Kent sentence examples

kent
  • In England a Lenten fast was first ordered to be observed by Earconberht, king of Kent (640-664).

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  • It is picturesquely placed on the river Kent, and is irregularly built.

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  • C. Polkinghorne, Survey and Record of Woolwich and West Kent (Woolwich, 1909).

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  • Towards the end of the reign of lEthelberht, who died about 616, Radwald of East Anglia, who had apparently spent some time at the court of Kent, began to win for himself the chief position among the Anglo-Saxon kings of his day.

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  • Kent, Israel's Hist.

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  • The only alien priories granted were Abberbury in Oxfordshire, Wedon Pinkney in Northamptonshire, Romney in Kent, and St Clare and Llangenith in Wales, all very small affairs, single manors and rectories, and these did not form a quarter of the whole endowment.

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  • He found ships for the invasion of England and fought in person at Senlac; in 1067 he became earl of Kent, and for some years he was a trusted royal minister.

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  • It is written in unusually picturesque and vigorous language, and is based on the Roman de toute chevalerie, a French compilation made about 1250 by a certain Eustace or Thomas of Kent.

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  • - For Physical Geography: Barton, Australian Physiography (Brisbane, 1895); Wall, Physical Geography of Australia (Melbourne, 1883); Taylor, Geography of New South Wales (Sydney, 1898); Saville Kent, The Great Barrier Reef of Australia (London, 1893); A.

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  • WHITSTABLE, a watering-place in the St Augustine's parliamentary division of Kent, England, on the north coast at the east end of the Swale, 6 m.

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  • CHATHAM, a port and municipal and parliamentary borough of Kent, England, on the right bank of the Medway, 34 m.

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  • During his reign the coasts of Gaul were harassed by the Saxon pirates, with whom the Picts and Scots of northern Britain joined hands, and ravaged the island from the wall of Antoninus to the shores of Kent.

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  • In November of this year he obtained a renewal of his pension of J350o a year from the post office which he was holding in 1 The title was taken, not from Leeds in Yorkshire, but from Leeds in Kent, 41 m.

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  • Further, there is no evidence for any kings in Kent from 784 until after Offa's death.

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  • Reedwald had been converted to Christianity in Kent, but after his return home he relapsed, according to Bede, owing to the influence of his wife, and there were to be seen in the same building a Christian and a pagan altar.

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  • Two of his daughters, Saethryth and ZEthelberg, took the veil; while another, Sexburg, was married to Earconberht, king of Kent; and a fourth, Æthelthryth, after two marriages, with Tondberht of the South Gyrwe and Ecgfrith of Northumbria, became abbess of Ely.

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  • Hampshire, Kent, Wiltshire and Dorsetshire formed the successive theatres of what he calls his " bloodless and inglorious campaigns."

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  • C. Kent, A.

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  • Kent, Israel's Laws and Legal Enactments (1907); and in general I.

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  • C. Kent, Hist.

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  • Down Sheep Breeders' Association, the Shropshire Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Southdown Sheep Society, the Suffolk Sheep Society, the Border Leicester Sheep Breeders' Society, the Wensleydale Longwool Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Incorporated Wensleydale Blue-faced Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the Kent Sheep Breeders' Association, the Devon Longwool Sheep Breeders' Society, the Dorset Horn Sheep Breeders' Association, the Cheviot Sheep Society and the Roscommon Sheep Breeders' Association.

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  • In 1904-1905 Lancashire (£8510), Kent (£5922) and Cheshire (£4310) spent most in this direction.

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  • In Anglo-Saxon England in the 7th and 8th centuries it seems certain that each of the larger kingdoms, Kent, Wessex, Mercia and Northumbria, had its separate witan, or council, but there is a difference of opinion as to whether this was identical with, or distinct from, the folkmoot, in which, theoretically at least, all freemen had the right to appear.

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  • ELISHA KENT KANE (1820-1857), American scientist and explorer, was born in Philadelphia on the 10th of February 1820, the son of the jurist John Kintzing Kane (1795-1858), a friend and supporter of Andrew Jackson, attorney-general of Pennsylvania in 1845-1846, U.S. judge of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania after 1846, and president of the American Philosophical Society in 1856-1858.

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  • MARGATE, a municipal borough and seaside resort in the Isle of Thanet parliamentary division of Kent, England, 74 m.

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  • SEVENOAKS, a market town in the Sevenoaks parliamentary division of Kent, England, 22 m.

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  • Lambarde was author of the Perambulation of Kent, and founded the College of the Poor of Queen Elizabeth at Greenwich.

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  • Kent, Railway Enterprise in China (London, 1907).

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  • He died of consumption on the 14th of June 1881 at Hayes Common, Kent.

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  • CHISLEHURST, an urban district in the Sevenoaks parliamentary division of Kent, England, 114 m.

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  • The restored church of St Nicholas, dating from the 13th century, though much altered in the 15th, contains'a window given by Queen Victoria in 1866 in memory of her father, the duke of Kent, who lived at Woolbrook Glen, close by, and died there in 1820.

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  • Licentious and avaricious, he amassed great wealth; and when he died on the 25th of October 1292 he left numerous estates in Shropshire, Worcestershire, Somerset, Kent, Surrey and elsewhere.

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  • By listening to the revelations of the "Holy Maid of Kent," the nun Elizabeth Barton, he was charged with misprision of treason, and was condemned to the loss of his goods and to imprisonment at the king's will, penalties he was allowed to compound by a fine of X300 (25th of March 1534).

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  • The fauna of Brixham cavern closely resembles that of Kent's Hole.

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  • They have also been found in Pleistocene gravels in several parts of England, as Maidenhead, Bromley, Freshfield near Bath, Barnwood near Gloucester, and in the brick-earth of the Thames valley at Crayford, Kent; while their remains also occur in Arctic America.

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  • TUNBRIDGE WELLS, a municipal borough and inland watering-place of England, chiefly in the Tonbridge parliamentary division of Kent, but extending into the eastern division of Sussex, 341 m.

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  • He took orders in 1874 and held a curacy at Dartford, in Kent, till 1877, when he became resident chaplain and private secretary to Dr Tait, archbishop of Canterbury, a position which he occupied till Dr Tait's death, and retained for a short time (1882-1883) under his successor Dr Benson.

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  • 1567) at Westerham, Kent.

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  • SITTINGBOURNE, a market town in the Faversham parliamentary division of Kent, England, on a navigable creek of the Swale, 444 m.

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  • ASHFORD, a market-town in the Southern or Ashford parliamentary division of Kent, England, 56 m.

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  • See Edward Hasted, History and Survey of Kent (Canterbury, 1778-1799, 2nd ed.

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  • 1797-1801); Victoria County History - Kent.

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  • The estuary may be taken to extend to the North Foreland of Kent.

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  • His defence of The Times newspaper, which had accused Sir John Conroy, equerry to the duchess of Kent, of misappropriation of money (1838), is chiefly remarkable for the confession - "I despair of any definition of libel which shall exclude no publications which ought to be suppressed, and include none which ought to be permitted."

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  • Disturbances at once occurred in Northumbria, on the Welsh marches and in Kent; and he was compelled to return in December.

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  • Tong Castle shares with the castle of the same name in Kent the legend of the dealings of the Saxon Hengest with the British chieftain Vortigern.

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  • 1381), English rebel, a man of obscure origin, was a native either of Kent or of Essex.

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  • Here they chose Wat Tyler to be their leader, and in the next few days the rising spread over Kent, where much pillage and damage to property occurred.

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  • About 1 io persons were executed for the rebellion in Kent and Essex, including John Ball, and Jack Straw, Tyler's chief lieutenant.'

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  • FOLKESTONE, a municipal borough, seaport and wateringplace of Kent, England, within the parliamentary borough of Hythe, 71 m.

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  • It is mainly Early English, but the original church, attached to a Benedictine priory, was founded in 1095 on the site of a convent established by Eanswith, daughter of Eadbald, king of Kent in 630.

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  • FAVERSHAM, a market town and river-port, member of the Cinque Port of Dover, and municipal borough in the Faversham parliamentary division of Kent, England, on a creek of the Swale, 9 m.

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  • QUEENBOROUGH, a municipal borough in the Faversham parliamentary division of Kent, England, in the Isle of Sheppey, close to the junction of the Swale and Medway, 2 m.

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  • ISLE OF THANET, the extreme north-eastern corner of Kent, England, insulated by the two branches of the river Stour, and forming one of the eight parliamentary divisions of the county.

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  • by Essex and Kent, S.

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  • by Kent and Surrey.

