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keller

keller

keller Sentence Examples

  • Miss Keller has told how she learned to speak.

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  • Keller, L.

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  • The Eastern protective detachment, now strengthened and placed under the orders of Count Keller, was disposed with a view to countering any advance on Liao-Yang from the east by a combination of manoeuvre and fighting.

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  • Keller, Memel, Pregel and Weichselstrom (2 vols., Berlin, 1900); and Schickert, Wasserwege and Deichwesen in der Memelniederung (Konigsberg, 1901).

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  • Keller, Alex.

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  • Howe, and for association with Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller; the Massachusetts school for idiotic and feebleminded children (1839); and the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary (1824), all receive financial aid from the commonwealth, which has representation in their management.

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  • high), designed by George Keller and built mostly of Ohio sandstone; in the base is a chapel containing a statue of Garfield and several panels on which are portrayed various scenes in his life; his remains are in the crypt below the statue.

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  • HELEN ADAMS KELLER (1880-), American blind deafmute, was born at Tuscumbia, Alabama, in 1880.

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  • During the tenure of his appointment with Count Morzin he married the daughter of a Viennese hairdresser named Keller, who had befriended him in his days of poverty, but the marriage turned out ill and he was shortly afterwards separated from his wife, though he continued to support her until her death in 1 Boo.

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  • Nickel has been found near Keller in Ferry county, and molybdenum near Davenport, Lincoln (disambiguation)|Lincoln county.

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  • The Liao-Yang central mass was still held in hand, for the landing of the 4th Army - really only a division at present - at Takushan and the wrong placing of another Japanese division supposed to be with Kuroki (really intended for Nogi) had aroused Kuropatkin's fears for the holding capacity of Keller's detachment.

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  • Meantime, except for the movement on Siu-yen already mentioned,' and various reconnaissances in force by Keller's main body and by Rennenkampf's Cossacks farther inland, all was quiet along the Motienling front.

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  • The Motienling pass, however, had been seized without difficulty, and Keller's power of counterattack had been reduced to nothing by the despatch of most of his forces to the concentration at Tashichiao.

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  • To clear up the situation Keller's force was augmented and ordered to attack Kuroki.

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  • And in effect he succeeded in concentrating the equivalent of an army corps, in addition to Keller's force, opposite to Kuroki's right.

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  • Count Keller was killed in the defence.

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  • At night, discouraged on each wing by the fall of Count Keller and the fate of the 35th and 36th, the whole Russian force retired on Anping, with a loss of 2400, to the Japanese r000 men.

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  • Keller, "in an age when iron and bronze had been long known, but had not come into our districts in such plenty as to be used for the common purposes of household life, at a time when amber had already taken its place as an ornament and had become an object of traffic."

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  • - The materials for the investigation of this singular phase of prehistoric life were first collected and systematized by Dr Ferdinand Keller (1800-1881), of Zurich, and printed in Mittheilungen der Antiquarischen Gesellschaft in Zurich, vols.

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  • The substance of these reports has been issued as a separate work in England, The Lake Dwellings of Switzerland and other parts of Europe, by Dr Ferdinand Keller, translated and arranged by John Edward Lee, 2nd ed.

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  • Some of the traditional qualities are indeed preserved: the practical joke, for instance, in the scene in Auerbach's Keller shows that he has not altogether shed his character as kobold; and, like the planet-spirits of the old magic he appears alternately in animal and human shape.

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  • He is also identified with the devil; thus, in accordance with old German tradition, he is dressed as a nobleman (ein edler Junker), all in red, with a little cape of stiff silk, a cock's feather in his hat, and a long pointed sword; at the witches' Sabbath on the Brocken he is hailed as "the knight with the horse's hoof," and Sybel in Auerbach's Keller is not too drunk not to notice that he limps.

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  • Near the Capitol, at the approach of the memorial bridge across the Park river, is the Soldiers' and Sailors' memorial arch, designed by George Keller and erected by the city in 1885 in memory of the Hartford soldiers and sailors who served in the American Civil War.

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  • In the midst of these hopes and difficulties Oecolampadius married, in the beginning of 1528, Wilibrandis Rosenblatt, the widow of Ludwig Keller, who proved to be non rixosa vel garrula vel vaga, he says, and made him a good wife.

