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kiel

kiel

kiel Sentence Examples

  • At Kiel, K.

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  • He was afterwards appointed professor ordinarius of philosophy at Kiel (1873), and in 1878 he was elected to the philosophical chair at Tubingen.

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  • 1860), after studying at Göttingen, Bonn and Giessen, became professor at Kiel (extraordinarius) in 1889 and afterwards at Bonn (extraordinarius 1894; ordinarius 1897).

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  • In 1883 he went to Kiel, becoming Privatdozent, and there he began the studies in Maxwell's electro-magnetic theory which a few years later resulted in the discoveries that rendered his name famous.

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  • HERMANN OLSHAUSEN (1796-1839), German theologian, was born at Oldeslohe in Holstein on the 21st of August 1796, and was educated at the universities of Kiel (1814) and Berlin (1816), where he was influenced by Schleiermacher and Neander.

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  • Among his numerous works the following are especially worthy of note: Bidrag till svenska radets historia under medeltiden (Upsala, 1872); Sveriges Historia, 1511 -1611 (Stockholm, 1878); Bidrag till svenska statsrickets historia (Stockholm, 1884-1887); Den svensk-norsk Unionen (Stockholm, 1889-1891), the best book on the Norwego-Swedish Union question from the Swedish point of view; Fjerde Artiklen of Fredstraktaten i Kiel (Stockholm, 1899); Carl Johan och Sveriges yttre politik, 1810-1815 (Stockholm, 1899); Carl XIV.

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  • Milchhbfer, Uber die alten Burgheiligtumer in Athen (Kiel, 1899).

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  • At Göttingen he remained, declining all further calls elsewhere, as to Erlangen, Kiel, Halle, Tubingen, Jena and Leipzig, until his death, which occurred on the 4th of February 1855.

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  • from Kiel by the railway to Eutin and Lubeck.

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  • Eggers, Schloss and Stadt Ploen (Kiel, 1877), and J.

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  • The through railway traffic of Hamburg is practically confined to that proceeding northwards - to Kiel and Jutland - and for the accommodation of such trains the central (terminus) station at Altona is the chief gathering point.

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  • He was educated at the Lubeck gymnasium and the university of Kiel, with which he was connected for nearly 65 years.

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  • In 1843 he was appointed professor of philology at Kiel and director of the archaeological museum founded by himself in co-operation with Otto Jahn.

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  • There is also regular communication by water with Kiel.

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  • After holding appointments at Kiel and Heidelberg, he was in 1874 made professor at Berlin; he had already in 1871 become a member of the Reichstag, and from that time till his death in 1896 he was one of the most prominent figures in the city.

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  • (B) The Christian Aramaic version or Peshito (P'shitta) is largely influenced by the LXX., compare Baethgen, Untersuchungen ilber die Psalmen each der Peschita, Kiel, 1878 (unfinished).

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  • In 1794 he accepted a call to Kiel, where he taught till his death in 1823, but his independent activity was at an end.

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  • Another canal has been projected for connecting Kiel with the Elbe by means of a canal trained through the Plan Lakes.

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  • In 1854 he removed from Prague to a similar appointment at Kiel, and again in 1862 from Kiel to Leipzig.

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  • He studied at Kiel University (1832), and became professor ordinarius of theology at Rostock (1850).

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  • of Kiel on the railway from Hamburg to Vamdrup, on the Danish frontier.

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  • Waitz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel and Berlin, 1844 foil.); H.

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  • After spending some time at the university of Kiel, he went to Berlin, where, from 1814 to 1817, he studied under De Wette, Neander and Schleiermacher.

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  • Rogge, Der Stapelzwang des hansischen Kontors zu Brugge im fiinfzehnten Jahrhundert (Kiel, 1903); A.

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  • of Altona-Hamburg by rail, and at the junction of lines to Kiel, Vamdrup (Denmark) and Tonning.

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  • Wassner, De heroum aped Graecos cultu (Kiel, 1883); article by F.

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  • Waitz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel, 1844); J.

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  • Schmid, Marius Victorinus Rhetor and seine Beziehungen zu Augustin (Kiel, 1895); Gore in Dictionary of Christian Biography, iv.; M.

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  • The Nova litteraria maris Balthici et Septentrionis (1698-1708) was more especially devoted to north Germany and the universities of Kiel, Rostock and Dorpat.

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  • from Schleswig, at the junction of the main line Altona-Vamdrup (Denmark), with branches to Kiel and Gliicksburg.

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  • Wind also gives rise to differences of level by driving the water before it, and the prevailing westerly wind of the southern Baltic is the chief cause of the sea-level at Kiel being 51 in.

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  • Makaroff, The Yermak in the Ice (in Russian) (St Petersburg, 1901); The Norwegian North Atlantic Expedition (on the " Voringen "), 1876-1878 (Christiania, 1880-1900); Expeditions scientifiques du " Travailleur " et du " Talisman," 1880-1883 (Paris, 1891 et seq.); Die Ergebnisse der Plankton-Expedition, 1889 (Kiel, 1892 et seq.); Resultats des campagnes scientifiques accomplies sur son yacht par Albert I e ' Prince Souverain de Monaco (Monaco, from 1889); The Danish " Ingolf " Expedition, 1806 (Copenhagen, 1900); Prof. Luksch, Expeditionen S.M.