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  • In this aspect the principal extension of London has been into the counties of Kent and Surrey, to the pleasant hilly districts about Sydenham, Norwood and Croydon, Chislehurst and Orpington, Caterham, Redhill and Reigate, Epsom, Dorking and Leatherhead; and up the valley of the Thames through Richmond to Kingston and Surbiton, Esher and Weybridge, and the many townships on both the Surrey and the Middlesex shores of the river.

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  • Among them, the Old Kent Road continues the southern section of Watling Street, from Dover and the south-east, through Woolwich and across Blackheath.

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  • A large pleasure traffic is maintained by the steamers of the New Palace Company and others in summer between London Bridge and Southend, Clacton and Harwich, Ramsgate, Margate and other resorts of the Kent coast, and Calais and Boulogne.

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  • The Board has asylums for the insane at Tooting Bec (Wandsworth), Ealing (for children); King's Langley, Hertfordshire; Caterham, Surrey; and Darenth, Kent.

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  • The Chelsea Water Company opened its supply from the Thames in 1721; the Lambeth waterworks were erected in 1783; the Vauxhall Company was established in 1805, the West Middlesex, near Hammersmith, and the East London on the river Lea in 1806, the Kent on the Ravensbourne (Deptford) in 1810, the Grand Junction in 1811, and the Southwark (which amalgamated with the Vauxhall) in 1822.

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  • appointed by the London County Council 1 pp y y (4), the City of London and the City of Westminster (2 each), the other Metropolitan boroughs (1 each), the county councils of Middlesex, Hertfordshire, Essex, Kent and Surrey (1 each), borough of West Ham (2), various groups of other boroughs and urban districts, and the Thames and the Lea Conservancies.

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  • " Water London " is an irregular area extending from Ware in Hertfordshire to Sevenoaks in Kent, and westward as far as Ealing and Sunbury.

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  • During these periods other companies had a surplus of water, and in 1899 an act was passed providing for the interconnexion of systems. The Thames and Lea are the principal sources of supply, but the Kent and (partially) the New River Company draw supplies from springs.

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  • The watering-places of the Sussex, Kent and Essex coasts, and pre-eminently Brighton, are specially favoured for these brief holidays.

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  • - The extent of the Port of London has been variously defined for different purposes, but for those of the Port Authority it is taken to extend from Teddington Lock to a line between Yantlet Creek in Kent and the City Stone opposite Canvey Isle and in Essex.

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  • Besides these authorities, the London County Council, the Board of Trade, the Admiralty, the Metropolitan and City Police, police of riparian boroughs, Kent and Essex Fisheries Commissioners, all the dock companies and others played some part in the government and public services of the port.

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  • (2) Camberwell (extending into Kent) - Divs.: Northern, Peckham, Dulwich.

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  • Roach Smith is a strong advocate for the bridge, and remarks, " It would naturally be erected somewhere in the direct line of road into Kent, which I cannot but think pointed towards the site of Old London Bridge, both from its central situation, from the general absence of the foundations of buildings in the approaches on the northern side, and from discoveries recently made in the Thames on the line of the old bridge " (Archaeologia, xxix.

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  • 449 or 450 the invaders settled in Britain, and in 457 Hengist and Aesc fought against the Britons at Crayford, driving them out of Kent.

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  • Essex seems seldom to have held an inde pendent position, for when London first appears as connected with the East Saxons the real power was in the hands of the king of Kent.

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  • Not many years afterwards the king of Kent again seems to have held some jurisdiction here.

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  • From the laws of the Kentish kings Lhothhere and Eadric (673-685) we learn that the Wic-reeve was an officer of the king of Kent, who exercised a jurisdiction over the Kentish men trading with or at London, or was appointed to watch over their interests.

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  • Verzellini died in 1606 and was buried at Down in Kent.

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  • About this time glass-works were established at Ewhurst and Alford in Surrey, Loxwood, Kirdford, Wisborough and Petworth in Sussex, and Sevenoaks and Penshurst in Kent.

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  • Beginning in Sussex, Surrey and Kent, where wood for fuel was plentiful, the foreign glass-workers and their descendants migrated from place to place, always driven by the fuel-hunger of their furnaces.

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  • The king's conduct, however, drew him to the side of the earl, and he had already joined Edward's enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare, refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husband's castle at Leeds in Kent.

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  • WALMER, a watering-place, and member of the Cinque Port of Sandwich, in the St Augustine's parliamentary division of Kent, England, 2 m.

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  • The place of their landing is said to have been Ebbsfleet in Kent.

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  • Its date is not certainly known, 450-455 being given by the English authorities, 428 by the Welsh (see Kent).

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  • The settlers of Kent are described by Bede as Jutes, and there are traces in Kentish custom of differences from the other.

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  • Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Hengest and Horsa were at first given the island of Thanet as a home, but soon quarrelled with their British allies, and gradually possessed themselves of what became the kingdom of Kent.

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  • Thenceforward Hengest reigned in Kent, together with his son Aesc (Oisc).

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  • There is no doubt, however, that the net result was the expulsion of the Britons from Kent.

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  • In 1886 experiments were conducted, under certain restrictions, and the plant was grown in Norfolk, Kent and other counties with sufficient success to prove the entire practicability of raising tobacco as a commercial crop in England.

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  • On the 18th of June 1808 he was elected a member of the House of Assembly of the province of Lower Canada, for the county of Kent.

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  • BROOK TAYLOR (1685-1731), English mathematician, was the son of John Taylor, of Bifrons House, Kent, by Olivia, daughter of Sir Nicholas Tempest, Bart., of Durham, and was born at Edmonton in Middlesex on the r8th of August 1685.

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  • STEPHEN HALES (1677-1761), English physiologist, chemist and inventor, was born at Bekesbourne in Kent on the 7th or 17th of September 1677, the fifth (or sixth) son of Thomas Hales, whose father, Sir Robert Hales, was created a baronet by Charles II.

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  • JAMES WOLFE (1727-1759), British general, the hero of Quebec, was born at Westerham in Kent on the 2nd of January 1727.

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  • Manning's boyhood was mainly spent at Coombe Bank, Sundridge, Kent, where he had for companions Charles and Christopher Wordsworth, afterwards bishops of St Andrews and of Lincoln.

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  • In the - end the estates of the houses of Lancaster, Kent, Bohun, Burgh and Mortimer swelled the revenues of Edward's children and grandchildren; in whose favour also the new title of duke was introduced.

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  • In the evening Prince Rupert returned, and by hugging the coast of Kent to the south of the fleets, was able to rejoin his colleague.

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  • In Kent county there are more than 60,000 acres of tidal marshland, some of which has been reclaimed by means of dykes; Cypress Swamp in the extreme S.

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  • In Indian River Hundred, Sussex county, there formerly lived a community of people, - many of whom are of the fair Caucasian type, - called " Indians " or " Moors "; they are now quite generally dispersed throughout the state, especially in Kent and Sussex counties.

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  • According to the constitution of 1831 the unit of representation in the legislature was the county; inasmuch as the population of New Castle county has exceeded after 1870 that of both Kent and Sussex, the inequality became a cause of discontent.

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  • Kent (op. cit) and of G.

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  • JOHN KEMPE (c. 1 3 80 - 1 454), English cardinal, archbishop of Canterbury, and chancellor, was son of Thomas Kempe, a gentleman of 011antigh, in the parish of Wye near Ashford, Kent.

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  • Coal has also been found in Kent, in the neighbourhood of Dover.

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  • WROTHAM, an urban district in the Medway parliamentary division of Kent, England, io m.

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  • In 604 we find Essex in close dependence upon Kent, being ruled by Saberht, sister's son of iEthelberht, under whom the East Saxons received Christianity.

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  • The three sons of Saberht, however, expelled Mellitus from his see, and even after their death in battle against the West Saxons, Eadbald of Kent was unable to restore him.

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  • There are grounds for believing that an East Saxon conquest of Kent took place in this reign.

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  • A forged grant of Ceadwalla speaks of the fall of Kent before Sigehere as a well-known event; and in a Kentish charter dated 676 a king of Kent called Swebhard grants land with the consent of his father King Sebbe.

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  • The violent death of Selred, king of Essex, is mentioned in the Saxon Chronicle under the year 746; but we have no more information of historical importance until the defeat of the Mercian king Beornwulf in 825, when Essex, together with Kent, Sussex and Surrey, passed into the hands of Ecgbert, king of Wessex.

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  • (After Dollo.) Maidstone, Kent.

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  • the duchess of Kent was, by 1 Will.

