Kentucky sentence example

kentucky
  • (1821-1875), soldier and political leader, was born at Lexington, Kentucky, on the 19th of February 1821.
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  • The principal tobacco-producing states, with the approximate value of their crops, were: Kentucky, £3,885,400; Ohio, £1,706,600;£1,706,600; North Carolina, £1,396,153; Wisconsin, £1,342,600; Virginia, £1,206,309, Pennsylvania, £979,550; Connecticut, £883,184; Tennessee, £511,035£511,035 Florida, £330,750; New York, £244,053, and Maryland, £241,046.
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  • It is near the great mineral deposits of Virginia, Tennessee, West Virginia, Kentucky and North Carolina; an important distributing point for iron, coal and coke; and has tanneries and lumber mills, iron furnaces, tobacco factories, furniture factories and packing houses.
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  • In October-November 1768, Sir William Johnson and representatives of Virginia and Pennsylvania met 3200 Indians of the Six Nations here and made a treaty with them, under which, for 10,460 in money and provisions, they surrendered to the crown their claims to what is now Kentucky and West Virginia and the western part of Pennsylvania.
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  • He neutralized the intrigues of certain British agents who were then working in Kentucky.
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  • This group of fields is followed in importance by the " Eastern Interior " group in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky, and the " Western Interior " group in Iowa, Missouri and Kansas.
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  • The only states Greeley carried were Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Tennessee and Texas.
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  • "Uncle Morrie" of the next letter is Mr. Morrison Heady, of Normandy, Kentucky, who lost his sight and hearing when he was a boy.
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  • Jefferson Davis was educated at Transylvania University (Lexington, Kentucky) and at the United States Military Academy at West Point.
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  • He graduated at Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1851, studied law under his father, and was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1853.
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  • Other pleasure resorts are the Lagoon on the Kentucky side (in Ludlow, Ky.), Chester Park, about 6 m.
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  • This provides for taking water from the Ohio river at a point on the Kentucky side opposite the village of California, Ohio, and several miles above the discharge of the city sewers; for the carrying of the water by a gravity tunnel under the river to the Ohio side, the water being thence elevated by four great pumping engines, each having a daily capacity of 30,000,000 gallons, to settling basins, being then passed through filters of the American or mechanical type, and flowing thence by a gravity tunnel more than 4 m.
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  • All the remaining states and territories stood by the Union, except Missouri, Kentucky and Maryland, in which public opinion was divided.
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  • In Kentucky the Unionist victory was secured almost without a blow, and, even at the end of 1861, the Confederate outposts west of the Alleghenies lay no farther north than the line Columbus - Bowling Green - Cumberland Gap, though southern Missouri was still a contested ground.
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  • C. Buell in Kentucky had likewise drilled his troops to a high state of efficiency and was preparing to move against the Confederate general Albert Sidney Johnston, whose reputation was that of being the foremost soldier on either side.
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  • Here Fort Donelson on the Cumberland, Fort Henry on the Tennessee and Columbus on the Mississippi guarded the left of the Southern line, Sidney Johnston himself maintaining a precarious advanced position at Bowling Green, with his lieutenants, Zollicoffer and Crittenden, farther east at Mill Springs, and a small force under General Marshall in the mountains of eastern Kentucky.
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  • It was at this moment that Bragg was in the full tide of his temporary success in Tennessee and Kentucky, and, after his great victory of Second Bull Run, Lee naturally invaded Maryland, which, it was assumed, had not forgotten its Southern sympathies.
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  • Morgan and other leaders created much excitement, especially "Morgan's Raid" (June 27 - July 26), through Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio, which states had hitherto little or no experience of the war on their own soil.
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  • From mountain heights along its eastern border the surface of Kentucky is a north-western slope across two much dissected plateaus to a gracefully undulating lowland in the north central part and a longer western slope across the same plateaus to a lower and more level lowland at the western extremity.
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  • The entire eastern quarter of the state, coterminous with the Eastern Kentucky coalfield, is commonly known as the region of the " mountains," but with the exception of the narrow area just described it properly belongs to the Alleghany Plateau Province.
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  • Another lowland area embraces that small part of the state in the extreme south-east which lies west of the Tennessee river; this belongs to that part of the Coastal Plain Region which extends north along the Mississippi river; it has in Kentucky an average elevation of less than 500 ft.
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  • The Licking, Kentucky, Green and Tradewater are the principal rivers wholly within the state.
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  • The Cumberland, after flowing for a considerable distance in the south-east and south central part of the state, passes into Tennessee at a point nearly south of Louisville, and in the extreme south-west the Cumberland and the Tennessee, with only a short distance between them, cross Kentucky and enter the Mississippi at Smithland and Paducah respectively.
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  • In its primeval state Kentucky was generally well timbered, but most of the middle section has been cleared and here the blue grass is now the dominant feature of the flora.
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  • Kentucky is chiefly an agricultural state.
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  • Indian corn is the largest and most valuable crop. As late as 1849, when it produced 58,672,591 bu., Kentucky was the second largest Indiancorn producing state in the Union.
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  • The culture of tobacco, which is the second most valuable crop in the state, was begun in the north part about 1780 and in the west and south early in the 19th century, but it was late in that century before it was introduced to any considerable extent in the Blue Grass Region, where it was then in a measure substituted for the culture of hemp. By 1849 Kentucky ranked second only to Virginia in the production of tobacco, and in 1899 it was far ahead of any other state in both acreage and yield, there being in that year 384,805 acres, which was 34'9% of the total acreage in the continental United States, yielding 314,288,050 lb.
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  • In 1909 the tobacco acreage in Kentucky was 420,000, the crop was 350,700,000 lb, valued at $37, 1 74, 200; the average price per pound had increased from 5'9 cents in 1899 to 10'6 cents in 1909.
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  • Kentucky is the principal hemp-growing state of the Union; the crop of 1899, which was grown on 14,107 acres and amounted to 10,303,560 lb, valued at $468,454, was 87'7% of the hemp crop of the whole country.
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  • In 1899 the total value of fruit grown in Kentucky was $2,491,457 (making the state rank thirteenth among the states of the Union in the value of this product), of which $ 1, 943, 6 45 was the value of orchard fruits and $435,462 that of small fruits.
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  • Kentucky also grows considerable quantities of cherries, pears, plums and peaches, and, for its size, ranks high in its crops of strawberries, blackberries and raspberries.
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  • The thoroughbred Kentucky horse has long had a world-wide reputation for speed; and the Blue Grass Region, especially Fayette, Bourbon and Woodford counties, is probably the finest horse-breeding region in America and has large breeding farms. In Fayette county, in 1900, the average value of colts between the ages of one and two years was $377.78.
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  • Manufactures.--Kentucky's manufactures are principally those for which the products of her farms and forests furnish the raw material.
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  • Good whisky is made in Maryland and in parts of Pennsylvania from rye, but all efforts in other states to produce from Indian corn a whisky equal to the Bourbon have failed, and it is probable that the quality of the Bourbon is largely due to the character of the Kentucky lime water and the Kentucky yeast germs. The average annual product of the state from 1880 to 1900 was about 20,000,000 gallons; in 1900 the product was valued at $9,786,527; in 1905 at $11,204,649.
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  • In 1900 and in 1905 Kentucky ranked fourth among the states in the value of distilled liquors.
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  • Measured by the value of the product, flour and grist mill products rose from third in rank in 1900 to first in rank in 1905, from $13,017,043 to $18,007,786, or 38.3%; and chewing and smoking tobacco and snuff fell during the same period from first to third in rank, from $14,948,192 to $13,117,000, or 12.3%; in 1900 Kentucky was second, in 1905 third, among the states in the value of this product.
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  • Other important manufactures (each with a product value in 1905 of more than one million dollars) were cotton-seed oil and cake (in 1900 Kentucky was fifth and in 1905 sixth among the states in the value of cotton-seed oil and cake), cooperage, agricultural implements, boots and shoes, cigars 1 In the census of 1905 statistics for other than factory-made products, such as those of the hand trades, were not included.