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  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

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  • On being summoned by the commissioners of the allied powers at Copenhagen to bring about a union between Norway and Sweden in accordance with the terms of the treaty of Kiel, and then return to Denmark, he replied that, as a constitutional king, he could do nothing without the consent of the Storthing, to the convocation of which a suspension of hostilities on the part of Sweden was the condition precedent.

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  • 1918 the mutiny, which had broken out in the navy at Kiel, developed into sanguinary street fighting and the naval authorities were unable to restore order, Noske was sent to Kiel with the Democratic Secretary of State, Hausmann, and, after a conference with representatives of the sailors and dockyard workers, arranged a suspension of hostilities on the basis of the sailors', soldiers' and workmen's demands.

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  • This triumph of the mutiny was the beginning of the German revolution, and the sailors from Kiel and other northern ports carried the idea of Workmen's and Soldiers' Councils throughout the north of Germany and ultimately to Berlin.

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  • Noske was appointed governor of Kiel, where he remained until he was recalled on Feb.

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  • He was educated at the Flensburg gymnasium and the universities of Kiel and Berlin.

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  • On graduating at Berlin in August 1836, Waitz went to Hanover to assist Pertz in the great national work of publishing the Monumenta Germaniae historica; and the energy and learning he displayed in that position won him a summons to the chair of history at Kiel in 1842.

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  • He was sent to Berlin to represent the interests of the duchies there, and during his absence he was elected by Kiel as a delegate to the national parliament at Frankfort.

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  • Waitz's chief works, apart from his contributions to the Monumenta, are: - Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (8 vols., Kiel, 1844-1878; 2nd ed., 2 vols.

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  • was never published); Lubeck unter Jurgen Wullenwever and die europdische Politik (3 vols.; Berlin, 1855-1856); and Grundziige der Politik (Kiel, 1862).

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  • (Berlin, 1837, 3rd ed., 1885); fiber das Leben and die Lehre des Ulfila (Hanover, 1840); Das alte Recht der salischen Franken (Kiel, 1846); and Deutsche Kaiser von Karl dem Grossen bis Maximilian (Berlin, 1872).

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  • In conjunction with other scholars Waitz took a leading part in the publication of the Forschungen zur deutschen Geschichte (Munich, 1862 seq.), and in the Nordalbingische Studien, published in the Proceedings of the Schleswig-Holstein Historical Society (Kiel, 1844-1851).

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  • In 1873 he went to Kiel as professor of chemistry and director of the laboratory, remaining there until 1889 when he went to the university of Breslau in the same capacity.

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  • In 1840 Droysen was appointed professor of history at Kiel.

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  • He was at once attracted into the political movement for the defence of the rights of the Elbe duchies, of which Kiel was the centre.

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  • After 1851 it was impossible for him to remain at Kiel, and he was appointed to a professorship at Jena; in 1859 he was called to Berlin, where he remained till his death.

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  • After studying at the gymnasium of his native place, he entered the university of Kiel (1716), where he took his master's degree in 1718.

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  • In 1719 he became assessor in the philosophical faculty at Kiel.

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  • Recent investigations are described in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland, and in the reports of the German Kommission zur Untersuchung der Deutschen Meere (published at Kiel).

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  • (1906), p. 325; C. Boysen, De Harpocrationis fontibus (Kiel, 1876).

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  • (1728-1762), emperor of Russia, only son of Charles Frederick, duke of Holstein-Gottorp, and of Anne, eldest surviving daughter of Peter the Great, was born at Kiel on the 21st of February 1728.

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  • A conference held in June 1900, in which the speakers included Mommsen and von Wilamowitz, Harnack and Diels, was followed by the " Kiel Decree " of the 26th of November.

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  • Another brother, Christian Heinrich Pfaff (1773-1852), graduated in medicine at Stuttgart in 1793, and from 1801 till his death was professor of medicine, physics and chemistry at the university of Kiel.

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  • He was educated at the gymnasium in Gotha, and afterwards at the universities of Erfurt, Kiel, where he came under the influence of the pietist Christian Kortholt (1633-1694), and Leipzig.

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  • From the earliest age young Niebuhr manifested extraordinary precocity, and from 1794 to 1796, being already a finished classical scholar and acquainted with several modern languages, he studied at the university of Kiel.

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  • Beitrdge zur Geschichte dieser Stadt (Kiel, 1854).

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  • He studied law at the universities of Berlin, Göttingen and Kiel, and began his political career in the service of Denmark, in the chancery of Schleswig-Holstein-Lauenburg at Copenhagen, and afterwards in the foreign office.

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  • When the insurrection broke out in the Elbe duchies (1848) he left the Danish service, and offered his services to the provisional government of Kiel, an offer that was not accepted.

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  • Waitz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel, 1860; 3rd ed.

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  • In 1796 he lectured at Kiel, and a year later went to Jena to study the natural philosophy of Schelling.

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  • of Kiel Bay, and Christian displayed a heroism which endeared him ever after to the Danish nation and made his name famous in song and story.

