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kilkenny

kilkenny

kilkenny Sentence Examples

  • Cashel, Cahir and several castles fell in February, and Kilkenny in March; Clonmel repulsing the assault with great loss, but surrendering on the 10th of May 1650.

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  • But jealousy between the kinsmen was complicated by differences between Owen Roe and the Catholic council which met at Kilkenny in October 1642.

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  • He was afterwards successively elected for Middlesex (1830), Kilkenny (1837) and for the Montrose burghs (1842), in the service of which constituency he died.

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  • The railways leaving Dublin are the following: the Great Northern, with its terminus in Amiens Street, with suburban lines, and a main line running north to Drogheda, Dundalk and Belfast, with ramifications through the northern countries; the Great Southern & Western (Kingsbridge terminus) to Kilkenny, Athlone and Cork; the Midland Great Western (Broadstone terminus), to Cavan, Sligo and Galway; the Dublin & South-Eastern (Harcourt Street and Westland Row for Kingstown); and there is the North Wall station of the London & North-Western, with the line known as the North Wall extension, connecting with the other main lines.

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  • Waterford, whence he marched through the counties of Kilkenny and Wicklow, and subsequently arrived in Dublin, where he remained a fortnight, sumptuously entertained by the provost, as the chief magistrate of the city was then called, till intelligence of the invasion of his kingdom by Bolingbroke recalled him to England.

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  • it was classed along with Dublin,Waterford and Kilkenny as one of the four staple towns of Ireland.

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  • He passed from the school at Kilkenny to Trinity College, Dublin (1700), where, owing to the peculiar subtlety of his mind and his determination to accept no doctrine on the evidence of authority or convention, he left the beaten track of study and was regarded by some as a dunce, by others as a genius.

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  • STATUTE OF KILKENNY, the name given to a body of laws promulgated in 1366 with the object of strengthening the English authority in Ireland.

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  • m., and covers the whole of the county Kilkenny, with parts of Waterford, Cork and Limerick, Tipperary, Carlow, King's and Queen's counties.

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  • EDMUND IGNATIUS RICE (1762-1844), Irish philanthropist, founder of the "Irish Christian Brothers," was born at Westcourt, near Callen, Kilkenny, on the 1st of June 1762.

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  • His father, George Carr Shaw, was a retired civil servant, the younger son of Bernard Shaw, high sheriff of Kilkenny.

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  • In 1646 he went to Kilkenny, then in the hands of the rebel "confederate Catholics," and, in opposition to the papal nuncio Rinuccini, urged, and in 1649 helped to secure, peace with the viceroy Ormonde.

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  • Kilkenny, Ireland (County) >>

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  • There is more than one meaning of Kilkenny discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • At six he went to Kilkenny School, where Congreve was a schoolfellow; at fourteen he entered pensioner at Trinity College, Dublin, where he seems to have neglected his opportunities.

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  • At Ferrybank, on the Kilkenny side of the river, there is a shipbuilding yard with patent slip and graving dock.

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  • a friend of St Columba and patron of Kilkenny in Ireland.

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  • (b) Leinster (eastern midlands and southeast): Counties Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's County, Longford, Louth, Meath, Queen's County, Westmeath, Wexford, Wicklow.

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  • in any part of Ireland, whereas over the larger part of the eastern slope of Great Britain it is some 3° lower; and in July the extremes in Ireland are 59° in the north and 62° in Kilkenny.

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  • The only important occurrences of coal in the south are in eastern Tipperary, near Killenaule, and in the Leinster coalfield (counties Kilkenny and Carlow and Queen's County), where there is a high synclinal field, including Lower and Middle Coal-Measures, and resembling in structure the Forest of Dean area in England.

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  • In addition to the foregoing, seven Roman Catholic institutions were ranked as colleges in the census of 1901: - All Hallows (Drumcondra), Holycross (Clonliffe), University College (Blackrock), St Patrick's (Carlow), St Kieran's (Kilkenny), St Stanislaus's (Tullamore) and St Patrick's (Thurles).

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  • Dublin, Meath, Kildare, Wicklow, Queen's Co., Kilkenny and Tipperary.

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  • Kilkenny?) two years later.

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  • Carlow, Kilkenny and the territory round Lough Neagh were settled, and after the capture of Lough Erne in 932 much of Longford was colonized.

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  • John did not venture farther west than Trim, but most of the Anglo-Norman lords swore fealty to him, and he divided the partially obedient districts into twelve counties - Dublin (with Wicklow), Meath (with Westmeath), Louth, Carlow, Kilkenny, Wexford, Waterford, Cork, Limerick, `:Kerry and Tipperary.

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  • Parliament was not more liberal, for the statute of Kilkenny, passed in 1366, ordained that "no Irishman be admitted into any cathedral or collegiate church, nor to any benefice among the English of the land," and also "that no religious house situated among the English shall henceforth receive an Irishman to their profession."

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  • In this reign too was passed the statute of Kilkenny (q.v.), a confession by the crown that obedient subjects were the minority.