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  • This curious and interesting plan has been made the subject of a memoir both by Keller (Zurich, 1844) and by Professor Robert Willis (Arch.

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  • Keller, Le General de Lamoriciere (Paris, 1873).

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  • Albert Keller >>

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  • The unit in the new issue was to be the krone, divided into loo Keller; the krone being almost of the:same value (24-25th) as the franc. (The twenty-krone piece in gold weighs 6.775 gr., the twenty-franc piece 6.453.) The gold krone was equal to 42 of the gold gulden, and it was declared equal to .5 of the silver gulden, so much allowance being made for the depreciation of silver.

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  • " The use of flax," says Ferdinand Keller (Lake Dwellings of Switzerland, translated by J.

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  • As to its applications at this early period, Keller remarks: " Flax was the material for making lines and nets for fishing and catching wild animals, cords for carrying the earthenware vessels and other heavy objects; in fact, one can hardly imagine how FIG.

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  • It has a curious old wine vault (Keller) which contains a series of mural paintings of the 16th century, representing the legend on which the play is based.

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  • Keller, H/storische Formenle lire der spaniscisen Sprache (Murrhardt, 1894); P. de Mugica, Gramdtica del castellano antiguo (Berlin, 1891); S.

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  • He was intrigued when Keller picked up a special old Imari pot.

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  • bier Keller.

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  • The faded grandeur of Curzon Street Station provides an elegant backdrop to a darkly humorous work by German artist Eva Meyer Keller.

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  • The faded grandeur of Curzon Street Station provides an elegant backdrop to a darkly humorous work by German artist Eva Meyer Keller.

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  • Tim Keller explained, ' New Yorkers are dazed and " rubbed raw " in a way that even long-time residents have never seen.

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  • Keller, Memel, Pregel and Weichselstrom (2 vols., Berlin, 1900); and Schickert, Wasserwege and Deichwesen in der Memelniederung (Konigsberg, 1901).

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  • Keller, Alex.

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  • Howe, and for association with Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller; the Massachusetts school for idiotic and feebleminded children (1839); and the Massachusetts charitable eye and ear infirmary (1824), all receive financial aid from the commonwealth, which has representation in their management.

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  • high), designed by George Keller and built mostly of Ohio sandstone; in the base is a chapel containing a statue of Garfield and several panels on which are portrayed various scenes in his life; his remains are in the crypt below the statue.

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  • HELEN ADAMS KELLER (1880-), American blind deafmute, was born at Tuscumbia, Alabama, in 1880.

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  • The case of Helen Keller is the most extraordinary ever known in the education of blind deaf-mutes (see Deaf And Dumb ad fin.), her acquirements including several languages and her general culture being exceptionally wide.

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  • Keller, L.

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  • During the tenure of his appointment with Count Morzin he married the daughter of a Viennese hairdresser named Keller, who had befriended him in his days of poverty, but the marriage turned out ill and he was shortly afterwards separated from his wife, though he continued to support her until her death in 1 Boo.

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  • Nickel has been found near Keller in Ferry county, and molybdenum near Davenport, Lincoln (disambiguation)|Lincoln county.

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  • The Eastern protective detachment, now strengthened and placed under the orders of Count Keller, was disposed with a view to countering any advance on Liao-Yang from the east by a combination of manoeuvre and fighting.

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  • The Liao-Yang central mass was still held in hand, for the landing of the 4th Army - really only a division at present - at Takushan and the wrong placing of another Japanese division supposed to be with Kuroki (really intended for Nogi) had aroused Kuropatkin's fears for the holding capacity of Keller's detachment.

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  • Meantime, except for the movement on Siu-yen already mentioned,' and various reconnaissances in force by Keller's main body and by Rennenkampf's Cossacks farther inland, all was quiet along the Motienling front.

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  • The Motienling pass, however, had been seized without difficulty, and Keller's power of counterattack had been reduced to nothing by the despatch of most of his forces to the concentration at Tashichiao.

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  • To clear up the situation Keller's force was augmented and ordered to attack Kuroki.

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  • And in effect he succeeded in concentrating the equivalent of an army corps, in addition to Keller's force, opposite to Kuroki's right.