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  • Darkness at last separated the contending fleets; and though the battle was a drawn one, the Danish fleet showed its superiority by blockading the Swedish ships in Kiel Bay.

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  • Klose, Geschichte and Lehre des Eumonius (Kiel, 1833); F.

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  • The coasts are shallow, and deficient in natural ports, except on the east of Schleswig-Holstein, where wide bays encroach upon the land, giving access to the largest vessels, so that the great naval harbour could be constructed at Kiel.

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  • Kiel Prussia 163,710

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  • The chief ports are Hamburg, Stettin, Bremen, Kiel, Lbeck, Flensburg, Bremerhaven, Danzig (Neufahrwasser), Geestemunde and Emden; and the number and tonnage of vessels of foreign nationality entering and clearing the ports of the empire, as compared with national shipping, were in 1906:

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  • Kiel 1665 121 35 2

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  • at Bamberg, Berlin (2), Bonn, Bothkamp in Schleswig, Breslau, Dhsseldorf, Gotha, Göttingen, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Jena Kiel, KOnigsberg, Leipzig, Munich, Potsdam, Strassburg and Wilhelmshaven.

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  • The coast defences include, besides the great naval ports of Wilhelmshaven on the North Sea and Kiel on the Baltic, Danzig, Pillau, Memel, Friedrichsort, Cuxhaven, Geestemunde and Swinemunde.

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  • In 1864 Prussia, in annexing Holstein, obtained possession of the excellent port of Kiel, which has since been strongly fortified.

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  • He saw clearly what the possession of the duchies would mean to Germany, their vast importance for the future of German sea-power; already he had a vision of the great war-harbour of Kiel and the canal connecting the Baltic and the North seas; and he was determined that these should be, if not wholly Prussian, at least wholly under Prussian control.

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  • Against this Austria protested, as having the same right as Prussia to Kiel; an angry correspondence followed; but neither power was quite prepared for war, and on the 20th of August 1865 the convention of Gastein, to use Bistnarcks phrase, papered over the cracks.

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  • The great ship canal from Kiel to the Elbe, which was begun in 1887 and completed in 1896, has perhaps even more importance for naval than for commercial purposes.

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  • Besides the numerous steam-ferries which connect island and island, and Jutland with the islands, and the Gjedser-Warnemiinde route, a favourite passenger line from Germany is that between Kiel and KorsOr, while most of the German Baltic ports have direct connexion with Copenhagen.

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  • When, therefore, in August 1807, Gambier arrived in the Sound, and the English plenipotentiary Francis James Jackson, not perhaps the most tactful person that could have been chosen, hastened to Kiel to place the British demands before the crown prince, Frederick not only refused to negotiate, but ordered the Copenhagen authorities to put the city in the best state of defence possible.

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  • She was punished for her obstinacy by being deprived of Norway, which she was compelled to surrender to Sweden by the terms of the treaty of Kiel (1814), on the 14th of January, receiving by way of compensation a sum of money and Swedish Pomerania, with Riigen, which were subsequently transferred to Prussia in exchange for the duchy of Lauenburg and 2,000,000 rix-dollars.

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  • In 1868 he became ordinary professor at Kiel, and in 1872 was appointed to the chair of Oriental languages at Strassburg, which he resigned in 1906.

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  • Waltz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel, 1844); E.

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  • Kiitzing, Tabulae Phycologicae (19 vols., Nordhausen, 1845-1869); P. Kuckuck, Beitrage zur Kenntniss der Meeresalgen (Kiel and Leipzig, 1897-1899); G.

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  • Schutt, Die Peridinien der Plankton-Expedition (Kiel and Leipzig, 1895); R.

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  • In 1839 he became professor in Kiel University, where, with the exception of one brief interval, when he was expelled with several colleagues because of his German sympathies, he remained till his death.

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  • His chief works are Entwurf eines Systems der Wissenschaftslehre (Kiel, 1846) and System der spekulativen Ethik (2 vols., 1850).

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  • OTTO JAHN (1813-1869), German archaeologist, philologist, and writer on art and music, was born at Kiel on the 16th of June 1813.

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  • After the completion of his university studies at Kiel, Leipzig and Berlin, he travelled for three years in France and Italy; in 1839 he became privatdocent at Kiel, and in 1842 professor-extraordinary of archaeology and philology at Greifswald (ordinary professor 1845).

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  • reflector by Johann Gottlieb Friedrich Schrader of Kiel, he made his famous observations on the surface features of the moon and planets.

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  • He was educated at the universities of Kiel, Leipzig and Berlin.

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  • He declined the offer of a classical chair at Kiel, and accepted a post as tutor to the son of an intimate friend of Altenstein, the Prussian minister of education.

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  • KIEL, the chief naval port of Germany on the Baltic, a town of the Prussian province of Schleswig-Holstein.

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  • It is beautifully situated at the southern end on the Kieler Busen (bay or harbour of Kiel), 70 m.

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  • It consists of a somewhat cramped old town, lying between the harbour and a sheet of water called Kleiner Kiel, and a better built and more spacious new town, which has been increased by the incorporation of the garden suburbs of Brunswick and Diisternbrook.

