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kiev

kiev

kiev Sentence Examples

  • White Church), a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 32 m.

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  • In 1550 a castle was built here by the prince of Kiev, and various privileges were bestowed upon the inhabitants.

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  • 988) settled at Kiev, and his province was part of the patriarchate of Constantinople, and appeals lay to Constantinople.

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  • In 1069 he succeeded in placing Izaslaus on the throne of Kiev, thereby confirming Poland's overlordship over Russia and enabling Boleslaus to chastise his other enemies, Bohemia among them, with the co-operation of his Russian auxiliaries.

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  • A second successful expedition to Kiev to reinstate his protege Izaslaus, is Boleslaus's last recorded exploit.

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  • The following table shows the urban population in the various divisions of the empire in 1897: - There were in European Russia and Poland only twelve cities with more than too,000 inhabitants in 1884; in 1900 there were sixteen, namely, St Petersburg, Moscow, Warsaw, Odessa, Lodz, Riga, Kiev, Kharkov, Vilna, Saratov, Kazan, Ekaterinoslav, Rostov-on-the Don, Astrakhan, Tula and Kishinev.

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  • That in the Duma any Radical elements survive at all is mainly due to the peculiar franchise enjoyed by the seven largest towns - St Petersburg, Moscow, Kiev, Odessa, Riga and the Polish cities of Warsaw and Lodz.

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  • In 1906 there were governors-general in Finland, Warsaw, Vilna, Kiev, Moscow and Riga.

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  • (Yuriev or Dorpat, Kazan, Kharkov, Kiev, Moscow, Odessa, St Petersburg, Warsaw and Tomsk), with 19,400 students, 6 medical academies (one for women), 6 theological academies, 6 military academies, 5 philological institutes, 3 Eastern languages institutes,.

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  • Even at Kiev and Lugansk the average of March is below 30°, while in central Russia it is 25° to 22°, and as low as 20° and 16° at Samara and Orenburg.

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  • The summer isotherms cross the winter isotherms nearly at right angles, so that Kiev and Ufa, Warsaw and Tobolsk, Riga and the upper Kama have the same average summer temperatures of 64°, 622° and 61° respectively.

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  • For more detailed bibliographical information see Apercu des travaux zoo-ge'ographiques, published at St Petersburg in connexion with the Exhibition of 1878; and the index Ukazatel Russkoi Literatury for natural science, mathematics and medicine, published since 1872 by the Society of the Kiev University.

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  • In Kovno, Vilna, Mogilev, Grodno, Volhynia, Podolia, Minsk, Vitebsk, Kiev, Bessarabia and Kherson, they constitute, on the average, 12 to 172% of the population, while in the cities and towns of these governments they reach 30 to 59% of the population.

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  • sinuous line drawn from Zhitomir via Kiev, Tula and Kazan to Ufa - that is, from W.S.W.

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  • Beetroot (6-8 million tons annually) for sugar is especially cultivated in Poland, the governments of Kiev, Podolia, Volhynia, Kharkov, Bessarabia and Kherson.

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  • The governments of Orel (shoe factories), Kherson, Vyatka, Nizhniy-Novgorod, Perm, Kiev and Kazan rank next in this respect.

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  • Nestor, an old monkish chronicler Origin of Kiev, relates that in the middle of the 9th century of the the Slav and Finnish tribes inhabiting the forest region around Lake Ilmen, between Lake Ladoga and the upper waters of the Dnieper, paid tribute to military adventurers from the land of Ras, which is commonly supposed to have been a part of Sweden.

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  • They at once began to conquer the surrounding country in all directions, and before two centuries had passed they had established themselves firmly at Kiev on the Dnieper, invaded.

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  • It had to be divided, therefore, into a number of independent principalities, but it continued to be loosely held together by the dynastic sentiment of the descendants of Rurik and by the patriarchal authority - a sort of patria potestas - of the senior member of the family, called the grand-prince, who ruled in Kiev, " the mother of Russian cities."

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  • During these interminable struggles of rival princes, Kiev, which had been so long the residence of the grand-prince and of the metropolitan, was repeatedly taken by storm and ruthlessly pillaged, and finally the whole valley of the Dnieper fell a prey to the marauding tribes of the steppe.

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  • member of the university of Kiev, and of the Prussian, Bavarian and Danish academies; he received the Prussian order Pour le Write, and was corresponding member of the Academie des sciences morales et politiques of the French Institute.

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  • That in the Duma any Radical elements survive at all is mainly due to the peculiar franchise enjoyed by the seven largest towns - St Petersburg, Moscow, Kiev, Odessa, Riga and the Polish cities of Warsaw and Lodz.

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  • sinuous line drawn from Zhitomir via Kiev, Tula and Kazan to Ufa - that is, from W.S.W.

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  • Nestor, an old monkish chronicler Origin of Kiev, relates that in the middle of the 9th century of the the Slav and Finnish tribes inhabiting the forest region around Lake Ilmen, between Lake Ladoga and the upper waters of the Dnieper, paid tribute to military adventurers from the land of Ras, which is commonly supposed to have been a part of Sweden.

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  • During these interminable struggles of rival princes, Kiev, which had been so long the residence of the grand-prince and of the metropolitan, was repeatedly taken by storm and ruthlessly pillaged, and finally the whole valley of the Dnieper fell a prey to the marauding tribes of the steppe.

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  • And he dreamed that the Holy Virgin Mother of the Kiev catacombs came to him and said, 'Believe in me and I will make you whole.'

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  • of Vasilkov, on the main road from Kiev to the Crimea, in 49 47' N.

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  • slopes of the central plateau and those of the Carpathian and Lublin mountains, and the Carpathian plateau, that is, the governments of Podolia, Volhynia, Poltava, and Kiev.

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  • of the black earth zone, that is in the governments of Kiev, Podolia, Poltava and in part of Kharkov.

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  • Here new principalities were founded and new agglomerations of principalities came into existence, some of them having a grand prince who no longer professed allegiance to Kiev.

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  • In the negotiations for peace the inordinate pretensions of the Muscovite prince were put forward boldly: he not only refused to restore Smolensk, but claimed Kiev and a number of other towns on the ground that in the old time of the independent principalities they had belonged to descendants of Rurik.

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  • p p These had been detected and pointed out by learned ecclesiastics of Kiev, where some of the ancient learning of Byzantium had been preserved, and Nikon determined to make the necessary corrections.