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  • Minerals.-The mineral resources of Kentucky are important and valuable, though very little developed.
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  • Bituminous coal is the principal mineral, and in 1907 Kentucky ranked eighth among the coal-producing states of the Union; the output in 1907 amounted to 10,753,124 short tons, and in 1902 to 6,766,984 short tons as compared with 2,399,755 tons produced in 1889.
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  • All Kentucky coal is either bituminous or semi-bituminous, but of several varieties.
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  • Of cannel coal Kentucky is the largest producer in the Union, its output for 1902 being 65,317 short tons, and, according to state reports, for 1903, 72,856 tons (of which 46,314 tons were from Morgan county), and for 1904, 68,400 tons (of which 52,492 tons were from Morgan county); according to the Mineral Resources of the United States for 1907 (published by the United States Geological Survey) the production of Kentucky in 1907 of cannel coal (including 4650 tons of semi-cannel coal) was 77,733 tons, and exclusive of semi-cannel coal the output of Kentucky was much larger than that of any other state.
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  • Some of the coal mined in eastern Kentucky is an excellent steam producer, especially the Jellico coal of Whitley county, Kentucky, and of Campbell county, Tennessee.
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  • Coal was first mined in Kentucky in Laurel or Pulaski county in 1827; between 1829 and 1835 the annual output was from 2000 to 6000 tons; in 1840 it was 23,527 tons and in 1860 it was 285,760 tons.
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  • Kentucky is the S.W.
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  • The value of clay products was $2,406,350 in 1905 (when Kentucky was tenth among the states) and was $2,611,364 in 1907 (when Kentucky was eleventh among the states).
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  • The manufacture of cement was begun in 1829 at Shippingport, a suburb of Louisville, whence the natural cement of Kentucky and Indiana, produced within a radius of 15 m.
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  • This confined sea-water is gradually being displaced by the downward sinking of the rain-water through the rifts of the strata, and thus finds its way to the surface: so that these springs offer to us a share of the ancient seas, in which perhaps a hundred million of years ago the rocks of Kentucky were laid down."
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  • Kentucky in 1909 had 3,503.98 m.
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  • Kentucky's trade during the greater part of the 19th century was very largely with the South, and with the facilities which river navigation afforded for this the development of a railway system was retarded.
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  • The population of Kentucky in 1880 2 was 1,648,690; in 1890, 1,858,635, an increase within the decade of 12.7%; and in 1900 it was 2,147,174, a further increase of 15.5%.
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  • The taking of life and " moon-shining," however, have become less and less frequent among them, and Berea College, at Berea, the Lincoln Memorial University, and other schools in Kentucky and adjoining states have done much to educate them and bring them more in harmony with the outside community.
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  • The population of Kentucky is largely rural.
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  • The cities 'of Kentucky which in 1900 had a population of more than 5000 were: Louisville (pop. in 1900, 204,731); Covingto`t (42,938); Newport (28,301); Lexington (26,369); Paducah (19,446); Owensboro (13,189); Henderson (10,272); Frankfort, the capital (9487); Bowling Green (8226); Hopkinsville (7280); Ashland (6800); Maysville (6423); Bellevue (6332); Dayton (6104), and Winchester (5964).
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  • Kentucky is governed under a constitution adopted in 1891.3 A convention to revise the constitution or to draft a new one meets on the call of two successive legislatures, ratified by a majority of the popular vote, provided that majority be at least one-fourth of the total number of votes cast at the preceding general election.
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  • The early history of the schools of Kentucky shows that the rural school conditions have been very unsatisfactory.
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  • The state makes provision for revenue for school purposes as follows: (1) the interest on the Bond of the Commonwealth for $1,327,000 00; (2) dividends on 798 shares of the capital stock of the Bank of Kentucky - representing a par value of $79,800.00; (3) the interest at 6% on the Bond of the Commonwealth for $381,986.08, which is a perpetual obligation in favour of the several counties; (4) the interest at 6% on $606,641.03, which was received from the United States; (5) the annual tax of 262 cents on each $100 of value of all real and personal estate and corporate franchises directed to be assessed for taxation; (6) a certain portion of fines, forfeitures and licences realized by the state; and (7) a portion of the dog taxes of each county.
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  • The present school system of Kentucky may be summarized under three heads: the rural schools, the graded schools, and the high schools (which are further classified as city and county high schools).
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  • Kentucky, in common with other states in this part of the country, suffered from over-speculation in land and railways during 1830-1850.
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  • The first banking currency in Kentucky was issued in 1802 by a co-operative insurance company established by Mississippi Valley traders.
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  • The Bank of Kentucky, established at Frankfort in 1806, had a monopoly for several years.
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  • The Bank of the Commonwealth was chartered in 1820 as a state institution and the charter of the Bank of Kentucky was revoked in 1822.
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  • In 1834 the .legislature chartered the Bank of Kentucky, the Bank of Louisville and the Northern Bank of Kentucky.
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  • Kentucky was the first settlement in this movement, the first state west of the Alleghany Mountains admitted into the Union.
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  • In 1763 the Kentucky country was claimed by the Cherokees as a part of their hunting grounds, by the Six Nations (Iroquois) as a part of their western conquests, and by Virginia as a part of the territory granted to her by her charter of 1609, although it was actually inhabited only by a few Chickasaws near the Mississippi river and by a small tribe of Shawnees in the north, opposite what is now Portsmouth, Ohio.
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  • The early settlers were often attacked by Indian raiders from what is now Tennessee or from the country north of the Ohio, but the work of colonization would have been far more difficult if those Indians had lived in the Kentucky region itself.
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  • It was Finley's descriptions that attracted Daniel Boone, and soon after Boone's first visit, in 1767, travellers through the Kentucky region became numerous.
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  • In March 1 775 Richard Henderson and some North Carolina land speculators met about 1200 Cherokee Indians in council on the Watauga river and concluded a treaty with them for the purchase of all the territory south of the Ohio river and between the Kentucky and Cumberland rivers.
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  • Kentucky county, practically coterminous with the present state of Kentucky and embracing all the territory claimed by Virginia south of the Ohio river and west of Big Sandy Creek and the ridge of the Cumberland Mountains, was one of three counties which was formed out of Fincastle county in 1776.
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  • Four years later, this in turn was divided into three counties, Jefferson, Lincoln and Fayette, but the name Kentucky was revived in 1782 and was given to the judicial district which was then organized for these three counties.
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  • Between these extremes were the small farmers of the" Barrens" 2 in Kentucky and of the Piedmont Region in Virginia.
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  • The aristocratic influences in both states have always been on the Southern and Democratic side, but while they were strong enough in Virginia to lead the state into secession they were unable to do so in Kentucky., 1 Most of the early settlers of Kentucky made their way thither either by the Ohio river (from Fort Pitt) or - the far larger number - by way of the Cumberland Gap and the " ` Wilderness Road."
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  • In the Act of 1776 for dividing Fincastle county, Virginia, the ridge of the Cumberland Mountains was named as a part of the east boundary of Kentucky; and now that this ridge had become a part of the boundary between the states of Virginia and Kentucky they, in 1 799, appointed a joint commission to run the boundary line on this ridge.
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  • In1798-1799the legislature passed the famous Kentucky Resolutions in protest against the alien and sedition acts.
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  • For several years the Anti-Federalists or Republicans had contended that the administration at Washington had been exercising powers not warranted by the constitution, and when Congress had passed the alien and sedition laws the leaders of that party seized upon the event as a proper occasion for a spirited public protest which took shape principally in resolutions passed by the legislatures of Kentucky and Virginia.
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  • The original draft of the Kentucky Resolutions of 1798 was prepared by Vice-President Thomas Jefferson, although the fact that he was the author of them was kept from the public until he acknowledged it in 1821.
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  • In 1820 commissioners representing Kentucky and Tennessee formally adopted the line of1779-1780and the line of 1819 as the boundary between the two states.