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  • The pride of Kiel is its magnificent harbour, which has a comparatively uniform depth of water, averaging 40 ft., and close to the shores 20 ft.

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  • The Kaiser Wilhelm Canal, commonly called the Kiel Canal, connecting the Baltic with the North Sea at Brunsbiittel, has its eastern entrance at Wik, 12 m.

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  • of Kiel (see Germany: Waterways).

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  • Kiel is connected by day and night services with Korsdr in Denmark by express passenger boats.

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  • The name of Kiel appears as early as the 10th century in the form Kyl (probably from the Anglo-Saxon Kille = a safe place for ships).

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  • Kiel is mentioned as a city in the next century; in 1242 it received the Lubeck rights; in the 14th century it acquired various trading privileges, having in 1284 entered the Hanseatic League.

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  • In recent tinies Kiel has been associated with the peace concluded in January 1814 between Great Britain, Denmark and Sweden, by which Norway was ceded to Sweden.

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  • In 1773 Kiel became part of Denmark, and in 1866 it passed with the rest of Schleswig-Holstein to Prussia.

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  • Since being made a great naval arsenal, Kiel has rapidly developed in prosperity and population.

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  • See Prahl, Chronika der Stadt Kiel (Kiel, 1856); Erichsen, Topographic des Landkreises Kiel (Kiel, 1898); H.

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  • Eckardt, Alt-Kiel in Wort and Bild (Kiel, 1899); P. Hasse, Das Kieler Stadtbuch, 1264-1289 (Kiel, 1875); Das dlteste Kieler Rentebuch 1300, 1487, edited by C. Reuter (Kiel, 1893); Das zweite Kieler Rentebuch 1487, 1586, edited by W.

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  • Stern (Kiel, 1904); and the Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft fiir Kieler Stadtgeschichte (Kiel, 1877, 1904).

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  • The number of matriculated students is usually greater in winter than in summer; the reason of the disproportion being that in the summer university towns having pleasant surroundings, such as Bonn, Heidelberg, Kiel and Jena, are more frequented.

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  • of Kiel, on the Altona-Vamdrup railway.

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  • See Warmstedt, Rendsburg (Kiel, 1850).

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  • The readiness with which the young Mytilus attaches itself to wicker-work is made the means of artificially cultivating and securing these molluscs for the market both in the Bay of Kiel in North Germany and at the mouth of the Somme and other spots on the coast of France.

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  • The more important industrial establishments, such as iron foundries, machine works, tobacco and cloth factories, are mainly confined to the large towns, such as Altona, Kiel and Flensburg.

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  • The shipbuilding of Kiel and other seaports, however, is important; and lace is made by the peasants of north Schleswig.

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  • Kiel is one of the chief seaports of Prussia, while oversea trade is also carried on by Altona and Flensburg.

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  • The chief educational institution in Schleswig-Holstein is the university of Kiel.

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  • Schleswig is the official capital of the province, but Altona and Kiel are the largest towns, the latter being the chief naval station of Germany.

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  • Kiel and Friedrichsort are fortified, but the old lines of Diippel have been dismantled.

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  • After studying at Heidelberg, Bonn and Berlin, he graduated at Kiel in 1847, and in the following year went to France, where he was teacher of German at Laval and at Reims. His leisure was given to Oriental studies, in which he had made great progress in Germany, and in 1852 he joined Fresnel's archaeological expedition to Mesopotamia.

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  • Langhorn, Historische Nachricht fiber die detnischen Moltkes (Kiel, 1871).

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  • Early in November stock sheep having lost the distinguishing "burst" put on at clipping time with a large iron letter dipped in hot tar, have the distinctive paint or kiel mark claimed by the farm to which they belong rubbed on the wool.

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  • After being educated at the university of Kiel he devoted himself to the study of Roman law and.

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  • of Denmark, and was appointed by royal ordinance to preach the Gospel at Kiel.

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  • After holding chairs at Kiel (1866), Konigsberg (1873), and Jena (1876), he was finally appointed professor of history at Tubingen, where he died on the 2nd of March 1887.

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  • Denmark retained possession of the Faeroes at the peace of Kiel in 1815.

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  • from Lubeck by the railway to Kiel.

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  • Returning in 1869, he was appointed assistant astronomer at Altona in 1873, and afterwards at Kiel.

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  • She was later used as a depot ship for U-boat flotillas 25 and 27, based at Kiel.

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  • Issue 2- were the Kiel mutinies a potentially revolutionary threat?

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  • At Kiel (53) and Trieste the average value of q is considerably less for wholly overcast days than for bright days.

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  • At Kiel, K.

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  • He was afterwards appointed professor ordinarius of philosophy at Kiel (1873), and in 1878 he was elected to the philosophical chair at Tubingen.

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  • 1860), after studying at Göttingen, Bonn and Giessen, became professor at Kiel (extraordinarius) in 1889 and afterwards at Bonn (extraordinarius 1894; ordinarius 1897).

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  • In 1883 he went to Kiel, becoming Privatdozent, and there he began the studies in Maxwell's electro-magnetic theory which a few years later resulted in the discoveries that rendered his name famous.

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  • Handelmann, Das Dannewerk (Kiel, 1885); Philippsen and Siinksen, Fiihrer durch das Danewerk (Hamburg, 1903).