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  • sqq.); Nikolai Ivanovich Kostomarov (1817-1885), professor of history at Kiev and St Petersburg, whose monographs and researches are collected in his Sobranye sochinenye (collected works, 21 vols., St Petersburg, 1903-6); V.

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  • 2 35 52.228 „ 1895 „ Kiev „ Baku..

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  • PODOLIA, a government of south-western Russia, having Volhynia on the N., Kiev and Kherson on the E.

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  • Podolia is traversed by a railway which runs parallel to the Dniester, from Lemberg to Odessa, and has two branch lines, to Kiev (from Zhmerinka) and to Poltava (from Balta).

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  • Oleg, prince of Kiev, extended his rule over this territory - the Ponizie, or "lowlands," which became later a part of the principalities of Volhynia, Kiev and Galicia.

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  • At last, in 1165, he was successful; and, after passing through many dangers, reached the court of Yaroslav, grand prince of Russia, at Kiev.

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  • In January 1671 we hear of him as in attendance upon the tsar on the occasion of his second marriage; but in February the same year he was dismissed, and withdrew to the Kruipetsky monastery near Kiev, where he took the tonsure under the name of Antony, and occupied himself with good works till his death in 1680.

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  • RADOMYSL, formerly Mychek, a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 31 m.

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  • of the city of Kiev, on the Teterev river.

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  • Above all these stretched a row of non-Scythian tribes from west to east: on the Marls (Maros) in Transylvania the Agathyrsi; Neuri in Podolia and Kiev, Androphagi and Melanchlaeni in Poltava, (Ryazan) and Tambov.

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  • An interchange of courtesies with the Metropolitan of Kiev on the occasion of the Booth anniversary of the conversion of Russia (1888), led to further intercourse, which has tended to a friendlier feeling between the English and Russian churches.

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  • The kingdom dwindled rapidly to its ancient limits between the Caucasus, the Volga and the Don, whilst the Russian traders of Novgorod and Kiev supplanted the Khazars as the carriers between Constantinople and the North.

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  • At the assault of Swiatoslav of Kiev the rotten fabric crumbled into dust.

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  • OLEG (?-912), prince of Kiev, succeeded Rurik, as being the eldest member of the ducal family, in the principality of Great Novgorod, the first Russian metropolis.

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  • Three years later he moved southwards and, after taking Smolensk and other places, fixed his residence at Kiev, which he made his capital.

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  • Oleg returned to Kiev laden with golden ornaments, costly cloths, wines, and all manner of precious things.

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  • The envoys returned to Kiev in 912 after being shown the splendours of the Greek capital and being instructed in the rudiments of the Greek faith.

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  • In the autumn of the same year Oleg died and was buried at Kiev.

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  • (Kiev, 1889).

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  • The Slavonic heroic saga of Russia centres round Vladimir of Kiev (980-1015), the first Christian ruler of that country, whose personality is eclipsed by that of Ilya (Elias) of Mourom, the son of a peasant, who was said to have saved the empire from the Tatars at the urgent request of his emperor.

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  • (Kiev, 1885).

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  • As a result of the Polish rebellion of 1830, in which the peasantry, whether Lithuanian, Polish or White Russian, did not take so great a part as the upper classes, the university of Vilna was abolished in 1832, its faculties being transferred in bulk to Kiev and in part to Kharkov and St.

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  • This was the work of Petrus Mogilas, metropolitan of Kiev, and other theologians.

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  • The great opposition which arose during his lifetime continued after his death, and found classic expression in the highly venerated confession of Petrus Mogilas, metropolitan of Kiev (1643).(1643).

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  • Vladimir, prince of Kiev, conquered Chersonesus (Korsun) before being baptized there, and restored it to the Greeks on marrying (988) the princess Anna.

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  • The foundation of Dorpat is ascribed to Yaroslav, prince of Kiev, and is dated 1030.

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  • AKHTYRKA, a town of Russia, in the government of Kharkov, near the Vorskla river, connected by a branch (11 m.) with the railway from Kiev to Kharkov.

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  • In home affairs his influence was insignificant, but his foreign policy was distinguished by the peace with Poland in 1683, whereby Russia at last recovered Kiev.

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  • Pinsk (Pinesk) is first mentioned in 1097 as a town belonging to Sviatopolk, prince of Kiev.

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  • Gedymin still further extended the limits of Lithuania by annexing Kiev, Chernigov and other old Russian principalities.

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  • Again, it should have been the first duty of the Republic adequately to fortify the dzikie pola, or "savage steppe," as the vast plain was called which extended from Kiev to the Black Sea, and some feeble attempts to do so were at last made.

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  • Kiev, the religious metropolis of western Russia, was to remain in the hands of Muscovy for two years.

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  • The "truce" of And russowo proved to be one of the most permanent peaces in history, and Kiev, though only pledged for two years, was never again to be separated from the Orthodox Slavonic state to which it rightly belonged.

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  • bishops, Woclaw Hieronim Sierakowski (1699-1784) of Lemberg, Feliks Pawel Turski of Chelm (1729-1800), Kajetan Ignaty Soltyk of Cracow (1715-1788), and Jozef Jendrzej Zaluski of Kiev (1702-1774), offered a determined resistance to Repnin's.

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  • The Polish universities of Warsaw and Vilna were suppressed, and the students compelled to go to St Petersburg and Kiev.

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  • A notable man was Joseph Andrew Zaluski, bishop of Kiev, a Pole who had become thoroughly frenchified - so much so, that he preached in French to the fashionable congregations of Warsaw.

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  • KIEV, a city of Russia, capital of the above government, on the right or west bank of the Dnieper, in 50 0 27' 12" N.

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  • Altogether Kiev is one of the most beautiful cities in Russia, and the vicinity too is picturesque.

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  • The Old Town, or Old Kiev quarter (Starokievskaya Chast), occupies the highest of the range of hills.

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  • The church of St Andrew the Apostle occupies the spot where, according to Russian tradition, that apostle stood when as yet Kiev was not, and declared that the hill would become the site of a great city.

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  • The foundation of the monastery is ascribed to two saints of the 11th century - Anthony and Hilarion, the latter metropolitan of Kiev.

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  • It is the industrial and trading quarter of the city, and the seat of the great fair of the " Contracts," the transference of which from Dubno in 1797 largely stimulated the commercial prosperity of Kiev.

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  • The educational and scientific institutions of Kiev rank next to those of the two capitals.

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  • Its university, removed from Vilna to Kiev in 1834, has about 2500 students, and is well provided with observatories, laboratories, libraries and museums; five scientific societies and two societies for aid to poor students are attached to it.