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  • Count Keller was killed in the defence.

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  • At night, discouraged on each wing by the fall of Count Keller and the fate of the 35th and 36th, the whole Russian force retired on Anping, with a loss of 2400, to the Japanese r000 men.

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  • Keller, "in an age when iron and bronze had been long known, but had not come into our districts in such plenty as to be used for the common purposes of household life, at a time when amber had already taken its place as an ornament and had become an object of traffic."

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  • - The materials for the investigation of this singular phase of prehistoric life were first collected and systematized by Dr Ferdinand Keller (1800-1881), of Zurich, and printed in Mittheilungen der Antiquarischen Gesellschaft in Zurich, vols.

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  • The substance of these reports has been issued as a separate work in England, The Lake Dwellings of Switzerland and other parts of Europe, by Dr Ferdinand Keller, translated and arranged by John Edward Lee, 2nd ed.

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  • Some of the traditional qualities are indeed preserved: the practical joke, for instance, in the scene in Auerbach's Keller shows that he has not altogether shed his character as kobold; and, like the planet-spirits of the old magic he appears alternately in animal and human shape.

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  • He is also identified with the devil; thus, in accordance with old German tradition, he is dressed as a nobleman (ein edler Junker), all in red, with a little cape of stiff silk, a cock's feather in his hat, and a long pointed sword; at the witches' Sabbath on the Brocken he is hailed as "the knight with the horse's hoof," and Sybel in Auerbach's Keller is not too drunk not to notice that he limps.

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  • Near the Capitol, at the approach of the memorial bridge across the Park river, is the Soldiers' and Sailors' memorial arch, designed by George Keller and erected by the city in 1885 in memory of the Hartford soldiers and sailors who served in the American Civil War.

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  • In the midst of these hopes and difficulties Oecolampadius married, in the beginning of 1528, Wilibrandis Rosenblatt, the widow of Ludwig Keller, who proved to be non rixosa vel garrula vel vaga, he says, and made him a good wife.

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  • This curious and interesting plan has been made the subject of a memoir both by Keller (Zurich, 1844) and by Professor Robert Willis (Arch.

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  • Keller, Le General de Lamoriciere (Paris, 1873).

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  • Albert Keller >>

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  • The unit in the new issue was to be the krone, divided into loo Keller; the krone being almost of the:same value (24-25th) as the franc. (The twenty-krone piece in gold weighs 6.775 gr., the twenty-franc piece 6.453.) The gold krone was equal to 42 of the gold gulden, and it was declared equal to .5 of the silver gulden, so much allowance being made for the depreciation of silver.

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  • Hazel nuts formed part of the food of the ancient lake-dwellers of Switzerland and other countries of Europe (see Keller, Lake Dwellings, trans.

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  • " The use of flax," says Ferdinand Keller (Lake Dwellings of Switzerland, translated by J.

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  • As to its applications at this early period, Keller remarks: " Flax was the material for making lines and nets for fishing and catching wild animals, cords for carrying the earthenware vessels and other heavy objects; in fact, one can hardly imagine how FIG.

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  • Keller (see The Mineral Industry, New York, 1899, vol.

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  • It has a curious old wine vault (Keller) which contains a series of mural paintings of the 16th century, representing the legend on which the play is based.

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  • Keller, H/storische Formenle lire der spaniscisen Sprache (Murrhardt, 1894); P. de Mugica, Gramdtica del castellano antiguo (Berlin, 1891); S.

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  • The family on my father's side is descended from Caspar Keller, a native of Switzerland, who settled in Maryland.

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  • My grandfather, Caspar Keller's son, "entered" large tracts of land in Alabama and finally settled there.

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  • The Keller homestead, where the family lived, was a few steps from our little rose-bower.

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  • Our favourite walk was to Keller's Landing, an old tumbledown lumber-wharf on the Tennessee River, used during the Civil War to land soldiers.

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  • Helen Keller's letters are important, not only as a supplementary story of her life, but as a demonstration of her growth in thought and expression--the growth which in itself has made her distinguished.

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  • So these selections from Miss Keller's correspondence are made with two purposes--to show her development and to preserve the most entertaining and significant passages from several hundred letters.