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  • (Kiel and Leipzig, 1893), 107 pp., 8 pls., 3 figs.; 34.

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  • The word is of obscure origin; a word with similar meaning, Kiel, is found in German, and French has quille, ninepin, apparently connected with Ger.

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  • HERMANN OLSHAUSEN (1796-1839), German theologian, was born at Oldeslohe in Holstein on the 21st of August 1796, and was educated at the universities of Kiel (1814) and Berlin (1816), where he was influenced by Schleiermacher and Neander.

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  • Among his numerous works the following are especially worthy of note: Bidrag till svenska radets historia under medeltiden (Upsala, 1872); Sveriges Historia, 1511 -1611 (Stockholm, 1878); Bidrag till svenska statsrickets historia (Stockholm, 1884-1887); Den svensk-norsk Unionen (Stockholm, 1889-1891), the best book on the Norwego-Swedish Union question from the Swedish point of view; Fjerde Artiklen of Fredstraktaten i Kiel (Stockholm, 1899); Carl Johan och Sveriges yttre politik, 1810-1815 (Stockholm, 1899); Carl XIV.

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  • Milchhbfer, Uber die alten Burgheiligtumer in Athen (Kiel, 1899).

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  • At Göttingen he remained, declining all further calls elsewhere, as to Erlangen, Kiel, Halle, Tubingen, Jena and Leipzig, until his death, which occurred on the 4th of February 1855.

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  • from Kiel by the railway to Eutin and Lubeck.

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  • Eggers, Schloss and Stadt Ploen (Kiel, 1877), and J.

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  • The plankton is divided into (a) the Zoo-plankton (such as the minute crustacea and the eggs and larva of fishes and many other marine animals); and (b) the Phyto-plankton, that is, the minute algae, diatoms, peridinians, some flagellate protozoa, spores of alga, etc. The investigation of the plankton from a new point of view, begun by Hansen in 1889, was continued by Lohmann at Kiel, by Cleve in Sweden, by Gran and Ostenfeldt in Norway and Denmark, and by Herdman, Allen and others in England.

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  • It is maintained by Brandt and others belonging to the Kiel school of marine biologists that the process of denitrification is, on the whole, more significant in the sea than that of nitrogen-fixation.

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  • The through railway traffic of Hamburg is practically confined to that proceeding northwards - to Kiel and Jutland - and for the accommodation of such trains the central (terminus) station at Altona is the chief gathering point.

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  • He was educated at the Lubeck gymnasium and the university of Kiel, with which he was connected for nearly 65 years.

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  • In 1843 he was appointed professor of philology at Kiel and director of the archaeological museum founded by himself in co-operation with Otto Jahn.

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  • There is also regular communication by water with Kiel.

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  • After holding appointments at Kiel and Heidelberg, he was in 1874 made professor at Berlin; he had already in 1871 become a member of the Reichstag, and from that time till his death in 1896 he was one of the most prominent figures in the city.

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  • (B) The Christian Aramaic version or Peshito (P'shitta) is largely influenced by the LXX., compare Baethgen, Untersuchungen ilber die Psalmen each der Peschita, Kiel, 1878 (unfinished).

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  • In 1794 he accepted a call to Kiel, where he taught till his death in 1823, but his independent activity was at an end.

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  • Another canal has been projected for connecting Kiel with the Elbe by means of a canal trained through the Plan Lakes.

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  • In 1854 he removed from Prague to a similar appointment at Kiel, and again in 1862 from Kiel to Leipzig.

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  • He studied at Kiel University (1832), and became professor ordinarius of theology at Rostock (1850).

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  • of Kiel on the railway from Hamburg to Vamdrup, on the Danish frontier.

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  • Waitz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel and Berlin, 1844 foil.); H.

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  • After spending some time at the university of Kiel, he went to Berlin, where, from 1814 to 1817, he studied under De Wette, Neander and Schleiermacher.

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  • Rogge, Der Stapelzwang des hansischen Kontors zu Brugge im fiinfzehnten Jahrhundert (Kiel, 1903); A.

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  • of Altona-Hamburg by rail, and at the junction of lines to Kiel, Vamdrup (Denmark) and Tonning.

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  • Wassner, De heroum aped Graecos cultu (Kiel, 1883); article by F.

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  • Waitz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel, 1844); J.

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  • Schmid, Marius Victorinus Rhetor and seine Beziehungen zu Augustin (Kiel, 1895); Gore in Dictionary of Christian Biography, iv.; M.

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  • The Nova litteraria maris Balthici et Septentrionis (1698-1708) was more especially devoted to north Germany and the universities of Kiel, Rostock and Dorpat.

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  • from Schleswig, at the junction of the main line Altona-Vamdrup (Denmark), with branches to Kiel and Gliicksburg.

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  • Wind also gives rise to differences of level by driving the water before it, and the prevailing westerly wind of the southern Baltic is the chief cause of the sea-level at Kiel being 51 in.