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  • AETHELBERT, king of Kent, son of Eormenric, probably came to the throne in A.D.

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  • This high-lying tract was crossed by the Roman Watling Street from Kent, on a line approximating to that of the modern Shooter's Hill; and was a rallying ground of Wat Tyler (1381), of Jack Cade (14501, and of Audley, leader of the Cornish rebels, defeated and captured here by the troops of Henry VII.

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  • WESTGATE-ON-SEA, a watering-place in the Isle of Thanet parliamentary division of Kent, England, 2 m.

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  • Already in 1550 Strype refers to certain " sectaries " in Essex and Kent, as " the first that made separation from the Reformed Church of England, having gathered congregations of their own."

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  • - From Winchester, in Hampshire, to Canterbury, in Kent, runs a road or way which can still be traced, now on the present made roads, now as a lane, bridle path, or cart track, now only by a line of ancient yews, hollies or oaks which once bordered it.

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  • VICTORIA [ALEXANDRINA VICTORIA], Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India (1819-1901), only child of Edward., duke of Kent, fourth son of King George III., and of Princess Victoria Mary Louisa of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (widow of Prince Emich Karl of Leiningen, by whom she already had two children), was born at Kensington Palace on the 24th of May 1819.

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  • The duke and duchess of Kent had been living at Amorbach, in Franconia, owing to their straitened circumstances, but they returned to London on purpose that ?,heir child should be born in England.

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  • Kent and Cambridge, all married in the following year, the two elder on the same day.

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  • All three had children, but the duke of Clarence's two baby daughters died in infancy, in 1819 and 1821; and the duke of Cambridge's son George, born on the 26th of March 1819, was only two months old when the birth of the duke of Kent's daughter put her before him in the succession.

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  • The duke of Kent wished her to be christened Elizabeth, and the prince regent wanted Georgiana, while the tsar Alexander I., who had promised to stand sponsor, stipulated for Alexandrina.

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  • The prince regent, who was present, named the child Alexandrina; then, being requested by the duke of Kent to give a second name, he said, rather abruptly, "Let her be called Victoria, after her mother, but this name must.

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  • In January 1820 the duke of Kent died, five days before his, brother succeeded to the throne as George IV.

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  • The widowed duchess of Kent was now a woman of thirty-four, handsome,, homely, a German at heart, and with little liking for English ways.

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  • afterwards to play an important role in Queen Victoria's life; and Leopold himself took a fatherly interest in the young princess's education, and contributed some thousands of pounds annually to the duchess of Kent's income.

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  • Prince Leopold still lived at this time at Claremont, where Princess Charlotte had died, and this became the duchess of Kent's occasional English home; but she was much addicted to travelling, and spent several months every year in visits to watering-places.

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  • Until she became queen she never slept a night away from her mother's room, and she was not allowed to converse with any grown-up person, friend, tutor or servant without the duchess of Kent or the Baroness Lehzen, her private governess, being present.

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  • Louise Lehzen, a native of Coburg, had come to England as governess to the Princess Fecdore of Leiningen, the duchess of Kent's daughter 1 The question of her name, as that of one who was to be queen,.

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  • In August 1831, in a discussion in parliament upon a grant to the duchess of Kent, Sir M.

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  • When both houses had voted loyal addresses, the question of the Civil List was considered, and a week or two later a message was brought to parliament requesting an increase of the grant formerly made to the duchess of Kent.

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  • The duchess of Kent and her brothers, King Leopold and the duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, had always hoped to arrange that the queen should marry her cousin, Albert of Saxe-CoburgGotha, and the prince himself had been made acquainted with this plan from his earliest years.

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  • The duchess of Kent had communicated her projects to Lord Melbourne, and they were known to many other statesmen, and to persons in society; but the gossip of drawing-rooms during the years 1837-38 continually represented that the young queen had fallen in love with Prince This or Lord That, and the more imaginative babblers hinted at post-chaises waiting outside Kensington Gardens in the night, private marriages and so forth.

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  • The In February 1839 this young lady, a daughter of the "Bed- marquis of Hastings, and a maid of honour to the chamber duchess of Kent, was accused by certain ladies of Plat' the bedchamber of immoral conduct.

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  • On 16th March, her mother, the duchess of Kent, died, and on 14th December, while the dispute with America about the Trent "affair was yet unsettled, the prince consort breathed his last at Windsor.

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  • See Kent (disambiguation) for articles sharing the title Kent.

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  • KENT, a south-eastern county of England, bounded N.

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  • The county is divided centrally, from west to east, by the well-marked range of hills known as the North Downs, entering Kent from Surrey.

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  • In the west above Westerham these hills exceed 800 ft.; to the east the height is much less, but even in Kent (for in Surrey they are higher) the North Downs form a more striking physical feature than their height would indicate.

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  • About two-thirds of the boundary line of Kent is formed by tidal water.

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  • Within historic times much of this marsh was covered by the sea, and the valley of the river Rother, which forms part of the boundary of Kent with Sussex, entering the sea at Rye harbour, was represented by a tidal estuary for a considerable distance inland.

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  • in thickness; (2) of a thin and local bed composed of alternations of brown clay and loam; (3) of a bed of fine light buff sand, which in west Kent attains a thickness of more than 60 ft.; (4) of bluish grey sandy marl containing fossils, and almost entirely confined to east Kent, the thickness of the formation being more than 60 ft.; and (5) of fine light grey sand of an equal thickness, also fossiliferous.

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  • The principal hop districts are the country between Canterbury and Faversham, the valley of the Medway in mid Kent, and the district of the Weald.

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  • For the rearing of sheep Kent is one of the chief counties in England.

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  • The Southeastern Agricultural College at Wye is under the control of the county councils of Kent and Surrey.

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  • The company which took up the mining was unsuccessful, and boring ceased in 1901, but the work was resumed by the Consolidated Kent Collieries Corporation, and an extension of borings revealed in 1905 the probability of a successful development of the mining industry in Kent.

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  • All those civil parishes within the county of Kent of which any part is within twelve miles of, or of which no part is more than fifteen miles from, Charing Cross are within the metropolitan police district.

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  • Kent is mainly in the diocese of Canterbury, but has parts in those of Rochester, Southwark and Chichester.

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  • For the ancient kingdom of Kent see the preceding article.

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  • The shire organization of Kent dates from the time of Aethelstan, the name as well as the boundary being that of the ancient kingdom, though at first probably with the addition of the suffix " shire," the form " Kentshire " occurring in a record of the folkmoot at this date.

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  • At the time of the Domesday Survey Kent comprised sixty hundreds, and there was a further division into six lests, probably representing the shires of the ancient kingdom, of which two, Sutton and Aylesford, correspond with the present-day lathes.

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  • Sheriffs of Kent are mentioned in the time of 'Ethelred II., and in Saxon times the shiremoot met three times a year on Penenden Heath near Maidstone.

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  • In the 13th century twelve liberties in Kent claimed to have separate bailiffs.

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  • Kent is remarkable as the only English county which comprises two entire bishoprics, Canterbury, the see for East Kent, having been founded in 597, and Rochester, the see for West Kent, in 600.

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  • Between the Conquest and the 14th century the earldom of Kent was held successively by Odo, bishop of Bayeux, William of Ypres and Hubert de Burgh (sheriff of the county in the reign of Henry III.), none of whom, however, transmitted the honour, which was bestowed by Edward I.

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  • Kent, from its proximity to London, has been intimately concerned in every great historical movement which has agitated the country, while its busy industrial population has steadily resisted any infringement of its rights and liberties.

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  • Rochester Castle was in 1216 captured by the dauphin of France, to whom nearly all Kent submitted, and during the wars of Henry III.

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  • In 1450 Kent took a leading part in Jack Cade's rebellion; and in 1554 the insurrection of Sir Thomas Wyat began at Maidstone.

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  • Among the earliest industries of Kent were the iron-mining in the Weald, traceable at least to Roman times, and the salt industry, which flourished along the coast in the 10th century.

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  • Cherries are said to have been imported from Flanders and first planted in Kent by Henry VIII., and from this period the culture of fruits (especially apples and cherries) and of hops spread rapidly over the county.

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  • The statute of 1630 forbidding the exportation of wool, followed by the Plague of 1665, led to a serious trade depression, while the former enactment resulted in the vast smuggling trade which spread along the coast, 40,000 packs of wool being smuggled to Calais from Kent and Sussex in two years.

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  • In 1290 Kent returned two members to parliament for the county, and in 1295 Canterbury, Rochester and Tunbridge were also represented; Tunbridge however made no returns after this date: In 1552 Maidstone acquired representation, and in 1572 Queenborough.

