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kidderminster

kidderminster

kidderminster Sentence Examples

  • Another cadet was Sir John Beauchamp of Holt, minister of Richard II., who was created Lord Beauchamp of Kidderminster (the first baron created by patent) 1387, but beheaded 1388; the barony became extinct with his son in 1400.

  • He entered the academy of Dr Philip Doddridge at Northampton, became minister of a congregation formed by a fusion of Presbyterians and Independents at High Street Chapel, Shrewsbury (1741), received Presbyterian ordination there (1745), resigned in 1766 owing to ill-health, and lived in retirement at Kidderminster until his death.

  • KIDDERMINSTER, a market town and municipal and parliamentary borough of Worcestershire, England, 1351 m.

  • Kidderminster is chiefly celebrated for its carpets.

  • In 736 lands upon the river Stour, called Stour in Usmere, which have been identified with the site of Kidderminster (Chideminstre), were given to Earl Cyneberght by King 'Ethelbald to found a monastery.

  • At the Domesday Survey, Kidderminster was still in the hands of the king and remained a royal manor until Henry II.

  • Kidderminster sent two members to the parliament of 1295, but was not again represented until the privilege of sending one member was conferred by the Reform Act of 1832.

  • The first mention of the cloth trade for which Kidderminster was formerly noted occurs in 1334, when it was enacted that no one should make woollen cloth in the borough without the bailiff's seal.

  • At first only the "Kidderminster" carpets were made, but in 1749 a Brussels loom was set up in the town and Brussels carpets were soon produced in large quantities.

  • Burton, A History of Kidderminster, with Short Accounts of some Neighbouring Parishes (1890).

  • Among the complainants were the inhabitants of Kidderminster, a town which had become famous for its ignorance and depravity.

  • His ministry continued, with very considerable interruptions, for about nineteen years; and during that time he accomplished a work of reformation in Kidderminster and the neighbourhood which is as notable as anything of the kind upon record.

  • The interruptions to which his Kidderminster life was subjected arose from the condition of things occasioned by the civil war.

  • Baxter blamed both parties, but Worcestershire was a cavalier county, and a man in his position was, while the war continued, exposed to annoyance and danger in a place like Kidderminster.

  • On his recovery he returned to his charge at Kidderminster, where he also became a prominent political leader, his sensitive conscience leading him into conflict with almost every one of the contending parties in state and church.

  • This he could not do, and after his refusal he was not allowed, even before the passing of the Act of Uniformity, to be a curate in Kidderminster, though he was willing to serve that office gratuitously.

  • A similar tribute of general esteem was paid to him nearly two centuries later, when a statue was erected to his memory at Kidderminster in July 1875.

  • After leading an unsuccessful cavalry charge against the enemy he fled, about 6 P.M., accompanied by Buckingham, Derby, Wilmot, Lauderdale and others, towards Kidderminster, taking refuge at Whiteladies, about 25 m.

  • bogeyrently resting on temporary accommodation bogies, its own are under overhaul in the mechanical shop at Kidderminster.

  • His Kidderminster play-off contenders instantly showed a keen spirit of adventure with three forward pushed onto Swansea's back line.

  • A description such as " Save Kidderminster Hospital " or " No to George Bush " would remind voters of what you stand for.

  • In 1852 he was returned to Parliament for Kidderminster in the Liberal interest.

  • Another cadet was Sir John Beauchamp of Holt, minister of Richard II., who was created Lord Beauchamp of Kidderminster (the first baron created by patent) 1387, but beheaded 1388; the barony became extinct with his son in 1400.

  • He entered the academy of Dr Philip Doddridge at Northampton, became minister of a congregation formed by a fusion of Presbyterians and Independents at High Street Chapel, Shrewsbury (1741), received Presbyterian ordination there (1745), resigned in 1766 owing to ill-health, and lived in retirement at Kidderminster until his death.

  • KIDDERMINSTER, a market town and municipal and parliamentary borough of Worcestershire, England, 1351 m.

  • Kidderminster is chiefly celebrated for its carpets.

  • In 736 lands upon the river Stour, called Stour in Usmere, which have been identified with the site of Kidderminster (Chideminstre), were given to Earl Cyneberght by King 'Ethelbald to found a monastery.

  • At the Domesday Survey, Kidderminster was still in the hands of the king and remained a royal manor until Henry II.

  • Kidderminster sent two members to the parliament of 1295, but was not again represented until the privilege of sending one member was conferred by the Reform Act of 1832.

  • The first mention of the cloth trade for which Kidderminster was formerly noted occurs in 1334, when it was enacted that no one should make woollen cloth in the borough without the bailiff's seal.

  • At first only the "Kidderminster" carpets were made, but in 1749 a Brussels loom was set up in the town and Brussels carpets were soon produced in large quantities.

  • Burton, A History of Kidderminster, with Short Accounts of some Neighbouring Parishes (1890).

  • Among the complainants were the inhabitants of Kidderminster, a town which had become famous for its ignorance and depravity.

  • His ministry continued, with very considerable interruptions, for about nineteen years; and during that time he accomplished a work of reformation in Kidderminster and the neighbourhood which is as notable as anything of the kind upon record.

  • The interruptions to which his Kidderminster life was subjected arose from the condition of things occasioned by the civil war.

  • Baxter blamed both parties, but Worcestershire was a cavalier county, and a man in his position was, while the war continued, exposed to annoyance and danger in a place like Kidderminster.

  • On his recovery he returned to his charge at Kidderminster, where he also became a prominent political leader, his sensitive conscience leading him into conflict with almost every one of the contending parties in state and church.

  • This he could not do, and after his refusal he was not allowed, even before the passing of the Act of Uniformity, to be a curate in Kidderminster, though he was willing to serve that office gratuitously.

  • A similar tribute of general esteem was paid to him nearly two centuries later, when a statue was erected to his memory at Kidderminster in July 1875.

  • More recent estimates of Baxter are those given by John Tulloch in his English Puritanism and its Leaders, and by Dean Stanley in his address at the inauguration of the statue to Baxter at Kidderminster (see Macmillan's Magazine, xxxii.

  • After leading an unsuccessful cavalry charge against the enemy he fled, about 6 P.M., accompanied by Buckingham, Derby, Wilmot, Lauderdale and others, towards Kidderminster, taking refuge at Whiteladies, about 25 m.

  • A description such as " Save Kidderminster Hospital " or " No to George Bush " would remind voters of what you stand for.

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