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  • The provisions of the statute of Kilkenny against trading with the Irish failed, for markets cannot exist without buyers.

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  • Even the walled towns, Kilkenny, Ross, Wexford, Kinsale, Youghal, Clonmel, Kilmallock, Thomastown, Fethard and Cashel, were!almost starved Henry VI.

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  • The house of Ormonde had created a sort of small Pale about Kilkenny, and part of Wexford had been colonized by men of English race.

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  • Down and Louth paid black rent to O'Neill, Meath and Kildare to O'Connor, Wexford to the Kavanaghs, Kilkenny and Tipperary to O'Carroll, Limerick to the O'Briens, and Cork to the MacCarthies.

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  • The system of provisions was soon introduced at the expense of free election, and was acknowledged by the statute of Kilkenny.

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  • The famous parliament of Kilkenny in 1366 was largely attended, but the details of its composition are not known.

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  • Writs for another parliament in the same year were addressed in addition to the counties of Waterford, Cork and Limerick; the liberties and crosses of Ulster, Wexford, Tipperary and Kerry; the cities of Waterford, Cork and Limerick; and the towns of Youghal, Kinsale, Ross, Wexford and Kilkenny.

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  • He could never co-operate with the Roman Catholic confederacy at Kilkenny, which was under old English influence, and by throwing in his lot with the Celts only widened the gulf between the two sections.

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  • His candidate in a by-election at Kilkenny was beaten by nearly two to one, and he himself was injured in the eyes by lime being thrown at him.

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  • On the death of William of Kilkenny in 1256 the monks elected him bishop of Ely, to the annoyance of Henry III.

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  • despatched him to that country as papal nuncio; he landed at Kenmare with .arms and money in October 1645, and took up his residence at Kilkenny.

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  • Called the Confederate Catholics, they had set up a provisional government, and when the nuncio reached Kilkenny they were engaged in negotiating for peace with the lord lieutenant, the marquess, afterwards duke, of Ormonde.

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  • Leaving Kilkenny he stayed for some time in Galway, and in February 1649 he left Ireland.

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  • In Ireland a society was founded in 1849 called the Kilkenny Archaeological Society, holding its meetings at Kilkenny.

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  • Cashel, Cahir and several castles fell in February, and Kilkenny in March; Clonmel repulsing the assault with great loss, but surrendering on the 10th of May 1650.

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  • But jealousy between the kinsmen was complicated by differences between Owen Roe and the Catholic council which met at Kilkenny in October 1642.

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  • He was afterwards successively elected for Middlesex (1830), Kilkenny (1837) and for the Montrose burghs (1842), in the service of which constituency he died.

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  • The railways leaving Dublin are the following: the Great Northern, with its terminus in Amiens Street, with suburban lines, and a main line running north to Drogheda, Dundalk and Belfast, with ramifications through the northern countries; the Great Southern & Western (Kingsbridge terminus) to Kilkenny, Athlone and Cork; the Midland Great Western (Broadstone terminus), to Cavan, Sligo and Galway; the Dublin & South-Eastern (Harcourt Street and Westland Row for Kingstown); and there is the North Wall station of the London & North-Western, with the line known as the North Wall extension, connecting with the other main lines.

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  • Waterford, whence he marched through the counties of Kilkenny and Wicklow, and subsequently arrived in Dublin, where he remained a fortnight, sumptuously entertained by the provost, as the chief magistrate of the city was then called, till intelligence of the invasion of his kingdom by Bolingbroke recalled him to England.

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  • it was classed along with Dublin,Waterford and Kilkenny as one of the four staple towns of Ireland.

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  • He passed from the school at Kilkenny to Trinity College, Dublin (1700), where, owing to the peculiar subtlety of his mind and his determination to accept no doctrine on the evidence of authority or convention, he left the beaten track of study and was regarded by some as a dunce, by others as a genius.

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  • STATUTE OF KILKENNY, the name given to a body of laws promulgated in 1366 with the object of strengthening the English authority in Ireland.

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  • This statute was written in Norman-French, and nineteen of its clauses are merely repetitions of some ordinances which had been drawn up at Kilkenny fifteen years earlier.

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  • m., and covers the whole of the county Kilkenny, with parts of Waterford, Cork and Limerick, Tipperary, Carlow, King's and Queen's counties.

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  • EDMUND IGNATIUS RICE (1762-1844), Irish philanthropist, founder of the "Irish Christian Brothers," was born at Westcourt, near Callen, Kilkenny, on the 1st of June 1762.

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  • His father, George Carr Shaw, was a retired civil servant, the younger son of Bernard Shaw, high sheriff of Kilkenny.

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  • In 1646 he went to Kilkenny, then in the hands of the rebel "confederate Catholics," and, in opposition to the papal nuncio Rinuccini, urged, and in 1649 helped to secure, peace with the viceroy Ormonde.

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  • Kilkenny, Ireland (County) >>

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  • There is more than one meaning of Kilkenny discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • At six he went to Kilkenny School, where Congreve was a schoolfellow; at fourteen he entered pensioner at Trinity College, Dublin, where he seems to have neglected his opportunities.