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  • In that year Miss Keller entered college.

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  • Miss Sullivan began to teach Helen Keller on March 3rd, 1887.

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  • good-by HELEN KELLER

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  • good-by HELEN KELLER.

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  • Good-by, HELEN KELLER.

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  • Her name is Adeline Keller.

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  • Good bye HELEN KELLER.

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  • With much love and a kiss HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • Your darling child HELEN KELLER.

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  • Toward the end of May Mrs. Keller, Helen, and Miss Sullivan started for Boston.

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  • With much love and two kisses From your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • From your darling little friend HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • With much love from your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • With much love, and many kisses, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • With much love and kisses, from your Affectionate cousin HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • Lovingly, your little friend, HELEN ADAMS KELLER.

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  • Like a good many of Helen Keller's early letters, this to her French teacher is her re-phrasing of a story.

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  • With much love and many kisses, from your affectionate little friend, HELEN ADAMS KELLER.

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  • From your affectionate little pupil, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • From your loving sister, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • From your loving little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • This letter is indorsed in Whittier's hand, "Helen A. Keller--deaf dumb and blind--aged nine years."

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  • With much love, from your darling child, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • With loving greeting to the little cousins, and Mrs. Hale and a sweet kiss for yourself, From your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • Your loving little pupil, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • Please tell the brave sailors, who have charge of the HELEN KELLER, that little Helen who stays at home will often think of them with loving thoughts.

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  • With much love, from your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • With much love to father, Mildred, you and all the dear friends, lovingly your little daughter, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • From your little friend HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • Your loving friend, HELEN KELLER.

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  • Please think of me always as your loving little sister, HELEN KELLER.

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  • From your loving little friend, HELEN KELLER.

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  • From your little friend, HELEN KELLER.

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  • With much love and a kiss, from your little friend, HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • From your little friend HELEN KELLER.

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  • An analysis of the case has been made elsewhere, and Miss Keller has written her account of it.

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  • Lovingly yours HELEN KELLER.

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  • Lovingly yours, HELEN KELLER.

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  • Lovingly your little friend, HELEN KELLER.

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  • Please accept them with the love and good wishes of your friend, HELEN KELLER.

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  • In reading this letter about Niagara one should remember that Miss Keller knows distance and shape, and that the size of Niagara is within her experience after she has explored it, crossed the bridge and gone down in the elevator.

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  • TO MRS. KATE ADAMS KELLER South Boston, April 13, 1893. ...Teacher, Mrs. Pratt and I very unexpectedly decided to take a journey with dear Dr. Bell Mr. Westervelt, a gentleman whom father met in Washington, has a school for the deaf in Rochester.

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  • GENTLEMEN--The bearer, Miss Helen Keller, accompanied by Miss Sullivan, is desirous of making a complete inspection of the Exposition in all Departments.

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  • In the spring of 1893 a club was started in Tuscumbia, of which Mrs. Keller was president, to establish a public library.

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  • I have only a few moments left in which to answer your questions about the "Helen Keller" Public Library.

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  • TO MRS. KATE ADAMS KELLER New York, March 31, 1895. ...Teacher and I spent the afternoon at Mr. Hutton's, and had a most delightful time!...

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  • On the first of October Miss Keller entered the Cambridge School for Young Ladies, of which Mr. Arthur Gilman is Principal.

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  • The "examinations" mentioned in this letter were merely tests given in the school, but as they were old Harvard papers, it is evident that in some subjects Miss Keller was already fairly well prepared for Radcliffe.

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  • Then the interference of Mr. Gilman resulted in Mrs. Keller's withdrawing Miss Helen and her sister, Miss Mildred, from the school.

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  • TO MISS MILDRED KELLER 138 Brattle Street, Cambridge, November 26, 1899. ...At last we are settled for the winter, and our work is going smoothly.

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  • In the fall Miss Keller entered Radcliffe College.

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  • It is fitting that Miss Keller's "Story of My Life" should appear at this time.

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  • Whatever doubts Miss Keller herself may have had are now at rest.

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  • But it is to be remembered that Miss Keller has written many things in her autobiography for the fun of writing them, and the disillusion, which the writer of the editorial took seriously, is in great part humorous.