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  • By the London Government Act of 1892 the borough of Greenwich was taken out of Kent and made one of the twenty-eight metropolitan boroughs of the county of London.

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  • As was to he expected from its connexion with the early history of England, and from its beauty and fertility, Kent possessed a larger than average number of monastic foundations.

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  • Kent is also rich in examples of ancient architecture other than ecclesiastical.

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  • Lambarde, Perambulation of Kent (London, 1576, 1826); R.

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  • Kilburne, Topographie or Survey of the County of Kent (London, 1659); J.

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  • Harris, History of Kent (London, 1719); E.

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  • Hasted, History and Topographical Survey of Kent (4 vols.

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  • Ireland, History of the County of Kent (London, 1828-1830); C. Sandys, Consuetudines Kantiae (London, 1851); A.

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  • Hussey, Notes on the Churches of Kent (London, 1852); L.

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  • Larking, The Domesday Book of Kent (1869); R.

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  • Furley, History of the Weald of Kent (Ashford, 1871-1874); W.

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  • Glynne, Notes on Churches of Kent, ed.

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  • Hutchinson, Men of Kent and Kentish Men (London, 1892); Victoria County History, " Kent."

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  • See also Archaeologia Cantiana (translations of the Kent Archaeological Society, London, from 1858).

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  • SIDNEY (or [[Sydney), Algernon]] (1622-1683), English politician, second son of Robert, 2nd earl of Leicester, and of Dorothy Percy, daughter of Henry, 9th earl of Northumberland, was born at Penshurst, Kent, in 1622.

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  • Fisher sent him in August 1511 to teach in Cambridge; Warham gave him a benefice, Aldington in Kent, worth 33,6s.8d.

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  • RAMSGATE, a municipal borough, watering-place, seaport and member of the Cinque Port of Sandwich, in the Isle of Thanet parliamentary division of Kent, England, 79 m.

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  • This is one of the most popular resorts on the Kent coast, well situated on the east coast of Thanet, practically contiguous with Broadstairs to the north, with which and Margate to the north-west it is united by an electric tramway.

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  • Peaches and pears grow in large quantities in Kent and neighbouring counties on the East Shore and in Washington and Frederick counties; apples grow in abundance in all parts of the Piedmont Plateau.

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  • He had opposed the grant of the Maryland charter, had established a trading post on Kent Island in Chesapeake Bay in 1631, and when commanded to submit to the new government he and his followers offered armed resistance.

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  • Joseph Kent .

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  • JOHN WALLIS (1616-1703), English mathematician, logician and grammarian, was born on the 23rd of November 1616 at Ashford, in Kent, of which parish his father, Rev. John Wallis (1567-1622), was incumbent.

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  • His wife was Isabella de Chilham, through whom he obtained lands in Kent.

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  • He held Dover successfully through the darkest hour of John's fortunes; he brought back Kent to the allegiance of Henry III.; he completed the discomfiture of the French and their allies by the naval victory which he gained over Eustace the Monk, the noted privateer and admiral of Louis, in the Straits of Dover (Aug.

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  • of Scotland; in 1227 he received the earldom of Kent, which had been dormant since the disgrace of Odo of Bayeux.

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  • 15) states that the people of the more northern kingdoms (East Anglia, Mercia, Northumbria, &c.) belonged to the Angli, while those of Essex, Sussex and Wessex were sprung from the Saxons, and those of Kent and southern Hampshire from the Jutes.

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  • Other early writers, however, do not observe these distinctions, and neither in language nor in custom do we find evidence of any appreciable differences between the two former groups, though in custom Kent presents most remarkable contrasts with the other kingdoms. Still more curious is the fact that West Saxon writers regularly speak of their own nation as a part of the Angelcyn and of their language as Englisc, while the West Saxon royal family claimed to be of the same stock as that of Bernicia.

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  • He became a fellow of his college, and at some date subsequent to 1571 left Oxford to become master of a school at Sandwich, Kent, where he died in 1610.

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  • In the remaining weeks of the summer he made his first expedition to Britain, and this was followed by a second crossing in 54 B.C. On the first occasion Caesar took with him only two legions, and effected little beyond a landing on the coast of Kent.

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  • PENSHURST, a village in the south-western parliamentary division of Kent, England, at the confluence of the Eden and Medway, 4z m.

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  • In 676 he ravaged Kent with fire and sword, destroying the monasteries and churches and taking Rochester.

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  • B.) Ethelred I., king of Wessex and Kent (866-871), was the fourth son of lEthelwulf of Wessex, and should, by his father's will, have succeeded to Wessex on the death of his eldest brother lEthelbald.

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  • He seems, however, to have stood aside in favour of his brother lEthelberht, king of Kent, to whose joint kingdoms he succeeded in 866.

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  • Selby of Otford, Kent, in a report dated the 18th of November 1800 (see Jour.

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  • 640), king of Kent, succeeded to the throne on the death of his father lEthelberht in 616.

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  • - (Principal synonyms: Undulina, Lank., 1871; Herpetomonas, Kent, 1880,1880, only in part; Paramoecioides, Grassi, 1881; Haematomonas, Mitrophan, 1883.) There is no anterior flagellum.

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  • lewisi (Kent), the well-known natural Trypanosome of rats (figs.

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  • lewisi (Kent)," Ann.

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  • Ford; Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States (5th ad., 2 vols., Boston, 1891); James Kent, Commentaries on American Law (14th ad., 4 vols., ibid..

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  • Except in Kent his wergild was fixed at two hundred shillings, or one-sixth of that of a thegn, and he is undoubtedly the twyhynde man of Anglo-Saxon law.

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  • In Kent his wergild was considerably higher, and his status probably also, but his position in this kingdom is a matter of controversy.

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  • She died at Hever, Kent, July 24 1912.

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  • Printed for the Kent Archaeological Society, 1869.

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  • We may also call attention to the greatly lengthened choir, commenced by Abbot John of York, 1203-1211, and carried on by his successor, terminating, like Durham Cathedral, in an eastern transept, the work of Abbot John of Kent, 1220-1247, and to the tower (D), added not long before the dissolution by Abbot Huby, 1494-1526, in a very unusual position at the northern end of the north transept.

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  • The Premonstratensian regular canons, or White canons, had as many as 35 houses in England, of which the most perfect remaining are those of Easby, Yorkshire, and Bayham, Kent.

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  • Earls and dukes of Kent >>

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  • Kent [see Lit.

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  • Kent, &C. See Caleb; Jerahmeel; Judah; Kenites; Levites; and Jews: History, §§ 5, 20 (end).

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  • Kent, Beginnings of Heb.

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  • BROMLEY, a municipal borough in the Sevenoaks parliamentary division of Kent, England, 102 m.

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  • In the south of England, the larch is much planted for the supply of hop-poles, though in parts of Kent and Sussex poles formed of Spanish chestnut are regarded as still more lasting.

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  • HERBERT MARSH (1757-1839), English divine, was born at Faversham, Kent, on the 10th of December 1757, and was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he was elected fellow in 1782, having been second wrangler and second Smith's prizeman.

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  • BENJAMIN HOADLY (1676-1761), English divine, was born at Westerham, Kent, on the 14th of November 1676.

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  • In 1851 he entered the Canadian parliament as member for Kent county.

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  • DARTFORD, a market town in the Dartford parliamentary division of Kent, England, on the Darent, 17 m.

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  • In 1871, one of the most eventful years of his life, be began Fors Clavigera, a small serial addressed to the working men of England, and published only by Mr George Allen, engraver, at Keston, in Kent, at 7d., and afterwards at 10d., but without discount, and not through the trade.

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  • About 1250 Eustace of Kent introduced into England the roman d'Alexandre in his Roman de toute chevalerie, many passages of which have been imitated in one of the oldest English poems on Alexander, namely, King Alisaunder (P. Meyer, Alexandre le grand, Paris, 1886, ii.

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  • 497); Livre des Sibiles (i i 60); Enseignements Trebor, by Robert de Ho (= Hoo, Kent, on the left bank of the Medway) [edited by Mary Vance Young, Paris; Picard, IoI; cf.

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  • NORTH FORELAND and South, two chalk headlands on the Kent coast of England, overlooking the Strait of Dover, the North Foreland forming the eastern projection of the Isle of Thanet, and the South standing 3 m.

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  • NICHOLAS WOTTON (c. 1497-1567), English diplomatist, was a son of Sir Robert Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, Kent, and a descendant of Nicholas Wotton, lord mayor of London in 1415 and 1430, and member of parliament for the city from 1406 to 1429.

