Kew sentence example

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  • The large difference between the means obtained at Potsdam and Kremsmtinster, as compared to the comparative similarity between the results for Kew and Karasjok, suggests that the mean value of the potential gradient may be much more dependent on local conditions than on difference of latitude.
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  • The December and June curves for Kew are good examples of the ordinary nature of the difference between midwinter and midsummer.
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  • The afternoon minimum at Kew gradually deepens as midsummer approaches.
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  • At Karasjok and Kremsmunster the seasonal variation in a i seems comparatively small, but at Potsdam and the Bureau Central it is as large as at Kew.
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  • With it may be studied with advantage the unique collection at Kew of pictures of plant-life in its broadest aspects, brought together by the industry and munificence of Miss Marianne North.
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  • Or to take the small but welldefined group of five-leaved pines, all the species of which may be seen growing side by side at Kew under identical conditions: we have the Weymouth pine (Pinus Strobus) in eastern North America, P. monlicola and the sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) in California, P. Ayacahwite in Mexico, the Arolla pine (P. Cembra) in Switzerland and Siberia, P. Peuce in Greece, the Bhotan pine (P. excelsa) in the Himalayas, and two other species in Japan.
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  • Swinhoe obtained no fewer than 65 different kinds of timber from a large yard in Taiwanfu; and his specimens are now to be seen in the museum at Kew.
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  • There are large herbaria at the British Museum and at the Royal Gardens, Kew, and smaller collections at the botanical institutions at the principal British universities.
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  • The Kew herbarium, founded by Sir William Hooker and greatly increased by his son Sir Joseph Hooker, is also very rich in types, especially those of plants described in the Flora of British India and various colonial floras.
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  • Specimens of flowering plants and vascular cryptograms are generally mounted on sheets of stout smooth paper, of uniform quality; the size adopted at Kew is 17 in.
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  • Weber, The Chemistry of Indiarubber (London, 1902); Selected papers from the Kew Bulletin, iii.
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  • Other facilities for outdoor enjoyment are provided in Hesketh Park (presented to the town by the Rev. Charles Hesketh, formerly rector of North Meols, and one of the lords of the manor), the Botanic Gardens, Kew Gardens, South Marine Park, and the Winter Gardens.
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  • Passing Richmond (16) and Kew the river flows through London and its suburbs for a distance of about 25 m., till it has passed Woolwich.
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  • A good series of tropical aroids is to be seen in the aroid house at Kew.
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  • The garden at Kew dates from about 1730, when Frederick, prince of Wales, obtained a long lease of Kew House and its gardens from the Capel family.
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  • The work of the Kew Observatory, at the Old Deer Park, Richmond, has also been placed under the direction of the N.P.L.
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  • The quality varies much, as well as the =colour and density; an Italian sample in the museum at Kew (of a very dark red tint) weighs about 241 lb to the cub.
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  • When James Bradley and Samuel Molyneux entered this sphere of astronomical research in 1725, there consequently prevailed much uncertainty as to whether stellar parallaxes had been observed or not; and it was with the intention of definitely answering this question that these astronomers erected a large telescope at the house of the latter at Kew.
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  • Here he had set up, on the igth of August 1727, a more convenient telescope than that at Kew, its range extending over 64° on each side of the zenith, thus covering a far larger area of the sky.
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  • The Kew Observatory pattern unifilar magnetometer is shown in figs.
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  • In the case of the Kew pattern unifilar the same magnet that is used for the declination is usually employed for determining H, and for the purposes of the vibration experiment it is mounted as for the observation of the magnetic meridian.
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  • By common consent the arboretum in the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew is one of the finest in the world.
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  • Its beginnings may be traced hack to 1762, when, at the suggestion of Lord Bute, the duke of Argyll's trees and shrubs were removed from Whitton Place, near Hounslow, to adorn the princess of Wales's garden at Kew.
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  • The botanical gardens at Kew were thrown open to the public in 1841 under the directorate of Sir William Hooker.
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  • Four years later the pleasure grounds and gardens at Kew occupied by the king of Hanover were given to the nation and placed under the care of Sir William for the express purpose of being converted into an arboretum.
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  • Of the more specialized public arboreta in the United Kingdom the next to Kew are those in the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh and the Glasnevin Garden in Dublin.
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  • A stone bridge of seven arches, erected in 1789, connecting Kew with Brentford on the other side of the river, was replaced by a bridge of three arches opened by Edward VII.
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  • Kew has increased greatly as a residential suburb of London; the old village consisted chiefly of a row of houses with gardens attached, situated on the north side of a green, to the south of which is the church and churchyard and at the west the principal entrance to Kew Gardens.
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  • From remains found in the bed of the river near Kew bridge it has been conjectured that the village marks the site of an old British settlement.
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  • The estate of Kew House about the end of the 17th century came into the possession of Lord Capel of Tewkesbury, and in 1721 of Samuel Molyneux, secretary to the prince of Wales, afterwards George II.
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  • Dutch House, close to Kew House, was sold by Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, to Sir Hugh Portman, a Dutch merchant, late in the 16th century, and in 1781 was purchased by George III.
