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kensington

kensington Sentence Examples

  • This first design, the model for which is preserved in the South Kensington Museum, is very inferior to what Wren afterwards devised.

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  • In 1875 he was transferred to the Science and Art Department at South Kensington, and on the foundation of the Royal College of Science he became director of the solar physics observatory and professor of astronomical physics.

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  • 1868), devoted himself to solar research, and became chief assistant in the Solar Physics Observatory, South Kensington.

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  • She was educated at home, and later identified herself with the movement for the higher education of women, being also one of a group of women who about 1858 were discussing the question of women's suffrage at the Kensington Society.

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  • The choir-screen was sold to the South Kensington Museum in London for goo, this sum being devoted to the work of modern restoration.

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  • It contains exhibits of food and animal products, formerly at South Kensington, entomological collections, &c.; and various loan exhibitions are held from time to time.

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  • There is a 15th-century Italian example in South Kensington Museum of a pilastered turret containing an oblong crystal case, the whole resting on a stemmed base, and surmounted with a cupola.

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  • - Hammersmith, Kensington, Paddington, Hampstead, St Pancras, Islington, Stoke Newington, Poplar.

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  • Brick earth overlies it from Kensington to Brentford and west thereof, and appears in Chelsea and Fulham, Hornsey and Stoke Newington, and in patches south of the Thames between Battersea and Richmond.

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  • From the western boundary of the City proper, an area covering the greater part of the city of Westminster, and extending into Chelsea, Kensington, Paddington and Marylebone, is exclusively associated with the higher-class life of London.

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  • The northern enters the county in Hammersmith as Uxbridge Road, crosses Kensington and borders the north side of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Bayswater Road.

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  • The southern highway enters Hammersmith, crosses the centre of Kensington as Kensington Road and High Street, borders Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Kensington Gore and Knightsbridge, with terraces of fine residences, and merges into Piccadilly.

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  • The royal parks, namely St James's, Green and Hyde Park, and Kensington Gardens, stretch in an irregular belt for nearly 3 m.

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  • between Whitehall (Westminster) and Kensington.

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  • Kensington Gardens, originally attached to Kensington Palace, were subsequently much extended; they are magnificently timbered, and contain plantations of rare shrubs and flowering trees.

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  • In Kensington (q.v.), on the west side of Kensington Gardens, is the palace acquired by William III.

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  • The only other public buildings, beyond those at Westminster, which fall into a great group are the modern museums, the Imperial Institute, London University and other institutions, and Albert Hall, which lie between Kensington Gore and Brompton and Cromwell Roads, and these, together with the National Gallery (in Trafalgar Square) and other art galleries, and the principal scientific, educational and recreative institutions, are considered in Section V.

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  • The Albert Memorial, Kensington Gardens, was erected (1872) by " Queen Victoria and her People to the memory of Albert, Prince Consort," from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, with a statue of the Prince (1876) by John Henry Foley beneath a huge ornate Gothic canopy.

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  • The Metropolitan District (commonly called the District) system serves Wimbledon, Richmond, Ealing and Harrow on the west, and passes eastward by Earl's Court, South Kensington, Victoria and Mansion House (City) to Whitechapel and Bow.

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  • The surface tramway system of London cannot be complete, as, within an area roughly represented by the boroughs of Chelsea, Kensington and Fulham, the city of Westminster and a considerable district north thereof, and the city of London, the ' Charing Cross station was the scene of a remarkable catastrophe on the 5th of December 1905, when a large part of the roof collapsed, and the falling debris did very serious damage to the Avenue theatre, which stands close to the station at a lower level.

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  • Here are the central offices of the letter, newspaper and telegraph departments, with the office of the Postmaster General; but the headquarters of the parcels department are at Mount Pleasant, Clerkenwell; those of the Post Office Savings Bank at Blythe Road, West Kensington, and those of the Money Order department in Queen Victoria Street.

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  • Such are that of the London Necropolis Company at Brookwood near Woking, Surrey, and that of the parishes of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, at Hanwell, Middlesex.

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  • The he Board of Education directly administers the following educational institutions - the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington, with its branch at Bethnal Green, from both of which objects are lent to various institutions for educational purposes; the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, with which is incorporated the Royal School of Mines; the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom and the Museum of Practical Geology, Jermyn Street; the Solar Physics Observatory, South Kensington; and the Royal College of Art, South Kensington.

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  • Music. - The principal educational institutions are - the Royal Academy of Music, Tenterden Street, Hanover Square; the Royal College of Music, South Kensington; Guildhall School, City, near the Victoria Embankment; London College, Great Marlborough Street; Trinity College, Manchester Square; Victoria College, Berners Street; and the Royal College of Organists, Bloomsbury.

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  • The natural history branch was removed to a building at South Kensington (the Natural History Museum) in 1881, where the zoological, botanical and mineralogical exhibits are kept.

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  • Close to this museum is the Victoria and Albert Museum (formerly South Kensington Museum, 1857) for which an extension of buildings, from a fine design by Sir Aston Webb, was begun in 1899 and completed in ten years.

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  • Besides the Government reference libraries at the British Museum and South Kensington there are other such libraries, of a specialized character, as at the Patent Office and the Record Office.

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  • The chief halls devoted mainly to concerts are the Royal Albert Hall, close to the South Kensington museums, and Queen's Hall in Langham Place, Regent Street.