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  • At Ferrybank, on the Kilkenny side of the river, there is a shipbuilding yard with patent slip and graving dock.

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  • a friend of St Columba and patron of Kilkenny in Ireland.

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  • (b) Leinster (eastern midlands and southeast): Counties Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's County, Longford, Louth, Meath, Queen's County, Westmeath, Wexford, Wicklow.

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  • in any part of Ireland, whereas over the larger part of the eastern slope of Great Britain it is some 3° lower; and in July the extremes in Ireland are 59° in the north and 62° in Kilkenny.

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  • The only important occurrences of coal in the south are in eastern Tipperary, near Killenaule, and in the Leinster coalfield (counties Kilkenny and Carlow and Queen's County), where there is a high synclinal field, including Lower and Middle Coal-Measures, and resembling in structure the Forest of Dean area in England.

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  • In addition to the foregoing, seven Roman Catholic institutions were ranked as colleges in the census of 1901: - All Hallows (Drumcondra), Holycross (Clonliffe), University College (Blackrock), St Patrick's (Carlow), St Kieran's (Kilkenny), St Stanislaus's (Tullamore) and St Patrick's (Thurles).

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  • Dublin, Meath, Kildare, Wicklow, Queen's Co., Kilkenny and Tipperary.

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  • Kilkenny?) two years later.

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  • Carlow, Kilkenny and the territory round Lough Neagh were settled, and after the capture of Lough Erne in 932 much of Longford was colonized.

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  • John did not venture farther west than Trim, but most of the Anglo-Norman lords swore fealty to him, and he divided the partially obedient districts into twelve counties - Dublin (with Wicklow), Meath (with Westmeath), Louth, Carlow, Kilkenny, Wexford, Waterford, Cork, Limerick, `:Kerry and Tipperary.

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  • Parliament was not more liberal, for the statute of Kilkenny, passed in 1366, ordained that "no Irishman be admitted into any cathedral or collegiate church, nor to any benefice among the English of the land," and also "that no religious house situated among the English shall henceforth receive an Irishman to their profession."

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    0
  • In this reign too was passed the statute of Kilkenny (q.v.), a confession by the crown that obedient subjects were the minority.

    0
    0
  • The provisions of the statute of Kilkenny against trading with the Irish failed, for markets cannot exist without buyers.

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    0
  • Even the walled towns, Kilkenny, Ross, Wexford, Kinsale, Youghal, Clonmel, Kilmallock, Thomastown, Fethard and Cashel, were!almost starved Henry VI.

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  • The house of Ormonde had created a sort of small Pale about Kilkenny, and part of Wexford had been colonized by men of English race.

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  • Down and Louth paid black rent to O'Neill, Meath and Kildare to O'Connor, Wexford to the Kavanaghs, Kilkenny and Tipperary to O'Carroll, Limerick to the O'Briens, and Cork to the MacCarthies.

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  • The system of provisions was soon introduced at the expense of free election, and was acknowledged by the statute of Kilkenny.

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  • The famous parliament of Kilkenny in 1366 was largely attended, but the details of its composition are not known.

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  • Writs for another parliament in the same year were addressed in addition to the counties of Waterford, Cork and Limerick; the liberties and crosses of Ulster, Wexford, Tipperary and Kerry; the cities of Waterford, Cork and Limerick; and the towns of Youghal, Kinsale, Ross, Wexford and Kilkenny.

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  • He could never co-operate with the Roman Catholic confederacy at Kilkenny, which was under old English influence, and by throwing in his lot with the Celts only widened the gulf between the two sections.

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  • His candidate in a by-election at Kilkenny was beaten by nearly two to one, and he himself was injured in the eyes by lime being thrown at him.

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    0
  • On the death of William of Kilkenny in 1256 the monks elected him bishop of Ely, to the annoyance of Henry III.

    0
    0
  • despatched him to that country as papal nuncio; he landed at Kenmare with .arms and money in October 1645, and took up his residence at Kilkenny.

    0
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  • Called the Confederate Catholics, they had set up a provisional government, and when the nuncio reached Kilkenny they were engaged in negotiating for peace with the lord lieutenant, the marquess, afterwards duke, of Ormonde.

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  • Leaving Kilkenny he stayed for some time in Galway, and in February 1649 he left Ireland.

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  • In Ireland a society was founded in 1849 called the Kilkenny Archaeological Society, holding its meetings at Kilkenny.

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  • In their efforts to cope with the prevailing disorder Lionel and his advisers summoned a parliament to meet at Kilkenny early in 1366 and here the statute of Kilkenny was passed into law.

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  • This statute was written in Norman-French, and nineteen of its clauses are merely repetitions of some ordinances which had been drawn up at Kilkenny fifteen years earlier.

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  • In their efforts to cope with the prevailing disorder Lionel and his advisers summoned a parliament to meet at Kilkenny early in 1366 and here the statute of Kilkenny was passed into law.

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