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  • He early became vicar of Boughton Malherbe and of Sutton Valence, and later of Ivychurch, Kent; but, desiring a more worldly career, he entered the service of Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of London.

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  • So Aulus Plautius with a singularly well equipped;army of some 40,000 men landed in Kent and advanced on London.

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  • In the lands looking on to the Thames estuary (Kent, Essex, Middlesex) the process had perhaps begun before the Roman conquest.

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  • Even densely peopled areas like north Kent, the Sussex coast, west Gloucestershire and east Somerset, immediately adjoin areas like the Weald of Kent and Sussex where Romano-British remains hardly occur.

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  • Many smaller places, too, for example, Magna or Kenchester near Hereford, Durobrivae or Rochester in Kent, another Durobrivae near Peterborough, a site of uncertain name near Cambridge, another of uncertain name near Chesterford, exhibited some measure of town life.

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  • - Early in the 4th century it was necessary to establish a special coast defence, reaching from the Wash to Spithead, against Saxon pirates: there were forts at Brancaster, Borough Castle (near Yarmouth), Bradwell (at the mouth of the Colne and Blackwater), Reculver, Richborough, Dover and Lymme (all in Kent), Pevensey in Sussex, Porchester near Portsmouth, and perhaps also at Felixstowe in Suffolk.

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  • It was to these adventurers, according to tradition, that the kingdom of Kent owed its origin.

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  • Bede states that the invaders belonged to three different nations, Kent and southern Hampshire being occupied by Jutes, while Essex, Sussex and Wessex were founded by the Saxons, and the remaining kingdoms by the Angli.

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  • The peculiarities of social organization in Kent certainly tend to show that this kingdom had a different origin from the rest; but the evidence for the distinction between the Saxons and the Angli is of a much less satisfactory character (see Anglo-Saxons).

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  • When history begins, fEthelberht, king of Kent, was supreme over all the kings south of the Humber.

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  • Sometimes we find one supreme king together with a number of under-kings (subreguli); sometimes again, especially in the smaller kingdoms, Essex, Sussex and Hwicce, we meet with two or more kings, generally brothers, reigning together apparently on equal terms. During the greater part of the 8th century Kent seems to have been divided into two kingdoms; but as a rule such divisions did not last beyond the lifetime of the kings between whom the arrangement had been made.

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  • Indeed, we find these terms even in Kent, though the social system of that kingdom seems to have been of an essentially different character.

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  • Again, there was apparently but one ges16cund class in Kent, with a wergild of 300 shillings, while, on the other hand, below the ceorlisc class we find three classes of persons described as laetas, who corresponded in all probability to the liti or freedmen of the continental laws, and who possessed wergilds of 80, 60 and 40 shillings respectively.

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  • In Domesday Book the heavy plough with eight oxen seems to be universal, and it can be traced back in Kent to the beginning of the 9th century.

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  • Cattle and sheep were pastured on the common lands appertaining to the village, while pigs, which (especially in Kent) seem to have been very numerous, were kept in the woods.

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  • It is evident that the relationships which prohibited marriage were different from those recognized by the Church; but the only fact which we know definitely is that it was customary, at least in Kent, for a man to marry his stepmother.

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  • the nobility among the Franks and the freedmen (as a distinct class) in the AngloSaxon kingdoms, except Kent.

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  • The latter appears most prominently in Kent and among the Old Saxons, Langobardi and Burgundians.

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  • i., 1903); and, for America, Bouvier's Law Dictionary, and Kent's Commentaries on American Law.

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  • In 1845 he received his first appointment, at Marden, Kent, and soon became famous as a preacher.

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  • On 6th December 1595 he was admitted to a canonry at Canterbury (which he resigned in 1602), and in the same year to the vicarage of Lewisham, Kent, where he became an intimate friend of Richard Hooker, his near neighbour, whom he absolved on his deathbed.

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  • On the 23rd of March 16 to he exchanged Lewisham for the rectory of Great Chart, Kent.

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  • PETER GUNNING (1614-1684), English divine, was born at Hoo, in Kent, and educated at the King's School, Canterbury, and Clare College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1633.

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  • In Devonshire and in parts of Kent the farmers entertain a marked prejudice against white pigs, because "the sun blisters their skin."

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  • in 1821, and, having been ordained in 1820, held successively curacies at Westwell in Kent and Ash (to the latter the rectory of Ivy Church was added in 1822).

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  • He studied first at the Edinburgh Academy, then for two years under the Rev. Thomas Dale, the poet, in Kent, passed one session at Glasgow University in 1833, and, having chosen the career of the Indian civil service, completed his studies with distinction at Haileybury College.

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  • It is first mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 605.The ealdorman, or sheriff, of the shire was probably charged with the duty of calling out and leading the fyrd, which appears always to have retained a local character, as during the time of the Danish invasions we read of the fyrd of Kent, of Somerset and of Devon.

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  • Paulet, with loyal and regretful indignation, declined the disgrace proposed to him in a suggestion "to shed blood without law or warrant"; and on the 7th of February the earls of Shrewsbury and Kent arrived at Fotheringay with the commission of the council for execution of the sentence given against his prisoner.

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  • BECKENHAM, an urban district in the Sevenoaks parliamentary division of Kent, England, 10 m.

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  • Another in 1584 forbade the building of any more iron-works in Surrey, Kent, and Sussex.

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  • Among the prominent men who have lived in Fairfield are Roger Sherman, the first President Dwight of Yale (who described Fairfield in his Travels and in his poem Greenfield Hill), Chancellor James Kent, and Joseph Earle Sheffield.

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  • Berhtric was succeeded by Ecgberht (q.v.), the chief event of whose reign was the overthrow of the Mercian king Beornwulf in 825, which led to the establishment of West Saxon supremacy and to the annexation by Wessex of Sussex, Surrey, Kent and Essex.

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  • Kent (Beginnings of Heb.

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  • AETHELBERT, king of the West Saxons, succeeded to the sub-kingdom of Kent during the lifetime of his father Æthelwulf, and retained it until the death of his elder brother Æthelbald in 860, when he became sole king of Wessex and Kent, the younger brothers Æthelred and Alfred renouncing their claim.

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  • His reign was marked by two serious attacks on the part of the Danes, who destroyed Winchester in 860, in spite of the resistance of the ealdormen Osric and Æthelwulf with the levies of Hampshire and Berkshire, while in 865 they treacherously ravaged Kent.

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  • AYLESFORD, a town in the Medway parliamentary division of Kent, England, 31 m.

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  • For three years (665-668) he ruled his monastery at Ripon in peace, though acting as bishop in Mercia and Kent during vacancies in sees there.

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  • He was consecrated by St Augustine before 604, and a church was built for him in London by Aethelberht, king of Kent; this church was dedicated to St Paul, and Mellitus became first bishop of London.

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  • He took refuge in Kent and then in Gaul, but soon returned to England, and in 619 became archbishop of Canterbury in succession to Laurentius.

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  • NORTHFLEET, an urban district of Kent, England, within the parliamentary borough of Gravesend, on the Thames, 22 m.

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  • Its name is said to be derived from a camp formed here by the Danish king, Sweyn, and tradition fixes at this spot the meeting between William the Conqueror and the men of Kent, to whom was confirmed the possession of all their ancient laws and privileges.

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  • In Essex and Kent, and along the shore of Lake Erie, tobacco and grapes form a staple crop, and wine of fair quality is produced.

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  • It was first used during the 16th century because of the belief held by Camden and other older historians, that during this period there were exactly seven kingdoms in England, these being Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Sussex and Wessex.

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  • SHEPPEY, an island off the Kentish coast of England, included in the north-eastern parliamentary division of Kent.

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  • The Reliques of Father Prout were collected from Fraser's Magazine and published in two volumes in 1836; The Final Reliques of Father Prout, chiefly extracted from the Daily News and the Globe, were edited by Blanchard Jerrold in 1876, and an edition of his works, edited by Charles Kent, was published in 1881.

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  • During his infancy the family removed to Chestertown, Kent county, Maryland, and after the death of his father (a country schoolmaster) in 1750 they removed to Annapolis.

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  • It is probably to be understood either of investiture with the consular insignia, or possibly with some titular royalty such as that of the under-kingdom of Kent.

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  • A landing in Kent in 884 or 885, 1 though successfully repelled, encouraged the East Anglian Danes to revolt.