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  • Among other popular places of entertainment may be mentioned the exhibition grounds and buildings at Earl's Court; similar grounds at Shepherd's Bush, where a Franco-British Exhibition was held in 1908, an Imperial Exhibition in 1909, and an Anglo-Japanese in 1910; the great Olympia hall, West Kensington; the celebrated wax-work exhibition of Madame Tussaud in Marylebone Roan, the Alexandra Palace, Muswell Hill, an institution resembling the Crystal Palace; and the Agricultural Hall, Islington, where agricultural and other exhibitions are held.

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  • At Queen's Club, West Kensington, the annual Oxford and Cambridge athletic meeting and others take place, besides football matches, and there is covered accommodation for tennis and other games.

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  • In Tottenham Court Road are the showrooms of several large upholstering and furnishing firms. Of the streets most frequented on account of their fashionable shops Bond Street, Regent Street, Oxford Street, Sloane Street and High Street, Kensington, may be selected.

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  • The wealthier metropolitan parishes became discontented with the form of local government to which they remained subject, and in 1897 Kensington and Westminster petitioned to be created boroughs by the grant of charters under the Municipal Corporation Acts.

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  • (lo) Kensington - Divs.: Northern, Southern; (11) City of London.

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  • In this diocese, which covers nearly the whole of Middlesex and a very small portion of Hertfordshire, are the suffragan bishoprics of Islington, Kensington and Stepney.

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  • cared little for London, the smoke of which gave him asthma, and when a great part of Whitehall was burnt in 1691 he purchased Nottingham House and made it into Kensington Palace.

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  • Kensington was then an insignificant village, but the arrival of the court soon caused it to grow in importance.

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  • In the South Kensington Museum is a fragment of such a tablet or slab; the figure, a portion of which remains, could not have been less than about 14 in.

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  • A specimen is in the Indian section of the South Kensington Museum.

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  • He was ordained deacon and priest on August 12th 1667, and until 1676 was chaplain and tutor in the family of Sir Heneage Finch at Kensington House.

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  • The immense scientific collection in the Bavarian national museum, illustrative of the march of progress from the Roman period down to the present day, compares in completeness with the similar collections at South Kensington and the Musee de Cluny.

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  • Some of the most exquisite and most ingenious of these earlier productions, such as the magnificent iron eagle in the south Kensington Museum, the wonderful articulated models of crayfish, dragons, serpents, birds, that are found in many European collections, came from the studios of the MiyOchins; but these were the play of giants, and were not made as articles of commerce.

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  • He made an unsuccessful and costly effort to establish a Catholic university at Kensington, and he also made provision for a diocesan seminary of strictly ecclesiastical type.

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  • A collection of unprinted Garrick letters is in the Forster library at South Kensington.

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  • Hartley, contains a library, museum, art gallery, lecture hall, laboratories, and school of science and art associated with that of South Kensington, London; the foundation was created for the advancement of natural history, astronomy, antiquities, and classical and Oriental literature.

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  • He received his general education at the City of London School, and his scientific education at the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, and at the universities of Wiirzburg and Munich.

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  • VICTORIA [ALEXANDRINA VICTORIA], Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India (1819-1901), only child of Edward., duke of Kent, fourth son of King George III., and of Princess Victoria Mary Louisa of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (widow of Prince Emich Karl of Leiningen, by whom she already had two children), was born at Kensington Palace on the 24th of May 1819.

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  • The baptism was performed in a drawing-room of Kensington Palace on the 24th of June by Dr Manners Sutton, archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • Dr Howley, archbishop of Canterbury, and the marquis of Conyngham, bearing the news of the king's death, started in a landau with four horses for Kensington, which they reached at five o'clock.

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  • The privy council assembled at Kensington in the morning; and the usual oaths were administered to the queen by Lord Chancellor Cottenham, after which all present did homage.

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  • The duchess of Kent had communicated her projects to Lord Melbourne, and they were known to many other statesmen, and to persons in society; but the gossip of drawing-rooms during the years 1837-38 continually represented that the young queen had fallen in love with Prince This or Lord That, and the more imaginative babblers hinted at post-chaises waiting outside Kensington Gardens in the night, private marriages and so forth.

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  • The International Exhibition of 1851, the creation of the Museum and Science and Art Department at South Kensington, the founding of art schools and picture galleries all over the country, the spread of musical taste and the fostering of technical education may be attributed, more or less directly, to the commission of distinguished men which began its labours under Prince Albert's auspices.

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  • On the 4th of July she laid the foundation stone of the Imperial Institute, the building at Kensington to which, at the instance of the prince of Wales, it had been determined to devote the large sum of money collected as a Jubilee offering, and which was opened by the queen in 1893.

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  • In May 1899, after another visit to the Riviera, the queen performed what proved to be her last ceremonial function in London: she proceeded in "semi-state" to South Kensington, and laid the foundation stone of the new buildings completing the Museum - henceforth to be called the Victoria and Albert Museum - which had been planned more than forty years before by the prince consort.

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  • radius is another circle - to the east Kew (9469) and Hawthorne (21,430), to the south-east St Kilda (20,542) and Brighton (10,047), to the south-west Williamstown (14,052) and Footscray (18,318), to the north-west Essenden (17,426), and Flemington and Kensington (10,946), and to the north Brunswick (24,141).

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  • He was appointed teacher of the principles of decoration; his lectures in manuscript are preserved in the art library, South Kensington.

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  • He was also employed by the prince consort to prepare a design for the Kensington Museum; and he made the drawings for the Wellington funeral car.

