jagiello reluctantly consented to his cousin's coronation; but before it could be accomplished Witowt died at Troki, on the 27th of October 1430.

  • Although not the equal of Achilles in bravery, Agamemnon is a dignified representative of kingly authority.

  • His kingly office had come to him from Pelops through the blood-stained hands of Atreus and Thyestes, and had brought with it a certain fatality which explained the hostile destiny which pursued him.

  • He strengthened the position of his family and provided for the security of his kingdom by associating his two sons, Recared and Hermenegild, with himself in the kingly office and placing parts of the land under their rule.

  • recognized Magyar nationality by endowing the young Magyar prince with a kingly crown.

  • of Levi), its very character, in common with the high priest's status, combines kingly and priestly powers in a manner which is impossible for the period (about 15th-13th cent.).

  • and the Psalms of Solomon, constitute an unmeasured attack on every office - prophetic, priestly and kingly - administered by the Maccabees.

  • When Pippin was crowned king of the Franks at St Denis on the 28th of July 754 by Pope Stephen II., Charles, and his brother Carloman were anointed by the pope as a sign of their kingly rank.

  • In especial he vindicates the propriety of resistance to kingly oppression or misrule, upholds the existence of an hereditary nobility interested in their country's good as the firmest barrier against such oppression, and maintains the authority of parliaments.

  • The kingly insignia of the High Priest of the sun at Emesa are described by Herodian (v.

  • Arnold-Forster, The Coming of the Kilogram, 1898), as the foot, palm, hand, digit, nail, pace, ell (ulna), &c. It seems probable, therefore, that a royal cubit may have been derived from some kingly stature, and its length perpetuated in the ancient buildings of Egypt, as the Great Pyramid, &c.

  • This conception, however, is not one of the constant elements of prophecy; other prophecies of Isaiah look for the decisive interposition of Yahweh in the crisis of history without a kingly deliverer.

  • When his father died in 78, he was by his mother forthwith appointed high priest, and on her death in 69 he claimed the succession to the supreme civil authority also; but, after a brief and troubled reign of three months, he was compelled to abdicate both kingly and priestly dignities in favour of his more energetic and ambitious younger brother Aristobulus II.

  • In every case we find kingly government from the time of our earliest records, and there is no doubt that the institution goes back to a date anterior to the invasion of Britain (see Offa; Wermund).

  • Many, if not all, of these persons were members of the royal family, and it is not unlikely that they originally bore the kingly title.

  • - From the evidence at our disposal it is difficult to determine how far the Teutonic peoples were under kingly government in early times.

  • It is quite in harmony with these statements that many Northern and probably all the Anglo-Saxon kingly families traced their origin to the gods.

  • Agathocles now put his name, first without, and then with, the kingly title, though never his own likeness - Hiero II.

  • The exploits of Hiero had already won him the kingly title (270) at Syracuse, and he was the representative of Hellenic life and independence throughout the island.

  • He was the first of Rome's kingly vassals.

  • Yet, among these and other elements of confusion, Manfred succeeded in setting up again the kingly power, first for his kinsmen and then for himself.

  • But the true evidence that beneath his misanthropical moods there was an enduring sentiment of humanity is afforded by the spirit in which he exercised his kingly functions.

  • Henry may have regarded the assertion of his own claims as part of his kingly duty, but in any case a permanent settlement of the national quarrel was essential to the success of his world policy.

  • Darnley had taken on him (his one act of kingly power) to dismiss the parliament, but he now found himself the mere tool of his accomplices.

  • The high ethical conception of the kingly office in Proverbs is out of keeping with the despotic character of Solomon's government.

  • Among these was a noble young soldier, Ahmad Khan, of the Saddozai family of the Abdali clan, who after the assassination of Nadir (1747) was chosen by the Afghan chiefs at Kandahar to be their leader, and assumed kingly authority over the eastern part of Nadir's empire, with the style of Dur-i-Durdn, " Pearl of the Age," bestowing that of Durani upon his clan, the Abdalis.

  • The kingly government is portrayed almost as described in Manu, with its hereditary castes of councillors and soldiers.

  • Agamemnon performs sacrifice himself, not because a priestly character was attached to the kingly office, but simply because he was " master in his own house."

  • The Sassanid ruler is the representative of the Kingly Majesty, derived from Ormuzd, which appears in the Avesla as the angel Kavaem Hvareno, the royal glory, and, according to legend, once beamed in the Iranian kings, unattainable to all but those of royal blood.

  • From this time till the fall of the Lombard power before the arms of their rivals the Franks under Charles the Great, the kingly rule continued.

  • Annalistik, Berlin, 1873) reveals in the first place a marked difference between the kingly period and that which followed the establishment of the republic. The history of the former stretches back into the regions of pure mythology.

  • In his writing Super potestate summi pontificis octo quaestionum decisions (1339-1342) Occam attacks the temporal supremacy of the pope, insists on the independence of kingly authority, which he maintains is as much an ordinance of.

  • When he took the kingly title in 1130 it became "Prima sedes, corona regis, et regni caput."

  • The mildest of men, a crowned monk, who let slip the reins of government from his hands while he busied himself in prayer and church building, he lowered the kingly power to a depth to which it had never sunk before in England.

  • It was rather, if some explanation must be found for it, a strife between the kingly power and feudal anarchy.

  • Unfortunately for England the kingly power was in the hands of an incapable holder, and feudal anarchy found a plausible mask by adopting the disguise of loyalty to the rightful heiress.

  • hated all kingly duties; he detested war, but he detested even more the routine work of administration.

  • Thereupon Edward, to the deep humiliation of the people, sued for another cessation of hostilities, and obtained it by conceding all that Robert asked, save the formal acknowledgment of his kingly title.

  • His personal beauty, his keen intelligence, his scholarship, his love of music and the arts, his kingly ambition, were all obvious enough.

  • The oratories were of the same form and material, but the larger churches and kingly banqueting halls were rectangular and made of sawn boards.

  • Conrad then travelled through his dominions, received tribute from tribes dwelling east of Saxony, and by his journey "bound the kingdom most firmly in the bond of peace, and the kingly protection."

  • From 1431 to 1454 the struggle against the English went on energetically; and the king, relieved in 1433 of his evil genius, La Trmoille, then became a man once more, playing a kingly part under the guidance of Dunois, Richemont, La Hire and Saintrailles, leaders of worth on the field of battle.

  • The most important work of the elector was to crown the labours of his father by securing the kingly title for himself and his descendants.

  • Bluff, hearty, good-natured and simple in his habits, yet he always had a high idea of his own kingly dignity, and his really statesmanlike qualities often surprised foreign diplomats, who were deceived by his homely exterior.

  • Offa's policy was apparently the extinction of the dependent kingdoms. In his reign the dynasties of Kent, Sussex and the Hwicce seem to have disappeared, or at all events to have given up the kingly title.

  • How noble and kingly the King was, especially in his misfortunes!

  • "Charmed to make your acquaintance, General!" he added, with a gesture of kingly condescension.

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