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  • The Danes, finding their position on the continent becoming more and more precarious, crossed to England in two divisions, amounting in the aggregate to 330 sail, and entrenched themselves, the larger body at Appledore and the lesser under Haesten at Milton in Kent.

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  • GRAND RAPIDS, a city and the county-eat of Kent county, Michigan, U.S.A., at the head of navigation on the Grand river, about 30 m.

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  • more quietly in Kent.

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  • HERNE BAY, a seaside resort in the St Augustine's parliamentary division of Kent, England, 8 m.

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  • The Essex and the Essex Union, the Surrey and the Surrey Union, the Old Berkeley, the West Kent, the Burstow, the Hertfordshire, the Crawley and Horsham, the Puckeridge, as regards foxhounds; the Berkhampstead, the Enfield Chase, Lord Rothschild's, the Surrey, the West Surrey and the Warnham, as regards staghounds - as well as the Bucks and Berks, which was substituted for the Royal Buckhounds - are within easy reach of the capital.

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  • ROBERT PLOT (1640-1696), English naturalist and antiquary, was born at Borden in Kent in 1640.

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  • He started cable works of his own at Elmer's End, Kent, in 1896, and gave valuable evidence before the commission appointed to inquire into the possibility of laying a Pacific cable.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1904 and died at Shortlands, Kent, Dec. 13 1920.

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  • In 686 the South Saxons attacked Hlothhere, king of Kent, in support of his nephew Eadric, but soon afterwards Berhthun was killed and the kingdom subjugated for a time by Ceadwalla, who had now become king of Wessex.

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  • The earldom of Sussex seems later to have been held sometimes with that of Kent.

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  • HENRY THOMAS BUCKLE (1821-1862), English historian, author of the History of Civilization, the son of Thomas Henry Buckle, a wealthy London merchant, was born at Lee, in Kent, on the 24th of November 1821.

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  • Kent (d.

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  • Later we find the Britons at war with the new-comers, now established in Kent, and four battles are fought, in the last of which, according to the Historia Brittonum, the king's son Vortemir, their leading opponent, is slain.

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  • Kent, The Student's Old Testament, vol.

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  • DOVER, a seaport and municipal and parliamentary borough of Kent, England, one of the Cinque Ports, 76 m.

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  • The mountains are easily reached from Plattsburgh, Port Kent, Herkimer, Malone and Saratoga Springs.

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  • After successively holding the livings of Pluckley and Brickley in Kent, he was installed in 1881 as dean of Wells.

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  • His tomb is in the old graveyard of St Margaret's church, Lee, Kent.

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  • "RICHBOROUGH, a port on the left bank of the mouth of the Stour river, Kent, England, 14 m.

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  • In 1921, the company proposed to work Richborough as a barge and train-ferry port, ancillary to Queenborough, both centres to serve the requirements of a comprehensive scheme of industrial development in the surrounding districts including the Kent coal-fields.

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  • GEORGE GROTE (1794-1871), English historian of Greece, was born on the 17th of November 1794, at Clay Hill near Beckenham in Kent.

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  • There is a village of Charing in Kent, and the name is connected by some with that of a Saxon family, Cerring.

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  • He took orders in 1629, and in 1633 in preaching before the court so won the approval of the earl of Leicester that he presented him to the living of Penshurst in Kent.

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  • It is commonly found in hedges and coppices, and as an undergrowth in woods, and reaches a height of some 12 ft.; occasionally, as at Eastwell Park, Kent, it may attain to 30 ft.

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  • In Kent they flourish best in a calcareous soil.

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  • The filbert, 2 among the numerous varieties of Corylus Avellana, is extensively cultivated, especially in Kent, for the sake of its nuts, which are readily distinguished from cob-nuts by their ample involucre and greater length.

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  • To obtain a good tree, the practice in Kent is to select a stout upright shoot 3 ft.

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  • In July 1765 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Camden, of Camden Place, in the county of Kent; and in the following year he was removed from the court of common pleas to take his seat as lord chancellor (July 30, 1766).

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  • His remains were interred in Seale church in Kent.

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  • p 227) that the ogams originated in Pembroke, " where there was a very ancient Teutonic settlement, possibly of Jutes, who, as is indicated by the evidence of runic inscriptions found in Kent, seem to have been the only Teutonic people of southern Britain who were acquainted with the Gothic Futhoro."

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  • HENRY CAVENDISH (1731-1810), English chemist and physicist, elder son of Lord Charles Cavendish, brother of the 3rd duke of Devonshire, and Lady Anne Grey, daughter of the duke of Kent, was born at Nice in October 1731.

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  • The first house in England was at Mottenden, in Kent, founded in 1224.

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  • " In this capacity William Fitz-Osbern, the steward of Normandy, and Odo of Bayeux, acted during the Conqueror's visit to the continent in 1067; they were left, according to William of Poitiers, the former to govern the north of England, the latter to hold rule in Kent, vice sua; Florence of Worcester describes them as "custodes Angliae," and Ordericus Vitalis gives to their office the name of " praefectura."

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  • In the sixth examination of John Philpot (1516-1555) in 1555 we are told that Lord Riche said to him, "All heretics do boast of the Spirit of God, and every one would have a church by himself, as Joan of Kent and the Anabaptists."

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  • Many Anabaptist communities existed in England toward the end of the 16th century, particularly in East Anglia, Kent and London.

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  • It was for these views that Joan Boucher of Kent was burnt in 1550.

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  • Silchester was taken, and moving eastwards Ceawlin and his brother Cutha defeated the forces of ZEthelberht, king of Kent, at the battle of Wibbandun in 568.

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  • Having fled for safety into Kent he returned to London and declared for Edward III., whom he crowned in February 1327.

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  • TENTERDEN, a market town and municipal borough in the Ashford parliamentary division of Kent, England, 62 m.

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  • In 1600 it was incorporated under the title of the "Mayor, Jurats and Commons" of the town and hundred of Tenterden, in the county of Kent, the members of the corporation ranking henceforward as barons of the Cinque Ports.

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  • DUDLEY FENNER (c. 1558-1587), English puritan divine, was born in Kent and educated at Cambridge University.

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  • For some months he seems to have assisted the vicar of Cranbrook, Kent, but it is doubtful whether he received ordination.

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  • On the 10th of July 1359 Wykeham was made chief keeper and surveyor, not only of Windsor, but of the castles of Dover, Hadley and Leeds (Kent), and of the manors of Foliejohn, Eton, Guildford, Kennington, Sheen (now Richmond), Eltham and Langly and their parks, with power to repair them and to pay for workmen and materials.

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  • In April the sheriffs of four batches of counties were each ordered to send forty masons to Wykeham at Windsor, This secular activity was rewarded by presentation to the deanery of St Martin-leGrand, with an order for induction on the 21st of May, on which day he was commissioned to inquire by a jury of men of Kent into the defects of the walls and tower of Dover (Pat.

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  • But as Wykeham was of the party of the Black Prince and his widow Joan of Kent, no dea ex machina was needed.

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  • those by Derenbourg, Ewald, Stanley, Stade, Renan, Schiirer, Kent, Wellhausen, Guthe), see also Madden, Coins of the Jews (1881), H.

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  • Unsuccessful overtures were made to him in 1763, and twice in 1765, in May and June - the negotiator in May being the king's uncle, the duke of Cumberland, who went down in person to Hayes, Pitt's seat in Kent.

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  • In the earlier part of his reign he was at war with Kent, but peace was made in 694, when the men of Kent gave compensation for the death of Mul, brother of Ceadwalla, whom they had burned in 687.

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  • HERBERT GEORGE WELLS (1866-), English novelist was born at Bromley, Kent, on the 21st of September 1866, the son of Joseph Wells, a professional cricketer.

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  • The worldly maintenance was the presentation in 1616 to the vicarage of Cranbrook in Kent.

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  • Gypsum is obtained from deposits along the banks of the Grand river in Kent county and in the vicinity of Alabaster along the shore of Lake Huron in Iosco county.

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  • Kent's Cavern >>

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  • In 1832 he obtained the living of East Farleigh, Kent, which in 1840 he exchanged for that of Burton Agnes, near Hull.

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  • HLOTHHERE, king of Kent, succeeded his brother Ecgberht in 673, and appears for a time to have reigned jointly with his nephew Eadric, son of Ecgberht, as a code of laws still extant was issued under both names.

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  • The peninsula of Angeln, between the Gulf of Flensburg and the Schlei, is supposed to have been the original seat of the English, and observers profess to see a striking resemblance between this district and the counties of Kent and Surrey.

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  • In August 1677 the ship " Kent " arrived in the Delaware, with 230 Quakers from London and Yorkshire.