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  • There are, besides, a theological academy, founded in 1615; a society of church archaeology, which possesses a museum built in 1900, very rich in old ikons, crosses, &c., both Russian and Oriental; an imperial academy of music; university courses for ladies; a polytechnic, with 1300 students - the building was completed in 190o and stands on the other side of Old Kiev, away from the river.

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  • Kiev is the principal centre for the sugar industry of Russia, as well as for the general trade of the region.

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  • In 1862 the population of Kiev was returned as 70,341; in 1874 the total was given as 127,251; and in 1902 as 319,000.

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  • Kiev is the headquarters of the IX.

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  • The history of Kiev cannot he satisfactorily separated from that of Russia.

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  • Rurik's successor Oleg conquered Kiev in 882 and made it the chief town of his principality.

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  • It was in the waters of the Dnieper opposite the town that Prince Vladimir, the first saint of the Russian church, caused his people to be baptized (988), and Kiev became the seat of the first Christian church, of the first Christian school, and of the first library in Russia.

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  • The Russian literature concerning Kiev is voluminous.

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  • Among recent publications are: Rambaud's La Russie epique (Paris, 1876); Avenarius, Kniga o Kievskikh Bogatuiryakh (St Petersburg, 1876), dealing with the early Kiev heroes; Zakrevski, Opisanie Kieva (1868); the materials issued by the commission for the investigation of the ancient records of the city; Taranovskiy, Gorod Kiev (Kiev, 1881); De Baye, Kiev, la mere des villes cusses (Paris, 1896) Goetz, Das Kiewer Hohlenkloster als Kulturzentrum des Vormongolischen Russlands (Passau, 1904).

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  • Byelyashevsky, The Mints of Kiev.

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  • Coislinianus of the 6th century in Paris, Turin, Kiev, Moscow and Mt.

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  • It was during his government that the Muscovite church received its patriarchate, which placed it on an equality with the other Eastern churches and emancipated it from the influence of the metropolitan of Kiev.

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  • of Kiev, on the railway between Kursk and Kiev.

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  • Peter Mogilas, metropolitan of Kiev, drew up in 1643 the Orthodox Confession of the Catholic and Apostolic Eastern Church.

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  • The emperor, however, being at war with Boleslaus of Poland, opposed his enterprise, and he went first to the court of St Stephen of Hungary, and, finding but slight encouragement there, to that of the grand prince Vladimir at Kiev.

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  • The first session at Florence and the seventeenth of the union council took place on the 26th of February 1439; there ensued long debates and negotiations on the filioque, in which Markos Eugenikos, archbishop of Ephesus, spoke for the irreconcilables; but the Greeks under the leadership of Bessarion, archbishop of Nicaea, and Isidor, metropolitan of Kiev, at length made a declaration on the filioque (4th of June), to which all save Markos Eugenikos subscribed.

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  • Russia, in the government of Kiev, 116 m.

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  • of Kiev by rail and not far from the borders of Volhynia.

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  • Here occurs the earliest mention of Vinland, and here are also references of great interest to Russia and Kiev, to the heathen Prussians, the Wends and other Slav races of the South Baltic coast, and to Finland, Thule or Iceland, Greenland and the Polar seas which Harald Hardrada and the nobles of Frisia had attempted to explore in Adam's own day (before 1066).

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  • He was imprisoned by Leontie, bishop of Kiev.

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  • Greek monks played a considerable part in the evangelization of the Sla y s, and the first Russian monastery was founded;at Kiev (c. 1050) by a monk from Mount Athos.

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  • Poland, with 193 (domiciled) inhabitants or 213 inhabitants in all to the square mile in 1897, and 240 to the square mile in 1904, has a denser population than any other region in the Russian empire, the next to it being the governments of Moscow, with 189 inhabitants to the square mile, Podolia with 186, and Kiev with 181.

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  • The sugar factories and refineries, situated chiefly in the governments of Warsaw, Lublin and Plock, turn out approximately one million tons of sugar in the year, the Polish sugar industry being exceeded in Russia only by that of Kiev.

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  • The most important ecclesiastical event of the reign was the elevation of the Bulgarian, Gregory Tsamblak, to the metropolitan see of Kiev (1425) by Vitovt, grand-duke of Lithuania; the immediate political consequence of which was the weakening of the hold of Muscovy on the south-western Russian states.

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  • PETER MOGILA (c. 1596-1647), metropolitan of Kiev from 1632, belonged to a noble Wallachian family.

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  • He was the author of a Catechism (Kiev, 1645) and other minor works, but is principally celebrated for the Orthodox Confession, drawn up at his instance by the Abbot Kosslowski of Kiev, approved at a provincial synod in 1640, and accepted by the patriarchs of Constantinople, Jerusalem, Alexandria and Antioch in 1642-1643, and by the synod of Jerusalem in 1672.

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  • It remained an independent principality until the 12th century, resisting the repeated attacks of the princes of Kiev; those of Pskov, Lithuania, and the Livonian Knights, however, proved more effective, and Polotsk fell under Lithuanian rule in 1320.

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  • He brilliantly distinguished himself at the Orthodox academy of Kiev, subsequently completing his education in Poland (for which purpose he turned Uniate), and at Rome in the College of the Propaganda.

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  • Primed with all the knowledge of the West, he returned home to seek his fortune, and, as the Orthodox monk, became one of the professors at, and subsequently rector of, the academy of Kiev.

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  • In 1709 Peter the Great, while passing through Kiev, was struck by the eloquence of Prokopovich in a sermon on "the most glorious victory," i.e.

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  • So invaluable, indeed, did he become to the civil power, that, despite the determined opposition of the Russian clergy, who regarded "the Light of Kiev" as an interloper and semi-heretic, he was rapidly promoted, becoming, in 1718, bishop of Pskov, and finally, in 1724, archbishop of Novgorod.

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  • On the other hand, while in the Eastern Church things have undergone little change, - the pilgrims, in addition to the Holy Land, visiting Mt Athos and Kiev - the developments in the Roman Church show important divergences.

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  • For his services he received the palatinate of Kiev.

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  • impulse which was driving part of the Norse and Danish peoples to piracies in the west was also driving the Swedes and perhaps a portion of the Danes to eastward invasion, which resulted in the establishment of a Scandinavian kingdom (GarOariki) in what is now Russia, with its capital first at Novgorod, afterwards at Kiev.

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  • Slonim is mentioned in 1040, when Yaroslav, prince of Kiev, defeated the Lithuanians in its neighbourhood.