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  • A few years ago a full-sized tree was felled in Fresno county, California, and contiguous transverse sections have been set up, one in the Museum of Natural History at New York, the other (upper one) in the British Museum of Natural History at South Kensington; the annual rings of the latter section have been carefully counted and found to indicate an age of 1335 years.

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  • KENSINGTON, a western metropolitan borough of London, England, bounded N.E.

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  • A considerable but indefinite area adjoining Brompton is commonly called South Kensington; but the area known as West Kensington is within the borough of Fulham.

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  • The brilliant period of history for which Kensington is famous may be dated from the settlement of the Court here by William III.

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  • A mansion standing on the western flank of the present Kensington Gardens had been the seat of Heneage Finch, Lord Chancellor and afterwards Earl of Nottingham.

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  • It was known as Nottingham House, but when bought from the second earl by William, who was desirous of avoiding residence in London as he suffered from asthma, it became known as Kensington Palace.

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  • In the palace died Mary, William's consort, William himself, Anne and George II., whose wife Caroline did much to beautify Kensington Gardens, and formed the beautiful lake called the Serpentine (1733).

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  • Kensington Square, however, lying south of High Street in the vicinity of St Mary Abbots church, still preserves some of its picturesque houses, nearly all of which were formerly inhabited by those attached to the court; it numbered among its residents Addison, Talleyrand, John Stuart Mill, and Green the historian.

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  • Another link with the past is found in Holland House, hidden in its beautiful park north of Kensington Road.

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  • The Roman Catholic church of Our Lady of Victories lies close to Kensington Road, and in Brompton Road is the Oratory of St Philip Neri, a fine building with richly decorated interior, noted for the beauty of its musical services, as is:the Carmelite Church in Church Street.

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  • Of secular institutions the principal are the museums in South Kensington.

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  • The Victoria and Albert, commonly called the South Kensington, Museum contains various exhibits divided into sections, and includes the buildings of the Royal College of Science.

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  • In Kensington Gardens, near the upper end of Exhibition Road, which separates the two museums, was held the Great Exhibition of 1851, the hall of which is preserved as the Crystal Palace at Sydenham.

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  • The greater part of the gardens, however, with the Albert Memorial, erected by Queen Victoria in memory of Albert, prince consort, the Albert Hall, opposite to it, one of the principal concert-halls in London, and the Imperial Institute to the south, are actually within the city of Westminster, though commonly connected with Kensington.

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  • Further notable buildings in Kensington are the town-hall and free library in High Street, which is also much frequented for its excellent shops, and the Brompton Consumption Hospital, Fulham Road.

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  • Kensington is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of London.

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  • The parliamentary borough of Kensington has north and south divisions, each returning one member.

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  • The clay model for it is in the South Kensington: Museum.

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  • 3 A Descriptive Catalogue of the Musical Instruments in the South Kensington Museum, by Carl Engel (London, 18 74), p. 143.

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  • His elder brother, Edward Stanley Poole (1830-1867), who was chief clerk in the science and art department at South Kensington, was an Arabic scholar, whose early death cut short a promising career.

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  • By 1888 Hall was at work on a commercial scale at Pittsburg, reducing German alumina; in 1891 the plant was removed to New Kensington for economy in fuel, and was gradually enlarged to 150o h.p.; in 1894 a factory driven by water was erected at Niagara Falls, and subsequently works were established at Shawenegan in Canada and at Massena in the United States.

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  • In 1864 it was bought by the South Kensington Museum.

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  • On only one other occasion - a vote for South Kensington - did they go into opposite lobbies, during twenty-five years of parliamentary life.

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  • On his return to London six years later he became professor of applied physics at the Finsbury College of the City and Guilds of London Technical Institute, and in 1884 he was chosen professor of electrical engineering at the Central Technical College, South Kensington.

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  • Oxenham died at Kensington on the 23rd of March 1888.

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  • The Great Exhibition, state-aided schools of design, the South Kensington Museum, and the establishment of a Science and Art Department under Government, were among the results of the important art revival which he inaugurated.

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  • WILLESDEN, an urban district in the Harrow parliamentary division of Middlesex, England, suburban to London, lying immediately outside the boundary of the county of London (boroughs of Hammersmith and Kensington).

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  • The extensive cemeteries of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, London, are here.

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  • Round the city are many pleasant suburbs, connected with it by rail and tramways; the chief of these are Burnside, Beaumont, Unley, Mitcham, Goodwood, Plymton, Hindmarsh, Prospect, St Peters, Norwood and Kensington.

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  • CHARLES PRATT CAMDEN, 1ST Earl (1714-1794), lord chancellor of England, was born in Kensington in 1714.

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  • by Kensington, E.

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  • from Chelsea, coverging and leading to Putney Bridge over the Thames; North End Road between Hammersmith and Fulham Roads; Lillie Road between South Kensington and Fulham Palace Road; and Wandsworth Bridge Road leading S.

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  • In the north Fulham includes the residential district known as West Kensington, and farther south that of Walham Green.

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  • Of these Hurlingham Park is the headquarters of the Hurlingham Polo Club and a fashionable resort; and Queen's Club, West Kensington, has tennis and other courts for the use of members, and is also the scene of important football matches, and of the athletic meetings between Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and those between the English and American Universities held in England.

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  • She was deprived of her guard of honour, and Prince George, on entering Kensington Palace, received no salute, though the drums beat loudly on his departure.° Instructions were given that the court expected no one to pay his respects, and no attention in the provinces was to be shown to their rank.

