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kindness

kindness

kindness Sentence Examples

  • From her visions, neither of them was capable of any measure of kindness.

  • He didn't do so out of the kindness of his heart.

  • Deidre wasn't expecting his version of kindness.

  • "Kindness and compassion aren't weaknesses," she countered.

  • Cynthia and her husband were appreciative of his efforts, which Dean knew came as much from nerves over his pending jury duty as early morning kindness.

  • Deidre glared at the phone, comparing Logan's unconcerned response with Dr. Wynn's kindness.

  • Andre alone has ever shown me any kindness.

  • "Besides, you should be resting," he said with a forced note of kindness.

  • I couldn't do it without your kindness.

  • She couldn't help but feel surprised by the kindness and careful planning of the refugees who'd lost everything but electricity in one building.

  • He had nearly forgotten the young lady, the recipient of Jeffrey Byrne's kindness.

  • Your father showed me mercy and you showed me kindness.

  • I've shown you what kindness I possess.

  • The White God didn't invite the Original Vamp into his home out of a sense of kindness or moral obligation.

  • As to his honesty and kindness of heart there were never two opinions.

  • In return for her kindness, being entrusted with foreknowledge by the visitation of God, they prophesied that God had decreed an end of rule for Herod and his line and that the sovereignty devolved upon her and Pheroras and their children.

  • But the narrative loses its point unless David's kindness " for Jonathan's sake " comes at an early date soon after he became king, and although the youth is found at Lo-debar (east of the Jordan) under the protection of Machir, the independent fragment in ii.

  • 27 makes Nahash himself David's ally, and accounts for David's eagerness to repay to Hanun, the son of Nahash, the kindness which he had received from the father (x.

  • In May 1535 he was betrayed by Henry Phillips, to whom he had shown much kindness, as a professing student of the new faith.

  • Charles, however, subsequently granted her a pension and treated her with kindness.

  • As Paley says, he loves " to record their fidelity to their masters, their sympathy in the trials of life, their gratitude for kindness and considerate treatment, and their pride in bearing the character of honourable men..

  • Lord Berkeley of Stratton, who was the viceroy, showed him much kindness and allowed him to establish a Jesuit school in Dublin.

  • The table on the following page, for which the writer is indebted to the kindness of Carolidi Effendi, formerly professor of history in the university of Athens, and in 1910 deputy for Smyrna in the Turkish parliament, shows the various races of the Ottoman Empire, the regions which they inhabit, and the religions which they profess.

  • Through the kindness of Henry Salt, the traveller and antiquarian, who was ever afterwards his patron, he was engaged at Astley's amphitheatre, and his circumstances soon began to improve.

  • Father Braun, to whose kindness the writer is indebted for the above account of the causes of the ritual changes in the Carolingian epoch, adds that the papacy was never narrowminded in its attitude towards local rites, and that it was not until the close of the middle ages, when diversity had become confusion and worse, that it began to insist upon uniformity.

  • The colonists, if mistaken in their general policy of leaving the natives in a condition of mitigated barbarism, had behaved towards them with uniform kindness and justice.

  • He was the son of a tailor, and was left an orphan in his eighth year; but, through the kindness of a friend, admission was gained for him into the military school of his native town, which was then under the direction of the Benedictines of Saint-Maur.

  • He was conveyed to Newgate gaol, where by the kindness of Lord Clare he was visited by two of his relatives, and where he died of his wound on the 4th of June 1798.

  • In February the same year (1575), the university of Leiden had been founded, and thither, by the kindness of friends, Arminius was sent to study theology.

  • 2 This may be paraphrased as follows:The precarium tenant may employ the interdict against a third party, because he cannot use the ordinary civil action, his holding being not a matter of business but rather of favour and kindness.

  • There were at first murmurings among his clergy against what they deemed his harsh control, but his real kindness soon made itself felt, and, during the sixteen years of his tenure of the see, his sound and vigorous rule dissipated the prejudices against him, so that when, on the death of Dr John Jackson in 1885, he was translated to London, the appointment gave general satisfaction.