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  • I ought to apologize to the reader and to Miss Keller for presuming to say what her subject matter is worth, but one more explanation is necessary.

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  • In her account of her early education Miss Keller is not giving a scientifically accurate record of her life, nor even of the important events.

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  • That is why her teacher's records may be found to differ in some particulars from Miss Keller's account.

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  • The way in which Miss Keller wrote her story shows, as nothing else can show, the difficulties she had to overcome.

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  • When Miss Keller puts her work in typewritten form, she cannot refer to it again unless some one reads it to her by means of the manual alphabet.

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  • In rewriting the story, Miss Keller made corrections on separate pages on her braille machine.

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  • The book is Miss Keller's and is final proof of her independent power.

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  • Mark Twain has said that the two most interesting characters of the nineteenth century are Napoleon and Helen Keller.

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  • Miss Keller is tall and strongly built, and has always had good health.

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  • When Miss Keller speaks, her face is animated and expresses all the modes of her thought--the expressions that make the features eloquent and give speech half its meaning.

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  • Finally Miss Keller told him to "fire both barrels."

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  • Mr. Joseph Jefferson was once explaining to Miss Keller what the bumps on her head meant.

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  • Miss Keller's humour is that deeper kind of humour which is courage.

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  • Moreover, Miss Sullivan does not see why Miss Keller should be subjected to the investigation of the scientist, and has not herself made many experiments.

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  • When a psychologist asked her if Miss Keller spelled on her fingers in her sleep, Miss Sullivan replied that she did not think it worth while to sit up and watch, such matters were of so little consequence.

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  • Miss Keller likes to be part of the company.

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  • It is amusing to read in one of the magazines of 1895 that Miss Keller "has a just and intelligent appreciation of different composers from having literally felt their music, Schumann being her favourite."

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  • Miss Keller's effort to reach out and meet other people on their own intellectual ground has kept her informed of daily affairs.

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  • Miss Sullivan, who knows her pupil's mind, selects from the passing landscape essential elements, which give a certain clearness to Miss Keller's imagined view of an outer world that to our eyes is confused and overloaded with particulars.

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  • If her companion does not give her enough details, Miss Keller asks questions until she has completed the view to her satisfaction.

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  • Miss Keller used to knit and crochet, but she has had better things to do.

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  • A friend tried Miss Keller one day with several coins.

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  • Miss Keller's reading of the manual alphabet by her sense of touch seems to cause some perplexity.

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  • Miss Keller puts her fingers lightly over the hand of one who is talking to her and gets the words as rapidly as they can be spelled.

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  • Miss Keller reads by means of embossed print or the various kinds of braille.

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  • The time that one of Miss Keller's friends realizes most strongly that she is blind is when he comes on her suddenly in the dark and hears the rustle of her fingers across the page.

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  • Miss Keller reads them all.

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  • Most educated blind people know several, but it would save trouble if, as Miss Keller suggests, English braille were universally adopted.

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  • Miss Keller has a braille writer on which she keeps notes and writes letters to her blind friends.

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  • Miss Keller does not as a rule read very fast, but she reads deliberately, not so much because she feels the words less quickly than we see then, as because it is one of her habits of mind to do things thoroughly and well.

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  • Miss Keller talks to herself absent-mindedly in the manual alphabet.

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  • Miss Sullivan says that both she and Miss Keller remember "in their fingers" what they have said.

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  • For Miss Keller to spell a sentence in the manual alphabet impresses it on her mind just as we learn a thing from having heard it many times and can call back the memory of its sound.

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  • Like every deaf or blind person, Miss Keller depends on her sense of smell to an unusual degree.

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  • The question of a special "sixth sense," such as people have ascribed. to Miss Keller, is a delicate one.

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  • Miss Keller is distinctly not a singular proof of occult and mysterious theories, and any attempt to explain her in that way fails to reckon with her normality.

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  • Miss Keller has two watches, which have been given her.

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  • Though there is less than half an inch between the points--a space which represents sixty minutes--Miss Keller tells the time almost exactly.

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  • The finer traits of Miss Keller's character are so well known that one needs not say much about them.

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  • The names of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller will always be linked together, and it is necessary to understand what Dr. Howe did for his pupil before one comes to an account of Miss Sullivan's work.