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  • Hake at Salamis and Curium for the South Kensington Museum, but no scientific record was made.

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  • Shortly after becoming chaplain to the bishop of London in 1762 he was appointed to a prebendal stall of St Paul's and to the vicarage of Kensington, and in 1764 he was made archdeacon of London.

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  • He died at Kensington on the 5th of September 1770.

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  • In the district of Kensington, covering 15 sq.

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  • When the gardens of the Royal Horticultural Society at South Kensington were being planned, Albert, Prince Consort, the president of the society, especially desired that there should be a maze formed in the ante-garden, which was made in the form shown in fig.

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  • Ampthill Park became in 1818 the seat of that Lord Holland in whose time Holland House, in Kensington, London, became famous as a resort of the most distinguished intellectual society.

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  • by Kensington, S.

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  • The parliamentary borough of Chelsea returns one member, and includes, as a detached portion, Kensal Town, north of Kensington.

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  • New Kensington >>

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  • by Kensington and S.

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  • The main thoroughfares are Uxbridge Road and Goldhawk Road, from Acton on the west, converging at Shepherd's Bush and continuing towards Notting Hill; King Street from Chiswick on the south-west, continued as Hammersmith Broadway and Road to Kensington Road; Bridge Road from Hammersmith Bridge over the Thames, and Fulham Palace Road from Fulham, converging at the Broadway.

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  • The following are suffragan or assistant bishoprics (the names of the dioceses to which each belongs being given in brackets): Dover, Croydon (Canterbury), Beverley, Hull, Sheffield (York), Stepney, Islington, Kensington (London), Jarrow (Durham), Guildford, Southampton, Dorking (Winchester), Barrow-inFurness (Carlisle), Crediton (Exeter), Grantham (Lincoln), Burnley (Manchester), Thetford, Ipswich (Norwich), Reading (Oxford), Leicester (Peterborough), Richmond, Knaresborough (Ripon), Colchester, Barking (St Albans), Swansea (St.

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  • NEW KENSINGTON, a borough of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the Allegheny river, 18 m.

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  • by the boroughs of Chelsea and Kensington, and N.

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  • The City of Westminster, as thus depicted, extends from the western end of Fleet Street to Kensington Gardens, and from Oxford Street to the Thames, which it borders over a distance of 3 m., between Victoria (Chelsea) Bridge and a point below Waterloo Bridge.

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  • The grand carpet which had covered the floor of one of the mosques for three centuries was purchased by a traveller about 1890 for ioo, and was finally acquired by the South Kensington Museum for many thousands.

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  • In January 1725 he was seized with a violent cough and inflammation of the lungs, which induced him to reside at Kensington; and in the following month he had a severe attack of gout, which produced a decided improvement in his general health.

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  • On the 28th of February 1727, feeling well, he went to London to preside at a meeting of the Royal Society; but the fatigue which attended this duty brought on a violent return of his former complaint, and he returned to Kensington on the 4th of March, when Dr Mead and Dr Chesselden pronounced his disease to be stone.

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  • He died at Kensington, on the 1st of March 1898.

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  • She enjoyed the hectic bustle of High Street Kensington.

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  • Paul Plummer freelance accompanist and vocal coach based in South Kensington, London.

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  • avenue between Harrods and Kensington Palace, this is a must.

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  • Useless customer service too, their store in Kensington, the only mobile phone store i have ever seen a bouncer in over here!

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  • The mantua on display at Kensington Palace is made of white silk brocaded in white and colored silk.

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  • The atmosphere on the campus is tranquil and peaceful, in sharp contrast to the hectic bustle of High Street Kensington.

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  • civet cats, the King kept snails, tortoises and exotic birds in the gardens at Kensington.

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  • The textile conservators considered it too fragile for a move up the road to Kensington Gardens.

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  • Cycle parking in central reserve cycle parking in central reserve Cycle parking in central reserve, High Street, Kensington.

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  • Kensington and Chelsea is a culturally diverse area of London.

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  • The six-inch pipes are one inch thick " The system covers an area from Kensington in the west to the east End docklands.

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  • The Parkcity, London Set within the exclusive district of Kensington & Chelsea, the 4* deluxe Parkcity epitomizes elegance and style.

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  • At the time, the former air hostess was living in the smart surroundings of Kensington, West London.

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  • The notebook Guardian does not infringe upon Kensington's patent.

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  • This land, the central part of modern Kensington, became a separate manor of Abbots Kensington.

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  • objet d'artthed over 14,000 books to the South Kensington Museum, along with pictures, prints, drawings and other objets d'art.

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  • Marlborough Court is located on Pembroke Road which runs parallel to Kensington High Street with its man.

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  • republicanism debate, Kensington, New South Wales University Press.

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  • Kensington Palace has been a royal residence for over 300 years.

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  • On 2 July 2003 at Kensington Town Hall, London, FOCAL will be holding a one-day seminar.

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  • The revelations come as Spencer's trusted employe prepares to stand trial for allegedly stealing an entire floor of Kensington Palace following her death.

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  • An exciting opportunity to purchase this substantial period stucco house situated moments from the amenities, facilities and transport links of South Kensington.

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  • swanky shops on Kensington High Street.

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  • The growth of the lace industry in the 17th century hastened the process by leading to the substitution of broad bands of lace as decoration; occasionally, as in a magnificent specimen preserved at South Kensington, nearly half the vestment is thus Apparelled Alb in the South Kensington Museum.