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  • Many would have followed Burr in a filibustering attack upon the Spanish in the South-West, but scarcely any would have approved of a separation of Kentucky from the Federal Union.
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  • No battles were fought in Kentucky during the War of 1812, but her troops constituted the greater part of the forces under General William Henry Harrison.
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  • Kentucky voted the Whig ticket in every presidential election from 1832 until the party made its last campaign in 1852.
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  • In 1860 the people of Kentucky were drawn toward the South by their interest in slavery and by their social relations, and toward the North by business ties and by a national sentiment which was fostered by the Clay traditions.
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  • A large majority of the state legislature, however, were Democrats, and in his message to this body, in January 1861, Governor Magoffin, also a Democrat, proposed that a convention be called to determine " the future of Federal and inter-state relations of Kentucky;" later too, in reply to the president's call for volunteers, he declared, " Kentucky will furnish no troops for the wicked purpose of subduing her sister Southern States."
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  • An election in August of one-half the Senate and all of the House of Representatives resulted in a Unionist majority in the new legislature of 103 to 35, and in September, after Confederate troops had begun to invade the state, Kentucky formally declared its allegiance to the Union.
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  • This body, composed mostly of Kentucky men who had joined the Confederate army, passed an ordinance of secession, elected state officers, and sent commissioners to the Confederate Congress, which body voted on the 9th of December to admit Kentucky into the Confederacy.
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  • Throughout the war Kentucky was represented in the Confederate Congress - representatives and senators being elected by Confederate soldiers from the state.
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  • Carlos Buell, in command of the Federal Army of the Ohio stationed there, and entering Kentucky in August 1862 proceeded slowly toward Louisville, hoping to win the state to the Confederate cause and gain recruits for the Confederacy in the state.
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  • $ Governor Stevenson resigned on the 13th of February 1871 to become U.S. Senator from Kentucky.
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  • Fordescriptionsof physical featuresand accounts of natural resources see Reports of the Kentucky Geological Survey, the Biennial Reports of the Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Statistics, the Reports of the United States Census and various publications of the U.S. Geological Survey, and other publications listed in Bulletin 301 (Bibliography and Index of North American Geology for 1901-1905) and other bibliographies of the Survey.
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  • For a brief description of the Blue Grass Region, see James Lane Allen's The Blue Grass Region of Kentucky and other Kentucky Articles (New York, 1900).
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  • For administration, see the Official Manual for the Use of the Courts, State and County Officials and General Assembly of the State of Kentucky (Lexington), which contains the Constitution of 1891; The Report of the Debates and Proceedings of the Convention..
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  • Bullitt and John Feland, The General Statutes of Kentucky (Frankfort and Louisville, 1877, revised editions, 1881, 1887); and the Annual Reports of state officers and boards.
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  • Among older histories are Humphrey Marshall, The History of Kentucky.
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  • Warfield's The Kentucky Resolutions of 1798 (New York, 2nd ed., 1887) is an excellent monograph.
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  • There is much valuable material in the Register (Frankfort, 1903 seq.) of the Kentucky State Historical Society, and especially in the publications of the Filson Club of Louisville.
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  • The Democrats carried every state except Massachusetts, Vermont, Kentucky and Tennessee.
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  • Again, in Kentucky and Tennessee, there is a double alternation of sandstone and limestone in the plateau-making strata; and as the skyline of the plateau bevels across these formations, there are west-facing escarpments, made ragged by mature dissection, as one passes from the topographically strong sandstone to the topographically weak limestone.
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  • The Caiolinian area extends from southern Michigan to northern Georgia and from the Atlantic coast to Western Kansas, comprising Delaware, all of Maryland except the mountainous Western portion, all of Ohio except the north-east corner, nearly the whole of Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, eastern Nebraska and Kansas, south-eastern South Dakota, western central Oklahoma, northern Arkansas, middle and eastern Kentucky, middle Tennessee and the Tennessee valley in eastern Tennessee, middle Virginia and North Carolina, western \Vest Virginia, north-eastern Alabama.
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  • The Austroriparian zone comprises nearly all the Gulf States as far West as the mouth of the Rio Grande, the greater part of Georgia, eastern South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia, and extends up the lowlands of the Mississippi Valley acru_~s western Tennessee and Kentucky into southern Illinois andlndiana and across eastern and southern Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma into south-eastern Missouri and Kansas.
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  • Four outlying groups beyond the mountains, with perhaps a twentieth part of the total population of the nation, one about Pittsburg, one in West Virginia, another in northern Kentucky, and the last in.
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  • (I) the North Atlantic division~down to New Jersey and Pennsylvania; (2) the South Atlantic divisionfrom Delaware to Florida (including West Virginia); (3) the North Central divisionincluding the states within a triangle tipped by Ohio, Kansas and North Dakota; (4) the South Central division -covering a triangle tipped by Kentucky, Alabama and Texas; and (5) the Western divisionincluding the Rocky Mountains and Pacific states.
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  • Ohio, West Virginia and California appeared as producers in 1876, Kentucky and Tennessee in 1883, Colorado in 1887.
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  • It is also found associated with limestone, as in the Mammoth Caves, Kentucky, and with gypsum, as atMontmartre.
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  • Zanesville was first platted in 1800 by Ebenezer Zane (r 747181 r) of Wheeling, Virginia (now West Virginia), his brother Jonathan, and John McIntire, his son-in-law, of Alexandria, Va., who under an act of Congress of 1796 surveyed a road from Wheeling to what is now Maysville, Kentucky, and received for this service three sections of land.
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  • A public park extending from the James to the heart of the city, a deep, spacious and well-protected harbour, a large shipbuilding yard with three immense dry docks, and two large grain elevators of 2,000,000 bushels capacity, are among the most prominent features; at the shipbuilding yard various United States battleships, including the "Kearsarge," "Kentucky," "Illinois," "Missouri," "Louisiana," "Minnesota," "Virginia" and "West Virginia," were constructed, as well as cruisers, gun-boats, merchant vessels, ferry-boats and submarines.
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  • On receiving Blount's report to the effect that the revolution had been accomplished by the aid of the United States minister and by the landing of troops from the " Boston," President Cleveland sent Albert Sydney Willis (1843-1897) of Kentucky to Honolulu with secret instructions as United States minister.
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  • He entered immediately, as a Democrat, into Kentucky politics, and political ambition caused his removal in 1818 to northern Alabama, near Huntsville.
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  • Birney's father was among those who advocated a "free state" constitution for Kentucky, and the home environment of the boy had thus fostered a questioning attitude towards slavery, though later he was himself a slave-holder.
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  • For this he was ostracized from Kentucky society; his anti-slavery journals were withheld in the mails; he could not secure a public hall or a printer.
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  • He removed with his family to Bloomington, Illinois, in 1852; was educated at the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington and at Centre College, Danville, Kentucky; and was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1857.
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  • It is the seat of Madison Institute for girls (1856) and of the Eastern Kentucky State Normal School (1906).
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  • United States, in Missouri, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio and elsewhere, there is an unconformable junction between the Lower and Upper Carboniferous, representing an interval of time during which the lower member was strongly eroded; it has even been proposed to regard the Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) as a distinct geological period, mainly on account of this break in the succession.
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  • He died in Frankfort, Kentucky, on the 19th of November 1850.
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  • A rock similar to the blue ground of Kimberley has been found in the states of Kentucky and New York.
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  • His grandfather,' Abraham Lincoln, settled in Kentucky about 1780 and was killed by Indians in 1784.
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  • His father, Thomas (1778-1851), was born in Rockingham (then Augusta) county, Virginia; he was hospitable, shiftless, restless and unsuccessful, working now as a carpenter and now as a farmer, and could not read or write before his marriage, in Washington county, Kentucky, on the 12th of June 1806, to Nancy Hanks (1783-1818), who was a native of Virginia, who is said to have been the illegitimate daughter of one Lucy Hanks, and who seems to have been, in 1 Lincoln's birthday is a legal holiday in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.