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  • From a scientific standpoint it is unfortunate that it was impossible to keep such a complete record of Helen Keller's development.

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  • This in itself is a great comment on the difference between Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller.

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  • Helen Keller became so rapidly a distinctive personality that she kept her teacher in a breathless race to meet the needs of her pupil, with no time or strength to make a scientific study.

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  • Miss Sullivan knew at the beginning that Helen Keller would be more interesting and successful than Laura Bridgman, and she expresses in one of her letters the need of keeping notes.

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  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.

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  • In a letter dated April 10, 1887, only five weeks after she went to Helen Keller, she wrote to a friend:

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  • In December, 1887, appeared the first report of the Director of the Perkins Institution, which deals with Helen Keller.

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  • This with the extracts from her letters, scattered through the report, is the first valid source of information about Helen Keller.

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  • In a year after she first went to Helen Keller, Miss Sullivan found herself and her pupil the centre of a stupendous fiction.

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  • Although Miss Sullivan is still rather amused than distressed when some one, even one of her friends, makes mistakes in published articles about her and Miss Keller, still she sees that Miss Keller's book should include all the information that the teacher could at present furnish.

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  • When Captain Keller applied to the director for a teacher, Mr. Anagnos recommended her.

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  • The only time she had to prepare herself for the work with her pupil was from August, 1886, when Captain Keller wrote, to February, 1887.

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  • The impression that Miss Sullivan educated Helen Keller "under the direction of Mr. Anagnos" is erroneous.

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  • I found Mrs. Keller and Mr. James Keller waiting for me.

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  • I was surprised to find Mrs. Keller a very young-looking woman, not much older than myself, I should think.

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  • Captain Keller met us in the yard and gave me a cheery welcome and a hearty handshake.

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  • As we approached the house I saw a child standing in the doorway, and Captain Keller said, There she is.

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  • I like Mrs. Keller very much.

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  • Since I wrote you, Helen and I have gone to live all by ourselves in a little garden-house about a quarter of a mile from her home, only a short distance from Ivy Green, the Keller homestead.

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  • I had a good, frank talk with Mrs. Keller, and explained to her how difficult it was going to be to do anything with Helen under the existing circumstances.

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  • After a long time Mrs. Keller said that she would think the matter over and see what Captain Keller thought of sending Helen away with me.

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  • It seems that Mr. Anagnos had heard of Helen before he received Captain Keller's letter last summer.

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  • One day this week Captain Keller brought Belle, a setter of which he is very proud, to see us.

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  • She stumbled upon Belle, who was crouching near the window where Captain Keller was standing.

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  • I have told Captain and Mrs. Keller that they must not interfere with me in any way.

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  • Only a few hours after my talk with Captain and Mrs. Keller (and they had agreed to everything), Helen took a notion that she wouldn't use her napkin at table.

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  • Mrs. Keller wanted to get a nurse for her, but I concluded I'd rather be her nurse than look after a stupid, lazy negress.

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  • Mrs. Keller spelled, "No--baby eat--no."

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  • Mrs. Keller spelled "teeth."

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  • Keller's Landing was used during the war to land troops, but has long since gone to pieces, and is overgrown with moss and weeds.

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  • I read the letter at the supper-table, and Mrs. Keller exclaimed: "My, Miss Annie, Helen writes almost as well as that now!"

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  • Helen had a letter this morning from her uncle, Doctor Keller.

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  • Mrs. Keller and I watched the nursery comedy from the door.

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  • Mrs. Keller took the baby in her arms, and when we had succeeded in pacifying her, I asked Helen, "What did you do to baby?"

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  • Captain Keller took my hand, but could not speak.

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  • Mrs. Keller replied, "He is dead."

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  • Captain Keller said at breakfast this morning that he wished I would take Helen to church.

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  • When it was time for the church service to begin, she was in such a state of excitement that I thought it best to take her away; but Captain Keller said, "No, she will be all right."

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  • Captain Keller invited some of the ministers to dinner.

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  • I think Mrs. Keller has definitely decided to go with us, but she will not stay all summer.

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  • Dr. Keller met us in Memphis.

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  • Almost every one on the train was a physician, and Dr. Keller seemed to know them all.