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  • It is a plain brick structure, now known as Kew Palace.
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  • The Royal Botanic Gardens of Kew originated in the exotic garden formed by Lord Capel and greatly extended by the princess dowager, widow of Frederick, prince of Wales, and by George III., aided by the skill of William Aiton and of Sir Joseph Banks.
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  • In the neighbouring Richmond Old Park is the important Kew Observatory.
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  • In 1859 he was appointed director of Kew Observatory, and there naturally became interested in problems of meteorology and terrestrial magnetism.
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  • The following may be mentioned; Arundinaria simoni, a fine plant which in the bamboo garden at Kew has reached 18 ft.
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  • The observations upon which it was founded were made at Molyneux's house on Kew Green.
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  • The building which houses the CEB is named after Kew's most famous economic botanist, Sir Joseph Banks.
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  • After the storm of October 1997 I was commissioned to produce a limited edition etching of Kew Gardens.
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  • In case you cant find a spot, Kew Gardens has a pay and display parking lot off of Kew Green.
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  • Blake comes to the rescue and also recovers the emerald necklace but Kew gets away to fight another day.
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  • Special dinner packages in Kew's refurbished orangery are available at £ 40.
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  • At the end of May Kew Gardens will be re-opening their Chinese pagoda to the public for the first time in many years.
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  • The Kew curves, for instance, might suggest that the range (maximum less minimum hourly value) was larger in June than in December.
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  • Here he had set up, on the igth of August 1727, a more convenient telescope than that at Kew, its range extending over 64° on each side of the zenith, thus covering a far larger area of the sky.
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  • He erected a 24-foot zenith sector at his house, Kew House, Kew Green in 1725.
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  • According to Mr Bean in Trees and Shrubs, p. 165, it is a native of Spain, and only hardy in the milder parts of Great Britain, needing at Kew wall protection, but in the gardens at Grayswood Hill, near Haslemere, thriving splendidly.
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  • After the trying winter of 1895, quite green and fresh at Kew.
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  • T. crocostemon is even hardier, growing and flowering on a wall at Kew, with protection in severe weather.
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  • Hemerocallis Aurantiaca Major - This is the name given by Mr Baker, of Kew, to a new and handsome kind from Japan, and of which a colored plate was given in The Garden, 23rd November 1895.
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  • So far it has proved quite hardy at Kew.
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  • Smilax Tamnoides - This grows well in the Bamboo Garden at Kew, and shows well how such a plant may be used to ramble over tree stumps to make a mass of picturesque vegetation.
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  • Though uninjured at Kew during recent winters, the plant is still on trial as to its hardiness in this country, and might possibly lose its buds in a severe winter.
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  • It has grown well at Kew, Fulham, and in the Edinburgh Botanic Gardens.
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  • Mr Coleman has grown it well amongst Rhododendrons at Eastnor Castle; Mr Gumbleton, Mr Hooke, Mr Ellacombe, and Kew have also had it in good condition.
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  • R. rubiginosum, a scarce kind which has proved fully hardy at Kew, its flowers bright rose spotted with crimson.
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  • J. Bean (Trees and Shrubs) has seen the shrub at Kew, but nowhere else.
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  • The largest specimen at Kew is 9 feet high, with a spreading base and foliage of the deepest and glossiest green.
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  • At Kew there is a group of this purple-leaved variety near the Palm House, amongst which is planted Lilium candidum, and nothing could more happily set off the beauty of this Lily.
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  • Osmanthus Myrtifolius - There is this Osmanthus at Kew, the lower part of which is ilicifolius, the upper part myrtifolius.
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  • A hybrid between it and Hookeri called Kewense (raised at Kew in 1874) has flowers of a pale flesh color, not so large as those of Aucklandi, but more numerous in the truss.
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  • The true plant has been grown outside for many years in the Rhododendron dell at Kew, and it has never been injured by frost, nor does it ever fail to set abundance of bloom.
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  • It flowers annually on the rockery at Kew.
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  • It is said by Mr Bean to be hardy at Kew.
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  • The finest trees in the country are not yet much over 20 feet high, and are to be found in Cornwall, where the rainfall is heavy and the atmosphere moist; all the same, there are good ones at Kew, Bagshot, and many other places.
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  • Smilacina Oleracea - Native of temperate Sikkim, and has been grown for many years at Kew.
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  • Carolina. It was grown in English gardens in 1780, but apparently lost to cultivation until reintroduced to Kew from Arnold Arboretum in 1902.
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  • The open-air water-lily tank in the Royal gardens, Kew, is one of the latest and most up-to-date in construction.
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  • It is decidedly less at Perpignan and Lisbon than at Potsdam, Kew and Greenwich, but nowhere is the seasonal difference more conspicuous than at Tokyo, which is south of Lisbon.
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  • Kew is uncertain.
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  • Regular work with this instrument, inaugurated at Kew by De la Rue in 1858, was carried on there for fourteen years; and was continued at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, from 1873 to 1882.
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