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  • In meeting all the extraordinary demands resulting from the Civil War he displayed great energy and resourcefulness, and was active in thwarting the schemes of the secessionists in the neighbouring state of Kentucky, and of the Knights of the Golden Circle, the Order of American Knights, and the Sons of Liberty (secret societies of Southern sympathizers and other opponents of the war) in Indiana.
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  • Pope and Hardin counties were the only sources of fluorspar in the United States from 1842 until 1898, when fluorspar began to be mined in Kentucky; in 1906 the output was 28,268 tons, valued at :8160,623, and in 1905 33, 2 75 tons, valued at $220,206.
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  • The Virginia House of Delegates, in 1778, extended the civil jurisdiction of Virginia to the north-west, and appointed Captain John Todd (1750-1782), of Kentucky, governor of the entire territory north of the Ohio, organized as "The County of Illinois"; the judges of the courts at Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes, who had been appointed under the British administration, were now chosen by election; but this government was confined to the old French settlements and was entirely inefficient.
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  • The majority of the early settlers came from the southern and border states, principally from Missouri and Kentucky; but subsequently there was a large immigration of New England and Eastern people, and these elements were stronger in the population of Jacksonville than in any other city of southern Illinois.
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  • In answer to those odious measures Jefferson and Madison prepared and procured the passage of the Kentucky and Virginia resolutions.
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  • On the 11th of September President Lincoln, who regarded the action as premature and who saw that it might alienate Kentucky and other border states, whose adherence he was trying to secure, annulled these declarations.
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  • Out of consideration for the "Radicals," however, Fremont was placed in command of the Mountain Department of Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee.
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  • The Virginia resolutions and the Kentucky resolutions (the latter having been drafted by Jefferson) were met by dissenting resolutions from the New England states, from New York, and from Delaware.
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  • Nearly all his arguments, especially where he attempts to interpret Jefferson's writings on the point, notably the Kentucky resolutions, are rather strained and specious, but it does seem that the Virginia resolutions were based on a different idea from Calhoun's doctrine of nullification.
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  • The plan was endorsed of holding a convention of all the states to settle the slavery question, and delegates were chosen to the proposed Border State Convention that was to meet at Frankfort, Kentucky, on the 27th of May.
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  • It is the shipping point of the Bedford Indiana (oolitic) limestone, which is found in the vicinity and is one of the most valuable and best known building stones in the United States - of this stone were built the capitols of Indiana, Georgia, Mississippi and Kentucky; the state historical library at Madison, Wisconsin; the art building at St Louis, Missouri; and many other important public buildings.
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  • He served for three months, in 1810, as attorney-general of Illinois Territory, but soon returned to Kentucky, and during the War of 1812 he was for a time on the staff of General Isaac Shelby.
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  • Settling in Frankfort, he soon took high rank as a criminal lawyer, was in the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1825 and 1829-1832, acting as speaker in the latter period, and from 1827 to 1829 was United States district-attorney.
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  • He was again a member of the United States Senate from 1842 to 1848, and in1848-1850was governor of Kentucky.
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  • When war became inevitable he threw himself zealously into the Union cause, and lent his great influence to keep Kentucky in the Union.
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  • He died at Frankfort, Kentucky, on the 26th of July 1863.
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  • His son, George Bibb Crittenden (1812-1880), soldier, was born in Russellville, Kentucky, on the 20th of March 1812, and graduated at West Point in 1832, but resigned hid commission in 1833.
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  • He died at Danville, Kentucky, on the 27th of November 1880.
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  • Another SOD, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden (1815-1893), soldier, was also born at Russellville, Kentucky.
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  • Tobacco was an important crop in the earlier history of the colony, and Virginia continued to be the leading tobacco-producing state of the Union (reporting in 1850 28.4% of the total crop) until after the Civil War, which, with the division of the state, caused it to fall into second place, Kentucky taking the lead; and in 1900 the crop of North Carolina also was larger.
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  • In 1774 Lord Dunmore, the governor, led an army to the Ohio river to break an Indian coalition which had been formed to check the rapid expansion of Virginia over what is now Kentucky and West Virginia.
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  • In 1784, Virginia, after some hesitation, ceded to the Federal government the north-west territory, which it held under the charter of 1609; in 1792 another large strip of the territory of Virginia became an independent state under the name of Kentucky.
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  • But the people of these cessions, especially of Kentucky, were closely allied to the great up-country party of Virginia, and altogether they formed the basis of the Jeffersonian democracy, which from 1794 opposed the chief measures of the Washington administration, and which on the passage of the Alien and Sedition laws in 1798 precipitated the first great constitutional crisis in Federal politics by the adoption in the Kentucky and Virginia legislatures of the resolutions, known by the names of those states, strongly asserting the right and duty of the states to arrest the course of the national government whenever in their opinions that course had become unconstitutional.
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  • Jefferson was the author of the Kentucky resolutions, and his friend Madison prepared those passed by the Virginia Assembly.
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  • The temperature is uniformly 54° Fahr., coinciding with that of Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.
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  • He was tail, rawboned and awkward; his early instruction was scant; but he "read books," talked well, and so, after his admission to the bar at Richmond, Virginia, in 1797, and his removal next year to Lexington, Kentucky, he quickly acquired a reputation and a lucrative income from his law practice.
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  • At the age of twenty-two (1799), he was elected to a constitutional convention in Kentucky; at twenty-six, to the Kentucky legislature; at twenty-nine, while yet under the age limit of the United States constitution, he was appointed to an unexpired term (1806-1807) in the United States Senate, where, contrary to custom, he at once plunged into business, as though he had been there all his life.
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  • He again served in the Kentucky legislature (1808-1809), was chosen speaker of its lower house, and achieved distinction by preventing an intense and widespread anti-British feeling from excluding the common law from the Kentucky code.
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  • His earliest championship of protection was a resolution introduced by him in the Kentucky legislature (1808) which favoured the wearing by its members of home-made clothes; and one in the United States Senate (April 1810), on behalf of home-grown and home-made supplies for the United States navy, but only to the point of making the nation independent of foreign supply.
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  • He was only twenty-two, when, as an opponent of slavery, he vainly urged an emancipation clause for the new constitution of Kentucky, and he never ceased regretting that its failure put his state, in improvements and progress, behind its free neighbours.
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  • Although in 1849 he again vainly proposed emancipation in Kentucky, he was unanimously elected to the United States Senate, where in 1850 he temporarily pacified both sections of the country by successfully offering, for the sake of the "peace, concord and harmony of these states," a measure or series of measures that became known as the "Compromiseof 1850."
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  • In 1848, Zachary Taylor, a Mexican War hero, and hardly even a convert to the Whig party, defeated Clay for the nomination, Kentucky herself deserting her "favourite son."
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  • From North Carolina as a centre "Separate" Baptist influence permeated Virginia and extended into Kentucky and Tennessee.
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  • He was educated for the medical profession, but entered the Sulpician Seminary of Paris in November 1803, was ordained priest in 1808, refused the post of chaplain to Napoleon, was professor of theology in the Diocesan Seminary at Rennes in 1808-1810, and in August 1810 settled in Baltimore, Maryland, whither his long general interest in missions, and particularly his acquaintance with Bishop Flaget of Kentucky, had drawn him.
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  • In 1815 Gallitzin was suggested for the bishopric of Bardstown, Kentucky, and in 1827 for the proposed see of Pittsburg, and he refused the bishopric of Cincinnati.
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  • The Cambarus and Amblyopsis have wide distribution, being found in many other caves, and also in deep wells, in Kentucky and Indiana.
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  • He was a member of a family prominent in the public life of Kentucky and the nation.
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  • His grandfather, John Breckinridge (1760-1806), who revised Jefferson's draft of the "Kentucky Resolutions" of 1798, was a United States senator from Kentucky in1801-1805and attorney-general in President Jefferson's cabinet in 1805-1806.