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  • The New English Dictionary suggests a connexion with "lathe," a term which survives as a division of the county of Kent, containing several "hundreds."

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  • At a trial carried out in 1894 at Bexley, Kent, only the main aeroplane, the fore and aft rudders, and the top and bottom side planes were in position.

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  • The east and south coasts show considerable stretches of uniform uninflected coast-line, and except for the Farne Islands and Holy Island in the extreme north, the flat islands formed by ramifications of the estuaries on the Essex and north Kent coasts, and the Isle of Wight in the south, they are without islands.

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  • From this point as far south as the North Foreland of Kent the coast, like the land, is almost wholly low, though there are slight cliffs at some points, as along the coasts of Norfolk and Suffolk, on which the sea constantly encroaches.

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  • The whole of Romney Marsh, in Kent and Sussex, formerly constituted an arm of the sea, where vessels rode in deep water, carrying produce to ports no longer in existence.

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  • Again, the Isle of Thanet, in the north-eastern corner of Kent, has practically ceased to be an island.

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  • The dissection of the great east and west anticline in the south-east of England has resulted in a remarkable piece of country, occupying the east of Hampshire and practically the whole of Sussex, Surrey and Kent, in which each geological stratum produces its own type of scenery, and exercises its own specific influence on every natural distribution.

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  • It thus occupies parts of Wiltshire, Hampshire, Surrey, Kent, Berkshire, Hertfordshire, the whole of Middlesex, the county of London and Essex, and the eastern edge of Suffolk and Norfolk.

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  • But in the eastern and southern counties the Chalk is covered by younger deposits of Tertiary age; the Pliocene Crags of Norfolk and Suffolk, the Lower London Tertiaries (London Clay, Woolwich and Reading Beds, &c.) of the London Basin comprising parts of Essex, Hertfordshire, Middlesex, Bucks and Berks, and northern Kent.

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  • First for consideration, though not in geographical extent, stands the area round London, in Middlesex, Surrey, Kent, Essex and Hertfordshire.

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  • Various lines chiefly in Kent.

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  • Kent.

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  • In fruit-growing, Kent takes the first place, but a good quantity is grown in Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Essex, in Worcestershire and other western counties, where, as in Herefordshire, Somerset and Devon, the apple is especially cultivated and cider is largely produced.

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  • Kent is again pre-eminent in the growth of hops; indeed this practice and that of fruit-growing give the scenery of the county a strongly individual character.

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  • Hop-growing extends from Kent into the neighbouring parts of Sussex and Surrey, where, however, it is much less important; it is also practised to a considerable degree in a group of counties of the midlands and west - Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Gloucestershire and Shropshire.

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  • Other counties in which the numbers are especially large are Devonshire, Kent, Cumberland and the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire.

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  • The counties comprising the greatest proportional amount of woodland fall into two distinct groups - Hampshire, Surrey, Sussex and Kent, with Berkshire and Buckinghamshire; Monmouth, Herefordshire and Gloucestershire.

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  • Among shell-fish, crabs and oysters are taken principally off the east coast; the oyster beds in the shallow water off the north Kent and Essex coasts, as at Whitstable and Colchester, being famous.

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  • Thus the industry centred chiefly upon the Weald (Sussex and Kent), the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire, and the Birmingham district; but from the first district named it afterwards wholly departed, following the development of the coal-fields.

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  • For limestone the principal localities are in Durham, Derbyshire and Yorkshire, while for chalk-quarrying Kent is pre-eminent among a group of southeastern counties, including Hampshire, Sussex and Surrey, with Essex.

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  • (2) The administrative county of London has an area taken entirely from the counties of Middlesex, Kent and Surrey.

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  • The state maintains five normal schools: that at Farmington (established 1864), that at Castine (1866), that at Gorham (1879); that at Presque Isle (the Aroostook state normal school, 1903), and the Madawaska training school at Fort Kent, each of which is under the direction of a board of trustees consisting of the governor, the state superintendent of schools, and five other members appointed by the governor and council for not more than three years.

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  • Samuel Emerson Smith Robert Pinckney Dunlap „ Edward Kent Whig John Fairfield.

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  • Democrat Edward Kent.

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  • In 798 he invaded Kent, deposed and imprisoned Eadberht Pra n, and made his own brother Cuthred king.

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  • Cuthred reigned in Kent from 798 to 807, when he died, and Coenwulf seems to have taken Kent into his own hands.

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  • He entered Brown University in 1824, left in his junior year on account of ill-health, was in Europe during the next twenty years, except in 1833-1834, when he was principal of Kent Academy at East Greenwich, and was the United States consul at Rome from 18 3 7 to 1845.

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  • In describing Kent's Cavern near Torquay, R.

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  • It is recorded in the Saxon Chronicle for 823 that he was sent with Eahlstan, bishop of Sherborne, and the ealdorman Wulfheard to drive out Baldred, king of Kent, which was successfully accomplished.

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  • On the accession of AEthelwulf, AEthelstan, his son or brother, was made sub-king of Kent, Surrey, Sussex and Essex.

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  • In 851 Ceorl, with the men of Devon, defeated the Danes at Wigganburg, and AEthelstan of Kent was victorious at Sandwich, in spite of which they wintered in England that year for the first time.

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  • LYDD, a market town and municipal borough in the southern parliamentary division of Kent, England, 712 m.

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  • eldest daughter of I Thomas, second Edward, earl of Kent.

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  • In this year he entered upon negotiations with Eadbald of Kent for a marriage with his sister lEthelberg.

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  • He was definitely recognized as overlord by all the other Anglo-Saxon kings of his day except Eadbald of Kent.

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  • The longwool breeds are the Leicester, Border Leicester, Cotswold, Lincoln, Kent, Devon Longwool, South Devon, Wensleydale and Roscommon.

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  • The Kent or Romney Marsh is native to the rich tract of grazing land on the S.

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  • coast of Kent.

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  • "SIR GEORGE HOWARD DARWIN (1845-1912), English astronomer, was born at Down, Kent, July 9 1845.

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  • KENT'S CAVERN, or Kent'S Hole, the largest of English bone caves, famous as affording evidence of the existence of Man in Devon (England) contemporaneously with animals now extinct or no longer indigenous.

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  • The most remarkable animal remains found in Kent's Cavern are those of the Sabretoothed tiger, Machairodus latidens of Sir Richard Owen.

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  • Soc. London, 111.286; Pengelly, "Literature of Kent's Cavern" in Trans.

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  • In July 1495 he was provided with a few ships and men by Maximilian, now emperor, and he appeared on the coast of Kent.

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  • BROADSTAIRS, a watering-place in the Isle of Tha.net parliamentary division of Kent, England, 3 m.

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  • HAWKHURST, a town in the southern parliamentary division of Kent, England, 47 m.

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  • It lies mainly on a ridge above the valley of the Kent Ditch, a tributary of the Rother.

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  • The Kent Sanatorium and one of the Barnardo homes are established here.

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  • With the coming of Augustine to Kent the darkness which for nearly two centuries had enwrapped the history of Britain begins to clear away.

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  • Wessex was won over by an independent adventurer, the Frank Birinus, who had no connection with the earlier arrivals in Kent.

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  • A kingdom like Kent or East Anglia, even.

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  • He annexed Kent and East Anglia,overawed Northumbria and Wessex, both hopelessly faction-ridden at the time, was treated almost as an equal by the emperor Charles the Great, and died still at the height of his power.

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  • Kent once more became a kingdom, and two successive Mercian sovereigns, Beornwulf and Ludica, fell in battle while vainly trying to recover Offas supremacy over East Anglia and Wessex.

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  • 823), permanently annexed Kent, to whose crown he had a claim by descent, in 829 received the homage of all the other English kings, and was for the remainder of his life reckoned as Bretwalda.

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  • Already ere Ecgbert ascended the throne of Kent the new enemy had made his first tentative appearance on the British shore.

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  • The campaigning ranged from Appledore in Kent to Exeter, from Chester to Shoeburyness; but wherever the invaders transferred themselves, either the king, or his son Edward, or his son-in-law Ethelred, the ealdorman of Mercia, was promptly at hand with a competent army.

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  • To a great extent the same horde of continental adventurers who had obtained the first batch of grants in Wessex and Kent were also the recipients of the later confiscations, so that their newly acquired estates were scattered all over England.

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  • All England, save the county of Kent and a few isolated castles elsewhere, submitted to, Matilda.