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  • He returned (1250) as grand-duke of Kiev and Novgorod, while to Andrew was given the far more important grandduchy of Vladimir.

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  • From 1805 to 1832 its Polish lyceum was the centre of superior instruction for the western provinces of Little Russia; but after the Polish insurrection of 1831 the lyceum was transferred to Kiev, and is now the university of that town.

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  • Volk-Karachevsky, The Struggle of Poland with the Cossacks (Rus.) (Kiev, 1899); Letters and other Writings of Wladislaus IV.

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  • DANIEL (DANIL), of Kiev, the earliest Russian travel-writer, and one of the leading Russian travellers in the middle ages.

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  • Several Russian friends and companions, from Kiev and Old Novgorod, are recorded by Daniel as present with him at the Easter Eve "miracle," in the church of the Holy Sepulchre.

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  • CHERKASY (Polish, Czerkasy), a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 96 m.

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  • of Kiev, on the right bank of the Dnieper.

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  • VOLHYNIA, a government of south-western Russia, bounded by the Polish governments of Lublin and Siedlce on the W., Grodno and Minsk on the N., Kiev on the E.

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  • ALEKSANDER ANDREEVICH, PRINCE BEZBORODKO (1747-1799), grand chancellor of Russia, was born at Gluchova on the, 4th of March 1747, and educated at home and in the clerical academy at Kiev.

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  • In the first part of its course, which may be said to end at Dorogobuzh, it flows through an undulating country of Carboniferous formation; in the second it passes west to Orsha, south through the fertile plain of Chernigov and Kiev, and then southeast across the rocky steppe of the Ukraine to Ekaterinoslay.

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  • At Kiev the river is free from ice on an average of 234 days in the year, at Ekaterinoslav 270 and at Kherson 277.

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  • of Kiev.

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  • The metropolitan, who was subject to the patriarch of Constantinople, resided at Kiev on the Dnieper.

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  • This body now governs the Russian Church, and consists of a procurator representing the emperor, the metropolitans of Kiev, Moscow and St Petersburg, the exarch of Georgia and five or six other bishops appointed by the emperor.

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  • long., at the junction of the navigable river Mukhovets with the Bug, and at the intersection of railways from Warsaw, Kiev, Moscow and East Prussia.

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  • His plans were ruined by the peace of Tilsit; he retired to Russia, and died at Kiev.

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  • In 1051 Henry married the Russian princess Anne, daughter of Yaroslav I., grand duke of Kiev.

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  • Daniel of Kiev >>

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  • UMAN, a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 120 m.

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  • of the city of Kiev.

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  • The legends of the saints of the Pecherskaya in Kiev were translated by Alexander Dascalul.

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  • In June 1649, arrayed in cloth-of-gold and mounted on a white charger, Chmielnicki made his triumphal entry into Kiev, where he was hailed as the Maccabaeus of the Orthodox faith, and permitted the committal of unspeakable atrocities on the Jews and Roman Catholics.

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  • The archbishop of Corinth girded him with a sword which had lain upon the Holy Sepulchre, and the metropolitan of Kiev absolved him from all his sins, without the usual preliminary of confession, before he rode forth to battle.

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  • It is an important junction of the railways from Vilna to Odessa and from Orel to Poland, and is in steamer communication with Kiev and Mogilev.

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  • Basil obtained timely aid, in the shape of Varangian mercenaries, from his brother-in-law Vladimir, the Russian prince of Kiev, and marched to Abydos.

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  • from Kiev.

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  • In 1866 it was brought into railway connexion with Kiev and Kharkov via Balta, and with Jassy in Rumania.

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  • By the truce of Andrussowo (February 1, 1667) Vitebsk, Polotsk and Polish Livonia were restored to Poland, but the infinitely more important Smolensk and Kiev remained in the hands of the Muscovite together with the whole eastern bank of the Dnieper.

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  • Florinsky, Lektsi po slavyankomu yazykoznaniye (Kiev, 1895).

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  • He then turned his arms against Jaroslav, grand duke of Kiev, whom he routed on the banks of the Bug, then the boundary between Russia and Poland.

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  • For ten months Boleslaus remained at Kiev, whence he addressed triumphant letters to the emperors of the East and West.

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  • VASILKOV, a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 23 m.

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  • One of his most important territorial accretions, the principality of Halicz-Vladimir, was obtained by the marriage of his son Lubart with the daughter of the Haliczian prince; the other, Kiev, apparently by conquest.

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  • See Teodor Narbutt, History of the Lithuanian nation (Pol.) (Vilna, 1835); Antoni Prochaska, On the Genuineness of the Letters of Gedymin (Pol.) (Cracow, 1895); Vladimir Bonifatovich Antonovich, Monograph concerning the History of Western and Southwestern Russia (Rus.) (Kiev, 1885).

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  • The ruins in and near the town include remains of a church supposed to have been built by Vladimir, grand duke of Kiev, in the loth-11th centuries, and of another built in 1160 by his descendant Mstisla y.

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  • This latter was apparently very well built, and its length exceeded that of the temple of St Sophia at Kiev.

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  • The rest of his life was spent in an easy captivity at Kaluga, St Petersburg; and Kiev.

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  • 1054), grand duke of Kiev, came to the throne, when a child of eight, by the death of his father on the 4th of August 1060.

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  • Patrick Viera and Martin Keown are both out for the Gunners, while Kiev have no major absentees.

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  • assassinated by a police agent in Kiev in 1911.

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  • centrethere are other lesser historic centers - Rome, Constantinople, Kiev, Moscow.

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  • Incredibly, Pravda also described an alleged retrieval of an alien artifact during archeological digs in Kiev, near the Tchaikovsky Conservatory.

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  • The later march of the Red Army on Kiev, however, caused dissensions among the leaders of the organization.

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  • Bookmark Base is a privately held, self-funded project with headquarters in Kiev, Ukraine.

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  • The first monarchic dynasty, which ruled until the Mongol invasion of the 13th century, built Kiev as its capital.

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  • White Church), a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 32 m.

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  • of Vasilkov, on the main road from Kiev to the Crimea, in 49 47' N.

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  • In 1550 a castle was built here by the prince of Kiev, and various privileges were bestowed upon the inhabitants.

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  • 988) settled at Kiev, and his province was part of the patriarchate of Constantinople, and appeals lay to Constantinople.

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  • In 1069 he succeeded in placing Izaslaus on the throne of Kiev, thereby confirming Poland's overlordship over Russia and enabling Boleslaus to chastise his other enemies, Bohemia among them, with the co-operation of his Russian auxiliaries.