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  • This first design, the model for which is preserved in the South Kensington Museum, is very inferior to what Wren afterwards devised.

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  • In 1875 he was transferred to the Science and Art Department at South Kensington, and on the foundation of the Royal College of Science he became director of the solar physics observatory and professor of astronomical physics.

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  • 1868), devoted himself to solar research, and became chief assistant in the Solar Physics Observatory, South Kensington.

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  • She was educated at home, and later identified herself with the movement for the higher education of women, being also one of a group of women who about 1858 were discussing the question of women's suffrage at the Kensington Society.

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  • The choir-screen was sold to the South Kensington Museum in London for goo, this sum being devoted to the work of modern restoration.

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  • It contains exhibits of food and animal products, formerly at South Kensington, entomological collections, &c.; and various loan exhibitions are held from time to time.

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  • There is a 15th-century Italian example in South Kensington Museum of a pilastered turret containing an oblong crystal case, the whole resting on a stemmed base, and surmounted with a cupola.

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  • - Hammersmith, Kensington, Paddington, Hampstead, St Pancras, Islington, Stoke Newington, Poplar.

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  • Brick earth overlies it from Kensington to Brentford and west thereof, and appears in Chelsea and Fulham, Hornsey and Stoke Newington, and in patches south of the Thames between Battersea and Richmond.

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  • From the western boundary of the City proper, an area covering the greater part of the city of Westminster, and extending into Chelsea, Kensington, Paddington and Marylebone, is exclusively associated with the higher-class life of London.

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  • The northern enters the county in Hammersmith as Uxbridge Road, crosses Kensington and borders the north side of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Bayswater Road.

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  • The southern highway enters Hammersmith, crosses the centre of Kensington as Kensington Road and High Street, borders Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Kensington Gore and Knightsbridge, with terraces of fine residences, and merges into Piccadilly.

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  • The royal parks, namely St James's, Green and Hyde Park, and Kensington Gardens, stretch in an irregular belt for nearly 3 m.

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  • between Whitehall (Westminster) and Kensington.

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  • Kensington Gardens, originally attached to Kensington Palace, were subsequently much extended; they are magnificently timbered, and contain plantations of rare shrubs and flowering trees.

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  • In Kensington (q.v.), on the west side of Kensington Gardens, is the palace acquired by William III.

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  • The only other public buildings, beyond those at Westminster, which fall into a great group are the modern museums, the Imperial Institute, London University and other institutions, and Albert Hall, which lie between Kensington Gore and Brompton and Cromwell Roads, and these, together with the National Gallery (in Trafalgar Square) and other art galleries, and the principal scientific, educational and recreative institutions, are considered in Section V.

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  • The Albert Memorial, Kensington Gardens, was erected (1872) by " Queen Victoria and her People to the memory of Albert, Prince Consort," from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott, with a statue of the Prince (1876) by John Henry Foley beneath a huge ornate Gothic canopy.

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  • The Metropolitan District (commonly called the District) system serves Wimbledon, Richmond, Ealing and Harrow on the west, and passes eastward by Earl's Court, South Kensington, Victoria and Mansion House (City) to Whitechapel and Bow.

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  • The surface tramway system of London cannot be complete, as, within an area roughly represented by the boroughs of Chelsea, Kensington and Fulham, the city of Westminster and a considerable district north thereof, and the city of London, the ' Charing Cross station was the scene of a remarkable catastrophe on the 5th of December 1905, when a large part of the roof collapsed, and the falling debris did very serious damage to the Avenue theatre, which stands close to the station at a lower level.

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  • Here are the central offices of the letter, newspaper and telegraph departments, with the office of the Postmaster General; but the headquarters of the parcels department are at Mount Pleasant, Clerkenwell; those of the Post Office Savings Bank at Blythe Road, West Kensington, and those of the Money Order department in Queen Victoria Street.

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  • ware Roads; the greater part of Paddington and Kensington, north part of Fulham and Hammersmith); South-west (S.W., City of Westminster south of Piccadilly, Chelsea, South Kensington, the greater part of Fulham, and London south of the Thames and west of Vauxhall Bridge); South-east (S.E., remainder of London south of the Thames); East (E., east of the City and Kingsland Road); North (N., west of Kingsland Road; Islington); North-west (N.W., greater part of St Pancras and St Marylebone, and Hampstead).

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  • Such are that of the London Necropolis Company at Brookwood near Woking, Surrey, and that of the parishes of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, at Hanwell, Middlesex.

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  • The he Board of Education directly administers the following educational institutions - the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington, with its branch at Bethnal Green, from both of which objects are lent to various institutions for educational purposes; the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, with which is incorporated the Royal School of Mines; the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom and the Museum of Practical Geology, Jermyn Street; the Solar Physics Observatory, South Kensington; and the Royal College of Art, South Kensington.

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  • Music. - The principal educational institutions are - the Royal Academy of Music, Tenterden Street, Hanover Square; the Royal College of Music, South Kensington; Guildhall School, City, near the Victoria Embankment; London College, Great Marlborough Street; Trinity College, Manchester Square; Victoria College, Berners Street; and the Royal College of Organists, Bloomsbury.

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  • The natural history branch was removed to a building at South Kensington (the Natural History Museum) in 1881, where the zoological, botanical and mineralogical exhibits are kept.

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  • Close to this museum is the Victoria and Albert Museum (formerly South Kensington Museum, 1857) for which an extension of buildings, from a fine design by Sir Aston Webb, was begun in 1899 and completed in ten years.