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  • They were even able to quell the first attempt at a reaction, by seizing and beheading Edmund, earl of Kent, the late kings half-brother, who was betrayed while organizing a plot for their destruction.

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  • From this date onward Franco-Spanish fleets were perpetually to be met not only in the Bay of Biscay but in the Channel; they made the voyage to Bordeaux unsafe, and often executed descents on the shores of Kent, Sussex, Devon and Cornwall.

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  • It was feared by some that Duke John might carry his ambitions so far as to, aim at the thronehe could do what he pleased with his doting father, and flaws might have been picked in the marriage of the Black Prince and his wife Joan of Kent, who were cousins, and therefore within the prohibited degrees.

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  • few fanatics like the mad priest of Kent, John Ball, who lad long preached socialist doctrines from the old text:

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  • The riots had begun, almost simultaneously in Kent and Essex:

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  • This was not, however, the case in Kent and London.

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  • Kent was pacified at the same Supprestime; and Henry Despenser, the warlike bishop of 7~~e2r~iflg.

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  • The earls of Kent and Huntingdon, close kinsmen of Richard on his mothers side, the earl of Salisbury-a noted LOllardand the lords Despenser and Lumley took arms at midwinter (Jan.

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  • Kent and Salisbury were slain at Cirencester, the others captured and executed with many of their followers.

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  • To clear out the government, and punish those responsible for the late disasters, the commons of Kent rose in insurrection under a captain who called himself John Mortimer, though his real name seems to have been John Cade.

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  • Hence came the marvellous success of the Yorkist counterstroke in June 1460, when the exiled Warwick, landing in Kent with a mere handful of men, was suddenly joined by the whole of the south of England and the citizens of London, and inflicted a crushing defeat on defeatsth.

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  • In districts as far apart as Kent and Yorkshire, his word counted for a good deal more than that of his sovereign.

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  • When the rising was well started Warwick declared his sympathy with the, aims of the insurgents, wedded his daughter to Clarence despite the kings prohibition of the match, and raised a force at Calais with which he landed in Kent, But his plot was already successful before he reached the scene of operations.

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  • Devon rose in the Lancastrian interest; Kent, where the earls name had always been popular, took arms a -.

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  • London, Essex, Hertfordshire, East Anglia, Kent and Sussex provided nearly all the victims; only one was burnt north of the Trent, and only one south-west of Wiltshire.

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  • the Commons did, and when the House imprisoned the gentlemen deputed by the freeholders of Kent to present a petition asking that its loyal addresses might be turned into bills of supply, it simply advertised its weakness to the whole country.

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  • The new queen, the only daughter of the duke of Kent, the fourth son of George III., had just accession.

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  • In February 1603 another attempt at escape failed, and she was then transferred to the care of the earl of Kent at Wrest House.

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  • He became rector of Chartham, Kent, in the same year.

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  • In 1670 he became archdeacon of Canterbury, and two years after he was appointed rector of Ickham, Kent.

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  • Dawes, at Wateringbury in Kent.

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  • of Folkestone, Kent.

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  • He paid special attention to the question of the existence of coal in Kent, and in 1882 was selected by the Channel tunnel committee to make a special survey of the French and English coasts.

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  • Augustine was the apostle of Kent, but Aidan was the apostle of England."

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  • JEFFREY AMHERST AMHERST, Baron (1717-1797), British soldier, was the son of Jeffrey Amherst of Riverhead, Kent, and by the interest of the duke of Dorset obtained an ensigncy in the Guards in 1731.

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  • In 1796 Lord Amherst was made field-marshal; and he died on the 3rd of August 1797 at "Montreal," his residence in Kent.

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  • Kent, Beginnings of Hebrew History, are more important for the literary analysis.

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  • In 1400 Thomas Holand, earl of Kent, held the bridge in the interests of the deposed Richard II., but was eventually forced to retire.

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  • WIHTRED, king of Kent (d.

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  • Bede states that Wihtred and Swefheard were both kings in Kent in 692, and this statement would appear to imply a period of East Saxon influence '(see Kent), while there is also evidence of an attack by Wessex.

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  • For their success against the earls of Kent and Salisbury Henry IV.

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  • The fruit orchards and raspberry fields of Kent are also known to be greatly benefited by the numerous colonies of bees owned by more than 3000 bee-keepers in the county.

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  • A very fine prospect over a great part of Surrey and Sussex, and extending to Hampshire and Kent, is obtained from the neighbouring Reigate Hill.

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  • TONBRIDGE [TUNBRIDGE], a market town in the Tonbridge or south-western parliamentary division of Kent, England, 291 m.

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  • BEXLEY, an urban district in the Dartford parliamentary division of Kent, England, 12 m.

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  • He now settled at Eltham in Kent, frequently preaching at Quaker meetings in the neighbourhood during the brief remainder of his troubled life.

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  • Concerning The Federalist Chancellor James Kent (Commentaries, i.

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  • It was the judgment of Chancellor James Kent, the justice of which can hardly be disputed, that " all the documentary proof and the current observation of the time lead us to the conclusion that he surpassed all his contemporaries in his exertions to create, recommend, adopt and defend the Constitution of the United States."

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  • Chancellor James Kent, and others only less competent, paid remarkable testimony to his legal abilities.

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  • 9 Chancellor Kent tells us (Memoirs and Letters, p. 32) that in 1804 Hamilton was planning a co-operative Federalist work on the history and science of government on an inductive basis.

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  • Kent always speaks of Hamilton's legal thinking as deductive, however (ibid, p. 290, 329), and such seems to have been in fact all his political reasoning: i.e.

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  • They settled in Kent and the Isle of Wight together with the adjacent parts of Hampshire.

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  • In Kent, however, it seems to have soon passed out of use, though there is good reason for believing that the inhabitants of that kingdom were of a different nationality from their neighbours (see Kent, Kingdom Of).

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  • The main axis of the Great Cordillera - so termed originally by Sir Roderick Murchison - bordering the eastern coast-line of Australia, may be traced across Bass Strait in the chain of islands forming the Furneaux and Kent group, which almost continually link Tasmania with Wilson's Promontory, the nearest and most southerly part of the Australian mainland.

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  • Aethelbert of Kent >>

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  • According to Bishop Burnet he was cast out by the Presbyterians; but whether this be so or not, he soon made his way to England and became vicar of Godmersham, Kent, from which living he was expelled by the Act of Uniformity in 1662.

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  • His brother !Ethelred, who succeeded him, invaded Kent in the following year, and in 679 fought a battle on the Trent against Ecgfrith, by which he recovered Lindsey.

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  • After this, however, we hear little of Mercian interference with the other kingdoms for some time; and since it is clear that during the last 15 years of the 7th century Wessex, Essex, Sussex and Kent were frequently involved in strife, it seems likely that the Mercian king had somewhat lost hold over the south of England.

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  • Offa's policy was apparently the extinction of the dependent kingdoms. In his reign the dynasties of Kent, Sussex and the Hwicce seem to have disappeared, or at all events to have given up the kingly title.

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  • DUNGENESS, a promontory of the south coast of England, in the south of Kent, near the town of Lydd.

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  • There's one particularly pernicious piece of red tape that Kent County Council supports.

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  • The funds raised through this charity abseil will remain in Kent.

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  • The only absentee - other than Cambs - is Kent.

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  • Furthermore, now that she had become the woman of the house she became less attentive to the children of the former Mrs Kent.

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  • Prior to joining Kent in September 2000 Cecilia did a European baccalaureate at the European School in Brussels.

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  • Adam has recently helped Bexley Cricket Club to win the Under 13 North Kent Junior league, coming top of the league batting averages.

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  • Free male betta to good home - Kent 14/11/04 No Hi Im giving away a free Male betta.

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  • bindsiting that servants are legally bound to obey masters, he imagines that Cordelia and Kent are disobedient on principle.

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  • Left-arm slow bowler Ian Fisher has been added to the 11 players which were on duty for the drawn game against Kent in Bristol.

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  • Kent are to open talks with Somerset pace bowler Richard Johnson about a possible move to the St Lawrence.

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  • The Kent police Band performed at a police bravery awards ceremony held at 10 Downing Street recently.

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  • Figure 2: A cruciform brooch from Dover, Kent, drawn by Dom Andrews.

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  • Of particular interest were the Anglo-Saxon burials, including a number of cremations -- a rite almost unknown in east Kent.

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  • Chris swam 100m butterfly coming 3rd in the final, qualifying to represent Kent Schools in a gala against Surrey.

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  • captivated a crowd of 17,500 at The St Lawrence Ground, home of Kent County Cricket Club, on Saturday evening.

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