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  • A second successful expedition to Kiev to reinstate his protege Izaslaus, is Boleslaus's last recorded exploit.

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  • Province Or Government European Russia - Archangel Astrakhan Bessarabia Chernigov Courland Don Cossacks' territory Ekaterinoslav Esthonia Grodno Kaluga Kazan Kiev Kostroma Kovno Kursk Kharkov Kherson Poland Kalisz Kielce Lomza Lublin Grand-Duchy of Finland- Abo-Bjbrneborg Kuopio Nyland Caucasia- Kuban Baku Black Sea territory Daghestan Russia in Asia- Turkestan- Transcaspia Western Siberia- Tobolsk Tomsk Eastern Siberia Irkutsk Yakutsk Transbaikalia Yeniseisk Amur Region Amur Maritime Province Sakhalin It has been found, from a comparison of the densities of population of the various provinces in 1859 with the distribution in 1897, that the centre of density has distinctly moved S., towards the shores of the Black Sea, and W., the greatest increase having taken place in the E.

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  • The following table shows the urban population in the various divisions of the empire in 1897: - There were in European Russia and Poland only twelve cities with more than too,000 inhabitants in 1884; in 1900 there were sixteen, namely, St Petersburg, Moscow, Warsaw, Odessa, Lodz, Riga, Kiev, Kharkov, Vilna, Saratov, Kazan, Ekaterinoslav, Rostov-on-the Don, Astrakhan, Tula and Kishinev.

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  • It is presided over by a lay procurator, representing the emperor, and consists, for the rest, of the three metropolitans of Moscow, St Petersburg and Kiev, the archbishop of Georgia, and a number of bishops sitting in rotation.

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  • In 1906 there were governors-general in Finland, Warsaw, Vilna, Kiev, Moscow and Riga.

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  • (Yuriev or Dorpat, Kazan, Kharkov, Kiev, Moscow, Odessa, St Petersburg, Warsaw and Tomsk), with 19,400 students, 6 medical academies (one for women), 6 theological academies, 6 military academies, 5 philological institutes, 3 Eastern languages institutes,.

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  • Even at Kiev and Lugansk the average of March is below 30°, while in central Russia it is 25° to 22°, and as low as 20° and 16° at Samara and Orenburg.

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  • The summer isotherms cross the winter isotherms nearly at right angles, so that Kiev and Ufa, Warsaw and Tobolsk, Riga and the upper Kama have the same average summer temperatures of 64°, 622° and 61° respectively.

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  • For more detailed bibliographical information see Apercu des travaux zoo-ge'ographiques, published at St Petersburg in connexion with the Exhibition of 1878; and the index Ukazatel Russkoi Literatury for natural science, mathematics and medicine, published since 1872 by the Society of the Kiev University.

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  • slopes of the central plateau and those of the Carpathian and Lublin mountains, and the Carpathian plateau, that is, the governments of Podolia, Volhynia, Poltava, and Kiev.

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  • In Kovno, Vilna, Mogilev, Grodno, Volhynia, Podolia, Minsk, Vitebsk, Kiev, Bessarabia and Kherson, they constitute, on the average, 12 to 172% of the population, while in the cities and towns of these governments they reach 30 to 59% of the population.

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  • 125,640,020 The ecclesiastical heads of the national Orthodox Greek Church consist of three metropolitans (St Petersburg, Moscow, Kiev), fourteen archbishops and fifty bishops, all drawn from the ranks of the monastic (celibate) clergy.

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  • of the black earth zone, that is in the governments of Kiev, Podolia, Poltava and in part of Kharkov.

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  • Beetroot (6-8 million tons annually) for sugar is especially cultivated in Poland, the governments of Kiev, Podolia, Volhynia, Kharkov, Bessarabia and Kherson.

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  • The governments of Orel (shoe factories), Kherson, Vyatka, Nizhniy-Novgorod, Perm, Kiev and Kazan rank next in this respect.

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  • They at once began to conquer the surrounding country in all directions, and before two centuries had passed they had established themselves firmly at Kiev on the Dnieper, invaded.

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  • It had to be divided, therefore, into a number of independent principalities, but it continued to be loosely held together by the dynastic sentiment of the descendants of Rurik and by the patriarchal authority - a sort of patria potestas - of the senior member of the family, called the grand-prince, who ruled in Kiev, " the mother of Russian cities."

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  • Here new principalities were founded and new agglomerations of principalities came into existence, some of them having a grand prince who no longer professed allegiance to Kiev.

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  • In the negotiations for peace the inordinate pretensions of the Muscovite prince were put forward boldly: he not only refused to restore Smolensk, but claimed Kiev and a number of other towns on the ground that in the old time of the independent principalities they had belonged to descendants of Rurik.

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  • p p These had been detected and pointed out by learned ecclesiastics of Kiev, where some of the ancient learning of Byzantium had been preserved, and Nikon determined to make the necessary corrections.

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  • Thus a step forward was made in securing the freedom of conscience proclaimed in the October manifesto and denounced by a synod of Orthodox bishops at Kiev in 1908, though the rights granted by the Duma were seriously curtailed in the Imperial Council, and have been largely rendered a dead letter by the action of the administration.

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  • sqq.); Nikolai Ivanovich Kostomarov (1817-1885), professor of history at Kiev and St Petersburg, whose monographs and researches are collected in his Sobranye sochinenye (collected works, 21 vols., St Petersburg, 1903-6); V.

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  • In Russia this usually lies flat, only certain metropolitans, and by prescription the bishops of the eparchy of Kiev, having the right to have the cross upright (see fig.

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  • 2 35 52.228 „ 1895 „ Kiev „ Baku..

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  • PODOLIA, a government of south-western Russia, having Volhynia on the N., Kiev and Kherson on the E.

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  • Podolia is traversed by a railway which runs parallel to the Dniester, from Lemberg to Odessa, and has two branch lines, to Kiev (from Zhmerinka) and to Poltava (from Balta).

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  • Oleg, prince of Kiev, extended his rule over this territory - the Ponizie, or "lowlands," which became later a part of the principalities of Volhynia, Kiev and Galicia.

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  • At last, in 1165, he was successful; and, after passing through many dangers, reached the court of Yaroslav, grand prince of Russia, at Kiev.

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  • In January 1671 we hear of him as in attendance upon the tsar on the occasion of his second marriage; but in February the same year he was dismissed, and withdrew to the Kruipetsky monastery near Kiev, where he took the tonsure under the name of Antony, and occupied himself with good works till his death in 1680.