  • A reference to Jerusalem, which we procured through the kindness of Mr Walter Besant, shows that the Abyssinians no longer have a chapel or privileges in the Church of the Sepulchre.

  • " It seemed," wrote Richard Cumberland, " as if a whole century had been stepped over in the passage of a single scene; old things were done away, and a new order at once brought forward, 1 In the subsequent Apology addressed to the Critical Reviewers, Churchill revenged himself for the slight which he supposed Garrick to have put upon him, by some spiteful lines, which, however, Garrick requited by good-humoured kindness.

  • Johnson, of whose various and often merely churlish remarks on Garrick and his doings many are scattered through the pages of Boswell, spoke warmly of the elegance and sprightliness of his friend's conversation, as well as of his liberality and kindness of heart; while to the great actor's art he paid the exquisite tribute of describing Garrick's sudden death as having " eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure."

  • Walton illustrates Herbert's kindness to the poor by many touching anecdotes, but he had not been three years in Bemerton when he succumbed to consumption.

  • The Latin word was used in the early Christian ages for the reward that is given in heaven to those who have shown kindness without hope of return.

  • The emigrants were treated with great kindness by Moroko, the chief of that tribe, and with the Barolong the Boers maintained uniformly friendly relations.

  • There is not a trace of human kindness in his satires, which were directed against the corruption of the times, the Reformation, and especially against Luther.

  • treated her with great kindness and consideration, and protected her from the suspicious attentions of the powers of the Grand Alliance.

  • Under more favourable conditions Louis would have gained a name for kindness and philanthropy, proofs of which did indeed appear during his reign in Holland and gained him the esteem of his subjects; but his morbid sensitiveness served to embitter his relations both of a domestic and of,'a political nature and to sour his own disposition.

  • Bitter in his hatred of heresy, he yet displayed great kindness to the poor.

  • In 1810 he was about to enter upon his new post of governor of Rome when he was, unexpectedly, elected successor to the Swedish throne, partly because a large part of the Swedish army, in view of future complications with Russia, were in favour of electing a soldier, and partly because Bernadotte was very popular in Sweden, owing to the kindness he had shown to the Swedish prisoners during the late war with Denmark.

  • Though he was not a good teacher, his influence both on his pupils and on those few intimate friends for whom alone he relaxed the gravity of his manner was profound, and, little as he-was known to the white inhabitants of Lexington, he was revered by the slaves, to whom he showed uniform kindness, and for whose moral instruction he worked unceasingly.

  • (44) a great amount of material of weighings of weights of Troy (supplied by Dr Schliemann's kindness), Memphis, at the British Museum, Turin, &c.

  • The novice is classified according as his destination is the priesthood or lay brotherhood, while a third class of "indifferents" receives such as are reserved for further inquiry before a decision of this kind a strict retreat, practically in solitary confinement, during which he receives from a director, yet relying on Thine infinite kindness and mercy and impelled by the desire of serving Thee, before the Most Holy Virgin Mary and all Thy heavenly host, I, N., vow to Thy divine Majesty Poverty, Chastity and Perpetual Obedience to the Society of Jesus, and promise that I will enter the same Society to live in it perpetually, understanding all things according to the Constitutions of the Society.

  • Henry received the proffered assistance gratefully, and in return for the king's kindness subsequently left by his will certain British crown jewels in his possession to the prince regent.

  • In 1754 he became deputy librarian for the Faculty of Advocates, by the kindness of Hume.

  • In addition to the books above mentioned, she wrote many pamphlets and short stories and The (American) Frugal Housewife (1829), one of the earliest American books on domestic economy, The Mother's Book (1831), a pioneer cook-book republished in England and Germany, The Girls' Own Book (1831), History of Women (2 vols., 1832), Good Wives (1833), The Anti-Slavery Catechism (1836), Philothea (1836), a romance of the age of Pericles, perhaps her best book, Letters from New York (2 vols., 1843-1845), Fact and Fiction (1847), The Power of Kindness (1851), Isaac T.