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  • His uncles, John Breckinridge (1797-1841), professor of pastoral theology in the Princeton Theological Seminary in1836-1838and for many years after secretary of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871), for several years superintendent of public instruction in Kentucky, an important factor in the organization of the public school system of the state, a professor from 18J3 to 1871 in the Danville Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Danville, Kentucky, and the temporary chairman of the national Republican convention of 1864, were both prominent clergymen of the Presbyterian Church.
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  • John Cabell Breckinridge graduated in 1838 at Centre College, Danville, Kentucky, continued his studies at Princeton, and then studied law at Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky.
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  • He practised law in Frankfort, Kentucky, in1840-1841and in Burlington, Iowa, from 1841 to 1843, and then returned to Kentucky and followed his profession at Lexington.
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  • In 1849 he was elected a Democratic member of the Kentucky legislature, and in1851-1855he served in the national House of Representatives.
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  • In 1860 he was nominated for the presidency by the pro-slavery seceders from the Democratic national convention, and received a total of 72 electoral votes, including those of every Southern state except Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri.
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  • Crittenden as United States senator from Kentucky in March 1861, but having subsequently entered the Confederate service he was expelled from the Senate in December 1861.
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  • In 1868 he returned to the United States and resumed the practice of law at Lexington, Kentucky, where he died on the 17th of May 1875.
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  • Kenton was named in honour of Simon Kenton (1755-1836) a famous scout and Indian fighter, who took part in the border warfare, particularly in Kentucky and Ohio, during the War of American Independence and afterwards.
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  • When in the summer of 1812 open hostilities with Great Britain began, Harrison was appointed by Governor Charles Scott of Kentucky major-general in the militia of that state.
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  • During the following year his father, Colonel Richard Taylor, a veteran of the War of Independence, migrated to Kentucky, settling near Louisville, and thereafter played an important part in the wars and politics of his adopted state.
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  • The boyhood and youth of Zachary Taylor were thus passed in the midst of the stirring frontier scenes of early Kentucky, and from this experience he acquired the hardihood and resoluteness that characterized his later life, although he inevitably lacked the advantages of a thorough education.
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  • Within a month after his victory over Santa Anna a Whig convention in Iowa nominated him for the presidency, and public meetings in Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania and elsewhere quickly took similar action, in many cases without regard to party lines.
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  • Danville is the seat of several educational institutions, the most important of which is the Central University of Kentucky (Presbyterian), founded in 1901 by the consolidation of Centre College (opened at Danville in 1823), and the Central University (opened at Richmond, Ky., in 1874).
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  • Other institutions at Danville are Caldwell College for women (1860; Presbyterian), and the Kentucky state institution for deaf mutes (1823).
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  • The Transylvania seminary was opened here in 1785, but four years later was removed to Lexington, and a Presbyterian theological seminary was founded here in 1853, but was merged with the Louisville theological seminary (known after 1902 as the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky) in 1901.
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  • From its first settlement in 1781 until the admission of Kentucky into the Union in 1792 Danville was an important political centre.
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  • For the next ten years he devoted himself to the practice of law and to the supervision of the Kentucky Railroad Company, of which he had become president in 1869.
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  • McCLERNAND, John Alexander (1812-1900), American soldier and lawyer, was born in Breckinridge county, Kentucky, on the 30th of May 1812.
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  • The early settlers of the state were practically all from Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia and the old slave-states of the south-east, and their influence was easily dominant in the state until well after the Civil War (about 1875), when northerners first began to enter the state in large numbers.
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  • The south-western Ozarks were settled originally by mountaineers from Kentucky and Tennessee, and retained a character of social primitiveness and industrial backwardness until after the Civil War.
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  • Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia furnished most of the new-corners.
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  • Stone had been a Presbyterian minister prominent in the Kentucky revival of 1801, but had been turned against sectarianism and ecclesiastical authority because the synod had condemned Richard McNemar, one of his colleagues in the revival, for preaching (as Stone himself had done) counter to the Westminster Confession, on faith and the work of the Holy Spirit in conversion.
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  • The Campbells gradually lost sight of Christian unity, owing to the unfortunate experience with the Baptists and to the tone taken by those clergymen who had met them in debates; and for the sake of Christian union it was peculiarly fortunate that in January 1832 at Lexington, Kentucky, the followers of the Campbells and those of Stone (who had stressed union more than primitive Christianity) united.
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  • Isaac Errett (1820-1888) was the most prominent leader of the progressive party, which was considered corrupt and worldly by the literalists, many of whom, in spite of his efforts, broke off from the main body, especially in Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas and Texas.
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  • Lexington is the seat of Transylvania University (non-sectarian; coeducational), formerly Kentucky University (Disciples of Christ), which grew out of Bacon College (opened at Georgetown, Ky., in 1836), was chartered in 1858 as Kentucky University, and was opened at Harrodsburg, Ky., in 18J9, whence after a fire in 1864 it removed to Lexington in 1865.
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  • At Lexington it was consolidated with the old Transylvania University, a well-known institution which had been chartered as Transylvania Seminary in 1783, was opened near Danville, Ky., in 1785, was removed to Lexington in 1789, was re-chartered as Transylvania University in 1798, and virtually ceased to exist in 1859.1 In 1908 Kentucky University resumed the old name, Transylvania University.
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  • The State University was founded (under the Federal Land Grant Act of 1862) in 1865 as the State Agricultural and Mechanical College, was opened in 1866, and was a college of Kentucky University until 1878.
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  • The first newspaper published west of the Alleghany Mountains, the Kentucky Gazette, was established here in 1787, to promote the separation of Kentucky from Virginia.
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  • The liberation of most of the slaves in the eastern counties followed; and some slave-holders removed to Kentucky.
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  • At the census of 1840, with the exception of a few thousand FrenchCanadians, the population was made up of American-born pioneers from the Eastern states, and in the southern portion of the territory of a sprinkling of men from Kentucky, Virginia and farther south.
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  • Louisville is a noted racing centre and has some fine tracks; the Kentucky Derby is held here annually in May.
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  • The leaftobacco market is the largest in the world, most of the leaf-tobacco produced in Kentucky, which in 1900 was 34.9% of the entire crop of the United States, being handled in Louisville; the city's trade in whisky, mules and cement 1 is notably large, and that in pork, wheat, Indian corn, coal and lumber is extensive.
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  • Other important manufactures in 1905 were: packed meats, particularly pork; men's clothing, especially "Kentucky jeans"; flour and grist mill products; cotton-seed oil and cake; leather, especially sole leather; foundry and machine shop products; steam-railway cars; cooperage; malt liquors; carriages and wagons, especially farm wagons; and carriage and wagon materials; agricultural implements, especially ploughs; and plumbers' supplies, including cast-iron gas and water pipes.
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  • Colonel William Preston, county surveyor of Fincastle county, within which the 2000-acre tract lay, refused to approve Captain Bullitt's survey, and had the lands resurveyed in the following year, nevertheless the tract was conveyed in December 1773 by Lord Dunmore to his friend Dr John Connolly, a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who had served in the British army, as commander of Fort Pitt (under Dunmore's appointment), was an instigator of Indian troubles which culminated in the Battle of Point Pleasant, and was imprisoned from 1775 until nearly the close of the War of American Independence for attempting under Dunmore's instructions to organize the "Loyal Foresters," who 1 Louisville cement, one of the best-known varieties of natural cement, was first manufactured in Shipping Port, a suburb of Louisville, in 1829 for the construction of the Louisville & Portland Canal; the name is now applied to all cement made in the Louisville District in Kentucky and Indiana.
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  • He removed to Kentucky, graduated at Transylvania University in 1811, took to journalism, and for some time edited Amos Kendall's paper, the Argus, at Frankfort.
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  • His Son, Montgomery Blair (1813-1883), politician and lawyer, was born in Franklin county, Kentucky, on the 10th of May 1813.