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  • RADOMYSL, formerly Mychek, a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 31 m.

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  • of the city of Kiev, on the Teterev river.

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  • The book was printed at the Pechersk monastery at Kiev, esteemed the special press of the Holy Synod, and its popularity is shown by the fact that it passed into three editions.

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  • Above all these stretched a row of non-Scythian tribes from west to east: on the Marls (Maros) in Transylvania the Agathyrsi; Neuri in Podolia and Kiev, Androphagi and Melanchlaeni in Poltava, (Ryazan) and Tambov.

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  • Others are found to the south-west of the central area, and in the governments of Kiev and Poltava we have many tombs with Scythic characteristics, but a difference (e.g.

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  • member of the university of Kiev, and of the Prussian, Bavarian and Danish academies; he received the Prussian order Pour le Write, and was corresponding member of the Academie des sciences morales et politiques of the French Institute.

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  • An interchange of courtesies with the Metropolitan of Kiev on the occasion of the Booth anniversary of the conversion of Russia (1888), led to further intercourse, which has tended to a friendlier feeling between the English and Russian churches.

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  • The Hungarians, severed from their kindred and their rulers, migrated to the Carpathians, whilst Oleg, the Russ prince of Kiev, passed through the Slav tribes of the Dnieper basin with the cry "Pay nothing to the Khazars" (884).

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  • The kingdom dwindled rapidly to its ancient limits between the Caucasus, the Volga and the Don, whilst the Russian traders of Novgorod and Kiev supplanted the Khazars as the carriers between Constantinople and the North.

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  • At the assault of Swiatoslav of Kiev the rotten fabric crumbled into dust.

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  • OLEG (?-912), prince of Kiev, succeeded Rurik, as being the eldest member of the ducal family, in the principality of Great Novgorod, the first Russian metropolis.

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  • Three years later he moved southwards and, after taking Smolensk and other places, fixed his residence at Kiev, which he made his capital.

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  • Oleg returned to Kiev laden with golden ornaments, costly cloths, wines, and all manner of precious things.

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  • The envoys returned to Kiev in 912 after being shown the splendours of the Greek capital and being instructed in the rudiments of the Greek faith.

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  • In the autumn of the same year Oleg died and was buried at Kiev.

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  • (Kiev, 1889).

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  • The Slavonic heroic saga of Russia centres round Vladimir of Kiev (980-1015), the first Christian ruler of that country, whose personality is eclipsed by that of Ilya (Elias) of Mourom, the son of a peasant, who was said to have saved the empire from the Tatars at the urgent request of his emperor.

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  • The principal efforts of this eminent empire-maker were directed to securing those of the Russian lands which had formed part of the ancient grand-duchy of Kiev.

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  • (Kiev, 1885).

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  • As a result of the Polish rebellion of 1830, in which the peasantry, whether Lithuanian, Polish or White Russian, did not take so great a part as the upper classes, the university of Vilna was abolished in 1832, its faculties being transferred in bulk to Kiev and in part to Kharkov and St.

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  • This was the work of Petrus Mogilas, metropolitan of Kiev, and other theologians.

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  • The great opposition which arose during his lifetime continued after his death, and found classic expression in the highly venerated confession of Petrus Mogilas, metropolitan of Kiev (1643).(1643).

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  • Vladimir, prince of Kiev, conquered Chersonesus (Korsun) before being baptized there, and restored it to the Greeks on marrying (988) the princess Anna.

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  • The foundation of Dorpat is ascribed to Yaroslav, prince of Kiev, and is dated 1030.

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  • AKHTYRKA, a town of Russia, in the government of Kharkov, near the Vorskla river, connected by a branch (11 m.) with the railway from Kiev to Kharkov.

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  • In home affairs his influence was insignificant, but his foreign policy was distinguished by the peace with Poland in 1683, whereby Russia at last recovered Kiev.

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  • Pinsk (Pinesk) is first mentioned in 1097 as a town belonging to Sviatopolk, prince of Kiev.

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  • sources by Nestor, a monk of Kiev (d.

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  • Gedymin still further extended the limits of Lithuania by annexing Kiev, Chernigov and other old Russian principalities.

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  • Again, it should have been the first duty of the Republic adequately to fortify the dzikie pola, or "savage steppe," as the vast plain was called which extended from Kiev to the Black Sea, and some feeble attempts to do so were at last made.

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  • Kiev, the religious metropolis of western Russia, was to remain in the hands of Muscovy for two years.

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  • The "truce" of And russowo proved to be one of the most permanent peaces in history, and Kiev, though only pledged for two years, was never again to be separated from the Orthodox Slavonic state to which it rightly belonged.

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  • bishops, Woclaw Hieronim Sierakowski (1699-1784) of Lemberg, Feliks Pawel Turski of Chelm (1729-1800), Kajetan Ignaty Soltyk of Cracow (1715-1788), and Jozef Jendrzej Zaluski of Kiev (1702-1774), offered a determined resistance to Repnin's.

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  • The Polish universities of Warsaw and Vilna were suppressed, and the students compelled to go to St Petersburg and Kiev.

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  • A notable man was Joseph Andrew Zaluski, bishop of Kiev, a Pole who had become thoroughly frenchified - so much so, that he preached in French to the fashionable congregations of Warsaw.

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  • KIEV, a city of Russia, capital of the above government, on the right or west bank of the Dnieper, in 50 0 27' 12" N.

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  • Altogether Kiev is one of the most beautiful cities in Russia, and the vicinity too is picturesque.

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  • The Old Town, or Old Kiev quarter (Starokievskaya Chast), occupies the highest of the range of hills.

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  • The church of St Andrew the Apostle occupies the spot where, according to Russian tradition, that apostle stood when as yet Kiev was not, and declared that the hill would become the site of a great city.

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  • The foundation of the monastery is ascribed to two saints of the 11th century - Anthony and Hilarion, the latter metropolitan of Kiev.

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  • It is the industrial and trading quarter of the city, and the seat of the great fair of the " Contracts," the transference of which from Dubno in 1797 largely stimulated the commercial prosperity of Kiev.

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  • The educational and scientific institutions of Kiev rank next to those of the two capitals.

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  • Its university, removed from Vilna to Kiev in 1834, has about 2500 students, and is well provided with observatories, laboratories, libraries and museums; five scientific societies and two societies for aid to poor students are attached to it.