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  • Dr. Keller distributed the extracts from the report that Mr. Anagnos sent me, and he could have disposed of a thousand if he had had them.

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  • One day, while she was out walking with her mother and Mr. Anagnos, a boy threw a torpedo, which startled Mrs. Keller.

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  • During the next two years neither Mr. Anagnos, who was in Europe for a year, nor Miss Sullivan wrote anything about Helen Keller for publication.

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  • In 1892 appeared the Perkins Institution report for 1891, containing a full account of Helen Keller, including many of her letters, exercises, and compositions.

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  • It made me laugh quite hard, for I know my father is Arthur Keller.

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  • Miss Keller's education, however, is so fundamentally a question of language teaching that it rather includes the problems of the deaf than limits itself to the deaf alone.

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  • All day long in their play-time and work-time Miss Sullivan kept spelling into her pupil's hand, and by that Helen Keller absorbed words, just as the child in the cradle absorbs words by hearing thousands of them before he uses one and by associating the words with the occasion of their utterance.

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  • The manual alphabet was not the only means of presenting words to Helen Keller's fingers.

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  • So Helen Keller's aptitude for language is her whole mental aptitude, turned to language because of its extraordinary value to her.

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  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.

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  • If Miss Keller is fond of language and not interested especially in mathematics, it is not surprising to find Miss Sullivan's interests very similar.

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  • And this does not mean that Miss Keller is unduly dependent on her teacher.

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  • There is, then, a good deal that Miss Sullivan has done for Miss Keller which no other teacher can do in just the same way for any one else.

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  • To have another Helen Keller there must be another Miss Sullivan.

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  • Let me sum up a few of the elements that made Helen Keller what she is.

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  • Mrs. Keller writes me that before her illness Helen made signs for everything, and her mother thought this habit the cause of her slowness in learning to speak.

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  • Miss Keller's later education is easy to understand and needs no further explanation than she has given.

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  • Miss Keller's vowels are not firm.

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  • Miss Keller will never be able, I believe, to speak loud without destroying the pleasant quality and the distinctness of her words, but she can do much to make her speech clearer.

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  • It is hard to say whether or not Miss Keller's speech is easy to understand.

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  • I am told that Miss Keller speaks better than most other deaf people.

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  • Miss Sullivan's account in her address at Chautauqua, in July, 1894, at the meeting of The American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf, is substantially like Miss Keller's in points of fact.

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  • Enough appears in the accounts by Miss Keller's teacher to show the process by which she reads the lips with her fingers, the process by which she was taught to speak, and by which, of course, she can listen to conversation now.

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  • It is a clumsy and unsatisfactory way of receiving communication, useless when Miss Sullivan or some one else who knows the manual alphabet is present to give Miss Keller the spoken words of others.

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  • Indeed, when some friend is trying to speak to Miss Keller, and the attempt is not proving successful, Miss Sullivan usually helps by spelling the lost words into Miss Keller's hand.

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  • President Roosevelt had little difficulty last spring in making Miss Keller understand him, and especially requested Miss Sullivan not to spell into her hand.

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  • Other people say they have no success in making Miss Keller "hear" them.

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  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.

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  • No one can have read Miss Keller's autobiography without feeling that she writes unusually fine English.

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  • No teacher could have made Helen Keller sensitive to the beauties of language and to the finer interplay of thought which demands expression in melodious word groupings.

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  • If Miss Sullivan wrote fine English, the beauty of Helen Keller's style would, in part, be explicable at once.

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  • But the extracts from Miss Sullivan's letters and from her reports, although they are clear and accurate, have not the beauty which distinguishes Miss Keller's English.

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  • In Captain Keller's library she found excellent books, Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare," and better still Montaigne.

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  • Any one who has tried to write knows what Miss Keller owes to the endless practice which Miss Sullivan demanded of her.

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  • For it was Dr. Bell who first saw the principles that underlie Miss Sullivan's method, and explained the process by which Helen Keller absorbed language from books.

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  • There is, moreover, a reason why Helen Keller writes good English, which lies in the very absence of sight and hearing.

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  • Miss Keller has given her account of it, and the whole matter was discussed in the first Volta Bureau Souvenir from which I quote at length:

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