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  • The convention adjourned to Baltimore, where the Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky and Maryland delegations left it, and where Douglas was nominated for the presidency by the Northern Democrats; he campaigned vigorously but hopelessly, boldly attacking disunion, and in the election, though he received a popular vote of 1,376,957, he received an electoral vote of only 12 - Lincoln receiving 180.
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  • Among Devonian plants, Equisetales, including not only Archaeocalamites, but forms referred to Asterophyllites and Annularia, occur; Sphenophyllum is known from Devonian strata in North America and Bear Island, and Pseudobornia from the latter; Lycopods are represented by Bothrodendron and Lepidodendron; a typical Lepidostrobus, with structure preserved, has lately been found in the Upper Devonian of Kentucky.
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  • Of the inhabitants born in the United States 38,561 were born in Georgia, 36,052 in Kentucky, 28,405 in North Carolina, 27,70 9 in Alabama, and 25,953 in Virginia.
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  • On the 17th of March 1775 Colonel Richard Henderson and his associates extinguished the Indian title to an immense tract of land in the valleys of the Cumberland, the Kentucky and the Ohio rivers (see Kentucky).
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  • Though these 1 For account of the settlement of the dispute over the northern boundary, see Kentucky.
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  • Then there are Canada hemp, Apocynum cannabinum, Kentucky hemp, Urtica cannabina, and others.
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  • The town is widely known as the seat of Berea College, which has done an important work among the mountaineers of Kentucky and of Tennessee.
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  • The nude body of a young girl was found in a wooded area in southern Kentucky.
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  • A network television station announced the arrest of Byron John Jacobson for the murder of Elsie Otis whose nude body was found in rural Kentucky!
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  • "Check out Elsie Otis in Kentucky and Timothy Burton in Rhode Island," I said and quickly and hung up.
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  • Which con artists web site at the footsie flotation to the kentucky.
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  • Only whiskey produced in Kentucky can be called bourbon LOOK OUT FOR.. .
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  • Born in 1866 in a log cabin in Kentucky on July 29 th.
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  • Dinner - Six pack of beer and Kentucky fried chicken three-piece Dinner, don't eat the coleslaw.
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  • Part 1 - Ode to cannabis cultivation - re Kentucky Hemp fields - general introduction Part 2 - Beginners guide to cannabis cultivation.
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  • Would get up insurers said rises Kentucky Derby change your car.
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  • The expansion of a corn belt in Kentucky had created a corn glut.
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  • American settlers began arriving from Kentucky in the 1810s; they achieved statehood in 1818.
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  • In May members staged a candle-lit vigil outside the Kingdom Hall in Benton, Kentucky.
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  • He served in Kentucky, was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers early in 1862; took part in the second day's fighting at the battle of Shiloh, served as chief of staff under Rosecrans in the Army of the Cumberland in 1863, fought at Chickamauga, and was made a major-general of volunteers for gallantry in that battle.
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  • The seams are principally above water levels and in many cases have been laid bare by erosion; and the supply is varied - besides a " fat coking, gassy bituminous," there are an excellent grade of splint coal (first mined in 1864 at Coalburg, Kanawha county) and (except that in Kentucky) the only important supply of cannel coal in the United States.
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  • (See also Kentucky.) Frankfort received a city charter in 1839.
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  • Harrodsburg was formerly the seat of Bacon College (see Lexington, Kentucky).
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  • Lancaster was founded in 1800 by Ebenezer Zane (1747-1811), who received a section of land here as part compensation for opening a road, known as "Zane's Trace," from Wheeling, West Virginia, to Limestone (now Maysville), Kentucky.
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  • When Christian county was formed from Logan county in 1797, Hopkinsville, formerly called Elizabethtown, became the countyseat, and was renamed in honour of Samuel Hopkins (c. 1 75 0 - 1819), an officer of the Continental Army in the War of Independence, a pioneer settler in Kentucky, and a representative in Congress from Kentucky in 1813-1815.
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  • In a modification of this method, known as the Kentucky cure, large barns are used, the temperature is not raised above 100° F., and the process occupies from four to six weeks.
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  • Democrat Whig Democrat Whig Democrat Whig " Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat Republican Democrat present Marietta, to a point nearly opposite the site of the present Huntington, Kentucky; the other was for an option to buy all the land between the Ohio and the Scioto rivers and the western boundary line of the Ohio Company's tract, extending north of the tenth township from the Ohio, this tract being pre-empted by " Manasseh Cutler and Winthrop Sargent for themselves and others " - actually for the Scioto Company (see Gallipolis).
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  • As brigadiergeneral (from March 1792) and second in command, he served under General Anthony Wayne in the latter's successful campaign of 1794 against the Indians, and in this campaign he seems to have tried to arouse discontent against his superior among the Kentucky troops, and to have intrigued to supplant him upon the reduction of the army.
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  • Kentucky is noted for its caves, the bestknown of which are Mammoth Cave and Colossal Cavern (qq.v.).
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  • In 1900 the state had 497,245 horses, 198,110 mules, 364,025 dairy cows, 755,714 other neat cattle, 1,300,832 sheep and 2,008,989 swine; in 1910 there were in Kentucky 407,000 horses, 207,000 mules, 394,000 mulch cows, 665,000 other neat cattle, 1,060,000 sheep and 989,000 swine.
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  • Nevertheless the Kentucky legislature on the 22nd of November 1799 reaffirmed in a new resolution the principles it had laid down in the first series, asserting in this new resolution that the state " does now unequivocally declare its attachment to the Union, and to that compact [the Constitution], agreeably to its obvious and real intention, and will be among the last to seek its dissolution," but that " the principle and construction contended for by sundry of the state legislatures, that the General Government is the exclusive judge of the extent of the powers delegated to it, stop nothing [short] of despotism - since the discretion of those who administer the government, and not the Constitution, would be the measure of their powers," " that the several states who formed that instrument, being sovereign and independent, have the unquestionable right to judge of the infraction," and " that a nullification by those sovereignties of all unauthorized acts done under color of that instrument is the rightful remedy."
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  • On the higher elevations the trees are mostly white pine, yellow pine and hemlock, but in the valleys and lower levels are oaks, hickories, maples, elms, birches, locusts, willows, spruces, gums, buckeyes, the chestnut, black walnut, butternut, cedar, ash, linden, poplar, buttonwood, hornbeam, holly, catalpa, magnolia, tulip-tree, Kentucky coffee-tree, sassafras, wild cherry, pawpaw, crab-apple and other species.
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  • In the general assembly of Kentucky in 1816, and in that of Alabama in 1819, he opposed inter-state rendition of fugitive slaves and championed liberal slave-laws.
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  • He served in the Mexican War as a lieutenantcolonel of Kentucky volunteers, and was an aide on Gen.
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  • The temperature is uniformly 54° Fahr., coinciding with that of Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.
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  • The fact that Rice was unduly optimistic and allowed the enterprises of the Convention to become almost hopelessly involved in debt, and was constrained to use some of the fund collected for missions to meet the exigencies of his educational and journalistic work, intensified the hostility of those who had suspected from the beginning the good faith of the agents and denied the scriptural authority of boards, paid agents, paid missionaries, &c. So virulent became the opposition that in several states, as Tennessee and Kentucky, the work of the Convention was for years excluded, and a large majority in each association refused to receive into their fellowship those who advocated or contributed to its objects.
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  • The cavernous limestone of Kentucky covers an area of 8000 sq.
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  • Bethany College, at Bethany, West Virginia, was chartered in 1840, and Alexander Campbell, who had founded it as Buffalo Seminary, was its president until his death in 1866; other colleges founded by the sect are: Kentucky University, Lexington, Ky.; Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio (1850, until 1867 known as Western Reserve Eclectic Institute); Butler College, Indianapolis, Indiana (1855); Christian University, Canton, Missouri (1851; coeducational); Eureka College, in Woodford county, Illinois (1855 coeducational); Union Christian College, Merom, Ind.
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  • Louisville boasts the famous Kentucky Derby, along with historic buildings, top arts venues and steamboat trips.