  • There were exceptions even to her personal kindness to those about her.

  • His fascinating manners, his witty sayings, and his ever-ready kindness and beneficence won for him a secure place in the respect and love of his fellow-citizens.

  • Hume's cheerful temper, his equanimity, his kindness to literary aspirants and to those whose views differed from his own won him universal respect and affection.

  • The Beguines wear the old Flemish head-dress and a dark costume, and are conspicuous for their kindness among the poor and their sick nursing.

  • The name was soon discovered; and Pope, with great kindness, exerted himself to obtain an academical degree and the mastership of a grammar school for the poor young poet.

  • Lord Chesterfield well knew the value of such a compliment; and therefore, when the day of publication drew near, he exerted himself to soothe, by a show of zealous and at the same time of delicate and judicious kindness, the pride which he had so cruelly wounded.

  • Frances Burney, whom the old man had cherished with fatherly kindness, stood weeping at the door; while Langton, whose piety eminently qualified him to be an adviser and comforter at such a,time, received the last pressure of his friend's hand within.

  • His early correspondence with Shelley, which began in 1811, is remarkable for its genuine good sense and kindness; but when Shelley carried out the principles of the author of Political Justice in eloping with Mary Godwin, Godwin assumed a hostile attitude that would have been unjustifiable in a man of ordinary views, and was ridiculous in the light of his professions.

  • He tells of the devotion of Mary and Martha, and of the band of women who ministered to our Lord's needs and followed Him to Jerusalem: he tells also of His kindness to more than one sinful woman.

  • 15, 16), and as controlled in his administration by truth, kindness and justice (xx.

  • All the ordinary social virtues such as truthfulness, honesty, kindness, chastity are emphasized and a great stress is laid on care for the poor (a social necessity at a tine when there were no well organized public charities).

  • 29), and in its inculcation of kindness to enemies (xxv.

  • To the minority of strict Jews he was therefore " the abomination of desolation standing where he ought not "; but the majority he carried with him and, when he was dying (165 B.C.) during his eastern campaigns, he wrote to the loyal Jews as their fellow citizen and general, exhorting them to preserve their present goodwill towards him and his son, on the ground that his son would continue his policy in gentleness and kindness, and so maintain friendly relations with them (2 Macc. ix.).

  • In short, his kindness of heart rose above all social, religious or political differences, and nothing destroyed his confidence in men and his sanguine views of life.

  • The kindness of friends, however, supplied provision for his children, and enabled him to carry out the long-cherished wish of visiting some of his philosophical allies.

  • Shamash the sun-god was invested with justice as his chief trait, Marduk is portrayed as full of mercy and kindness, Ea is the protector of mankind who is grieved when, through a deception practised upon Adapa, humanity is deprived of immortality.

  • He accompanied his uncle Marcus to Cilicia, and, in the hope of obtaining a reward, repaid his kindness by informing Caesar of his intention of leaving Italy.

  • Saxony established a penitentiary at Zwickau in 1850 and in its earlier management exhibited exaggerated kindness to its inmates.

  • He requires kindness, forgiveness and loving sacrifice from all to all (Isa.

  • In 1687 a project of settling the crown on the princess, to the exclusion of Mary, on the condition of Anne's embracing Roman Catholicism, was rendered futile by her pronounced attachment to the Church of England, and beyond sending her books and papers James appears to have made no attempt to coerce his daughter into a change of faith,' and to have treated her with kindness, while the birth of his son on the 10th of June 1688 made the religion of his daughters a matter of less political importance.

  • Instances abound of her kindness and consideration for others.

  • the ripening coco-nuts are taboo as long as the breadfruit lasts, thus securing the former for future use; or it is put on after a death, and the nuts thus saved are given to the family - a kindness to them, and a mark of respect for the dead.