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  • Makaroff, The Yermak in the Ice (in Russian) (St Petersburg, 1901); The Norwegian North Atlantic Expedition (on the " Voringen "), 1876-1878 (Christiania, 1880-1900); Expeditions scientifiques du " Travailleur " et du " Talisman," 1880-1883 (Paris, 1891 et seq.); Die Ergebnisse der Plankton-Expedition, 1889 (Kiel, 1892 et seq.); Resultats des campagnes scientifiques accomplies sur son yacht par Albert I e ' Prince Souverain de Monaco (Monaco, from 1889); The Danish " Ingolf " Expedition, 1806 (Copenhagen, 1900); Prof. Luksch, Expeditionen S.M.

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  • Reports of many minor expeditions and researches have appeared in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland; the Marine Biological Association at Plymouth; the Kiel Commission for the Investigation of the Baltic; the Berlin Institut fur Meereskunde; the bluebooks of the Hydrographic Department; the various official reports to the British, German, Russian, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Belgian and Dutch governments on the respective work of these countries in connexion with the international cooperation in the North Sea; the Bulletin du musee oceanographique de Monaco (1903 seq.); the Scottish Geographical Magazine; the Geographical Journal; Petermanns Mitteilungen; Wagner's Geogi'aphisches Jahrbuch; the Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Societies of London and Edinburgh; the Annalen der Hydrographie; and the publications of the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

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  • On being summoned by the commissioners of the allied powers at Copenhagen to bring about a union between Norway and Sweden in accordance with the terms of the treaty of Kiel, and then return to Denmark, he replied that, as a constitutional king, he could do nothing without the consent of the Storthing, to the convocation of which a suspension of hostilities on the part of Sweden was the condition precedent.

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  • During the 19th century the opening of a railway system in East Prussia and Russia gave a new impetus to its commerce, making it the principal outlet for the Russian staples - grain, seeds, flax and hemp. It has now regular steam communication with Memel, Stettin, Kiel, Amsterdam and Hull.

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  • 1918 the mutiny, which had broken out in the navy at Kiel, developed into sanguinary street fighting and the naval authorities were unable to restore order, Noske was sent to Kiel with the Democratic Secretary of State, Hausmann, and, after a conference with representatives of the sailors and dockyard workers, arranged a suspension of hostilities on the basis of the sailors', soldiers' and workmen's demands.

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  • This triumph of the mutiny was the beginning of the German revolution, and the sailors from Kiel and other northern ports carried the idea of Workmen's and Soldiers' Councils throughout the north of Germany and ultimately to Berlin.

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  • Noske was appointed governor of Kiel, where he remained until he was recalled on Feb.

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  • He was educated at the Flensburg gymnasium and the universities of Kiel and Berlin.

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  • On graduating at Berlin in August 1836, Waitz went to Hanover to assist Pertz in the great national work of publishing the Monumenta Germaniae historica; and the energy and learning he displayed in that position won him a summons to the chair of history at Kiel in 1842.

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  • He was sent to Berlin to represent the interests of the duchies there, and during his absence he was elected by Kiel as a delegate to the national parliament at Frankfort.

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  • Waitz's chief works, apart from his contributions to the Monumenta, are: - Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (8 vols., Kiel, 1844-1878; 2nd ed., 2 vols.

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  • was never published); Lubeck unter Jurgen Wullenwever and die europdische Politik (3 vols.; Berlin, 1855-1856); and Grundziige der Politik (Kiel, 1862).

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  • (Berlin, 1837, 3rd ed., 1885); fiber das Leben and die Lehre des Ulfila (Hanover, 1840); Das alte Recht der salischen Franken (Kiel, 1846); and Deutsche Kaiser von Karl dem Grossen bis Maximilian (Berlin, 1872).

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  • In conjunction with other scholars Waitz took a leading part in the publication of the Forschungen zur deutschen Geschichte (Munich, 1862 seq.), and in the Nordalbingische Studien, published in the Proceedings of the Schleswig-Holstein Historical Society (Kiel, 1844-1851).

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  • In 1873 he went to Kiel as professor of chemistry and director of the laboratory, remaining there until 1889 when he went to the university of Breslau in the same capacity.

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  • In 1840 Droysen was appointed professor of history at Kiel.

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  • He was at once attracted into the political movement for the defence of the rights of the Elbe duchies, of which Kiel was the centre.

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  • After 1851 it was impossible for him to remain at Kiel, and he was appointed to a professorship at Jena; in 1859 he was called to Berlin, where he remained till his death.

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  • After studying at the gymnasium of his native place, he entered the university of Kiel (1716), where he took his master's degree in 1718.

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  • In 1719 he became assessor in the philosophical faculty at Kiel.

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  • Recent investigations are described in the Reports of the Fishery Board for Scotland, and in the reports of the German Kommission zur Untersuchung der Deutschen Meere (published at Kiel).

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  • (1906), p. 325; C. Boysen, De Harpocrationis fontibus (Kiel, 1876).

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  • (1728-1762), emperor of Russia, only son of Charles Frederick, duke of Holstein-Gottorp, and of Anne, eldest surviving daughter of Peter the Great, was born at Kiel on the 21st of February 1728.

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  • A conference held in June 1900, in which the speakers included Mommsen and von Wilamowitz, Harnack and Diels, was followed by the " Kiel Decree " of the 26th of November.