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  • Louisville, Kentucky is a city known for its many antebellum houses.
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  • The University of Louisville, aka U of L, is one of the most well-known colleges in the state of Kentucky.
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  • The new economics building at the University of Kentucky is both modern looking and aesthetically pleasing.
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  • We signed up for the 24-hour dance marathon at the Univeristy of Kentucky, to help raise money for children with cancer.
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  • They include Alaska, Georgia, Colorado, Hawaii, California, Kentucky, Iowa, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Tennessee, Vermont, Utah, New York, Wyoming and Washington.
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  • They became the defining beverage for the Kentucky Derby in 1938.
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  • Next time the Kentucky Derby rolls around, invite your friends over for a Derby party and impress them with your skills by making the classic Mint Julep and simple syrup.
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  • The official cocktail of the Kentucky Derby and Daisy's pick in The Great Gatsby, Mint Juleps are a quintessential summertime drink.
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  • Bourbon is a spirit distilled from corn, and although it can be made many places, it is most commonly associated with Kentucky.
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  • Pewter Mint Julep cups offer a stunning way to present cocktails of all sorts, not just the classic Mint Julep that is the hallmark of the Kentucky Derby.
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  • Mint Julep Cup with the Seal of Kentucky - This polished pewter ulep cup is adorned with the seal of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
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  • The Kentucky Derby Mint Julep is a great favorite of horse racing fans.
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  • This delightful southern cocktail has been the official drink of the Kentucky Derby since 1938.
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  • Of course, it would be sacrilage to make this cocktail with anything other than Kentucky bourbon.
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  • Early Times Kentucky Whisky has become the official brand used in the Kentucky Derby Mint Julep.
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  • Now that you know a little about the history of the Mint Julep's association with the Kentucky Derby, you might be ready to give one a try.
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  • Most people think of juleps as drinks served annually at the Kentucky Derby and certainly don't associate them with easy cocktail recipes.
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  • In Kentucky during this period, the number of marriages per thousand residents dropped from 13.5 to 7.9.
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  • Kentucky's divorce rate fell slightly, from 5.8 to 4.7 per thousand couples.
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  • Kentucky Fried Chicken offers the Tender Roast Sandwich, which if ordered without the sauce has 270 calories with 45 calories from fat, making the sandwich under 20 percent fat.
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  • Unlike some online stores, this is an actual brick-and-mortar store located in Hazard, Kentucky.
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  • Try mini jugs of maple syrup for a Vermont wedding, buckeye candies for Ohio nuptials, or horse and jockey figurines in your wedding colors for a Kentucky celebration.
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  • The Amazing Race All-Stars will bring back some of the more popular teams from seasons' past, most notably, "Rob and Amber" and "Team Kentucky."
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  • Their nuptials were also the subject of a reality program and an upcoming Fox reality show will document their life as newlyweds.Team Kentucky finished sixth during the latest edition of The Amazing Race.
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  • Rob Mariano and Amber Brkich, as well as Dave and Mary Conley (Team Kentucky) are likely to be joined by Uchenna and Joyce Agu (season 7 winners), Colin Guinn and Christie Woods (Amazing Race 5) and cousins Charla and Mirna (also season 5).
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  • Although Nick Lachey was born in Harlan, Kentucky, he spent most of his childhood in Ohio.
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  • Born in Owensboro, Kentucky, on June 9, 1963, John Christopher Depp II and his family moved over twenty times before settling in Miramar, Florida when he was seven.
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  • Titled "In Sanatorium," episode one took place at Waverly Hills Sanatorium located in Louisville, Kentucky.
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  • Born in 1961 in Lexington, Kentucky, George Clooney is known for his rugged good looks and outstanding acting in such television shows as ER and Roseanne, and movies including Ocean's 11 and Syriana.
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  • John Christopher Depp II was born in Owensboro, Kentucky, on June 9, 1963.
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  • Rebecca Gayheart was born on August 12, 1971, in Hazard, Kentucky.
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  • Belle of Louisville-The circa 1914 Belle of Louisville is a National Historic Landmark vessel that operates day sightseeing and dinner cruises along the Ohio River, from downtown Louisville, Kentucky.
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  • The University of Kentucky near Lexington, for example, has a beautiful arboretum and demonstration vegetable garden, and the staff loves to share their knowledge of raised bed gardening with visitors.
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  • Cool season grasses include Kentucky bluegrass, fescue, and blends suited for northern climates.
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  • According to the University of Kentucky, the most common household allergens are dust mites.
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  • They took their time with the planning until 1968, when actor Fess Parker announced his own plans to build a theme park in his Northern Kentucky home, very close to Cincinnati.
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  • Games and movies ship from California, Colorado, Kentucky or Pennsylvania, which means that ordered items should actually arrive at your house in less than a week.
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  • If you live in Kentucky, one of the Bluegrass cellular phones may be all you need.
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  • Bluegrass Cellular is based out of central Kentucky and offers coverage to rural areas in 34 counties.
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  • Bluegrass Cellular phones are a great pick for those in rural Kentucky.
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  • This stroke belt includes Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.
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  • Most of the sweet potatoes grown in the United States are grown in North Carolina, Mississippi, and Kentucky.
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  • Almost all information for Alabama through Kansas is lost, and half of the state of Kentucky.
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  • Century Beauty is a distributor based in Louisville, Kentucky that caters to salon professionals.
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  • With mining accidents seen in locations like New Zealand, Kentucky and Chile, miners know that accidents know no boundaries, and can lead to immediate death or disability.
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  • Kentucky Candle Wax Supply - You'll find different waxes and blends here, as well as lots of other candle making supplies.
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  • Kentucky Candle Wax Supply - KY Candle Wax specializes in soy candle making products, including all of the basics you'll need.
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  • The Ohio Valley typically encompasses three states: Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana.
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  • Major cities in the Ohio Valley include Cincinnati, Columbus, and Cleveland, Ohio; Lexington, Louisville, Covington, and Bowling Green, Kentucky; and Fort Wayne, South Bend, and Indianapolis, Indiana.
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  • Diners will find few good choices at Taco Bell, Kentucky Fried Chicken, and Jack-in-the-Box.
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  • Edgar Cayce was born on March 18, 1877 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
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  • Born in 1877 in the state of Kentucky, it didn't take long for the world to recognize that he was a unique individual.
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  • A Ghost At The Hayswood Hospital - Maysville, Kentucky - The quality of this video leaves a lot to be desired, and that is often a hallmark of a faked ghost sighting.
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  • The founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, Colonel Harland Sanders, used to carry the 11 herbs and spices mixture in his car!
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  • Finding them often takes a bit of effort, but Kentucky zoo coupons can be a helpful way to cut costs when planning a vacation with your family.
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  • If you're planning to visit Kentucky, there are many zoos and aquariums worth the trip.
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  • Look for Kentucky zoo coupons by checking a zoo's Web site, as well as local newspapers.
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  • Getting KFC coupons, or coupons for Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants, is easier than ever when you check their website online.
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  • Based in Louisville, Kentucky, the famous recipe that started it all and was developed by Colonel Harland Sanders, is still used today in the "Original Recipe".
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  • The fastest way to get Kentucky Fried Chicken coupons is to jump on your computer to find KFC printable coupons.
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  • Meijer operates stores in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky.
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  • Off Broadway stores can be found in California, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland and New Hampshire.
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  • The reported cases were traced back to 13 tattooists in Ohio, Kentucky, and Vermont.
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  • Berea is considered to be the Folk Arts and Crafts Capital of Kentucky, and many working craftspeople and artisans are found here.
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  • Berea, Kentucky is located just off the I-75, 40 miles south of Lexington (it's where the Bluegrass meets the mountains).
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  • Humana began with one nursing home in Louisville, Kentucky in 1961.
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  • They expanded rapidly, and in the first several years added facilities in Connecticut, Kentucky and Virginia.
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  • Hailing from the "math rock" capital of the world, Louisville, Kentucky, My Morning Jacket has a much different sound than many of the bands born of that scene.