  • Allon was a man of sound judgment, strong will, great moral courage and personal kindness.

  • In all this it was the position and rights of the clergy that were assailed; and James showed kindness to the church in seeking to secure that stipends should be paid and that new churches should be provided where required.

  • Nor did his kindness cease there; before sailing on the expedition to Cadiz, in the beginning of 1596, he addressed letters to Buckhurst, Fortescue and Egerton, earnestly requesting them to use their influence towards procuring for Bacon the vacant office of master of the rolls.

  • The same writer greatly praises him for his kindness to Christian missionaries.

  • Paul, however, refused to accept his resignation and would have sent him abroad for the benefit of his health, had not a sudden stroke of paralysis prevented Bezborodko from taking advantage of his master's kindness.

  • In a letter to her brother, drawn up by Gardiner by the king's direction, she acknowledged the unreality of the marriage and the king's kindness and generosity.

  • In fact, however, the evidence goes to show that the empress, who was at all times very fond of children, treated Paul with kindness.

  • Though this kindness towards the Germanic tribes was resented by the Romans, and in some cases ill requited, yet it may be said that it not only averted a great danger to the empire, but considerably strengthened Theodosius' army.

  • came to the throne, he thought it politic to treat her with kindness.

  • Towards her parents her conduct was uniformly exemplary, and the charm of her unselfish kindness made her a favourite in the village.

  • And he spoke to them at some length on the kindness of Ananda.

  • bene, well, and volens, wishing), a term for an act of kindness, or a gift of money, or goods, but used in a special sense to indicate sums of money, disguised as gifts, which were extorted by various English kings from their subjects, without consent of parliament.

  • During his absence from England Whitefield found that a divergence of doctrine from Calvinism had been introduced by Wesley; and notwithstanding Wesley's exhortations to brotherly kindness and forbearance he withdrew from the Wesleyan connexion.

  • He is sent back in disgrace, punished by solitude and plain bread, presently repents, reforms and is killed by kindness.

  • Aristotle goes somewhat further in recognizing the moral value of friendship (c1xAia); and though he considers that in its highest form it can be realized only by the fellowship of the wise and good, he yet extends the notion so as to include the domestic affections, and takes notice of the importance of mutual kindness in binding together all human societies.

  • The character of the people is marked by simplicity of manners, kindness and hospitality.

  • Lord Cadogan became lord-lieutenant of Ireland, and Mr Gerald Balfour - who announced a policy of " killing Home Rule by kindness " - chief secretary.

  • At an inn in the Orient he cured a sick monk, who later on, as bishop of Olmiitz, returned the kindness by saving the Jews from massacre.

  • Doa Christina, apart from the dictates of gratitude towards the head of her Church for the kindness shown to her son and government, was a zealous Catholic. She proved all thfough her regency that she not only relied upon the support of the Vatican and of the prelates, but that she was determined to favor the Church and the religious foundations in every possible way.

  • He was generous and charitable, of "a solid and masculine kindness," and of a temper hot, but completely under control.

  • All the acts of kindness which he did for the poor during the six years he was stationed at Gravesend will never be fully known.

  • By the kindness of a friend named Richter, he was enabled to resume his university career, and in the autumn of that year he graduated as doctor and qualified as privatdocent.

  • " Yet his nature had its kindly side: " He feels kindness deeply - and his love for his wife and children, and for all children, is very great " (Queen Victoria, loc. cit).

  • His anxiety to be believed is very great, and I must say his personal promises I am inclined to believe; then his feelings are very strong; he feels kindness deeply..

  • From her visions, neither of them was capable of any measure of kindness.

  • He didn't do so out of the kindness of his heart.

  • Deidre wasn't expecting his version of kindness.

  • "The Dark One is not known for mercy or kindness," he said, amused.

  • "Kindness and compassion aren't weaknesses," she countered.

  • Cynthia and her husband were appreciative of his efforts, which Dean knew came as much from nerves over his pending jury duty as early morning kindness.

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