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  • There are, besides, a theological academy, founded in 1615; a society of church archaeology, which possesses a museum built in 1900, very rich in old ikons, crosses, &c., both Russian and Oriental; an imperial academy of music; university courses for ladies; a polytechnic, with 1300 students - the building was completed in 190o and stands on the other side of Old Kiev, away from the river.

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  • Kiev is the principal centre for the sugar industry of Russia, as well as for the general trade of the region.

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  • In 1862 the population of Kiev was returned as 70,341; in 1874 the total was given as 127,251; and in 1902 as 319,000.

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  • Kiev is the headquarters of the IX.

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  • The history of Kiev cannot he satisfactorily separated from that of Russia.

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  • Rurik's successor Oleg conquered Kiev in 882 and made it the chief town of his principality.

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  • It was in the waters of the Dnieper opposite the town that Prince Vladimir, the first saint of the Russian church, caused his people to be baptized (988), and Kiev became the seat of the first Christian church, of the first Christian school, and of the first library in Russia.

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  • The Russian literature concerning Kiev is voluminous.

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  • Among recent publications are: Rambaud's La Russie epique (Paris, 1876); Avenarius, Kniga o Kievskikh Bogatuiryakh (St Petersburg, 1876), dealing with the early Kiev heroes; Zakrevski, Opisanie Kieva (1868); the materials issued by the commission for the investigation of the ancient records of the city; Taranovskiy, Gorod Kiev (Kiev, 1881); De Baye, Kiev, la mere des villes cusses (Paris, 1896) Goetz, Das Kiewer Hohlenkloster als Kulturzentrum des Vormongolischen Russlands (Passau, 1904).

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  • Byelyashevsky, The Mints of Kiev.

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  • Coislinianus of the 6th century in Paris, Turin, Kiev, Moscow and Mt.

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  • It was during his government that the Muscovite church received its patriarchate, which placed it on an equality with the other Eastern churches and emancipated it from the influence of the metropolitan of Kiev.

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  • of Kiev, on the railway between Kursk and Kiev.

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  • Peter Mogilas, metropolitan of Kiev, drew up in 1643 the Orthodox Confession of the Catholic and Apostolic Eastern Church.

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  • The emperor, however, being at war with Boleslaus of Poland, opposed his enterprise, and he went first to the court of St Stephen of Hungary, and, finding but slight encouragement there, to that of the grand prince Vladimir at Kiev.

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  • The first session at Florence and the seventeenth of the union council took place on the 26th of February 1439; there ensued long debates and negotiations on the filioque, in which Markos Eugenikos, archbishop of Ephesus, spoke for the irreconcilables; but the Greeks under the leadership of Bessarion, archbishop of Nicaea, and Isidor, metropolitan of Kiev, at length made a declaration on the filioque (4th of June), to which all save Markos Eugenikos subscribed.

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  • Russia, in the government of Kiev, 116 m.

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  • of Kiev by rail and not far from the borders of Volhynia.

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  • Here occurs the earliest mention of Vinland, and here are also references of great interest to Russia and Kiev, to the heathen Prussians, the Wends and other Slav races of the South Baltic coast, and to Finland, Thule or Iceland, Greenland and the Polar seas which Harald Hardrada and the nobles of Frisia had attempted to explore in Adam's own day (before 1066).

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  • He was imprisoned by Leontie, bishop of Kiev.

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  • Greek monks played a considerable part in the evangelization of the Sla y s, and the first Russian monastery was founded;at Kiev (c. 1050) by a monk from Mount Athos.

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  • Poland, with 193 (domiciled) inhabitants or 213 inhabitants in all to the square mile in 1897, and 240 to the square mile in 1904, has a denser population than any other region in the Russian empire, the next to it being the governments of Moscow, with 189 inhabitants to the square mile, Podolia with 186, and Kiev with 181.

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  • The sugar factories and refineries, situated chiefly in the governments of Warsaw, Lublin and Plock, turn out approximately one million tons of sugar in the year, the Polish sugar industry being exceeded in Russia only by that of Kiev.

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  • The most important ecclesiastical event of the reign was the elevation of the Bulgarian, Gregory Tsamblak, to the metropolitan see of Kiev (1425) by Vitovt, grand-duke of Lithuania; the immediate political consequence of which was the weakening of the hold of Muscovy on the south-western Russian states.

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  • PETER MOGILA (c. 1596-1647), metropolitan of Kiev from 1632, belonged to a noble Wallachian family.

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  • He was the author of a Catechism (Kiev, 1645) and other minor works, but is principally celebrated for the Orthodox Confession, drawn up at his instance by the Abbot Kosslowski of Kiev, approved at a provincial synod in 1640, and accepted by the patriarchs of Constantinople, Jerusalem, Alexandria and Antioch in 1642-1643, and by the synod of Jerusalem in 1672.

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  • It remained an independent principality until the 12th century, resisting the repeated attacks of the princes of Kiev; those of Pskov, Lithuania, and the Livonian Knights, however, proved more effective, and Polotsk fell under Lithuanian rule in 1320.

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  • He brilliantly distinguished himself at the Orthodox academy of Kiev, subsequently completing his education in Poland (for which purpose he turned Uniate), and at Rome in the College of the Propaganda.

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  • Primed with all the knowledge of the West, he returned home to seek his fortune, and, as the Orthodox monk, became one of the professors at, and subsequently rector of, the academy of Kiev.

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  • In 1709 Peter the Great, while passing through Kiev, was struck by the eloquence of Prokopovich in a sermon on "the most glorious victory," i.e.

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  • So invaluable, indeed, did he become to the civil power, that, despite the determined opposition of the Russian clergy, who regarded "the Light of Kiev" as an interloper and semi-heretic, he was rapidly promoted, becoming, in 1718, bishop of Pskov, and finally, in 1724, archbishop of Novgorod.

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  • On the other hand, while in the Eastern Church things have undergone little change, - the pilgrims, in addition to the Holy Land, visiting Mt Athos and Kiev - the developments in the Roman Church show important divergences.

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  • For his services he received the palatinate of Kiev.

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  • impulse which was driving part of the Norse and Danish peoples to piracies in the west was also driving the Swedes and perhaps a portion of the Danes to eastward invasion, which resulted in the establishment of a Scandinavian kingdom (GarOariki) in what is now Russia, with its capital first at Novgorod, afterwards at Kiev.

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  • Slonim is mentioned in 1040, when Yaroslav, prince of Kiev, defeated the Lithuanians in its neighbourhood.

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  • He returned (1250) as grand-duke of Kiev and Novgorod, while to Andrew was given the far more important grandduchy of Vladimir.