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  • Elvis' first single - That's All Right b/w Blue Moon of Kentucky - was pressed.
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  • Hill, sisters and kindergarten teachers in late 1800s Kentucky, are credited with developing the melody that would become Happy Birthday.
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  • Shannon makes a $100,000 bet on a horse in the Kentucky Derby, causing Gene to panic.
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  • Southern Belles Louisville follows the lives of five Kentucky women as they deal with various life challenges and decisions.
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  • Her second husband was a member of Kentucky high society, so after the divorce Kellie faced a major lifestyle change.
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  • Graves County, Kentucky native Kevin Skinner experienced a Susan Boyle moment on America's Got Talent.
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  • The reality TV show star Trish Suhr was born a small town girl in Middlesboro, Kentucky on December 30, 1974.
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  • The college sports section offers an assortment of universities, and you can find basketball layouts for the University of Kentucky and the University of Illinois, among others.
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  • It is bounded on the north-west by Ohio, from which it is separated by the Ohio river, on the north by Pennsylvania and Maryland, the Potomac river dividing it from the latter state; on the east and south-east by Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, the boundary lines in the first two cases being meridians, in the last case a very irregular line following the crest of mountain ridges in places; and on the south-west by Virginia and Kentucky, the Big Sandy river separating it from the latter state.
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  • Much of the natural gas is piped out of the state into Ohio (even into the northern parts), Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Maryland; within the state gas has been utilized as a fuel in carbon black and glass factories.
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  • Of the inhabitants born in the United States 61,508 were natives of Virginia, 40,301 of Ohio, 28,927 of Pennsylvania and 10,867 of Kentucky; and of the foreign-born there were 6J37 Germans, 334 2 Irish, 2921 Italians and 2622 English.
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  • The revivals in Kentucky brought about differences which resulted in the high-handed exclusion of the revivalists.
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  • More or less closely connected with the Northern Church are the theological seminaries at Princeton, Auburn, Pittsburg (formerly Allegheny - the Western Seminary), Cincinnati (Lane), New York (Union) and Chicago (McCormick), already named, and San Francisco Seminary (1871) since 1892 at San Anselmo, Cal., a theological seminary (1891) at Omaha, Nebraska, a German theological seminary (1869) at Bloomfield, New Jersey, the German Presbyterian Theological School of the North-west (1852) at Dubuque, Iowa, and the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, which is under the control and supervision of the northern and southern churches.
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  • Its strength was increased by the addition: in 1863 of the small Independent Presbyterian Church of South Carolina; in 1865 of the United Synod (New School), which at that time had 120 ministers, 190 churches, and 12,000 communicants; in 1867 of the presbytery of Patapsco; in 1869 of the synod of Kentucky; and in 1874 of the synod of Missouri.
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  • In 1869-1879 he was professor of Hebrew in the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (first in Greenville, South Carolina, and after 1877 in Louisville, Kentucky), and in 1880 he became professor of Hebrew and Oriental languages in Harvard University, where until 1903 he was also Dexter lecturer onzbiblical literature.
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  • He was a school teacher in his native state, served during the War of 1812 in the Kentucky militia, and then settled in Missouri, where he worked as a schoolmaster and practised law.
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  • The city is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Louisville & Nashville, and the Frankfort & Cincinnati railways, by the Central Kentucky Traction Co.
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  • It is built among picturesque hills on both sides of the river, and is in the midst of the famous Kentucky "blue grass region" and of a rich lumber-producing region.
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  • General Wayne's victory was followed by an extensive immigration of New Englanders, of Germans, Scotch-Irish and Quakers from Pennsylvania, and of settlers from Virginia and Kentucky, many of whom came to escape the evils of slavery.
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  • The active growth of the petroleum industry of the United States began in 1859, though in the early part of the century the petroleum of Lake Seneca, N.Y., was used as an embrocation under the name of " Seneca oil," and the "American Medicinal Oil" of Kentucky was largely sold after its discovery in 1829.
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  • The earliest system adopted for the collection of petroleum appears to have consisted in Early skimming the oil from the surface of the water upon Methods which it had accumulated, and Professor Lesley states, that at Paint Creek, in Johnson county, Kentucky, a Mr George and others were in the habit of collecting oil from the sands, " by making shallow canals loo or 200 ft.
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  • He first entered Kentucky University but finished his course at Bethany College in 1873.
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  • A third type of musk-ox skull is, however, known from North America, namely one from the celebrated Big-Bone Lick, Kentucky, on which the genus and species Bootherium bombifrons was established, which differs from all the others by its small size, convex forehead and rounded horn-cores, the latter being very widely separated, and arising from the sides of the skull.
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  • The system reached from Kentucky and Virginia across Ohio, and from Maryland across Pennsylvania and New York, to New England and Canada, and as early as 1817 a group of anti-slavery men in southern Ohio had helped to Canada as many as moo slaves.
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  • Levi Coffin (1798-1877), a native of North Carolina (whose cousin, Vestal Coffin, had established before 1819 a "station" of the Underground near what is now Guilford College, North Carolina), in 1826 settled in Wayne County, Ohio; his home at New Garden (now Fountain City) was the meeting point of three "lines" from Kentucky; and in 1847 he removed to Cincinnati, where his labours in bringing slaves out of the South were even more successful.
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  • With the Spanish governor Estevan Miro, who succeeded Galvez in 1785, James Wilkinson of Kentucky, arrested at New Orleans with a flat-boat of supplies in 1787, intrigued, promising him that Kentucky would secede from the United States and would join the Spanish; but Wilkinson was unsuccessful in his efforts to carry out this plan.
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  • He served in the first battle of Bull Run; commanded a brigade in Kentucky in the winter of 1861, a division in Tennessee and Mississippi early in 1862, and the 1st Corps in Kentucky in October of the same year; was in command of Nashville in November and December of that year; and was then engaged in Tennessee until after the battle of Chickamauga, after which he saw no active service at the front during the Civil War.
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  • It is the seat of Bethel Female College (Baptist, founded 1854), of South Kentucky College (Christian; co-educational; chartered 1849) and of the Western Kentucky Asylum for the Insane.
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  • In1824-1828he was professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Brown University, acting as president in 1826-1827; in1828-1831was president of Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky; and in1831-1837was president of the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, where he organized the Alabama Female Athenaeum.
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  • The deposits in the great limestone caves of Kentucky, Virginia and Indiana have been probably derived from the overlying soil and accumulated by percolating water; they are of no commercial value.
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  • In a modification of this method, known as the Kentucky cure, large barns are used, the temperature is not raised above 100° F., and the process occupies from four to six weeks.
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  • The total membership of this order probably reached 250,000 to 300,000, principally in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Kentucky and south-western Pennsylvania.
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  • Promoted, brigadier-general of volunteers, Sherman was in August sent to Kentucky to serve under General Robert Anderson.
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  • On the 26th of October he reported that 200,000 men would be required for the Kentucky campaign.
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  • Blaine graduated at Washington College in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1847, and subsequently taught successively in the Military Institute, Georgetown, Kentucky, and in the Institution for the Blind at Philadelphia.
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  • Virginia has contributed largely to the population of West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri.
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  • The movement resembled those under the Campbells and Stone in Kentucky in 1801-1804, and in Lyndon, Vermont, among the Baptists in 1800.
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  • He began to take an active part in the movement for separate statehood for Kentucky, and in 1787 he entered into an irregular commercial agreement with the Spanish officials of Louisiana.
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  • His commercial connections at New Orleans enabled him to hold out the lure of a ready market at that port for Kentucky products, and this added greatly to the strength of the separatist movement.
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  • The town is the seat of the Kentucky Wesleyan College (co-educational; Methodist Episcopal, South), opened in 1866, and of the Winchester Trades and Industrial School (1900).
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  • Williams. From 1867 to 1871 he was state librarian of Kentucky.
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  • I was born in Kentucky, you know, where all the best and most aristocratic horses come from.
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