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  • Besides the Government reference libraries at the British Museum and South Kensington there are other such libraries, of a specialized character, as at the Patent Office and the Record Office.

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  • The chief halls devoted mainly to concerts are the Royal Albert Hall, close to the South Kensington museums, and Queen's Hall in Langham Place, Regent Street.

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  • Among other popular places of entertainment may be mentioned the exhibition grounds and buildings at Earl's Court; similar grounds at Shepherd's Bush, where a Franco-British Exhibition was held in 1908, an Imperial Exhibition in 1909, and an Anglo-Japanese in 1910; the great Olympia hall, West Kensington; the celebrated wax-work exhibition of Madame Tussaud in Marylebone Roan, the Alexandra Palace, Muswell Hill, an institution resembling the Crystal Palace; and the Agricultural Hall, Islington, where agricultural and other exhibitions are held.

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  • At Queen's Club, West Kensington, the annual Oxford and Cambridge athletic meeting and others take place, besides football matches, and there is covered accommodation for tennis and other games.

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  • In Tottenham Court Road are the showrooms of several large upholstering and furnishing firms. Of the streets most frequented on account of their fashionable shops Bond Street, Regent Street, Oxford Street, Sloane Street and High Street, Kensington, may be selected.

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  • The wealthier metropolitan parishes became discontented with the form of local government to which they remained subject, and in 1897 Kensington and Westminster petitioned to be created boroughs by the grant of charters under the Municipal Corporation Acts.

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  • (lo) Kensington - Divs.: Northern, Southern; (11) City of London.

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  • In this diocese, which covers nearly the whole of Middlesex and a very small portion of Hertfordshire, are the suffragan bishoprics of Islington, Kensington and Stepney.

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  • cared little for London, the smoke of which gave him asthma, and when a great part of Whitehall was burnt in 1691 he purchased Nottingham House and made it into Kensington Palace.

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  • Kensington was then an insignificant village, but the arrival of the court soon caused it to grow in importance.

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  • In the South Kensington Museum is a fragment of such a tablet or slab; the figure, a portion of which remains, could not have been less than about 14 in.

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  • A specimen is in the Indian section of the South Kensington Museum.

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  • He was ordained deacon and priest on August 12th 1667, and until 1676 was chaplain and tutor in the family of Sir Heneage Finch at Kensington House.

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  • The immense scientific collection in the Bavarian national museum, illustrative of the march of progress from the Roman period down to the present day, compares in completeness with the similar collections at South Kensington and the Musee de Cluny.

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  • Some of the most exquisite and most ingenious of these earlier productions, such as the magnificent iron eagle in the south Kensington Museum, the wonderful articulated models of crayfish, dragons, serpents, birds, that are found in many European collections, came from the studios of the MiyOchins; but these were the play of giants, and were not made as articles of commerce.

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  • He made an unsuccessful and costly effort to establish a Catholic university at Kensington, and he also made provision for a diocesan seminary of strictly ecclesiastical type.

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  • A collection of unprinted Garrick letters is in the Forster library at South Kensington.

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  • Hartley, contains a library, museum, art gallery, lecture hall, laboratories, and school of science and art associated with that of South Kensington, London; the foundation was created for the advancement of natural history, astronomy, antiquities, and classical and Oriental literature.

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  • He received his general education at the City of London School, and his scientific education at the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, and at the universities of Wiirzburg and Munich.

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  • VICTORIA [ALEXANDRINA VICTORIA], Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India (1819-1901), only child of Edward., duke of Kent, fourth son of King George III., and of Princess Victoria Mary Louisa of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (widow of Prince Emich Karl of Leiningen, by whom she already had two children), was born at Kensington Palace on the 24th of May 1819.

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  • The baptism was performed in a drawing-room of Kensington Palace on the 24th of June by Dr Manners Sutton, archbishop of Canterbury.

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  • Dr Howley, archbishop of Canterbury, and the marquis of Conyngham, bearing the news of the king's death, started in a landau with four horses for Kensington, which they reached at five o'clock.

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  • The privy council assembled at Kensington in the morning; and the usual oaths were administered to the queen by Lord Chancellor Cottenham, after which all present did homage.

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  • The duchess of Kent had communicated her projects to Lord Melbourne, and they were known to many other statesmen, and to persons in society; but the gossip of drawing-rooms during the years 1837-38 continually represented that the young queen had fallen in love with Prince This or Lord That, and the more imaginative babblers hinted at post-chaises waiting outside Kensington Gardens in the night, private marriages and so forth.

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  • The International Exhibition of 1851, the creation of the Museum and Science and Art Department at South Kensington, the founding of art schools and picture galleries all over the country, the spread of musical taste and the fostering of technical education may be attributed, more or less directly, to the commission of distinguished men which began its labours under Prince Albert's auspices.

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  • On the 4th of July she laid the foundation stone of the Imperial Institute, the building at Kensington to which, at the instance of the prince of Wales, it had been determined to devote the large sum of money collected as a Jubilee offering, and which was opened by the queen in 1893.

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  • In May 1899, after another visit to the Riviera, the queen performed what proved to be her last ceremonial function in London: she proceeded in "semi-state" to South Kensington, and laid the foundation stone of the new buildings completing the Museum - henceforth to be called the Victoria and Albert Museum - which had been planned more than forty years before by the prince consort.