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  • From 1805 to 1832 its Polish lyceum was the centre of superior instruction for the western provinces of Little Russia; but after the Polish insurrection of 1831 the lyceum was transferred to Kiev, and is now the university of that town.

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  • Volk-Karachevsky, The Struggle of Poland with the Cossacks (Rus.) (Kiev, 1899); Letters and other Writings of Wladislaus IV.

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  • DANIEL (DANIL), of Kiev, the earliest Russian travel-writer, and one of the leading Russian travellers in the middle ages.

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  • Several Russian friends and companions, from Kiev and Old Novgorod, are recorded by Daniel as present with him at the Easter Eve "miracle," in the church of the Holy Sepulchre.

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  • CHERKASY (Polish, Czerkasy), a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 96 m.

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  • of Kiev, on the right bank of the Dnieper.

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  • VOLHYNIA, a government of south-western Russia, bounded by the Polish governments of Lublin and Siedlce on the W., Grodno and Minsk on the N., Kiev on the E.

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  • ALEKSANDER ANDREEVICH, PRINCE BEZBORODKO (1747-1799), grand chancellor of Russia, was born at Gluchova on the, 4th of March 1747, and educated at home and in the clerical academy at Kiev.

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  • In the first part of its course, which may be said to end at Dorogobuzh, it flows through an undulating country of Carboniferous formation; in the second it passes west to Orsha, south through the fertile plain of Chernigov and Kiev, and then southeast across the rocky steppe of the Ukraine to Ekaterinoslay.

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  • At Kiev the river is free from ice on an average of 234 days in the year, at Ekaterinoslav 270 and at Kherson 277.

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  • of Kiev.

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  • The metropolitan, who was subject to the patriarch of Constantinople, resided at Kiev on the Dnieper.

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  • This body now governs the Russian Church, and consists of a procurator representing the emperor, the metropolitans of Kiev, Moscow and St Petersburg, the exarch of Georgia and five or six other bishops appointed by the emperor.

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  • long., at the junction of the navigable river Mukhovets with the Bug, and at the intersection of railways from Warsaw, Kiev, Moscow and East Prussia.

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  • His plans were ruined by the peace of Tilsit; he retired to Russia, and died at Kiev.

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  • In 1051 Henry married the Russian princess Anne, daughter of Yaroslav I., grand duke of Kiev.

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  • Daniel of Kiev >>

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  • UMAN, a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 120 m.

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  • of the city of Kiev.

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  • The legends of the saints of the Pecherskaya in Kiev were translated by Alexander Dascalul.

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  • In June 1649, arrayed in cloth-of-gold and mounted on a white charger, Chmielnicki made his triumphal entry into Kiev, where he was hailed as the Maccabaeus of the Orthodox faith, and permitted the committal of unspeakable atrocities on the Jews and Roman Catholics.

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  • The archbishop of Corinth girded him with a sword which had lain upon the Holy Sepulchre, and the metropolitan of Kiev absolved him from all his sins, without the usual preliminary of confession, before he rode forth to battle.

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  • It is an important junction of the railways from Vilna to Odessa and from Orel to Poland, and is in steamer communication with Kiev and Mogilev.

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  • Basil obtained timely aid, in the shape of Varangian mercenaries, from his brother-in-law Vladimir, the Russian prince of Kiev, and marched to Abydos.

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  • from Kiev.

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  • In 1866 it was brought into railway connexion with Kiev and Kharkov via Balta, and with Jassy in Rumania.

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  • By the truce of Andrussowo (February 1, 1667) Vitebsk, Polotsk and Polish Livonia were restored to Poland, but the infinitely more important Smolensk and Kiev remained in the hands of the Muscovite together with the whole eastern bank of the Dnieper.

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  • Florinsky, Lektsi po slavyankomu yazykoznaniye (Kiev, 1895).

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  • He then turned his arms against Jaroslav, grand duke of Kiev, whom he routed on the banks of the Bug, then the boundary between Russia and Poland.

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  • For ten months Boleslaus remained at Kiev, whence he addressed triumphant letters to the emperors of the East and West.

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  • VASILKOV, a town of Russia, in the government of Kiev, 23 m.

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  • One of his most important territorial accretions, the principality of Halicz-Vladimir, was obtained by the marriage of his son Lubart with the daughter of the Haliczian prince; the other, Kiev, apparently by conquest.

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  • See Teodor Narbutt, History of the Lithuanian nation (Pol.) (Vilna, 1835); Antoni Prochaska, On the Genuineness of the Letters of Gedymin (Pol.) (Cracow, 1895); Vladimir Bonifatovich Antonovich, Monograph concerning the History of Western and Southwestern Russia (Rus.) (Kiev, 1885).

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  • The ruins in and near the town include remains of a church supposed to have been built by Vladimir, grand duke of Kiev, in the loth-11th centuries, and of another built in 1160 by his descendant Mstisla y.

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  • This latter was apparently very well built, and its length exceeded that of the temple of St Sophia at Kiev.

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  • The rest of his life was spent in an easy captivity at Kaluga, St Petersburg; and Kiev.

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  • 1054), grand duke of Kiev, came to the throne, when a child of eight, by the death of his father on the 4th of August 1060.

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  • The Kiev Grenadiers, Podolian...

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  • After passing a chasseur regiment and in the lines of the Kiev grenadiers--fine fellows busy with similar peaceful affairs--near the shelter of the regimental commander, higher than and different from the others, Prince Andrew came out in front of a platoon of grenadiers before whom lay a naked man.

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  • He imagined only important possibilities: "If the enemy attacks the right flank," he said to himself, "the Kiev grenadiers and the Podolsk chasseurs must hold their position till reserves from the center come up.

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  • His new brethren gave him letters to the Kiev and Odessa Masons and promised to write to him and guide him in his new activity.

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  • When he reached Kiev he sent for all his stewards to the head office and explained to them his intentions and wishes.

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  • In Kiev Pierre found some people he knew, and strangers hastened to make his acquaintance and joyfully welcomed the rich newcomer, the largest landowner of the province.

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  • Le prochain--your Kiev peasants to whom you want to do good.

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  • When I was in Kiev, Crazy Cyril says to me (he's one of God's own and goes barefoot summer and winter), he says, 'Why are you not going to the right place?

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  • After his liberation he reached Orel, and on the third day there, when preparing to go to Kiev, he fell ill and was laid up for three months.

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  • "These aren't needed," said she, putting aside some plates of Kiev ware.

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