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  • Another brother, Christian Heinrich Pfaff (1773-1852), graduated in medicine at Stuttgart in 1793, and from 1801 till his death was professor of medicine, physics and chemistry at the university of Kiel.

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  • He was educated at the gymnasium in Gotha, and afterwards at the universities of Erfurt, Kiel, where he came under the influence of the pietist Christian Kortholt (1633-1694), and Leipzig.

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  • From the earliest age young Niebuhr manifested extraordinary precocity, and from 1794 to 1796, being already a finished classical scholar and acquainted with several modern languages, he studied at the university of Kiel.

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  • Apart from the natural fear that he would arouse prejudice in the English-speaking provinces, the second Riel rebellion was then still fresh in the public mind, and the fierce nationalist agitation which Kiel's execution had excited in Quebec had hardly subsided.

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  • Beitrdge zur Geschichte dieser Stadt (Kiel, 1854).

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  • He studied law at the universities of Berlin, Göttingen and Kiel, and began his political career in the service of Denmark, in the chancery of Schleswig-Holstein-Lauenburg at Copenhagen, and afterwards in the foreign office.

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  • When the insurrection broke out in the Elbe duchies (1848) he left the Danish service, and offered his services to the provisional government of Kiel, an offer that was not accepted.

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  • Waitz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel, 1860; 3rd ed.

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  • In 1796 he lectured at Kiel, and a year later went to Jena to study the natural philosophy of Schelling.

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  • of Kiel Bay, and Christian displayed a heroism which endeared him ever after to the Danish nation and made his name famous in song and story.

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  • Darkness at last separated the contending fleets; and though the battle was a drawn one, the Danish fleet showed its superiority by blockading the Swedish ships in Kiel Bay.

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  • Klose, Geschichte and Lehre des Eumonius (Kiel, 1833); F.

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  • The coasts are shallow, and deficient in natural ports, except on the east of Schleswig-Holstein, where wide bays encroach upon the land, giving access to the largest vessels, so that the great naval harbour could be constructed at Kiel.

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  • Kiel Prussia 163,710

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  • The chief ports are Hamburg, Stettin, Bremen, Kiel, Lbeck, Flensburg, Bremerhaven, Danzig (Neufahrwasser), Geestemunde and Emden; and the number and tonnage of vessels of foreign nationality entering and clearing the ports of the empire, as compared with national shipping, were in 1906:

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  • Kiel 1665 121 35 2

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  • at Bamberg, Berlin (2), Bonn, Bothkamp in Schleswig, Breslau, Dhsseldorf, Gotha, Göttingen, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Jena Kiel, KOnigsberg, Leipzig, Munich, Potsdam, Strassburg and Wilhelmshaven.

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  • The coast defences include, besides the great naval ports of Wilhelmshaven on the North Sea and Kiel on the Baltic, Danzig, Pillau, Memel, Friedrichsort, Cuxhaven, Geestemunde and Swinemunde.

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  • In 1864 Prussia, in annexing Holstein, obtained possession of the excellent port of Kiel, which has since been strongly fortified.

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  • He saw clearly what the possession of the duchies would mean to Germany, their vast importance for the future of German sea-power; already he had a vision of the great war-harbour of Kiel and the canal connecting the Baltic and the North seas; and he was determined that these should be, if not wholly Prussian, at least wholly under Prussian control.

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  • Against this Austria protested, as having the same right as Prussia to Kiel; an angry correspondence followed; but neither power was quite prepared for war, and on the 20th of August 1865 the convention of Gastein, to use Bistnarcks phrase, papered over the cracks.

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  • The great ship canal from Kiel to the Elbe, which was begun in 1887 and completed in 1896, has perhaps even more importance for naval than for commercial purposes.

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  • Besides the numerous steam-ferries which connect island and island, and Jutland with the islands, and the Gjedser-Warnemiinde route, a favourite passenger line from Germany is that between Kiel and KorsOr, while most of the German Baltic ports have direct connexion with Copenhagen.

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  • When, therefore, in August 1807, Gambier arrived in the Sound, and the English plenipotentiary Francis James Jackson, not perhaps the most tactful person that could have been chosen, hastened to Kiel to place the British demands before the crown prince, Frederick not only refused to negotiate, but ordered the Copenhagen authorities to put the city in the best state of defence possible.

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  • September till the 5th of September, and ended with Treaty of the capitulation of the city and the surrender of the Kiel, 1814.

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  • She was punished for her obstinacy by being deprived of Norway, which she was compelled to surrender to Sweden by the terms of the treaty of Kiel (1814), on the 14th of January, receiving by way of compensation a sum of money and Swedish Pomerania, with Riigen, which were subsequently transferred to Prussia in exchange for the duchy of Lauenburg and 2,000,000 rix-dollars.

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  • In 1868 he became ordinary professor at Kiel, and in 1872 was appointed to the chair of Oriental languages at Strassburg, which he resigned in 1906.

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  • Waltz, Deutsche Verfassungsgeschichte (Kiel, 1844); E.

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  • Kiitzing, Tabulae Phycologicae (19 vols., Nordhausen, 1845-1869); P. Kuckuck, Beitrage zur Kenntniss der Meeresalgen (Kiel and Leipzig, 1897-1899); G.