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  • The city has also Saint Francis Xavier College (Roman Catholic, established in 1831 and until 1840 known as the Athenaeum); Saint Joseph College (Roman Catholic, 1873) Mount St Mary's of the West Seminary (Roman Catholic, theological, 1848, at Cedar Point, Ohio); Hebrew Union College (1875), the leading institution in the United States for educating rabbis; the largely attended Ohio Mechanics' Institute (founded 1828), a private corporation not conducted for profit, its object being the education of skilled workmen, the training of industrial leaders, and the advancement of the mechanic arts (in 1907 there were in all departments 1421 students, a large majority of whom were in the evening classes); an excellent art academy, modelled after that of South Kensington; the College of Music and the Conservatory of Music (mentioned below); the Miami Medical College (opened in 1852); the Pulte Medical College (homeopathic; coeducational; opened 1872); the Eclectic Medical Institute (chartered 1845); two women's medical colleges, two colleges of dental surgery, a college of pharmacy, and several business colleges.

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  • radius is another circle - to the east Kew (9469) and Hawthorne (21,430), to the south-east St Kilda (20,542) and Brighton (10,047), to the south-west Williamstown (14,052) and Footscray (18,318), to the north-west Essenden (17,426), and Flemington and Kensington (10,946), and to the north Brunswick (24,141).

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  • He was appointed teacher of the principles of decoration; his lectures in manuscript are preserved in the art library, South Kensington.

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  • He was also employed by the prince consort to prepare a design for the Kensington Museum; and he made the drawings for the Wellington funeral car.

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  • A few years ago a full-sized tree was felled in Fresno county, California, and contiguous transverse sections have been set up, one in the Museum of Natural History at New York, the other (upper one) in the British Museum of Natural History at South Kensington; the annual rings of the latter section have been carefully counted and found to indicate an age of 1335 years.

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  • KENSINGTON, a western metropolitan borough of London, England, bounded N.E.

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  • A considerable but indefinite area adjoining Brompton is commonly called South Kensington; but the area known as West Kensington is within the borough of Fulham.

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  • The brilliant period of history for which Kensington is famous may be dated from the settlement of the Court here by William III.

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  • A mansion standing on the western flank of the present Kensington Gardens had been the seat of Heneage Finch, Lord Chancellor and afterwards Earl of Nottingham.

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  • It was known as Nottingham House, but when bought from the second earl by William, who was desirous of avoiding residence in London as he suffered from asthma, it became known as Kensington Palace.

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  • In the palace died Mary, William's consort, William himself, Anne and George II., whose wife Caroline did much to beautify Kensington Gardens, and formed the beautiful lake called the Serpentine (1733).

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  • Kensington Square, however, lying south of High Street in the vicinity of St Mary Abbots church, still preserves some of its picturesque houses, nearly all of which were formerly inhabited by those attached to the court; it numbered among its residents Addison, Talleyrand, John Stuart Mill, and Green the historian.

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  • Another link with the past is found in Holland House, hidden in its beautiful park north of Kensington Road.

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  • The Roman Catholic church of Our Lady of Victories lies close to Kensington Road, and in Brompton Road is the Oratory of St Philip Neri, a fine building with richly decorated interior, noted for the beauty of its musical services, as is:the Carmelite Church in Church Street.

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  • Of secular institutions the principal are the museums in South Kensington.

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  • The Victoria and Albert, commonly called the South Kensington, Museum contains various exhibits divided into sections, and includes the buildings of the Royal College of Science.

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  • In Kensington Gardens, near the upper end of Exhibition Road, which separates the two museums, was held the Great Exhibition of 1851, the hall of which is preserved as the Crystal Palace at Sydenham.

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  • The greater part of the gardens, however, with the Albert Memorial, erected by Queen Victoria in memory of Albert, prince consort, the Albert Hall, opposite to it, one of the principal concert-halls in London, and the Imperial Institute to the south, are actually within the city of Westminster, though commonly connected with Kensington.

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  • Further notable buildings in Kensington are the town-hall and free library in High Street, which is also much frequented for its excellent shops, and the Brompton Consumption Hospital, Fulham Road.

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  • Kensington is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of London.

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  • The parliamentary borough of Kensington has north and south divisions, each returning one member.

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  • The clay model for it is in the South Kensington: Museum.

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  • 3 A Descriptive Catalogue of the Musical Instruments in the South Kensington Museum, by Carl Engel (London, 18 74), p. 143.

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  • His elder brother, Edward Stanley Poole (1830-1867), who was chief clerk in the science and art department at South Kensington, was an Arabic scholar, whose early death cut short a promising career.

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  • By 1888 Hall was at work on a commercial scale at Pittsburg, reducing German alumina; in 1891 the plant was removed to New Kensington for economy in fuel, and was gradually enlarged to 150o h.p.; in 1894 a factory driven by water was erected at Niagara Falls, and subsequently works were established at Shawenegan in Canada and at Massena in the United States.

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  • In 1864 it was bought by the South Kensington Museum.

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  • On only one other occasion - a vote for South Kensington - did they go into opposite lobbies, during twenty-five years of parliamentary life.

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  • On his return to London six years later he became professor of applied physics at the Finsbury College of the City and Guilds of London Technical Institute, and in 1884 he was chosen professor of electrical engineering at the Central Technical College, South Kensington.

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  • Oxenham died at Kensington on the 23rd of March 1888.

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  • The Great Exhibition, state-aided schools of design, the South Kensington Museum, and the establishment of a Science and Art Department under Government, were among the results of the important art revival which he inaugurated.

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  • WILLESDEN, an urban district in the Harrow parliamentary division of Middlesex, England, suburban to London, lying immediately outside the boundary of the county of London (boroughs of Hammersmith and Kensington).

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  • The extensive cemeteries of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, London, are here.

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  • Round the city are many pleasant suburbs, connected with it by rail and tramways; the chief of these are Burnside, Beaumont, Unley, Mitcham, Goodwood, Plymton, Hindmarsh, Prospect, St Peters, Norwood and Kensington.

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  • CHARLES PRATT CAMDEN, 1ST Earl (1714-1794), lord chancellor of England, was born in Kensington in 1714.

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  • by Kensington, E.

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  • from Chelsea, coverging and leading to Putney Bridge over the Thames; North End Road between Hammersmith and Fulham Roads; Lillie Road between South Kensington and Fulham Palace Road; and Wandsworth Bridge Road leading S.

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  • In the north Fulham includes the residential district known as West Kensington, and farther south that of Walham Green.

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  • Of these Hurlingham Park is the headquarters of the Hurlingham Polo Club and a fashionable resort; and Queen's Club, West Kensington, has tennis and other courts for the use of members, and is also the scene of important football matches, and of the athletic meetings between Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and those between the English and American Universities held in England.

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  • She was deprived of her guard of honour, and Prince George, on entering Kensington Palace, received no salute, though the drums beat loudly on his departure.° Instructions were given that the court expected no one to pay his respects, and no attention in the provinces was to be shown to their rank.

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  • Hake at Salamis and Curium for the South Kensington Museum, but no scientific record was made.

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  • Shortly after becoming chaplain to the bishop of London in 1762 he was appointed to a prebendal stall of St Paul's and to the vicarage of Kensington, and in 1764 he was made archdeacon of London.

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  • He died at Kensington on the 5th of September 1770.

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  • In the district of Kensington, covering 15 sq.

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  • When the gardens of the Royal Horticultural Society at South Kensington were being planned, Albert, Prince Consort, the president of the society, especially desired that there should be a maze formed in the ante-garden, which was made in the form shown in fig.

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  • Ampthill Park became in 1818 the seat of that Lord Holland in whose time Holland House, in Kensington, London, became famous as a resort of the most distinguished intellectual society.

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  • by Kensington, S.

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  • The parliamentary borough of Chelsea returns one member, and includes, as a detached portion, Kensal Town, north of Kensington.

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  • New Kensington >>

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  • by Kensington and S.

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  • The main thoroughfares are Uxbridge Road and Goldhawk Road, from Acton on the west, converging at Shepherd's Bush and continuing towards Notting Hill; King Street from Chiswick on the south-west, continued as Hammersmith Broadway and Road to Kensington Road; Bridge Road from Hammersmith Bridge over the Thames, and Fulham Palace Road from Fulham, converging at the Broadway.

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  • The following are suffragan or assistant bishoprics (the names of the dioceses to which each belongs being given in brackets): Dover, Croydon (Canterbury), Beverley, Hull, Sheffield (York), Stepney, Islington, Kensington (London), Jarrow (Durham), Guildford, Southampton, Dorking (Winchester), Barrow-inFurness (Carlisle), Crediton (Exeter), Grantham (Lincoln), Burnley (Manchester), Thetford, Ipswich (Norwich), Reading (Oxford), Leicester (Peterborough), Richmond, Knaresborough (Ripon), Colchester, Barking (St Albans), Swansea (St.

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  • NEW KENSINGTON, a borough of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the Allegheny river, 18 m.

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  • by the boroughs of Chelsea and Kensington, and N.

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  • The City of Westminster, as thus depicted, extends from the western end of Fleet Street to Kensington Gardens, and from Oxford Street to the Thames, which it borders over a distance of 3 m., between Victoria (Chelsea) Bridge and a point below Waterloo Bridge.

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  • The grand carpet which had covered the floor of one of the mosques for three centuries was purchased by a traveller about 1890 for ioo, and was finally acquired by the South Kensington Museum for many thousands.

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  • In January 1725 he was seized with a violent cough and inflammation of the lungs, which induced him to reside at Kensington; and in the following month he had a severe attack of gout, which produced a decided improvement in his general health.

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  • On the 28th of February 1727, feeling well, he went to London to preside at a meeting of the Royal Society; but the fatigue which attended this duty brought on a violent return of his former complaint, and he returned to Kensington on the 4th of March, when Dr Mead and Dr Chesselden pronounced his disease to be stone.

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  • He died at Kensington, on the 1st of March 1898.

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  • The Republicanism Debate, Kensington, New South Wales University Press.

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  • A Best Western hotel in a great location adjacent to Kensington Gardens, and next door to former residence of famous comedian Benny Hill.

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  • Kensington Palace has been a royal residence for over 300 years.

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  • The revelations come as Spencer 's trusted employe prepares to stand trial for allegedly stealing an entire floor of Kensington Palace following her death.

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  • An exciting opportunity to purchase this substantial period stucco house situated moments from the amenities, facilities and transport links of South Kensington.

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  • She bought the card from one of the swanky shops on Kensington High Street.

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  • For many months, individuals left cards, flowers and candles outside Kensington Palace.

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  • Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society. 10531 Metropolitan Ave, Kensington, MD 20895.

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  • The Kensington Collection features pale green and deep fuchsia floral print on accessories ranging from small to large.

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