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  • Schutt, Die Peridinien der Plankton-Expedition (Kiel and Leipzig, 1895); R.

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  • In 1839 he became professor in Kiel University, where, with the exception of one brief interval, when he was expelled with several colleagues because of his German sympathies, he remained till his death.

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  • His chief works are Entwurf eines Systems der Wissenschaftslehre (Kiel, 1846) and System der spekulativen Ethik (2 vols., 1850).

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  • OTTO JAHN (1813-1869), German archaeologist, philologist, and writer on art and music, was born at Kiel on the 16th of June 1813.

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  • After the completion of his university studies at Kiel, Leipzig and Berlin, he travelled for three years in France and Italy; in 1839 he became privatdocent at Kiel, and in 1842 professor-extraordinary of archaeology and philology at Greifswald (ordinary professor 1845).

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  • reflector by Johann Gottlieb Friedrich Schrader of Kiel, he made his famous observations on the surface features of the moon and planets.

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  • He was educated at the universities of Kiel, Leipzig and Berlin.

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  • He declined the offer of a classical chair at Kiel, and accepted a post as tutor to the son of an intimate friend of Altenstein, the Prussian minister of education.

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  • KIEL, the chief naval port of Germany on the Baltic, a town of the Prussian province of Schleswig-Holstein.

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  • It is beautifully situated at the southern end on the Kieler Busen (bay or harbour of Kiel), 70 m.

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  • It consists of a somewhat cramped old town, lying between the harbour and a sheet of water called Kleiner Kiel, and a better built and more spacious new town, which has been increased by the incorporation of the garden suburbs of Brunswick and Diisternbrook.

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  • The pride of Kiel is its magnificent harbour, which has a comparatively uniform depth of water, averaging 40 ft., and close to the shores 20 ft.

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  • The Kaiser Wilhelm Canal, commonly called the Kiel Canal, connecting the Baltic with the North Sea at Brunsbiittel, has its eastern entrance at Wik, 12 m.

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  • of Kiel (see Germany: Waterways).

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  • Kiel is connected by day and night services with Korsdr in Denmark by express passenger boats.

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  • The name of Kiel appears as early as the 10th century in the form Kyl (probably from the Anglo-Saxon Kille = a safe place for ships).

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  • Kiel is mentioned as a city in the next century; in 1242 it received the Lubeck rights; in the 14th century it acquired various trading privileges, having in 1284 entered the Hanseatic League.

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  • In recent tinies Kiel has been associated with the peace concluded in January 1814 between Great Britain, Denmark and Sweden, by which Norway was ceded to Sweden.

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  • In 1773 Kiel became part of Denmark, and in 1866 it passed with the rest of Schleswig-Holstein to Prussia.

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  • Since being made a great naval arsenal, Kiel has rapidly developed in prosperity and population.

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  • See Prahl, Chronika der Stadt Kiel (Kiel, 1856); Erichsen, Topographic des Landkreises Kiel (Kiel, 1898); H.

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  • Eckardt, Alt-Kiel in Wort and Bild (Kiel, 1899); P. Hasse, Das Kieler Stadtbuch, 1264-1289 (Kiel, 1875); Das dlteste Kieler Rentebuch 1300, 1487, edited by C. Reuter (Kiel, 1893); Das zweite Kieler Rentebuch 1487, 1586, edited by W.

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  • Stern (Kiel, 1904); and the Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft fiir Kieler Stadtgeschichte (Kiel, 1877, 1904).

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  • The number of matriculated students is usually greater in winter than in summer; the reason of the disproportion being that in the summer university towns having pleasant surroundings, such as Bonn, Heidelberg, Kiel and Jena, are more frequented.

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  • of Kiel, on the Altona-Vamdrup railway.

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  • See Warmstedt, Rendsburg (Kiel, 1850).

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  • The readiness with which the young Mytilus attaches itself to wicker-work is made the means of artificially cultivating and securing these molluscs for the market both in the Bay of Kiel in North Germany and at the mouth of the Somme and other spots on the coast of France.

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  • The more important industrial establishments, such as iron foundries, machine works, tobacco and cloth factories, are mainly confined to the large towns, such as Altona, Kiel and Flensburg.

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  • The shipbuilding of Kiel and other seaports, however, is important; and lace is made by the peasants of north Schleswig.

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  • Kiel is one of the chief seaports of Prussia, while oversea trade is also carried on by Altona and Flensburg.

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  • The chief educational institution in Schleswig-Holstein is the university of Kiel.

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  • Schleswig is the official capital of the province, but Altona and Kiel are the largest towns, the latter being the chief naval station of Germany.

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  • Kiel and Friedrichsort are fortified, but the old lines of Diippel have been dismantled.

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  • After studying at Heidelberg, Bonn and Berlin, he graduated at Kiel in 1847, and in the following year went to France, where he was teacher of German at Laval and at Reims. His leisure was given to Oriental studies, in which he had made great progress in Germany, and in 1852 he joined Fresnel's archaeological expedition to Mesopotamia.

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  • Langhorn, Historische Nachricht fiber die detnischen Moltkes (Kiel, 1871).

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